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CANADIAN 



STATISTICAL 



REVIEW 




JANUARY 1952 






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VOLUME XXVII NUMBER 1 



DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS, OTTAWA, CANADA 



c 

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CANADIAN 

STATISTICAL 

REVIEW JANUARY 1952 

(FORMERLY MONTHLY RKVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS) 

Contents: 

Current Economic Conditions Page i 

Statistical Tables Page 1 

List of Statistical Tables Inside Back Cover 



Published by Authority 

of the Rt. Hon. C. D. HOWE 

Minister of Trade & Commerce 



Annual subscription: $3.00 
Single copies: 35** each 



Subscription orders should be sent to the King's Printer, Ottawa, Ontario, 
and remittances made payable to the Receiver General of Canada. 



Current Economic 
Conditions 

Current economic conditions are illustrated 
by the behaviour of series in the accompanying 
chart. The recent period has been one of internal 
adjustment, with prices and production showing 
a tendency to level off. The adjustments that 
have been taking place are concerned partly 
with the change-over to defence production and 
partly with the reaction to the heavy consumer 
purchasing of durables in the earlier part of the 
year. Prices which a year ago were rising 
sharply, partly due to forces of a speculative 
nature, have recently shown less tendency to in- 
crease. Inventories have also shown a levelling 
off after large increases in the first three 
quarters of 1951. Employment and incomes have 
been rising continuously. Salaries, wages and 
supplementary labour income for the first ten 
months of 1951 were seventeen per cent above 
the same period of 1950. Retail sales have not 
maintained the rate of increase recorded earlier 
in the year; nevertheless, for the eleven months 
of 1951, they were eleven per cent above the 
same period of 1950, in value terms. 

Industrial Production and Employment 

The chart on page ii shows that while in- 
dustrial production in 1951 was eight per cent 
above 1950, there was considerable diversity 
among the component indexes. (Figures in the 
chart and text are based on the first eleven 
months of 1950 and 1951). The industries pro- 
ducing goods which are predominantly for 
consumption, and which are affected by the 
changes in effective demand of consumers, were 
invariably below the general average. These 
industries include foods and beverages, textiles 
and clothing, tobacco products and electrical 
apparatus such as radios and refrigerators. For 
the latter two groups, actual declines are shown. 
On the other hand, defence supporting industries 
and industries producing a considerable portion 
of their product for export, showed large in- 
creases in output. These include transportation 
equipment, mining, primary iron and steel and 
pulp and paper. It may be noted that the trans- 
portation equipment group includes items such 
as aircraft, ships and locomotives, and items 



COST OF LIVING INDEXES 

INDEXES , 9 35_ 39= |Q0 

200 i- 



I 90 



I 80 



I 70 



U.S.A. .•• 



CANADA 



I 60 
250 i- 



240 



230 



220 



2 I 



200 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I | j i | | | 



I 90 



I 80 



GENERAL WHOLESALE PRICE 
INDEXES 



CANADA 




!_L 



d. 3U 




-fuoiniML. rnuuu 


220 


- 


USA*.. '""/\ 


2 1 


- 


A / /CAN A DA 


200 


1 




1 90 


- /y 




1 80 


v'i i i 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



JAN ,r,r~ JAN - 

1950 1951 

Federal Reserve Board Index 



PRODUCTION INDICATORS 

PERCENTAGE CHANGE 

OVER FIRST ELEVEN 

MONTHS OF 1950 

"/ 

'o 

20 i— 



TRANSPORT 
EQUIPMENT 



NON FERROUS 
GROUP 

PRIMARY 
IRON aSTEEL 



I 



PULP a PAPER 



INDUSTRIAL 
PRODUCTION 




TOBACCO 

ELECTRICAL 
(RADIO a 
x REFRIGERATORS) 



E I even mon t hs 
of 195 I 



purchased by consumers such as motor vehicles. 
The latter showed an increase of nine per cent 
for the year despite the recent monthly decrease 
in output. 

Among the primary industries, a large in- 
crease in production is expected for agriculture, 
but the statistic is not yet available. Mining 
production of all types was up by two per cent 
and employment in forestry operations showed 
an increase of approximately thirty per cent, in 
the most recently available comparisons of 1951 
with 1950. 

The index of industrial employment in No- 
vember (186.2, 1939 = 100) was 4.5 per cent 
above November of 1950 (178. 1). Average weekly 
wages and salaries increased by 12.3 per cent, 
from $46.29 in November, 1950 to $51.97 in No- 
vember 1951. Monthly labour income for the first 
ten months of 1951 was seventeen percent above 
that for the same period of 1950. 

Retail Trade, Stocks and Consumer Credit 

The value of retail sales in November was 
approximately nine per cent above November of 
a year ago. In the month of December, a weighted 
average of department store weekly sales was 
up only one per cent above the high figure of 
December 1950. The eleven month comparison 
shows total sales to be up by eleven per cent in 
value, which when compared with commodity 
price increases of approximately thirteen per 
cent, would indicate that a small decline in 
volume took place. Stock figures are available 
for department and chain stores only. As of No- 
vember 1, they were up by seventeen per cent 
and nineteen per cent respectively, over Novem- 
ber a year ago. The department store stock-sales 
ratios rose from 2.5 at November 1, 1950 to 3.0 
at November 1, 1951. Chain store stock-sales 
ratios were relatively unchanged, between the 
same dates. Instalment accounts outstanding 
were reduced by approximately $40 million, or 
27 per cent, between the ends of the first and 
third quarters of 1951. 

Foreign Trade 

For the eleven months of 1951 ending in 
November, the value of exports was 25 per cent 
above that recorded in the corresponding period 

(Concluded on page iv) 



11 



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111 



of 1950, while their volurre was ten per cent 
higher. Irrports showed even greater gains. In 
the first eleven months their value was over 
thirty per cent above the corresponding figure 
for 1950, and their volume was over fourteen 
per cent higher than 1950. 

Trends in trade varied considerably within 
the year. The import increase was especially 
pronounced in the first and second quarters but 
tapered off in the third quarter. In the fourth 
quarter, imports were little greater than in the 
fourth quarter of 1950. On the other hand, ex- 
ports showed much less increase in the first 
two quarters of the year than in the latter quar- 
ters. The negative balance on the year's trade 
was thus due to trade in the first-half-year, 
whereas in the last half-year taken separately 
a positive balance was achieved. 

The abolition of the emergency exchange 
conservation controls at the beginning of the 
year facilitated an increase in imports of many 
consumers' type manufactures early in the year. 
However, as the market for consumers' durables 
slackened, imports of many of them, notably 
automobiles, fell off sharply. Export volume was 
restricted in the first half-year particularly by 



limited supplies of various commodities, a 
notable example being high grade wheat. In the 
last half-year these factors were less important. 

Overseas markets played a more important 
part in Canada's trade in 1951 than in 1950, but 
trade with the United States remained dominant. 
That country took about 60 percent of Canada's 
exports (65 per cent in 1950) and provided 
about 68 per cent of imports (67 per cent in 
1950). The United Kingdom took about 16 per 
cent of our exports and provided almost 11 per 
cent of imports, and other European countries 
took a further 8 percent of exports and provided 
over 4 per cent of imports. 

Farm Cosh Income 

Cash income of Canadian farmers from the 
sale of farm products in 1951 amounted to an 
all-time high total of $2,819,400,000, according 
toan advance preliminary estimate. Comparisons 
with preceding years are shown in the chart on 
page iii. The increase in 1951 was largely attri- 
butable to substantial grain participation and 
adjustment payments by the Canadian Wheat 
Board, higher average livestock prices and un- 
usually heavy marketings of western grain during 
the spring months. 



iv 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 1 



INTRODUCTION 



Selected Economic Indicators 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION 



EMPLOYMENT IN 
MANUFACTURING 



Index of 
Industrial 



Steel 

Ingots 

and 



News- 



Power by 

Central 
Electric (1) 



Automo- Total Durable 



Non- 
durable 



Average 

Hourly 

Earnings 

in Manu- 



Production Gold (1) Copper Castings print u) Stations biles <2) Index Goods Goods factures 





1935-39 
= 100 


Thousand 
fine ounces 


Million 
pounds 


Thousand tons 


Million 
kwh. 


Thou- 
sands 




1939 = 100 


Cents 
per hour 


1939 


109.3 


425 


50.7 


129 


244 


2,362 


13.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


42.7 


1950 


198.3 


370 


44.0 


282 


440 


4,242 


32.6 


177.5 


211.4 


155.4 


103.6 


1950 O 
N 
D 


210.7 
210.6 
209.2 


376 
378 
382 


44.5 
46.9 
45.5 


294 
289 
291 


456 
457 
431 


4,395 
4,458 
4,674 


35.6 
30.3 
30.7 


185.6 
185.4 
185.3 


221.5 
222.4 
223.1 


162.2 
161.3 
160.7 


105.3 
106.4 
107.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


210.0 
214.0 
217.1 


374 
347 
372 


45.6 
40.6 
48.6 


310 
281 
315 


453 
425 
473 


4,784 
4,376 
4,910 


39.2 
40.6 
47.8 


182.4 
184.5 
186.3 


223.3 
226.9 
229.9 


155.8 
156.9 
157.9 


109.0 
110.4 
111.4 


A 
M 
J 


218.2 
223.4 
218.8 


363 
369 
363 


47.7 
47.0 
45.2 


312 
313 
294 


448 
486 
464 


4,895 
5,130 
4,707 


41.1 
42.9 
36.2 


188.8 
189.9 
192.0 


234.8 
237.0 
240.9 


158.8 
159.2 
160.2 


112.8 
114.1 
115.9 


J 

A 

S 


208.0 
205.4 
208. 2 r 


344 
345 
359 


45.0 
45.3 
43.5 


275 
287 
268 


452 
485 
431 


4,629 
4,596 
4,404 


30.3 
21.8 
29.9 


193.9 
194.0 
194.1 


242.9 
242.0 
242.1 


162.1 
162.8 
162.9 


118.4 
119.1 
120.6 


O 

N 


211.9" 
208.1" 


378 


41.8 
44.2 


309 
307 


492 
472 


4,920 
4,936 


32.5 
29.5 


194. 2 r 
190.7 


240. 2 r 
238.3 


164. 4 r 
159.9 


121.9' 
123.5 



Civil- 
ian 
Labour 
Force (3) 



Thou- 
sands 



Percentage of 

Paid 
Workers 
and Un- 



Ordinary 

Claimants 

on Live 

Unem- 
employed , . 

v ' ployment 

Seeking Work' 41 Register' 5 ' 



Value of Retail 
Trade 



Civilian 
Labour 
Force 



Percentage 



Thou- 
sands 







New 










Railway 


Dwelling 


Building 




Index of 


Total 


Revenue 


Units 


Permits: 


Depart- 


Whole- 


Labour 


Freight 


Com- 


58 Muni- 


ment 


sale 


Income 


Loadings 
Thou- 


pleted < 6 > 


cipalities 
Thou- 


Total stores 


Sales 








Million 


sand 




sand 




1935-39 


dollars 


tons 


Number 


dollars 


Million dollars 


= 100 



1939 
1950 


4,598 
5,233 


11.4 
2.9 


4 





165.3 


215 r 
689 


5,233 
9,016 


4,308 
7,646 


5,023 
44,467 


789^0 


72^7 


109.1 
306.7 


1950 O 
N 
D 


5,201 


2.2 


3 


1 


90.3 
124.8 
183.3 


736 
744 
738 


11,262 

10,432 

9,032 


9,528 

8,766 

11,290 


52,554 
41,828 
33,425 


830.4 
831.8 
976.4 


83.7 

98.2 

118.9 


339.4 
326.9 
282.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


5,172 


3^3 


4 


5 


220.5 
208.0 
184.5 


730 

733 r 

745 


9,338 
8,280 
9,144 


6,950 
6,712 
5,859 


24,954 
29,957 
38,504 


703.8 
694.3 
851.5 


58.3 
58.4 
72.6 


308.6 
303.1 
333.6 


A 
M 

J 


5,332 


l'6 


2 


2 


136.8 
88.9 
86.5 


763 
792 
821 


9,413 
10,738 
10,902 


5,688 
6,876 
6,609 


46,825 
54,676 
36,588 


859.2 
931.1 
940.2 


75.2 
76.6 
69.5 


340.9 
361.7 
343.7 


J 
A 

S 


5,421 


1.4 


2 





83.9 
80.9 
83.1 


827 
833 r 
848 


10,678 

10,913 r 

10,237" 


4,926 
7,183 
7,002 


48,029 
33,439 
27,776 


865.8 
897.4 
891.2 


54.5 
61.5 
72.4 


328.9 
362.3 
348.0 


o 

N 


5,210 


i!9 


2 


6 


99.8 
153.7 




11,951" 
11,031" 


8,164 
8,842 


38,251 
24,731 


898. 7' 
906.7 


81.3 
101.9 


375. 4 r 
354.0 



(1) For newsprint, gold and power, Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949, May, 1949 and January, 1950 
respectively. (2 'Monthly data are producers shipments. (3 >Data exclude persons in certain remote parts of 
several provinces and Indians on reservations. Newfoundland included as of March, 1950. (4 'Includes only those 

not at work and seeking work. (5 'Newfoundland included as of April, 1949. (6) Conversions are included with 

annual data only. 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 1 - concluded 



JANUARY, 1952 



Selected Economic Indicators 

Monthly averages or calendar months 





Cost of 
Living 
Index 


Price 
Index 
of Resi- 
dential 
Building 
Materials 


Wholesale Price Index 


Exports 
of 
Domestic 
Commod- 
ities 121 


Imports 
of 
Merchan- 
dise 


Federal 
Government " 


Cheques 
Cashed 

in 
Clearing 
Centres 


Index 

of 

Common 

Stock 

Prices 


Index 




General 


Cana- 
dian 
farm 
products 


of 
Long- 
Term 
Bond 
Yields 




Total 
expend- 
itures 


Total 
revenues 






1935-39 - 100 






Mill 


ion dollars 




1935-39 


100 


1939 


101.5 


102.3 


99.2 


92.6 


77 


63 


46 


42 


2.635 


91.6 


101.8 


1950 


166.5 


242.7 


211.2 


236 . 7 r 


260 


265 


204 


215 


8.386 


131.6 


91.3 


1950 N 


170.7 


262.1 


222.4 


239 2 r 


293 


328 


209 


252 


11,008 


144.5 


93.9 


D 


171.1 


263 3 


225.2 


243 .3 r 


290 


266 


247 


261 


9.315 


146.3 


96.7 


1951 J 


172.5 


269.6 


232.3 


251. r 


285 


327 


203 


332 


9.002 


153.8 


97.9 


F 


175.2 


274.9 


238.5 


262. 5 r 


234 


274 


168 


269 


7.984 


166.5 


97.7 


M 


179.7 


282.6 


241.8 


273. r 


290 


343 






8,830 


162.9 


104.6 


A 


181.8 


287 2 


242.2 


265 4 r 


295 


393 


97 


218 


9.017 


165.6 


104.9 


M 


182.0 


289.5 


241.9 


265. 3 r 


323 


405 


199 


353 


9,484 


164.2 


104.9 


J 


184.1 


289.2 


242.7 


272 . 6 r 


313 


360 


234 


295 


9,500 


160.7 


105.3 


J 


187.6 


289.8 


244.2 


277. l r 


374 


371 


264 


336 


9.032 


162.0 


104 7 


A 


188.9 


290.4 


241.5 


256.4 


350 


357 


221 


314 


9,072 


169.7 


104.9 


S 


189.8 


290.9 


240.1 


253.9 


320 


312 


277 


288 


8,775 


179.8 


105.0 


O 


190 4 


290.8 


239.6 


252.6 


371 


344 


263 


355 


10,619 


183.3 


105.7 


N 


191.2 


289.3 


239.1 


258.4 


380 




278 


308 


10,737 


174.0 


107.8 


D 


191.1 


















177.3 


112.0 



1 Annual totals are for fiscal years ended March 31 of period shown. 



As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 



TABLE 2 



Significant Statistics of United Kingdom 



UNEM- 
PRODUCTION CONSUMPTION PLOYED » 


IMPORTS 2 
RETAINED EXPORTS 2 


PRICES 


WAGE 
RATES 


Steel Ingots Insured 
and Raw Raw 1 " Workers 
Index of Coal *■' Castings Cotton Wool Registered 




Interim 
Retail 
Wholesale Prices 


Weekly 


Production Weekly average 


Including Munitions 





1946 = 100 



Thousand tons 



Million 
pounds 



Thousands 



Index of volume 
1947 = 100 



June 17, June 30, 
1938 = 100 1947 - 100 1947 = 100 



1939 
1950 


140 


4,437 
4,160 


254 
313 


11.29 
8.72 


43'2 


1,251 
297 


114 


162 


101.4 
258.7 


114 


111 


1950S 


143 


4,221* 


326 


8.48 


43.5 


308 






268.4 


114 


110 


O 
N 
D 


152 
153 
140 


4,347 
4,404 
4.143* 


328 

336* 

296 


9.52 

9.28* 

8.02 


44.7 
43.6 
36.7 


327 ] 

326 

331 


111 


175 


( 275.6 

] 285.0 

288.3 


115 
116 
116 


111 
113 
114 


1951 J 
F 
M 


140 
151 
141 


4,211 
4,517 
4,243* 


306* 

326 

318 


8.69* 

9.12 

8.25 


43.2 
37.4 
36.0 


367 1 
335 
305 , 


120 


160 


| 295.8 

301.4 

[ 309.2 


117 
118 
119 


115 
116 
117 


A 
M 

J 


151 
144 
149 


4,605 
4,199 
4,301* 


323 

305' 

308 


9.55 

8.79* 

8.82 


37.2 
36.4 
34.4 


281 
241 
215 ! 


134 


173 


I 314.3 
315.3 
316.4 


121 
124 
125 


118 
118 
119 


J 

A 

S 


140 
127 
145" 


3,940 
3,462 
4,437* 


256 

266* 

303 


8.38 

8.30' 

8.61 


33.0 
29.1 
28.8 


210 
228 

241 j 


140 


165 


315.4 
319.0 

320. 6 r 


126 
127 
128 


120 
120 
121 


O 




4,507 


301 






290 




175" 


323 4 


129 


122 



'Average of five weeks. " Annual data as of middle of July. Monthly data for dates varying from 8th to 17th 

of month. - Average quarterly statistics are given in the monthly section, except the recent data for exports which 

are monthly estimates. (3 'Great Britain. ' Monthly average or calendar months. 

Source: Monthly Digest of Statistics and Statistical Abstract for the United Kingdom. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 3 



Significant Statistics of United States 

Monthly averages or calendar months ' 



INTRODUCTION 



INDEX OF 
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 

Manufactured Goods 



LABOUR FORCE 



CONSTRUC- 
TION CON- PASSENGER 

TRACTS AUTO- 

AWARDED MOBILES 



MANUFACTURING 



Total Total 



Dur- 
able 



Non- 
durable 



Em- 
ployed 



Un- 
employed 



Factory 
Sales 



New 
Orders 



Sales 



Inventories 
End of 
Period 



1935-39 = 100 
seasonally adjusted 



Million persons 



Billion 
Million dollars Billion dollars 

dollars Thousands unadjusted seasonally adjusted 



1939 
1950 


109 
200 


109 
209 


109 
237 


109 
187 


45.8 
60.0 


9.5 
3.1 


296 
l,208 r 


238.9 
555.5 


20^6 


5.1 
19.1 


11.5 
33.3 


1950 O 
N 
D 


216 
215 
218 


225 
224 
229 


261 
260 
268 


196 
195 
197 


61.8 
61.3 
60.3 


1.9 

2.2 
2.2 


1,136 
1,087 
1,168 


651.2 
504.4 
521.4 


23. 8 r 
21.4 
22. 9 r 


20.7 
20.5 
21.0 


30.9 
32.2 
33.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


221 
221 
222 


231 
232 
234 


268 
271 
277 


201 
201 
199 


59.0 
58.9 
60.2 


2.5 
2.4 
2.1 


1,043 
1,141 
1,267 


478.6 
505.9 
617.4 


28. 2 r 
25. 8 r 
28. 5 r 


22.6 
22.3 
22.6 


34.1 
34.7 
35.6 


A 
M 
J 


223 
222 
221 


234 
233 
231 


279 
276 
274 


198 
198 
197 


60.0 
61.2 
61.8 


1.7 
1.6 
2.0 


1,375 
2,573 
1,409 


503.0 
511.9 
482.0 


23. 8 r 
23. 6 r 
24. l r 


22.5 
23.4 
22.1 


36.9 
38.1 
39.0 


J 
A 

S 


212 
217 
219 


222 

226 r 

228 


265 r 
267 r 
272 


187 
193 
192 


62.5 
62.6 
61.6 


1.9 
1.6 
1.6 


1,380 
1,263 
1,083 


381.4 
426.9 
365.9. 


21. 6 r 
23. r 
21. 2 r 


21.3 
21.8 
20.8 


39.9 
40.6 
41.0 


o 

N 


218 r 
218p 


226 r 
227? 


274 
275" 


188 r 
188» 


61.8 
61.3 


1.6 
1.8 


1,051 
932 


414.5 


23.7 


22.4 


41.3 



Wholesale Consumers 
Personal Commodity Price 
Income' 1 ' Prices Index 



Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 
Manufac- 
turing 



Merchandise 

Exports 
including 
re-exports' 2 ' Imports 



Consumer 
Credit Out- 
standing, 

End of 
Period.' 3 ' 



Department Stores 



Sales 



Stocks 



Common 

Stock 

Prices* 4 ' 

402-416 





Billion 
dollars 


1926 = 100 


1935-39 = 
100 


Dollars 


Million dollars 


Billion 
dollars 


1935-39 = 100 
seasonally adjusted 


1935-39 = 
100 


1939 
1950 


72.6 
224. 7 r 


77.1 
161.5 


99.4 
171.9 


0.633 

1.465 r 


265 
856 


193 
738 


7:o r 

17. 9 r 


106 
303 


329 


94.2 
146.4 


1950 O 
N 
D 


234.1 
236.4 

244.4 


169.1 
171.7 
175.3 


175.6 
176.4 
178.8 


1.501 
1.514 
1.543 


906 

978 

1,065 


923 
854 
867 


19.4 

19.4 
19. l r 


291 
290 
325 


329 
332 
329 


157.8 
156.1 
158.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


243.6 
243.3 
245.5 


180.1 
183.6 
184.0 


181.5 
183.8 
184.5 


1.555 
1.561 
1.571 


974 r 
1,076 
1,284 


l,023 r 
909 
1,099 


19.9 
19.5 
19.4 


362 
326 
291 


338 
349 
368 


168.6 
174.7 
170.3 


A 
M 

J 


249.0 
249.8 
251.0 


183.6 
182.9 
181.7 


184.6 
185.4 
185.2 


1.578 
1.586 
1.599 


i,372 r 
l,355 r 
l,292 r 


l,032 r 
1,018 
930 


19.1 
19.2 
19.3 


302 
301 
302 


377 
365 
353 


172.3 
173.9 
171.7 


J 

A 

S 


252.4 
253.7 
253. 6 r 


179.4 
178.0 
177.6 


185.5 
185.5 
186.6 


1.600 
1.596' 
1.612 


1,190 
1,267 
1,231 


893 
879 
718 r 


19.1 
19.3 
19.4 


309 
319 
312 


353 
342 
334 r 


172.8 
181.5 
187.3 


o 

N 


257.5 


178. l r 
178.3 


187.4 
188.6 


1.614 r 
1.619 


1,154 


832 


19.5 


303 
311 


326" 


185.0 
177.7 



(1) Personal income is given on an annual basis for months as well as for years. (2) Includes army civilian supply 
exports from February, 1947. '"Annual totals are averages of end-of-month figures. (4) Standard and Poor's 

Corporation. 

Source: Survey of Current Business U.S. Department of Commerce. 



INTRODUCTION JANUARY, 1952 

Population," Births, Marriages and Deaths 

TABLE 4 Monthly averages or calendar months (,) 



CANADA " 



NEWFOUNDLAND 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages 





Thov 


isaml 


s 


Number 


Thousands 


Number 


Thousands 




Number 


1939 
1950 


11 
13 


,267 
,845 


19,122 
29,686 


8,638 
10,158 


9,079 
10,064 355 




94 
96 


177 
238 


53 
52 


1950S 


13 


921 


33,621 


13,763 


9,372 


. 




277 


79 


O 
N 
D 






30,243 
28,261 
29,634 


12,831 
12,334 

8,516 


9,573 

9,820 

10,546 






217 
218 
162 


88 
55 
50 


1951 J 
F 
M 






27,118 
26,498 
30,475 


5,928 
5,220 
5,205 


10,297 
10,889 
12,275 






280 
186 
205 


23 
21 

22 


A 
M 

J 






30,880 
32,371 
33,991 


7,475 

9,847 

14,152 


11,207 

10,284 

9,080 






224 
316 
220 


26 
35 

77 


J 

A 

S 






31,134 
32,746 
29,059 


16,559 
13,791 
14,179 


8,847 
9,926 

8,585 






219 
212 
219 


68 
72 
75 


O 






33,532 


13,971 


10,015 






255 


76 



P.E.I. 



NOVA SCOTIA 



NEW BRUNSWICK 



QUEBEC 



Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births 





Number 


Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 


Number 


1939 
1950 


94 
75 


561 
658 


985 
1,451 


419 
428 


527 
563 


447 
522 


940 
1,403 


311 
363 


424 
414 


3 
3 


230 
976 


6,635 
9,752 


1950S 


52 




1,995 


721 


496 




1,712 


605 


436 






11,374 


O 
N 
D 


63 
72 
71 




1,476 
1.580 
1,253 


537 
533 
328 


522 
552 
492 




1,287 
1,438 
1,180 


508 
478 
247 


353 
511 
353 






10,216 

8,886 

11,446 


1951 J 
F 
M 


93 
95 
91 




1,544 
1,292 
1,319 


371 
332 
249 


488 
507 
661 




1,269 
1,193 
1,417 


241 
198 
178 


400 
419 
630 






6,563 

8,220 

10,536 


A 
M 

J 


97 
59 

74 




1,269 
1,513 
1,408 


194 
411 
861 


610 
397 
327 




1.346 
1,733 
1,297 


241 
372 
435 


474 
449 
331 






9,499 
10,924 
10,804 


J 

A 

S 


45 
95 
66 




1,439 
1.383 
1,441 


594 
363 
572 


407 
437 
483 




1,305 
1,666 
1,288 


486 
569 
519 


288 
413 
396 






10,917 
9,890 
9,745 


O 


63 




1,519 


219 


333 




1,288 


432 


377 






9,910 



Note. — Until the end of 1949, annual and monthly data for births, deaths and marriages are based on tabulated 
figures by month of occurrence on the basis of residence. Figures for 1950 and 1951 are provisional and represent 
registrations filed in Provincial Vital Statistics offices during the month under review, regardless of the month of 
occurrence. 

1 Estimates are given by years as of June 1, and in Canada as a whole, as of the first day of the last month of each 

?uarter. l3 Exclusive of stillbirths. Not applicable to figures on population. '"Yukon, North-West 

erritories and Newfoundland not included in figures for births, marriages and deaths. 
Source: Monthly Report of Births, Marriages and Deaths, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



INTRODUCTION 



Population, < Births, Marriages and Deaths 

TABLE 4 - concluded Monthly averages or calendar months** 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



MANITOBA 



SASK. 



Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population 



Number 



Thousands 



Number 



Thousands 



Number 



Thousands 



1939 
1950 


2,409 
2,778 


2,782 
2,735 


3,708 5,344 
4,512 9,046 


2,888 
3,668 


3,128 
3,676 


726 1,132 
795 1,614 


640 
580 


513 906 
547 874 


1950S 


3,497 


2,735 


10,611 


5,609 


3,543 


1,593 


825 


497 


O 

N 
D 


3,247 
3,771 
2,483 


2,484 
3,096 
3,064 


9,569 
8,559 
8,567 


4,978 
3,376 
2,699 


3,511 
3,283 
3,783 


1,608 
1,477 
1,595 


765 
806 
626 


457 
529 
545 


1951 J 
F 
M 


908 

939 

1,104 


2,475 
3,019 
3,462 


9,139 
8,843 
9,159 


2,148 
2,163 
2,103 


3,880 
4,174 
4,282 


1,585 
1,353 
1,634 


501 
320 
290 


677 
554 
663 


A 
M 
J 


1,476 
2,467 
4,154 


3,147 
2,770 
2,417 


10,234 

9,119 

11,644 


3,259 
3,678 
5,065 


4,111 
3,789 
3,531 


1,720 
1,669 
1,910 


383 
471 
800 


627 
586 
569 


J 

A 

S 


5,335 
4,796 
4,496 


2,559 
2,986 
2,283 


9,625 

10,124 

9,083 


6,103 
3,996 
5,495 


3,268 
3,276 
3,022 


1,729 
1,760 
1,663 


858 
797 
678 


459 
498 
457 


O 


3,995 


3,044 


11,065 


4,995 


3,536 


1,757 


919 


561 



SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths 







Number 




Thousands 


Number 




Thousands 




Number 




1939 
1950 


1,505 
1,770 


610 
598 


503 
513 


786 
895 


1,373 
2,155 


653 
771 


482 
579 


792 
1,138 


1,031 
2,258 


655 
921 


626 
963 


1950S 


1,935 


478 


399 




1,986 


697 


351 




2,138 


1,252 


863 


O 

N 
D 


1,692 
1,367 
1,872 


905 
955 
610 


519 
407 
568 




1,951 
2,187 
1,729 


830 

1,386 

613 


785 
320 
803 




2,227 
2,549 
1,830 


973 
974 
860 


879 

1,050 

867 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1,660 
1,608 
2,031 


307 
245 
259 


589 
561 
608 




2,628 
1,853 
1,900 


735 
428 
311 


610 
671 
628 




2,450 
1,950 
2,274 


694 
574 
689 


1,085 

889 

1,250 


A 
M 
J 


1,914 
1,904 
2,023 


403 
738 
711 


510 
563 
445 




2,505 
2,572 
2,322 


720 
714 
977 


673 
659 
488 




2,169 
2,621 
2,363 


773 

961 

1,072 


958 

1,012 

898 


J 

A 

S 


1,688 
1,964 
2,064 


808 
853 
452 


593 
449 
439 




2,026 
2,979 
1,263 


1,091 

1,066 

775 


359 
815 
613 




2,186 
2,768 
2,293 


1,216 
1,279 
1,117 


869 
957 
826 


O 


1,874 


1,416 


570 




3,221 


875 


507 




2,643 


1,044 


1,024 



<»As of June 1. 



(2) Exclusive of stillbirths. 



!) Not applicable to figures on population. 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 5 



JANUARY, 1952 



National Accounts: Income and Expenditure 





NIT NATIONAL INCOME AT FACTOR COST AND GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT AT MARKET PRICES 




Salaries, 
wages and 
supplemen- 
tary labour 

income 


Military 

pay and 

allowances 


Investment 
income 


Net income 

of agncul- Nit 

ture and national 
other unin- Income at 
corporated factor 

business cost 


Indirect 
taxes less 
subsidies 


Depredation 

allowances 

and similar 

business 

costs " 


Residual 
error of 
estimate 


dross 

national 

product 

at market 

prices 










Million dollars 










1939 
1949 
1950" 


2.583 
7,800 
8,300 


32 

115 
137 


783 
2,367 
2,996 


891 4,289 
2,887 13,169 
2,875 14,308 


737 
1.831 
2.001 


582 
1,321 
1,471 


-10 
+61 
+ 11 


5,598 
16,382 
17,791 








GROSS NATIONAL EXPENDITURE AT MARKET PRICES 








Personal 

expenditure 

on consumer 

goods and 

services 


Government 
Expenditure 


Gross Home Investment 


Exports 

of goods 

and 

services' 21 


Imports of 

goods and 

services 


Residual 
error of 
estimate 


Gross 




Mutual Aid 

UNRRA 

and Military 

Relief 


All 
Other 


Plant, 
equipment 

and 
housing" 1 Inventories 


expend- 
iture at 
market 
prices 










Million dollars 










1939 
1949 
1950" 


3,861 
11,086 
11,810 


— 


724 
2,106 
2,333 


554 327 
2,970 108 
3,163 805 


1,451 
4,011 
4,173 


-1,328 
-3,837 
-4,482 


+ 9 
-62 
-11 


5,598 
16,382 
17,791 



Note: Newfoundland is included for 1949 and 1950. 
1 Includes an estimate of capital outlay charged to current account, 
and Military Relief. 

Source: National Accounts, Income and Expenditure 1926-1947, and "Revised Preliminary 1950", D.B.S. 



- Excludes Mutual Aid, UNRRA 



TABLE 6 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 



INDUSTRIAL 
PRODUCTION 



MINING 



MANU- 
FACTURES 



Metals 



Fuels 





Total 


Total 


Total 


Gold 


Copper 


Nickel 


Total 


Coal 


Non-Metals 


Total 


1939 
1950 


109.3 
198.3 


118.4 
147.5 


119.1 
110.2 


122.4 
106.0 


120.0 
102.3 


117.3 
127.2 


117.3 

213.3 


104.7 

126.0 


113.9 
272.7 


107.8 
207.6 


1950 O 
N 
D 


210.7 
210.6 
209 . 2 


158.8 
162.1 
154.6 


113.8 
117.1 

112.4 


109.9 
106.1 
111 7 


101.0 
110.0 
103.2 


125.2 
148.9 
124.8 


240.8 
258.0 
228 


133.0 
141.2 
136.1 


328.1 
307.0 
283.7 


221.7 
221.0 
219.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


210.0 
214.0 
217.1 


158.3 
157.6 
156.5 


111.7 
110.5 
112.9 


105.2 
105.6 
104.6 


103.8 
102.5 
110.6 


132.5 
129.5 
140.7 


238.8 

230.2 
210.4 


127.6 
117.4 
109.6 


336.6 

355.8 
332.9 


218.9 
224.3 
227.9 


A 
M 

J 


218.2 
223.4 
218.8 


153.8 

167.6 
174.0 


111 3 
111.6 
114.5 


106.1 

99.9 

101.9 


112.3 

107.0 
106.4 


132.0 
150.9 
148.1 


215.9 
278.0 
299 9 


122.6 
119.3 
122.5 


287.6 
304.8 
310.8 


228.5 
231.9 
225.9 


J 

A 

S 


208.0 
205.4 
208.2' 


165.9 
168. 1 

174 1 


109.8 
109 2 
115.6 


100.6 

93 3 

109.2 


102.4 
103 2 
102 5 


142.5 
148 3 
145 5 


290.1 
309.6 
311. 6 r 


111.1 
115 2 
126.3 


280.5 
296.6 
294 7 r 


213.5 
210.5 
214.1 


O 

N 


211. 9" 

208.1 


172.5' 
173 


112 8 
114.3" 


106.3 


95.3 
104 


141 7 
144 1 


316.3 


137 7 


294.9 
290.7* 


218.5" 
213.7" 



Only series with definite seasonal patterns are adjusted. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 6 -continued 



INTRODUCTION 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 











NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 










TOTAL 








Foods and Beverages 










Total 








Foods 










Total 




Meat products 




Dairy products 


Flour and 
feed 




Total 


Cattle 
slaughterings 


Hog slaught 
erings 


Total 


Butter and 
cheese 


Concen- 
trated milk 


Total 


1939 


108.0 


111.7 


110.2 


105.1 


101.4 


108.2 


111.4 


109.6 


124.2 


118.7 


1950 


187.9 


192.6 


173.3 


136.4 


146.1 


138.8 


124.9 


102.2 


268.0 


142.1 


1950 O 


197.4 


202.6 


181.8 


127.6 


118.8 


140.6 


119.3 


98.3 


256.0 


158.2 


N 


196.7 


197.8 


176.1 


112.5 


108.1 


118.5 


130.8 


102.0 


308.2 


163.2 


D 


194.2 


193.5 


178.5 


110.5 


99.5 


122.8 


148.6 


123.9 


284.5 


169.8 


1951 J 


189.3 


180.4 


166.1 


125.7 


134.2 


126.7 


129.1 


103.6 


286.0 


150.5 


F 


193.9 


184.5 


165.8 


117.3 


131.0 


116.0 


120.5 


91.2 


280.2 


163.2 


M 


197.4 


194.5 


169.3 


126.9 


143.9 


127.7 


117.9 


89.3 


223.4 


172.6 


A 


199.3 


197.0 


170.1 


135.7 


184.3 


118.6 


107.9 


85.8 


268.2 


160.1 


M 


202.5 


202.6 


182.5 


162.3 


220.1 


141.5 


119.8 


90.2 


315.6 


156.4 


J 


196.4 


203.1 


181.3 


158.9 


206.4 


145.3 


120.5 


91.9 


322.0 


162.8 


J 


191.6 


204.7 


179.1 


134.9 


142.7 


144.1 


114.6 


87.0 


321.6 


130.6 


A 


191.4 


212.1 


187.9 


148.0 


122.8 


177.3 


121.5 


94.9 


319.8 


143.8 


S 


189.8 


203.8 


184.5 


142.5 


122.7 


166.2 


124.9 


100.7 


292.2 


153.4 


O 


196. 4 r 


209.0' 


188. 4' 


140.0 


121.6 


162.3 


130.1 


106.8 


290.4 


152.6 


N 


190. 2" 


200.4 


179.6 


114.4 


85.1 


138.7 


132.3 


103.4 


328.7 


156.6 










NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 












Foods and Beverages 






Tobacco Products 




Rubber 
Products 




Foods 




Beverages 




Total 


Cigars 


Cigarettes 


Cut 
tobacco 




Flour and 

feed: 

Wheat flour 


Sugar 


Total 


Liquors 


Beer 




1939 


114.9 


108.1 


117.8 


125.3 


104.6 


111.7 


106.2 


112.9 


113.6 


108.7 


1950 


143.7 


159.2 


267.3 


234.9 


294.2 


216.1 


153.5 


273.5 


124.2 


278.8 


1950 O 


160.7 


210.4 


283.0 


297.5 


313.7 


188.5 


152.5 


235.8 


108.8 


332.4 


N 


168.1 


170.0 


282.0 


360.2 


275.0 


199.0 


165.1 


244.5 


123.6 


314.6 


D 


178.7 


134.8 


251.9 


281.7 


246.6 


197.5 


155.7 


240.0 


132.6 


335.4 


1951 J 


155.2 


85.8 


235.6 


261.0 


222.7 


219.9 


167.0 


270.4 


141.5 


319.4 


F 


174.8 


113.1 


257.0 


298.4 


242.9 


235.6 


135.7 


305.5 


128.2 


340.2 


M 


179.0 


142.8 


292.2 


343.1 


294.5 


255.7 


140.2 


327.5 


150.5 


336.7 


A 


174.3 


147.9 


301.5 


286.2 


346.2 


230.9 


151.6 


305.3 


108.5 


357.2 


M 


165.6 


186.1 


280.6 


222.5 


341.7 


230.5 


171.2 


281.1 


154.9 


299.6 


J 


167.3 


172.4 


287.7 


209.4 


348.7 


216.9 


138.5 


264.5 


151.1 


246.3 


J 


121.2 


142.6 


303.9 


201.2 


396.6 


187.8 


100.6 


238.1 


116.8 


262.2 


A 


138.8 


144.7 


305.7 


273.7 


367.8 


147.2 


89.4 


173.8 


118.5 


222.6 


S 


146.8 


107.6 


278.7 


300.5 


311.8 


108.7 


56.2 


131.1 


84.8 


288.9 


O 


146.9 


182.8 


289.3 


374.9 


289.8 


226.4 


129.9 


290.9 


129.7 


281.6 


N 


155.3 


145.2 


281.3 


361.8 


275.8 


203.8 


142.5 


244.0 


149.0 


263.3 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 6 - continued 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 



JANUARY, 1952 



100 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



Leather Products 



Textiles ex. Clothing 



Clothing 



Paper Products 



Boots 
and 
Total Tanneries shoes 



Cotton Silk 

con- Wool, yarn and 
Total sumption and cloth rayon 



Total 



Pulp and 
paper: 
Total 



1939 
1950 


109.3 

127.7 


108.4 
113.6 


109.9 
137.5 


106.3 
172.4 


110.8 
145.2 


101 6 
196.8 


99.9 
242.3 


106.9 
138.2 


99.5 
195.7 


96.7 
183.4 


1950 O 
N 
D 


142.8 
142 8 
133 6 


136.3 
134.6 
128.8 


147.4 
148.5 
136.9 


178.0 
187.6 
183.4 


150.8 
166.6 
151.6 


201.5 
208.6 
209.5 


249.8 
254.1 
260.6 


142.1 
145.6 
145 .6 


207.3 
206.4 
201.5 


191.1 
194.9 
191.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


143.5 
145.9 
138.0 


134.9 
133.8 
112.9 


149.5 
154.4 
155.7 


184.1 
186.5 
190.8 


153.1 
158.1 
175.2 


208.2 
209.9 
209.5 


263.6 
262.9 
253.1 


140.4 
146.4 
148.5 


202.9 
207.5 
207.1 


192.1 
197.4 
197.6 


A 
M 

J 


135 3 
125.0 
104.9 


107.9 
99.4 
73.7 


154.5 
143.0 
126.9 


192.9 
193.1 
179.6 


173.7 
173.3 
161.2 


212.6 
212.6 
192.0 


261.7 
262.6 
249.7 


149.8 
148.5 
138.1 


212.3 
214.6 
213 3 


202.5 
204.0 
204.6 


J 

A 

S 


85.5 
112.0 

101 8 


52.4 
63.4 
63.5 


108.8 
146.2 
128.7 


156.9 
151.3 
158.4 


114.4 
110.9 
130.8 


185.3 
172.5 
170.7 


238.9 
237.2 
234.9 


129 
127.0 
130.4 


211.3 
213.5 
212.5 


201.1 
204.4 
202.7 


O 

N 


106.8 


78 .0 


127 .0 


161 2 
154.8 


139.9 
131.8 


174.2 
168.8 


227 .2 
218.4 


130 l r 
124 2 


214.9' 
210 6 


205.7 
204.8 



NON-DURABLE MANUTACTURES 



Paper Products 
Pulp and paper 



Printing 

and 

Publishing 



Petroleum and Coal Products 



Chemical Products 



Pulp 



Paper 



Total 



Coke and 

gas 
products 



Petroleum refining 



Total Gasoline 



Heavy 
fuel oils 



Total 



Paints ana 
varnishes 



1939 
1950 


97.6 
195.4 


95.1 
162.8 


104.1 
176.0 


106.7 
225.8 


99.2 
170.7 


115.5 
289.8 


266 .5 


196 A 


112.7 
190.3 


111.1 
377.6 


1950 O 
N 
D 


208.7 
209.6 
203.7 


161.2 
169.8 
171.2 


179.8 
184.2 
185.3 


240.6 
237.7 
225.0 


174.6 
174.3 
182.2 


317.5 
311.5 
274.9 


300.9 
293.9 
254.8 


208.1 
205.2 
215.1 


195.3 
192.9 
189.9 


382.9 
361.8 
336.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


208.0 
215.4 
211.9 


165.0 
166.7 
173.2 


173.1 
178.8 
176.4 


225.7 
223.3 
219.8 


177.1 
185.5 
167.8 


282.2 
267.3 
280.5 


251.7 
236.5 
240.8 


204.9 
169.3 
192.0 


196.7 
199.3 
197.6 


392.4 
387.7 
384.2 


A 
M 

J 


221.1 

220.5 
220.7 


170.8 
175.8 
177.2 


167.0 
177.1 
170.5 


210.4 
274.4 
283.7 


177.3 
173.8 
169.3 


249.6 
391.6 
416.8 


211.9 
337.0 
352.4 


185.5 
245.0 
245.8 


212.5 
216.2 
216.2 


455.9 
455.1 
454.3 


I 

A 

S 


220.6 
221.9 
222.5 


168.1 
174.7 
169.0 


170.2 
173.2 
168.4 


275.2 
285.3 
263.2 


170.4 
163.4 
164.4' 


397.1 
427.2 
378.2 


346.5 
370.7 
335.0 


237.7 
260.3 
246.3 


207.0 
198.0 
199.9 


406.6 
347.6 
334.6 


O 

N 


223.6 
222.1 


175 2 
175.3 


180.5' 
177.1 


268.3 


175 5 


376.3 


351.2 


255.6 


197.9' 
200.1" 


324.4 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 6 -concluded 



INTRODUCTION 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 











DURABLE MANUFACTURES 










TOTAL 


Wood 
Products 






Iron and Steel Product! 


i 




Transportation 
Equipment 




Total 


Primary iron and steel 


Iron 
castings 


Wire and 

wire 
products 


Total 


Motor 
vehicles 




Total 


Pig iron 


Steel 


1939 


107.5 


107.8 


108.7 


110.3 


104.4 


115.1 


99.1 


114.7 


94.5 


93.4 


1950 


241.2 


171.5 


226.1 


268.0 


281.7 


222.3 


302.1 


158.5 


269.8 


251.6 


1950 O 


263.5 


180.9 


243.8 


287.8 


295.6 


233.1 


344.1 


173.5 


290.4 


279.2 


N 


262.6 


196.1 


248.7 


298.5 


309.3 


249.3 


359.8 


163.5 


263.0 


231.2 


D 


263.1 


216.5 


242.5 


269.4 


284.7 


242.5 


350.9 


151.9 


275.2 


243.4 


1951 J 


269.8 


197.6 


252.6 


300.4 


288.5 


256.5 


372.7 


170.9 


309.6 


299.6 


F 


276.4 


202.0 


249.4 


308.1 


307.3 


265.2 


354.8 


158.8 


340.0 


336.3 


M 


280.3 


197.8 


252.6 


316.1 


316.6 


261.8 


369.3 


166.3 


358.0 


365.8 


A 


278.5 


151.0 


263.5 


321.5 


313.1 


266.6 


394.9 


183.4 


340.4 


323.7 


M 


282.4 


184.4 


261.7 


321.5 


314.2 


259.7 


359.3 


175.1 


339.5 


314.1 


J 


276.5 


207.2 


254.2 


306.7 


316.2 


252.4 


348.2 


170.0 


317.7 


273.3 


J 


251.0 


176.6 


237.3 


286.3 


301.7 


219.3 


264.4 


145.5 


300.9 


241.0 


A 


243.3 


176.4 


238.9 


286.1 


291.6 


233.1 


306.5 


138.8 


257.1 


161.3 


S 


255. 6 r 


166.4' 


249.3 


305.3 


315.2 


240.8 


336.8 


172.7 


319.9 


244.6 


o 


256. 5» 


168.0 


258.2 


314. 3 r 


322.2 


263.7 


351.4 


182.4 


321. 4 r 


243.2 


N 


253. 9» 




256.2" 


326. 6» 


331.5 


273.8 




155.3 


311.4 


220.0 










DURABLE MANUFACTURES 








Electric 
Power 




Non-Ferrous Metals 
and Products 


Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Electric 

refrig- 

Total Radios erators 


Non-Metallic Mineral Products 






Total 


Smelting 
and 

refining 


Total 


Cement 


Lime and 
gypsum 
products 


Clay 
products 




1939 


119.5 


121.0 


102.0 






106.1 


109.5 


118.7 


119.3 


108.4 


1950 


237.2 


150.6 


369.6 


310 ! 3 


787.4 


237.8 


326.4 


278.5 


237.0 


194.4 


1950 O 


262.3 


157.0 


431.8 


350.5 


954.3 


253.3 


318.7 


323.2 


226.1 


191.8 


N 


270.2 


156.7 


415.8 


299.4 


966.2 


251.1 


314.4 


306.4 


233.3 


192.0 


D 


266.0 


156.1 


395.1 


345.6 


873.0 


246.8 


363.3 


285.5 


234.9 


201.0 


1951 J 


265.8 


157.1 


399.5 


300.1 


936.1 


250 8 


321.2 


293.7 


282.5 


211.3 


F 


266.0 


157.2 


406.8 


341.9 


914.0 


262.1 


394.0 


293.3 


266.8 


210.3 


M 


268.0 


150.8 


400.2 


234.8 


999.5 


269.6 


378.6 


300.3 


271.1 


216.0 


A 


285.8 


169.0 


418.6 


345.4 


955.2 


273.4 


362.1 


303.8 


262.9 


229.2 


M 


293 3 


166.0 


392.2 


305.1 


851.4 


276.8 


368.5 


297.6 


258.9 


236.2 


J 


292.8 


168.8 


362.3 


300.4 


723.0 


267.3 


294.8 


300.0 


244.1 


226.8 


J 


270.8 


158.8 


283.1 


175.2 


461.9 


255.2 


319.1 


268.5 


230.6 


227.5 


A 


266.1 


164.0 


284.1 


183.8 


447.6 


260. 4 r 


309.5 


329.1 


246. 8 r 


219.5 


S 


253.7 


152.6 


312.3 


263.4 


414.3 


256. 4 r 


316.3 


322. 4 r 


229. 7 r 


209.3 


O 


262. 6 r 


147. 5 r 


271.2 


100.8 


360.8 


251. 7* 


311.9 


307.1 




215.3 


N 


265. 6» 




266. 1p 




344.1 


246.1" 


320.6 






213.1 



LABOUR 



TABLE 7 



JANUARY, 1952 



The Canadian Labour Force 



1947 



1948 



1949 1950"> 



195C 



1951 



CLASSIFICATION 



Survey Averages 



Nov. 4 March 3 June 2 Aug. 18 Nov. 3 



Thousands of persons 14 years oi age and over 



.^on-institutional Civilian Popula 
tion 



Civilian Labour Force. 

Agricultural 

Non-agricultural 



With jobs 

At work — 35 hours or more . 
At work — 15 to 34 hours. . . . 

At work — 1 to 14 hours 

Not at work but with jobs. . . . 



Paid workers 

Agricultural .... 
Non-agricultural. 



Without jobs and seeking work. 
Persons not in the Labour Force. . . 



8,960 9,132 9,324 9,709 9,751 9,800 9,854 9,887 9,790 



4,908 
1,119 

3,789 

4,810 

4,222 
318 
114 
156 

3,262 

119 

3,143 

98 

4,052 



4,982 

1,100 
3,882 

4,879 

4,301 

337 

109 

132 

3,372 

134 

3,238 

103 

4,150 



5,090 

1,094 
3.996 

4,957 
4,377 

348 
97 

135 

3,469 

144 

3,325 

133 



5,216 

1,038 
4,178 

5,046 

4.422 

373 

100 

151 

3,571 

112 

3,459 

170 



4,234 4,493 



5,201 

974 
4,227 

5,084 

4,513 

378 

94 

99 

3,683 

102 

3,581 

117 

4,550 



5,172 

854 
4,318 

5,000 

4,245 

433 

111 

211 

3,665 

69 

3,596 

172 

4,628 



5,332 

1,017 
4,315 

5,247 

4,699 

339 

117 

92 

3,802 

114 

3,688 

85 

4,522 



5,421 

1,090 
4,331 

5,343 
4,646 

312 
81 

304 

3,849 

133 

3,716 

78 

4,466 



5,210 

880 
4,330 

5,110 

4,458 

451 

82 

119 

3,800 

90 

3,710 

100 

4,580 



Note. — These estimates are derived from a sample survey and are subject to sampling error. In general the smaller 
the estimate the larger is the relative sampling error. 

'"Newfoundland included in estimates from March, 1950. 
Source: Labour Force Bulletin, D.B.S. 



TABLE 8 



Canadian Labour Income 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



SALARIES AND WAGES 



Agriculture, 

Logging, 

Fishing, 

Trapping, 

Mining 



Manufacturing Construction 



Public Utilities, 

Transportation, 

Communications, 

Storage 

Trade 



Finance, 

Services 

(including 

government) 



SUPPLEMEN- 
TARY 
LABOUR 
INCOME 



TOTAL 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 



23 
53 



62 
229 



8 

50 



58 
178 



59 
156 



10 Note — Series revised. As of January , 1950, Newfoundland is included. 

Source: Monthly Estimates of Canadian Labour Income, D.B.S. 



5 
23 



215 
689 



1950 J 


54 


228 


56 


179 


159 


22 


698 


J 


55 


230 


57 


181 


160 


23 


706 


A 


57 


232 


58 


171 


157 


24 


699 


S 


59 


241 


58 


186 


159 


25 


728 


O 


61 


244 


58 


188 


160 


25 


736 


N 


62 


247 


56 


193 


161 


25 


744 


D 


60 


250 


51 


190 


162 


25 


738 


1951 J 


59 


252 


47 


187 


160 


25 


730 


F 


59 


254 


46 


188 


162 


24 


728 


M 


55 


260 


46 


191 


168 


25 


745 


A 


55 


266 


53 


196 


166 


27 


763 


M 


61 


269 


59 


202 


174 


27 


792 


J 


67 


276 


64 


208 


179 


27 


821 


J 


66 


276 


68 


209 


178 


30 


827 


A 


68 


279 


71 


211 


176 


28 


833 


S 


70 


284 


74 


214 


178 


28 


848 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 9 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



INDUSTRIAL COMPOSITE 



FORESTRY 



MINING 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
merit payrolls earnings* ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
168.0 


100.0 
321.8 


23.44 
44.84 


100.0 
160.1 


100.0 
388.2 


17.37 
42.01 


100.0 
112.2 


100.0 
211.2 


28.69 
53.95 


1950 O 
N 
D 


177.1 
178.1 
179.2 


346.6 
351.7 
356.3 


45.88 
46.29 
46.63 


193.4 
233.7 
260.5 


481.1 
587.5 
647.5 


43.20 
43.66 
43.04 


115.6 
116.0 
116.8 


220.9 
226.0 
230.5 


54.84 
55.89 
56.60 


1951 J 
F 
M 


175.3 
172.3 
172.3 


338.2 
351.5 
353.8 


45.27 
47.87 
48.19 


256.0 
248.3 
244.1 


632.1 
609.0 
633.7 


42.58 
42.45 
44.94 


115.1 
114.9 
114.7 


217.0 
233.1 
235.2 


54.08 
58.22 
58.85 


A 
M 
J 


173.3 
175.6 
180.3 


357.8 
367.9 
379.0 


48.43 
49.17 
49.34 


208.0 
167.9 
188.6 


549.8 
472.8 
539.8 


45.76 
48.74 
49.54 


114.7 
115.0 
116.4 


230.1 
237.4 
238.3 


57.56 
59.20 
58.74 


J 

A 

S 


183.6 
184.3 
185.4 


392.5 
394.0 
400.2 


50.17 
50.16 
50.66 


197.6 
180.5 
181.8 


589.7 
495.2 
505.5 


51.66 
47.49 
48.15 


119.0 
120.0 
119.5 


250.2 
254.2 
252.3 


60.32 
60.77 
60.77 


O 

N 


186. 5' 
186.2 


410.0' 
412.3 


51.59' 
51.97 


214.6' 
259.8 


630.2' 
797.1 


50.83' 
53.12 


120.1 
121.2 


263.0' 
263.7 


63.01' 
62.60 



MANUFACTURING 



Total 



Durable Goods (1 > 



Non-durable Goods (2) 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 

177.5 


100.0 
360.1 


22.79 
46.21 


100.0 
211.4 


100.0 
431.6 


24.28 
49.52 


100.0 
155.4 


100.0 
308.4 


21.82 
43.28 


1950 O 
N 
D 


185.6 
185.4 

185.3 


385.1 
389.7 
394.6 


47.27 
47.90 

48.51 


221.5 
222.4 
223.1 


464.0 
472.0 
478.5 


50.86 
51.52 
52.07 


162.2 
161.3 
160.7 


327.8 
330.0 
333.7 


44.08 
44.65 
45.28 


1951 J 
F 
M 


182.4 
184.5 
186.3 


373.1 
402.1 
405.3 


46.60 
49.64 
49.56 


223.3 
226.9 
229.9 


457.1 
497.4 
501.3 


49.72 
53.23 
52.94 


155.8 
156.9 
157.9 


312.1 
332.9 
335.6 


43.68 
46.27 
46.35 


A 
M 
J 


188.8 
189.9 
192.0 


414.6 
423.7 
429.0 


50.03 
50.84 
50.90 


234.8 
237.0 
240.9 


542.5 
530.8 
537.6 


53.47 
54.39 
54.20 


158.8 
159.2 
160.2 


329.0 
345.9 
350.1 


46.72 
47.39 
47.67 


J 

A 

S 


193.9 
194.0 
194.1 


440.0 
440.1 
446.1 


51.70 
51.68 
52.37 


242.9 
242.0 
242.1 


552.0 
550.2 
559.8 


55.24 
55.25 
56.17 


162.1 
162.8 
162.9 


358.8 
355.5 
363.9 


48.25 
48.22 
48.71 


O 
N 


194.2' 
190.7 


454.4' 
450.8 


53.31' 

53.85 


240.2' 
238.3 


567.5' 
569.0 


57.40' 
58.03 


164.4' 
159.9 


372.6' 
365.2 


49.42' 
49.81 



Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. Statistics throughout Tables 9 to 11 are compiled 
from data which relate to the last pay period of the preceding month. 

'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

(l 'Includes wood products, iron and steel products, transportation equipment, non-ferrous metal products, 
electrical apparatus and supplies, and non-metallic mineral products. (2) Includes foods and beverages, tobacco 

and tobacco products, rubber products, leather products, textile products except clothing, clothing, paper products, 
printing, publishing and allied industries, products of petroleum and coal, chemical products, and miscellaneous 
manufacturing industries. 

Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



11 



LABOUR 

Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
TABLE 9 - continued Monthly averages or first of month 



JANUARY, 1952 











MANUFACTURING 










Textile Products excer. 

Employ- Aggregate 
ment payrolls 

1939 = 100 


>t Clothing 

Weekly 
earnings* 




Clothing 






Wood Products 






Employ- 
ment 

1939 


Aggregate 
payrolls 

= 100 


Weekly 
earnings* 


Employ- 
ment 

1939 


Aggregate 
payrolls 

= 100 


Weekly 
earnings* 




Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100 
149.6 


100.0 
330.6 


18.00 

39.75 


100.0 
139.4 


100.0 

273.7 


17 15 
33.63 


100.0 

171.1 


100.0 

365.7 


19.32 
41.21 


1950 O 
N 
D 


152.4 
155.1 
157.3 


344.6 
357.4 
372.1 


40.68 
41.47 
42.57 


141.8 

144.5 
145.0 


289.1 
295.8 
294.8 


34.96 
35.10 
34.86 


185.8 
182.3 

175.9 


417.7 
413.4 
398.6 


43.44 
43.81 
43.75 


1951 J 
F 
M 


157.6 
159 4 
160.0 


346.6 
384.4 
381.5 


39.57 
43.40 
42.91 


140.8 
147.1 

150.4 


262.9 
311.1 

319.5 


32.02 
36.28 
36.43 


170.7 
172.8 

175.0 


359.7 
393.3 
399.6 


40.70 
43.96 
44.09 


A 
M 

J 


161.3 
160 8 
158.5 


390.4 
393.5 
378.7 


43.56 
44.04 
43.00 


152.0 
150.2 

146.2 


323.1 

320.1 
301.5 


36.48 
36.54 
35.35 


177 2 
177.9 
184.2 


406.4 
422.1 
428.6 


44.29 
45.81 
44.93 


J 

A 

S 


156.1 
152.8 
150.9 


370.3 
352.6 
355.0 


42.68 
41.52 
42.35 


140 8 
137.1 
138.5 


287.5 
284.5 
293.8 


35.02 
35.57 
36.37 


187.1 
188.3 
187.3 


448.6 
449.6 
454.9 


46.30 
46.09 
46.88 


O 

N 


149.5 

147 7 


362.9 
357.2 


43.68' 
43.52 


137.2 

135.4 


296.9 r 
289.5 


37.10* 

36.64 


181.2- 
175.3 


454 6' 
442.5 


48.43' 
48.73 










MANUFACTURING 










Paper Products 


Iron 


and Steel Products 


Transportation Equipment 




Employ- 
ment 

1939 


Aggregate 
payrolls 

= 100 


Weekly 
earnings* 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate 
payrolls 


Weekly 
earnings* 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate 
payrolls 


Weekly 
earnings* 




Dollars 


1939 


100 


Dollars 


1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100 
171.1 


100.0 
348.1 


26.87 
54.60 


100.0 
215.7 


100.0 
437.5 


25.14 
50 92 


100 

215.5 


100.0 

427.4 


26.73 
53.01 


1950 O 
N 
D 


179.0 

177.5 
176 4 


374.7 
372.2 

381.2 


56.26 
56.34 
58.07 


224 9 
227.5 
229.2 


467.5 
481.8 
488.7 


52.25 
53.22 
53.59 


221.8 

221 5 
225.6 


440.9 
452.1 
472.9 


54.47 
54.56 
56.02 


1951 J 
F 
M 


172.5 
172.2 
172 9 


359 8 
376.9 
377.0 


56.05 
58.78 
58.57 


230.8 
234.0 
236.1 


468.5 

500.5 
505.3 


51.03 
53.93 

53.95 


229 4 
235.0 

240.4 


462.6 
519.1 

520.6 


53.90 
58.85 
57.69 


A 

M 
J 


175 4 
177.7 
184.5 


379.2 

390.1 
423.9 


58.07 
58.99 
61.74 


240.6 
243.2 

245.6 


525 4 
545.1 
548.4 


55.05 
56.55 
56.34 


248.4 
250.8 
255.8 


531.8 
534.4 
547.4 


57.04 
56.75 
57.00 


J 

A 

S 


192 4 
193.6 
194.9 


464.0 
470.1 
475.4 


64.78 
65.21 

65.52 


246.7 
244.6 
245.3 


559.4 
558.3 
563.9 


57.34 
57.71 
58.13 


258 7 
259.8 
261.7 


561.3 

553.8 
578.6 


57.81 
56.80 
58.85 


O 

N 


192 9 
189 .6 


475.0 r 
465 6 


66.16' 
65.96 


247.0 

245.1 


581.4' 

583 5 


59 . 54' 
60 .21 


261.0' 
263.0 


586.1' 

594 9 


59.78' 
60.20 



12 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 9 -continued 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



MANUFACTURING 



CONSTRUCTION 



Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Chemical Products 



Total 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
287.6 


100.0 
593.2 


24.38 
50.16 


100.0 
215.0 


100.0 
381.4 


28.14 
49.90 


100.0 
165.0 


100.0 
379.9 


18.83 
43.27 


1950 O 
N 
D 


302.2 
308.2 
314.4 


634.4 
657.6 
668.2 


51.19 
52.02 
51.97 


219.6 
220.6 
220.9 


398.0 
402.3 
406.7 


50.98 
51.31 
51.81 


189.2 
185.8 
180.4 


447.8 
444.8 
427.0 


44.55 
45.08 
44.53 



1951 J 
F 
M 


316.0 
318.1 
320.2 


628.2 
686.7 
691.4 


48.62 
52.79 
52.79 


217.7 
221.0 
222.6 


403.2 
420.3 
424.2 


52.12 
53.51 
53.63 


158.1 
145.1 
139.7 


343.8 
359.8 
353.8 


40.82 
46.56 
47.56 


A 
M 

J 


326.2 
328.7 
331.6 


720.3 
735.3 
749.1 


53.99 
54.69 
55.22 


225.2 
229.5 
232.3 


436.7 
449.9 
454.6 


54.57 
55.16 
55.08 


141.9 
163.4 
182.7 


352.0 
408.9 
459.3 


46.59 
46.99 
47.15 


J 

A 

S 


333.1 
325.8 
323.5 


759.7 
748.9 
749.5 


55.74 
56.18 
56.62 


234.4 
234.6 
236.6 


465.7 
469.4 
477.7 


55.92 
56.30 
56.82 


190.4 
199.5 
206.7 


495.7 
526.3 
556.0 


48.81 
49.48 
50.44 


o 

N 


322. 5 r 
317.3 


758. 4 r 
761.0 


57.48 r 
58.62 


235. 3 r 
236.9 


481. 3 r 
489.4 


57.57 r 
58.12 


206. l r 
203.2 


570. 8 r 
558.0 


51.95' 
51.49 




CONSTRUCTION 


TRANSPORTATION, STORAGE 
AND COMMUNICATION 


PUBLIC UTILITY OPERATION 




Buildings and Structures 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate 
payrolls 


Weekly 
earnings* 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate 
payrolls 






Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate 
payrolls 


Weekly 
earnings* 


Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
356.8 


100.0 
683.0 


24.29 
46.33 


100.0 
167.2 


100.0 
286.5 


28.68 
49.15 


100.0 
183.6 


100.0 
317.9 


29.53 
51.14 


1950 O 
N 
D 


401.7 
400.0 
391.6 


796.0 
800.2 
781.2 


48.13 
48.54 
48.32 


175.1 
173.9 
173.1 


309.1 
305.9 
309.8 


50.62 
50.46 
51.34 


186.7 
185.5 
183.3 


329.3 
324.9 
329.6 


52.09 
51.77 
53.11 


1951 J 
F 
M 


347.8 
338.0 
334.6 


614.2 
687.5 
688.2 


42.73 
49.22 
49.77 


168.1 
165.0 
165.7 


299.6 
302.7 
303.8 


51.07 
52.55 
52.53 


179.8 
180.1 
178.3 


321.2 
326.1 
331.1 


52.76 
53.48 
54.85 


A 
M 
J 


339.7 
363.0 
398.2 


681.0 
763.8 
827.8 


48.51 
50.92 
50.23 


166.7 
171.5 
176.5 


308.8 
317.6 
331.2 


53.05 
53.03 
53.72 


179.4 
183.2 
190.9 


331.5 
343.3 
359.2 


54.57 
55.36 
55.57 


J 
A 

S 


415.4 
427.5 
449.2 1 


899.7 

941.9 

,011.3 


52.32 
53.22 
54.39 


183.2 
186.4 
189.0 


346.2 
352.9 
361.3 


54.12 
54.20 
54.74 


193.8 
195.8 
195.3 


369.3 
373.7 
371.0 


56.22 
56.32 
56.03 


o 

N 


449. 7 r l 
447.6 1 


,047.8 r 
,030.9 


56.29 r 
55.64 


186. 7 r 
186.1 


359. 2 r 
360.2 


55.06 
55.39 


191. 8 r 
189.9 


375. 8 r 
375.5 


57.79' 
58.35 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



13 



LABOUR 



TABLE 9 - concluded 



JANUARY, 1952 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or iirst of month 



TRADE 



FINANCE, INSURANCE 
AND REAL ESTATE 



SERVICE 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
167.2 


100.0 
297.4 


21.83 
38.81 


100.0 
155.3 


100.0 
233.7 


29.59 
43.90 


100.0 
177.7 


100.0 
320.1 


16.33 
29.50 


1950 O 
N 
D 


170.5 
174.2 
181.8 


307.6 
317.1 
328.1 


39.36 
39.74 
39.40 


159.5 
159.9 
159.6 


243.7 
245.3 
245.9 


44.54 
44 . 73 
44.72 


182.5 
176.7 
173.4 


334.2 
326.8 
324.1 


29.91 
30.20 
30.50 


1951 J 
F 
M 


184.4 
169.5 
168.1 


333.9 
317.4 
319.5 


39.55 
40.91 
41.58 


159.8 
160.8 
161.7 


246.5 
251.2 
252.1 


44.78 
45.35 
45.28 


172.9 
173.3 
172.5 


318.7 
327.1 
330.8 


30.23 

30.97 
31.45 


A 
M 

J 


170.9 
171.0 
172.8 


325.6 
332.9 
338.4 


41.60 
42.51 
42.77 


167.5 
170.8 
171.0 


264.6 
271.3 
272.0 


45.91 
46.16 
46.23 


172.9 

175.9 
180.9 


332.0 
340.9 
350.4 


31.50 
31.79 

31.77 


J 

A 

S 


173.3 
170.8 
171.0 


345.5 
342.9 
342.4 


43.53 
43.85 
43.74 


172.0 
172.6 
173.0 


273.6 
274.7 
276.1 


46.23 
46.27 
46.40 


188.8 
193.4 
193.7 


363.7 
368.0 
369.3 


31.60 
31.21 
31.28 


O 

N 


175.5' 

176.5 


354 4' 
357.6 


44.17' 
44.31 


173.3' 
176.4 


280.9 
289.5 


47.11- 

47.71 


187.9 
183.0 


367.0' 
363.3 


32.07 
32.59 



Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 



TABLE 10 Monthly averages or first of month 




PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND NOVA SCOTIA 


NEW BRUNSWICK 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
173.1 


100.0 
301.1 


19.79 
34.44 


100.0 
142.5 


100.0 
261.8' 


21.42 

39.40 


100.0 
169.9 


100.0 
325.8 


20.21 
38.76 


1950 O 
N 
D 


196.9 
198.9 
195.9 


342.3 
347.5 
343.6 


34.41 
34.59 
34.90 


152.8 
152.0 
152.6 


282.2 
282.0 
283.0 


39.57 
39.74 
39.80 


179.9 
178.8 
184.1 


353.9 
354.4 
364.8 


39.77 
40.06 
40.07 


1951 J 
F 
M 


184.2 
165.3 
160.1 


318.5 
298.6 
298.2 


34.42 
35.96 
37.06 


149.1 
142 .2 
135.7 


264.1 
271.6 
265.9 


37.99 
40.97 
42.02 


187.5 
179.3 
179.0 


362.4 
368.5 
371.3 


39.08 
41.56 
41.94 


A 

M 
J 


152.0 
161 8 
178.1 


289.9 
304.4 
338.9 


37.95 
37.43 
37.87 


140.3 
140.3 
149.4 


279.4 
280.9 
293.7 


42.70 
42.93 
42.15 


177.1 
171.7 
171.6 


372.6 
357.2 
357.2 


42.53 
42.06 
42.09 


J 

A 

S 


186.9 
188.7 
192.4 


353.5 
363.4 
365.9 


37.63 
38.32 
37.85 


149.6 
155.3 
157 8 


303.7 
314.5 
313 .2 


43.52 
43.44 
42.56 


174.9 
179.9 
182.3 


377.1 
387.3 
394.2 


43.60 
43.63 
43.85 


O 

N 


188.6 
182.6 


362.9 
356.3 


38.29 
38.82 


158.6 
158.6 


323.1 

325.1 


43.67 
43.94 


183.6' 
185.9 


407.3' 
420.0 


44.97' 
4S.79 



14 'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. 
Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 10 - concluded 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 
Monthly averages or first of month 



QUEBEC 




ONTARIO 




MANITOBA 




Employ- Aggregate 
ment payrolls 


Weekly 
earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate 
ment payrolls 

1939 = 100 


Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 


Employ- Aggregate 
ment payrolls 


Weekly 
earnings* 


1939 = 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 100 


Dollars 



1939 
1950 



100.0 
155.0 



100.0 
312.9 



21.26 
42.89 



100.0 
177.7 



100.0 
338.8 



24.45 
46.58 



100.0 
168.0 



100.0 
286.8 



25.69 
43.84 



1950 O 
N 
D 


164.0 
166.0 
167.0 


338.7 
343.7 
348.8 


43.91 
44.02 
44.45 


185.8 
187.3 
189.1 


361.4 
369.4 
376.4 


47.57 
48.22 
48.74 


174.8 
175.5 
177.9 


307.0 
309.1 
313.6 


45.14 
45.23 
45.35 


1951 J 
F 
M 


162.3 
159.9 
161.0 


327.8 
343.1 
349.6 


42.99 
45.67 
46.21 


186.9 
185.6 
185.7 


361.4 
379.5 
378.6 


47.34 
50.07 
49.92 


171.2 
165.5 
164.3 


296.8 
298.1 
302.6 


44.61 
46.35 
47.41 


A 
M 
J 


160.3 
163.3 
167.9 


348.2 
359.8 
372.0 


46.23 
46.90 
47.16 


187.3 
188.5 
191.9 


386.6 
395.0 
402.3 


50.53 
51.31 
51.34 


165.2 
167.5 
172.6 


302.6 
309.2 
324.7 


47.13 
47.51 
48.42 


J 

A 

S 


171.0 
171.6 
173.2 


381.8 
387.0 
396.1 


47.52 
47.99 
48.66 


194.7 
193.5 
194.1 


416.4 
413.6 
417.8 


52.38 
52.34 
52.72 


177.6 
179.7 
180.4 


339.2 
344.3 
348.7 


49.15 
49.31 
49.69 


O 

N 


175.3' 
177.7 


406.5' 
413.1 


49.33' 
49.48 


195.4' 
193.8 


428.5' 
427.8 


53.73' 
54.08 


178. 6 r 
178.2 


348.5' 
348.7 


50.17' 
50.31 



SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939 = 100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939=100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939 = 100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



1939 
1950 



100.0 
140.8 



100.0 
249.6 



24.18 
42.86 



100.0 
188.5 



100.0 
338.7 



25.39 
45.61 



100.0 
180.7 



100.0 
332.0 



26.01 
47.70 



1950 O 
N 
D 


150.4 
152.1 
150.9 


274.0 
275.4 
272.8 


44.04 
43.80 
43.82 


197.5 
196.7 
197.7 


363.0 
368.1 
368.9 


46.68 
47.51 
47.45 


194.6 
191.3 
189.6 


368.2 
366.4 
362.8 


49.20 
49.81 
49.76 


1951 J 
F 
M 


144.4 
134.9 
133.3 


262.8 
249.9 
250.8 


44.13 
44.89 
45.60 


193.7 
186.5 
186.7 


355.8 
356.9 
362.3 


46.73 
48.69 
49.37 


180.4 
177.0 
176.9 


331.3 
342.6 
347.6 


47.78 
50.36 
51.10 


A 
M 
J 


135.3 
137.9 
149.8 


256.8 
258.5 
288.1 


46.01 
45.43 
46.62 


187.0 
192.9 
202.5 


356.1 
373.0 
395.9 


48.44 
49.19 
49.74 


181.0 
187.2 
192.3 


353.2 
378.1 
390.9 


50.74 
52.49 
52.82 


J 

A 

S 


154.6 
157.5 
157.8 


298.0 
307.9 
310.0 


46.71 
47.37 
47.61 


208.9 
218.0 
219.0 


418.3 
434.3 
441.3 


50.93 
50.68 
51.28 


197.4 
198.1 
198.9 


408.2 
400.3 
412.1 


53.76 
52.52 
53.86 


O 

N 


156. 9' 
157.2 


312.8' 
313.5 


48.32' 
48.35 


214. 0' 
211.6 


446.2 
441.2 


52.77' 
53.06 


201. 0' 
197.2 


426.1' 
431.6 


55.12' 
56.91 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



15 



LABOUR 

TABLE 11 


Employment and Earnings: By Cities 
Monthly averages or first of month 


JANUARY, 1952 




HALIFAX MONTREAL 




QUEBEC CITY 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate Weekly Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
payrolls earnings* ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate Weekly 
payrolls earnings* 





1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


-100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
186.6 


100 
289.9 


23.42 
36.35 


100.0 
165.4 


100.0 
315.9 


22.82 
43.58 


100.0 
147.5 


100.0 
296.6* 


18.62 
37.40 


1950 O 
N 
D 


193.8 
191.6 
195.1 


302.5 
301.6 
301.8 


36.55 
36.87 
36.29 


170.6 
171.6 

172.7 


333.9 
338.8 
342.3 


44.66 
45.05 
45.28 


154.4 
153.5 
153.2 


316.7 

315.4 
320.9 


38.19 
38.25 
38.95 


1951 J 
F 
M 


199.2 
192.5 
192.6 


303.4 
308.9 
316.6 


35.71 

37.64 
38.50 


168.8 
167.5 
168.2 


320.1 
336.9 
343.1 


43.33 
45.97 
46.60 


146.2 
142.6 
142.7 


295.1 
301.0 

299.9 


37.14 
39.29 
39.13 


A 
M 

J 


209.1 

195.7 
198.6 


349.9 
328.6 
329.6 


39.20 
39.33 
38.87 


170.9 
173.6 
174.6 


346.8 
361.1 
361.5 


46.36 
47.55 
47.31 


144.6 
148 1 
152.0 


301.4 
317.6 
333.0 


38.80 
39.88 
40.77 


J 

A 

S 


202.5 
200.0 
211.8 


346.0 
348.6 
366.4 


40.02 
40.84 
40.52 


176.3 
174.8 
175.8 


367.6 
366.7 
377.1 


47.65 
47.93 
49.00 


155.4 

159.1 
159.3 


339.5 
351.8 
355.7 


40.70 
41.18 
41.59 


O 

N 


212.3 
213.1 


376.5 

378.4 


41.54 
41.59 


178.0* 
178.3 


386 5 r 
391.6 


49 60' 
50.18 


158.6' 
158.1 


361.2' 
357.3 


42.41' 
42.09 



TORONTO 



OTTAWA-HULL 



HAMILTON 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
183.6 


100.0 
341.0 


25.05 
46.49 


100.0 
180.1 


100.0 
317.3 


23.17 
40.81 


100.0 
187.5 


100.0 
379.6 


24.19 
48.91 


1950 O 
N 
D 


187.8 
191.1 
194.5 


357.8 
368.5 
375.6 


47.72 
48.33 
48.46 


186.0 
187.0 
187.6 


337.2 
338.5 
340.5 


41.98 
41.90 
42.04 


191.2 
194.5 
198.2 


396.0 
404.3 
416.9 


50.10 
50.28 
50.88 


1951 J 
F 
M 


194.0 
191.0 
191.1 


362.0 
377.4 
376.9 


46.81 
49.58 
49.48 


188.7 
183.6 
181.7 


335.0 
339.3 
338.3 


41.12 
42.80 
43.13 


197.4 
196.2 
196.7 


403.8 
421.3 
420.8 


49.49 
51.96 
51.84 


A 
M 
J 


194 1 
195.4 
196.2 


390.0 
401.1 
401.8 


50.40 
51.49 
51.37 


183.5 
186.6 
190.4 


343.5 
356.2 
372.6 


43.36 
44.22 
45.32 


199.5 
205.9 
208.6 


434 3 
459.8 
468.8 


52.74 
54.09 
54.45 


J 

A 

S 


197.9 
194.4 
195.5 


412.3 
407.4 
413.9 


52.27 
52.57 
53.20 


192.8 
192.5 
192.1 


382.5 
387.0 
387.2 


45.93 
46.57 
46.73 


211 8 
210.5 
206.8 


483.1 
482.1 
470.4 


55.26 
55.47 
55.11 


O 

N 


197. 3' 
197 2 


425.7' 
426.4 


54.21 r 
54.35 


192.4* 
194.6 


390.7* 
394.5 


47.09* 
47.02 


206 9* 
201.5 


477.0* 
463.7 


55.89' 
55.78 



16 Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. 'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 11 - concluded 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Cities 
Monthly averages or first of month 



WINDSOR 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
rnent payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
217.0 


100.0 
427.7 


27.79 
54.60 


100.0 
168.0 


100.0 
283.4 


24.29 
40.94 


100.0 
198.6 


100.0 
362.2 


25.07 
45.68 


1950 O 
N 
D 


229.1 
221.7 
223.5 


450.5 
455.6 
470.9 


54.63 
55.81 
58.59 


173.3 
175.3 
179.2 


299.9 
303.9 
312.1 


42.05 
42.12 
42.35 


206.6 
202.8 
206.4 


387.3 
383.6 
388.0 


46.99 
47.41 
47.18 


1951 J 
F 
M 


231.2 
234.6 
237.9 


457.7 
524.5 
530.9 


55.15 
62.28 
62.25 


173.3 
168.1 
166.8 


295.1 
298.3 
302.8 


41.41 
43.15 
44.17 


199.4 
195.9 
197.2 


361.2 
375.2 
378.8 


45.47 
48.07 
48.31 


A 
M 
J 


240.2 
235.8 
237.3 


509.2 
480.7 
493.1 


59.14 
56.84 
57.97 


167.9 
168.7 
172.5 


304.4 
308.8 
319.4 


44.09 
44.52 
45.18 


201.0 
203.7 
204.8 


384.7 
402.3 
403.9 


47.97 
49.48 
49.41 


J 

A 

S 


235.7 
231.9 
223.7 


477.5 
452.0 
460.5 


56.51 
54.37 
57.38 


175.3 
174.5 
175.1 


332.5 
331.3 
333.8 


46.29 
46.32 
46.49 


208.4 
207.4 
207.8 


423.4 
424.1 
430.8 


50.90 
51.23 
51.94 


O 

N 


211.8 
211.2 


439. 9 r 
448.5 


57.91 r 
59.21 


173. 9 r 
174.5 


335. 2 r 
338.8 


46.97 r 
47.32 


207. 3 r 
202.7 


435. 2 r 
428.8 


52.59 r 
53.01 



*Average weekly wages and salaries. 



TABLE 12 



Average Hourly Earnings 

Monthly averages or first of month 







MINING 










MANUFACTURING 










Total 


Metal 
Mining 


Coal 
Mining 


Total 


Durable 
Goods 


Non- 
durable 
Goods 


Foods and 
Beverages 

Total Meat 
products 


Tobacco 

and 
Tobacco 
Products 


Rubber 
Products 


Leather 
Products 












< 


^ents per 


lour 










1949 
1950 


117.2 
121.4 


115.9 
121.1 


128.3 
130.1 


98.6 
103.6 


106.5 
112.0 


90.6 
95.2 


86.0 
89.8 


105.9 
111.4 


85.7 
94.6 


104.5 
110.2 


74.9 
78.5 


1950 O 
N 
D 


123.1 
123.7 
124.8 


124.6 
124.4 
125.2 


128.9 
130.3 
130.5 


105.3 
106.4 
107.8 


114.3 
115.2 
116.4 


96.3 
97.5 
99.0 


88.2 
91.2 
93.6 


111.4 
116.5 
117.7 


100.5 
100.7 
100.0 


110.8 
112.3 
111.9 


80.4 
80.6 
81.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


127.1 
127.7 
130.1 


127.9 
128.1 
130.0 


131.0 
131.8 
135.5 


109.0 
110.4 
111.4 


117.1 
119.0 
119.9 


100.5 
101.2 
102.3 


95.1 
95.5 
96.6 


117.9 
118.9 
120.7 


96.6 
94.3 
93.7 


114.6 
118.8 
120.9 


82.1 
82.4 
82.9 


A 

M 

J 


130.5 
131.5 
131.6 


130.2 
131.6 
132.0 


136.3 
137.6 
137.3 


112.8 
114.1 
115.9 


121.6 
122.9 
123.8 


103.4 
104.6 
107.2 


98.5 

98.6 

100.4 


121.3 
120.7 
128.0 


100.8 
110.9 
110.5 


122.6 
123.6 
123.5 


83.9 
84.8 
86.2 


J 

A 

S 


133.3 
136.1 
137.1 


134.3 
139.3 
140.4 


139.0 
137.4 
138.7 


118.4 
119.1 
120.6 


127.0 
128.2 
130.0 


109.1 
109.4 
110.6 


100.1 

99.2 

100.8 


127.8 
126.9 
132.9 


114.6 
112.1 
112.2 


122.7 
125.2 
127.7 


86.4 
85.9 
86.3 


O 

N 


138.2' 
138.3 


141. 2 r 
140.6 


138.5 
138.8 


121.9' 
123.5 


132.1 
133.2 


111.2' 
113.0 


99.7 
103.0 


133.6' 
135.5 


122.4' 
126.0 


129.7' 
131.9 


87.5' 
88.8 



Data are for hourly rated wage earners of firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. Statistics throughout 
Tables 12 and 13 are compiled from data which relate to the last pay period of the preceding month. 
Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 



17 



LABOUR 



TABLE 12 - concluded 



JANUARY, 1952 



Average Hourly Earnings 

Monthly averages or first of month 















MANUFACTURING 












Textile Products 
except Clothing 


Clothing 




Wood Products 

Total Saw and 1 
planing 
mills 


■"urniture 


Paper Products Printing Iron and Ste 

Publishing 

and Allied 
Total Pulp and Industries Total 
paper 
mills 


el Products 




Total 


Cotton 
goods 


Primary 
iron and 

steel 














Cents per hour 












1949 
1950 


83.0 
86 


85.1 
87.6 


76.4 
79.3 




90.2 
95.0 


95.3 
100.7 


86.0 
89.0 


106.3 

110.8 


113.7 
118.1 


112.8 
121.8 


108.4 
115.5 


117.5 
126.5 


1950 O 
N 
D 


87.1 
88.5 

91.1 


88.9 

89.6 
95.8 


80.8 
81.1 
80.5 




98 4 
99.1 
99.7 


104.1 

105.4 
106.2 


91 
91.5 
92.3 


113.3 
113.6 
116.8 


120.8 
121.1 
125.4 


123.9 
124.5 
125.7 


117.7 
118.8 
119.9 


128.8 
128.7 
131.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


91.3 
92.9 
94.0 


95.7 
97.9 
99.4 


80.6 
82.9 
84.2 




99.8 

99.7 
101.1 


107.1 
106.8 
108.5 


91.7 
92.7 
93.4 


118.4 
119.9 
120.5 


126.5 
128.2 
128.2 


125.7 
126 
129.5 


119.9 
122.0 
123.6 


131.3 
134.2 
134.9 


A 
M 
J 


94.6 
95.4 
96.3 


99.7 
100.3 
100.8 


85.1 
85.4 
85.8 




103.9 
105.5 
105.0 


112.7 
113.6 
112.0 


93.9 
96.2 
96.8 


119.7 
120.8 
128.2 


127.2 
128.4 
136.7 


131.7 
132.9 
132.9 


125.3 

127.4 
128.8 


135.4 
136.8 
137.7 


J 

A 

S 


97.3 
97.5 
99.0 


99.9 

99.8 

101.3 


86.7 
86.9 
87.7 




105.9 
105.5 
108.8 


112.6 
111.8 
116.5 


97.2 
97.4 
98.3 


133.6 
135.0 
135.0 


142.9 
143.9 
143.8 


133.1 
131.8 
133.9 


131.1 

133.1 
134.8 


138.6 
143.9 
147.1 


O 

N 


100 r 
100.4 


101.4' 
101.2 


88.6 
89.0 




110.8 
112.2 


118. 4 r 
120.8 


99. 7 r 
100.2 


136. 9 r 
137.8 


146.3' 
147.1 


135. 2' 
136.3 


137.0 
138.1 


150.2 
151.7 












MANUFACTURING 








CONSTRUCTION 




Iron and St< 
Products 

Agricultur. 
implement 


sel Transportation Equipment 


Non-ferrou! 

Metal 

Products 


i Electrical 
Apparatus 
and 
Supplies 


Non- 
Metallic 
Mineral 
Products 


Products o 

Petroleum 

and Coal 


Chemical 
Products 


Total 


Buildings 
and 




— Total 

d 

s 


Railroad and Motor 
rolling stock vehicles 
equipment 


Structures 














Cents per hour 












1949 
1950 


114.5 
125.7 


116.0 
120.9 


114.0 
114.4 


130.7 
137.0 


106.9 
111.7 


109.1 
114.7 


96.2 
102.0 


122.6 
130.3 


98.6 
103.7 


101.2 
105.6 


107.9 
113.3 


1950 O 
N 
D 


124.1 
128.7 
131.5 


123.9 
124.3 
125.8 


116.7 
116.6 

116.7 


139.8 
142.6 
145.3 


113.5 
114.3 
115.1 


116.5 
117.9 
117.6 


104.4 
105.9 
106.9 


133.7 
135.3 
138.0 


106.0 
106.8 
107.5 


107.2 

108.8 
109.5 


115.8 
117.1 
117.5 


1951 I 
F 
M 


130.8 
132.0 
133.0 


125.5 
128.7 
129.0 


118 
118 
119 


4 
2 
5 


141.8 
148 5 
149.1 


118.8 
119.9 
119.9 


117.5 
120.4 
120.9 


108.0 
108.3 

109.5 


141.8 
140.1 
142 


110.4 
112.0 
113.1 


109.7 
113.5 
114.1 


118.7 
121.2 
122 1 


A 
M 

J 


140.3 
140 3 
146 5 


129.5 
129.6 

130.0 


119 
122 
121 


2 
5 
9 


150.5 
146.3 
146.9 


121.5 
121.9 
122.3 


123.0 
125.3 
128.2 


111.3 
112.7 
114.7 


141.9 
148.4 
152 


114.2 
116.1 
116.9 


115.0 
115.4 
116.2 


122.5 
124.0 
125.9 


J 

A 

S 


149.5 
150.5 
150 4 


136.6 

137 1 
137.7 


138 
139 
137 


g 

i 

4 


147 

148 9 
148.1 


127.6 
132.9 
134.0 


130.0 
130.1 
131.7 


117.1 
117.9 
120 1 


149.6 
151.0 
159.7 


118.9 
120.8 
122.3 


117.5 
117.7 
120.3 


127.7 
127.9 
131.0 


O 
N 


153.9 
151.6 


140.5' 
140.0 


141 
139 


3 
2 


151.3 
149 8 


135.7 

137.7 


132.7 
134.4 


121 5 
123.1 


163 4 
163.3 


123. 6 r 
124.8 


122. 4' 
123.6 


133.8 
134.6 



18 



JANUARY, 1952 



LABOUR 



Average Hours Worked per Week 



TABLE 13 


























MINING 










MANUFACTURING 










Total 


Metal 
mining 


Coal 
mining 


Total 


Durable 
goods 


Non- 
durable 
goods 


Foods and 
beverages 


Rubber 
products 


Leather 
products 


Textile 
products 

except 
clothing 


Clothing 


1949 


42.6 


45.3 


37.4 


42.3 


42.5 


42.0 


42.4 


40.9 


40.1 


42.7 


38.2 


1950 


43.0 


45.1 


38.1 


42.3 


42.5 


42.2 


42.6 


41.5 


39.4 


43.3 


38.3 


1950 O 


43.1 


44.5 


39.1 


42.9 


43.0 


42.8 


42.8 


41.5 


40.4 


44.0 


39.5 


N 


43.9 


45.3 


39.6 


43.0 


43.1 


43.0 


42.8 


43.4 


39.9 


44.3 


39.9 


D 


43.9 


45.2 


40.2 


43.1 


43.1 


43.1 


43.0 


42.7 


40.6 


44.3 


39.8 


1951 J 


40.5 


42.6 


34.9 


40.1 


40.2 


39.9 


40.4 


38.4 


37.0 


40.4 


35.0 


F 


44.1 


45.4 


40.6 


42.9 


43.1 


42.6 


42.3 


43.0 


41.6 


44.0 


39.3 


M 


43.7 


44.9 


39.5 


42.3 


42.5 


42.2 


42.0 


42.7 


41.4 


43.0 


39.0 


A 


42.5 


44.4 


36.4 


42.2 


42.3 


42.1 


41.8 


41.7 


39.8 


43.6 


38.7 


M 


43.4 


44.6 


39.5 


42.5 


42.6 


42.5 


42.2 


42.8 


40.4 


43.7 


38.9 


J 


43.0 


44.3 


38.0 


41.9 


42.1 


41.6 


42.3 


41.4 


37.7 


41.8 


37.1 


J 


43.3 


43 9 


40.5 


41.7 


42.0 


41.4 


42.5 


40.8 


37.1 


41.1 


35.8 


A 


43.0 


43.3 


41.2 


41.4 


41.4 


41.3 


42.3 


39.8 


38.4 


39.2 


36.4 


S 


42.2 


42.5 


39.1 


41.5 


41.7 


41.4 


41.8 


40.6 


38.2 


39.5 


37.3 



O 


43 


.9 


44 


2 


41 


.2 


41 


.9 


42.0 


43 


r 


42 


8 


40 


7 r 


38 


4 r 


40.5 


378 


N 


43 


5 


43 


7 


41 


2 


41 


.8 


42.1 


41 


6 


42 


7 


41 


6 


37 


1 


40.2 


36.9 



MANUFACTURING 



CONSTRUCTION 



Wood Paper Printing Iron and Transporta- Non-ferrous Electrical Non- Chemical 

products products publishing steel tion metal apparatus metallic products 

and allied products equipment products and mineral 

industries supplies products 



Total 



Buildings 

and 
structures 



1949 
1950 


41.3 
41.4 


46.4 
46.9 


40.6 
40.6 


42.9 
42.4 


42.2 
42.5 


43.2 
43.4 


41.1 
41.3 


44.9 
45.2 


43.5 
43.3 


39.7 
39.9 


40.1 
39.6 


1950 O 
N 
D 


42.6 
42.6 
42.3 


47.6 
47.5 
47.8 


40.8 
40.7 
40.9 


43.0 
43.4 
43.2 


42.8 
42.5 
42.8 


43.4 
43.9 
43.8 


41.7 
42.1 
41.9 


45.4 
45.7 
45.8 


43.5 
43.4 
43.5 


41.0 
40.7 
40.1 


40.6 
40.4 
40.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


38.3 
42.4 
41.9 


44.9 
46.8 
46.7 


39.4 
40.2 
39.7 


40.3 
42.5 
42.0 


41.2 
44.5 
43.3 


41.7 
43.6 
43.1 


38.0 
41.6 
41.3 


43.1 
45.4 
44.8 


42.3 
43.4 
42.7 


35.0 
40.1 
40.6 


33.7 
39.2 
39.4 


A 

M 

J 


40.9 
41.9 
41.0 


46.2 
47.0 
46.7 


40.2 
40.3 
40.2 


42.4 
43.0 
42.2 


42.6 
42.2 
42.4 


43.3 
43.8 
42.7 


41.4 
41.4 
40.8 


44.6 
45.6 
44.9 


43.4 
43.5 
43.0 


39.0 
39.8 
39.6 


37.9 
39.7 
38.7 


J 
A 

S 


42.1 
42.1 
41.3 


47.2 
47.3 
47.3 


40.3 
40.3 
40.1 


42.5 
41.9 
41.8 


40.9 
39.8 
41.5 


42.6 
42.1 
42.1 


40.8 
40.9 
40.8 


44.7 
44.5 
44.1 


42.6 
42.6 
42.6 


40.7 
41.5 
41.7 


40.0 
40.7 
40.9 


o 

N 


42. 3 r 
42.0 


47.2 
46.6 


40. 6 r 
40.4 


42.2 
42.4 


41.4 
41.7 


42. 3 r 
41.8 


41. 2 r 
41.5 


44.8 
44.9 


42.7 
42.7 


42.4 
41.5 


41.6 
40.8 



Data refer to hourly rated wage earners of firms customarily employing 15 persons or more as reported at the first of the month. 
Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 



19 



LABOUR JANUARY, 1952 

Percentage of Women in Reporting Establishments : By Industries 



TABLE 


14 








F 


irst of month 














MANUFACTURING 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 
STORAGE AND 
COMMUNI- 
CATION 


TRADE 


FINANCE 
INSURANCE 
AND REAL 

ESTATE 


SERVICE 


INDUS- 
TRIAL 

COMPOSITE 




Total 


Non- 
Durable Durable 
Goods Goods 


Textiles Clothing 

(except (Textile 

Clothing) and Fur) 












1944 O 


29.1 


19.4 


40.2 


48.0 


68.6 


12.2 


49 3 


53.9 


58.2 


27.1 


1950 O 
N 
D 


23 6 
23.7 
23.8 


11.2 
11.4 
11.5 


34.7 
34 .8 
34.9 


36 8 
36.9 

37 1 


65.1 
65.6 
65.7 


14.1 
14.0 
14.0 


37.4 
38.0 
39.4 


48.2 
48 3 
48 3 


50.7 
50.6 
50.8 


22.3 
22.3 
22,6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


23.0 
23.3 
23.3 


11.4 
11.4 
11.5 


33.9 
34.4 
34.6 


37.1 
36.9 
36 8 


65.7 
65.7 
65.8 


14.5 

14.5 
14.4 


39.2 
37.0 
36.3 


49.7 
49.6 
49.6 


50.4 
50 2 
50.1 


22.6 
22.5 
22.5 


A 
M 

J 


23.2 
23.0 
22.7 


11.4 
11.4 
11.3 


34.6 
34.3 
34.0 


36.5 
36.6 
36.6 


66.2 
66.5 
66.5 


14.6 

14.4 
14.3 


37.1 
36.9 
37.1 


49.1 
49.1 
48 9 


50.2 
50.1 
50.2 


22.7 
22.4 
22.1 


J 

A 

S 


22.4 
22.2 
22.3 


11.0 
10 9 
10.8 


33.5 
33.2 
33.5 


36.2 
35 5 
35.6 


65.9 
64.8 
65.0 


14.0 
14.0 
13.8 


37.3 
36.6 
36.2 


48.9 

48 9 
49.1 


50.4 
50.6 
50.8 


21.8 
21.6 
21.5 


O 

N 


22.7 
22.3 


10 7 
10.6 


34.0 
33.6 


35.8 
35.9 


65.3 
65.3 


13 8 
13.8 


37 6 
37 8 


48 .9 
49 4 


50.6 
50 2 


21.7 
21.5 



Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



TABLE 15 



Unemployment Insurance 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Ordinary 
claimants 
on live 
unem- 
ployment 
register' 1 ' 



Number of 

persons 

receiving 

benefit 2 



Number of 
persons 

commenc- 
ing the 

receipt of 
benefit 



Thousands 



Number of 

days' 

benefit 

paid 

Thousand 
days 



Amount of 
benefit 
paid 



Employer 

and 
employee 
contribu- 
tions 



Total 



Balance in 

fund at 

end of 

period" 



Million dollars 



Employment Offices' 1 ' 

Live 
applications 

for Unfilled 

employment vacancies 



Thousands 



1949 
1950 

1950 O 
N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 

N 



135.6 
165.3 

90.3 
124.8 
183.3 

220.5 
208.0 
184.5 

136.8 
88.9 
86.5 

83.9 
80.9 
83 1 

99.8 
153.7 



130.3 
127.9 

65.7 

79.1 

101.9 

149.8 
158.0 
147.2 



109.4 
75.9 
57.1 

57.5 
60 1 
64.3 



72 3 
97.5 



54.99 
61.81 

33.77 
49.53 
69.87 

104.67 
79.42 
68.45 

54.74 
41.29 
31.28 

39.13 
37.88 
38.18 

46.10 
67.86 



2.574 
3.293 

1,541 
1,782 
2.193 

3,788 
3.853 
4.193 

3,088 
2.323 
1.481 

1,417 

1.487 
1,378 

1.567 
2.033 



5.78 
7 88 

3.57 
4.18 
5.31 

9.37 

9.59 

10.47 



68 
66 
51 

43 
67 
46 

3.90 
5.11 



8.83 
9.88 

11.31 
11.44 
12.58 

12.27 
12.22 
11.44 

12.77 
12.81 
11.68 

12.16 

16.25' 

12.57 

12.21 
13.65 



11.76 
13.12 



552.2 
602.4 



14 86 625.8 

15.06 636.6 

16.45 647.8 

16.09 654.1 

16.04 659.4 

17.11 664 6 



16.72 
16.85 
15.46 

16.23 

20.95" 

16.64 

16.26 
18.02 



672.8 
683.9 
695.9 

708.7 
726 ; 
739.1 

751.5 
764.4 



197 
253 

148 
187 
227 

301 
298 
291 

218 
152 
140 

131 
128 
133 

157 
210 



35 
40 

55 
46 
35 

37 
40 
45 

58 
71 
63 

55 
61 
70 

57 

42 



20 Note: Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949. In the hrst five columns "unemployment assistance" for 

that province is disregarded. . 

' Monthly data as of end of month while annual section is based on averages of month-end statistics. As oi 

January 1950, the number of benefit payments (equivalent to the number of benefic.ar.es) in the week wh'ch includes 
the last day of the month has been substituted for the number of payments in the week which inc udes the ^ d *»«* 
of the month. ' ' Supplementary benefit payments are excluded. ' Includes prepayment of $4,000,000 by Post 

Office. , n - o 

Source: Unemployment Insurance Commission and Monthly Report of Unemployment Insurance Branch, JJ.B.b. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 16 



LABOUR 



Time Lost in Labour Disputes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Total all 
industries 



MANUFACTURING 



Aircraft, 
Printing Logging, Automo- ship- 
Fur and Textiles Pulp and and lumber biles building 
leather and paper publish- and its and and (arm 

products clothing products ing products parts implements 



Food, 

animal and 

vegetable 
products 



Tobacco 

and 

beverages 



Rubber 













Thousand 


man-working days 










1939 
1950 


18.7 
115.8 


0.2 


— 


3.5 
0.3 


1.1 


2.3 

4.6 


0.3 





0.1 
1.3 


1.4 


0.1 
0.9 


1950 O 
N 
D 


30.8 

49.5 

8.5 


0.1 
0.8 


— 


0.1 


1.3 


3.2 
2.3 
1.5 


— 


— 


0.5 


5.4 


4.8 
6.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


16.8 
18.9 
15.1 


0.7 
1.3 


— 


0.3 
1.6 
0.4 


0.2 
1.7 
0.3 


0.4 
0.3 
1.1 


— 


0.1 
0.4 


0.2 
2.8 


0.3 


0.4 


A 
M 
J 


9.7 

34.9 

128.2 


0.6 
0.9 


0.6 


4.4 
35.4 


— 


0.1 
5.0 
7.1 


0.2 


— 


2.6 
3.5 
2.2 


0.2 
0.4 
3.3 


2.8 


J 

A 

S 


119.4 
219.5 
105.2 


0.1 


48.1 
55.0 


0.7 


0.6 


0.8 
0.5 
0.3 


0.7 
0.8 
5.3 


0.8 
0.2 


2.1 
3.9 
1.6 


0.6 
0.1' 


2.1 
1.5 


O 

N 


49.3 
38.3 


1.7 


2.5 
9.7 


— 


5.2 
0.4 


— 


6.0 
7.4 


— 


6.8 
2.9 


— 


6.7 
0.7 



MANUFACTURING 



Other iron Electrical 
and steel apparatus 



Other 
Non- 
ferrous 



Non- 
metallics, 
chemicals 
and 
miscel- 
laneous 



Con- 
struction 



Fishing 

and 
Trapping 



Mining 



Transport Trade, 
and Public Finance 
Utilities and 

Service 



Coal 



Other 











Thousand man-working days 








1939 
1950 


0.5 
7.1 


0.5 


2.4 


0.2 
0.3 


0.1 
2.4 


0.1 


9.3 
1.2 


0.9 
2.7 


84.0 


1.6 

4.8 


1950 O 
N 
D 


7.0 

36.9 

4.5 


1.5 
1.0 


3.1 


0.2 


0.2 
0.1 


— 


1.1 
0.2 
2.0 


— 


0.1 


3.9 
0.5 
0.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1.1 

12.7 

2.3 


— 


5.9 
0.2 


0.2 
1.1 
0.1 


0.2 
0.9 
0.2 


— 


7.2 
0.2 
0.5 


— 


— 


0.2 
0.1 
5.2 


A 
M 
J 


1.5 

11.5 
59.9 


1.6 


0.6 
2.8 
5.3 


0.2 
0.6 


3.7 
8.3 


— 


1.8 
0.8 
0.7 


0.1 


0.2 
0.1 


1.6 
1.0 
1.3 


J 

A 

S 


48.6 
55.1 
5.8 r 


— 


2.4 

6.8 

21.4 


3.1 
0.9 
0.7 


25.0 

18.0 

7.4 


— 


25.5 


32.0 

58.0 

4.4 


0.8 
0.2 
0.1 


0.4 
0.9 
0.9 


O 

N 


13.5 
5.8 


— 


5.7 
0.9 


0.4 


0.5 


— 


0.4 
0.2 


1.0 
8.2 


— 


0.7 
0.5 



The distribution of monthly data for metal products in the last month is on a preliminary basis. 
Source: Labour Gazette, Department of Labour. 



21 



PRICES 














JAIMUAK 


i, i: 


isi 








Living Costs in Canada 








TABLE 17 




Monthly averages or first of month 














COST-OF-LIVING 


INDEX 






Index oi 
Retail 
Prices; 
Commod- 
ities Only 


Index oi 




Total 


Food 


Rent 


Fuel and 
Lighting 

6 


Clothing 
12 


Home 

Furnishings 

and 

Services 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Living 
Costs 


Base period 100 


31 


19 


9 


23 














1935-39 = 


LOO 








1939 
1950 


101.5 
166.5 


100.6 
210 9 


103.8 
132.9 


101.2 

138.3 


100.7 

182.3 


101.4 

169.2 


101.4 

132.6 


101.0 
190.0 


99. 
177. 


5 
6 


1950 N 
D 


170.7 
171.1 


218.6 
218 8 


136.4 
136.4 


140.6 
140.7 


184.5 
184.9 


174.8 
176.4 


133.4 
134.1 


195.1 
195.6 






1951 J 
F 
M 


172.5 
175.2 
179.7 


220.2 
224.4 
233.9 


136.4 
136.4 
137.6 


141.5 
141.7 
146.5 


187.1 
192.4 
196.3 


179.8 
185.1 
188.6 


135.8 
137.0 
137.8 


197 3 
201.4 
207.9 


184 


1 


A 
M 

J 


181.8 
182.0 
184.1 


238.4 
235.4 
239.8 


137.6 
137.6 
139.8 


146.7 
146.2 
146.2 


198.8 
201.5 
202.5 


190.7 
194.9 
197.1 


138.8 
140.7 
141.0 


211.2 
211.3 
214.0 


197 


1 


J 

A 

S 


187.6 

188.9 
189.8 


249.7 
251.4 
251.1 


139.8 
139.8 
142.7 


147.2 
148.2 

149.5 


202.9 
204.6 
206.9 


197.4 
199.0 
199.1 


142.2 
143.7 
144.0 


219.6 
221.1 
221.6 


214 


.7 


O 

N 
D 


190.4 
191.2 
191.1 


249.7 
250.2 
249.3 


142.7 
144.8 
144.8 


150.2 
150.8 
150.8 


213.8 
214.6 
215.5 


200.1 
199.9 
200.6 


144.3 
144.9 
144 9 


222.4 
223.0 
222.7 







The Index oi Farm Living Costs is available ior January, April and August only. 

Source: Prices and Price Indexes: Price Index Numbers oi Commodities and Services Used by Farmers, D.B.S 



Wholesale Price Indexes 



TABLE 18 




Mori 


ithly aver 


ages or ca 


dendar m 


onths 










GENERAL 
INDEX 


VEGETABLE PRODUCTS 












Total 


Fresh 
iruits 


Grains 


Milled 
cereal 
ioods 


Bakery 
products 


Rubber 
and its 
products 


Sugar 

and its 

products 


Tea, coifee 

and 

cocoa 


Potatoes 












1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


99.2 
211.2 


89.1 
202.0 


93.8 
178 3 


70.5 
219.4 


81.4 

188.6 


97.2 
155.2 


102.3 
178.1 


107.7 
185.9 


101.2 
326.8 


121.2 
143.5 


1950 O 
N 
D 


220.0 
222.4 

225.2 


206.9 
209.3 
209.5 


175.5 
188.1 
183.2 


208.2 
207.6 
209.3 


197.2 
197.7 
197.6 


161.7 
161.7 
161.7 


219.6 
231.1 
228.7 


204.5 
202.7 
202.9 


350.7 
344.8 
343.9 


116.8 
108.0 
113.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


232.3 
238.5 
241.8 


214.1 
219.0 
220.6 


172.9 
183.6 
186.5 


213.0 
217.1 
219.0 


199.2 
200.8 
200.5 


161.7 
171.2 
171.7 


238.0 
241.8 
245.0 


203.1 
203.1 
203.8 


359.5 
374.0 
377.7 


123.2 
134.6 
140.0 


A 

M 
J 


242.2 
241.9 
242.7 


221.7 
220.0 
217.6 


176 6 
172.7 
154.4 


220.8 
215.1 
211.1 


200.5 

199.2 
200.2 


171.7 
171.7 
171.7 


248.8 
244.0 
240.1 


205.8 
220.9 
234.2 


374.5 
372.0 
371.3 


139.6 
134.5 
144.2 


J 

A 

S 


244.2 
241.5 
240.1 


216.1 
215.9 
217.1 


150.4 
167.6 
174 3 


213.3 
215.1 
217.6 


199.3 
201.3 
202.0 


174.8 
174.8 
174.8 


230.1 
230.1 
232.2 


230.6 
214.5 
211.6 


353.2 
357.8 
353.0 


187.7 
175.8 
192.0 


O 

N 


239.6 
239 . 1 


218.9 
220.9 


171 3 
167.1 


220.6 
223.2 


202 9 

203 7 


176.4 
176.4 


231.9 
230.3 


211.3 
204 8 


347.8 
337.2 


234.3 
348.6 



22 The data ior 1950 and 1951 are subject to revision. 

Source: Prices and Price Indexes, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 18 - continued 



PRICES 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



ANIMALS AND THEIR PRODUCTS 



Total 



Leather Milk 

Fishery Hides and unmanu- Boots and Live and its 

products skins factured shoes stock products 



Meats 



Eggs 



Fresh 



Cured 













1935-39 = 100 










1939 
1950 


100.6 
251.3 


102.2 
260.7 


103.8 
258.2 


102.8 
235.1 


101.8 
178.8 


104.1 
334.1 


97.6 
214.2 


94.8 
168.9 


107.8 
337.7 


100.0 
205.8 


1950 O 
N 
D 


260.8 
263.2 
268.7 


274.4 
276.1 
279.6 


308.7 
325.8 
337.6 


265.2 
269.9 
279.8 


192.6 
195.3 
195.3 


339.1 
339.2 
352.2 


218.1 
222.5 
227.1 


203.7 
205.2 
200.2 


335.8 
339.0 
355.1 


210.9 
210.8 
196.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


281.2 
294.5 
302.4 


288.1 
287.1 
288.6 


380.3 
400.8 
403.1 


309.5 
327.9 
327.9 


200.4 
204.1 
211.4 


375.4 
402.2 
409.0 


228.6 
229.3 
247.9 


163.2 
173.6 
195.6 


383.5 
410.0 
414.8 


208.5 
216.7 
216.2 


A 
M 
J 


296.7 
299.1 
309.1 


288.4 
275.1 
267.1 


368.2 
351.4 
346.0 


324.4 
324.4 
318.1 


219.1 
224.8 
223.4 


402.6 
410.1 
434.4 


230.7 
231.6 
233.5 


204.4 
219.7 
236.3 


417.9 
418.9 
449.2 


209.5 
219.5 
227.7 


J 
A 

s 


312.7 
305.4 
300.9 


286.6 
281.4 
281.9 


312.7 
256.5 
257.2 


312.6 
298.8 
274.3 


223.4 
223.7 
222.8 


438.6 
422.6 
410.3 


235.6 
235.7 
234.5 


255.4 
253.7 
253.5 


453.4 
438.8 
435.4 


234.0 
239.7 
249.7 


O 

N 


294.8 

289.4 


280.9 
284.4 


274.6 
208.2 


274.3 
245.0 


218.8 
216.3 


397.5 
393.8 


235.3 
240.9 


243.2 
229.1 


421.9 
413.2 


238.5 
226.7 



FIBRES, TEXTILES AND THEIR PRODUCTS 



Total 



Miscel- 
laneous 
fibres 
Cotton and 

fabrics products 



Rayon <» 
fabrics 



Rayon (2 > 
yarns 



Wool 

raw, 

domestic 



Hosiery 

and knit 

goods, 

chiefly 

wool 



Wool 
cloth 



WOOD, WOOD 

PRODUCTS AND 

PAPER 



Total Newsprint 



1935-39 = 100 



1939 
1950 

1950 O 
N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

o 

N 



98.9 
246.7 



277 
281 



285.0 

298.8 
314.6 
327.1 

324.7 
316.5 
306.6 

294.1 
283.0 
270.2 

269.0 
270.6 



95.2 
241.0 

266.3 
266.3 
267.3 

267.3 
277.3 
278.1 

278.1 
278.1 
278.1 

278.1 
278.1 
268.6 

257.2 
257.2 



99.1 
276.5 

285.2 
289.4 
303.6 

312.1 
313.5 
341.4 

375.0 
375.0 
375.0 

368.0 
356.4 
373.4 



373 
372 



112.8 
191.9 

196.2 
196.2 
199.4 

200.5 
200.5 
203.7 

203.7 
203.7 
203.7 

203.7 
199.4 
199.4 

199.4 
210.1 



97.3 
154.0 

168.5 
168.5 
168.5 

168.5 
168.5 
187.3 

195.8 
195.8 
195.8 

195.8 
195.8 
195.8 

195.8 
195.8 



95 
328 



417.3 
447.4 
468.2 

561.4 
644.9 
753.3 

649.2 
591.1 
532.2 

470.0 
390.2 
310.0 

310.0 
313.2 



103.0 
208.9 

219.1 
219.1 
219.1 

219.1 
268.0 
283.3 

288.5 
286.6 
286.6 

286.6 
286.6 
286.6 

286.0 
286.0 



98.6 
293.6 

371.4 
373.7 
369.8 

408.4 
434.3 
452.9 

463.3 
425.1 
387.8 

337.1 
328.0 
292.2 

280.0 
283.7 



107.5 

258.3 

263.3 
269.3 
273.8 

284.5 
286.5 
289.0 



293, 
294, 
293, 

303. 
302. 
302, 



301.7 
299.0 



116.3 
248.7 

237.6 
251.8 
255.3 

255.6 
254.9 
253.9 

255.1 
256.4 
258.0 

283.8 
282.3 
280.7 

279.9 
277.8 



C1) Changed from silk fabrics to rayon fabrics in January, 1942. 
silk hosiery. 



(2) From 1926 to 1941 rayon yarns and artificial 23 



PRICES 



TABLE 18 continued 



JANUARY, 1952 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



1939 
1950 

1950 O 
N 
D 

19511 
F 
M 

A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 

N 



WOOD, WOOD 

PRODUCTS AND 

PAPER 



IRON AND ITS PRODUCTS 



NON-FERROUS 
METALS 



Lumber 

and 

timber 



Pulp 



Total 



Rolling 

mill 

Pig iron products Hardware 



Wire 



Scrap iron 
and steel 



Total 



1935-39 = 100 



106.4 
388.2 

414.6 
412.0 
414.9 

445.4 
455.2 
468.2 

469 8 



93.4 
195.1 

213.0 
212.2 
213.1 

233.7 
233.0 
232.2 



469 
459 



458.1 
456 4 
457.4 

456.1 
449.5 



256 
257 
259 

257 

255. 

255 



255.0 
253 2 



104.8 
183.6 

190.2 
190.6 
192.5 

196.4 
201.4 
201.5 

204.5 
206.4 
206.8 

210.8 
212.0 
214.5 

215.7 
216.8 



101.5 
218.1 

223.0 
228.4 
233.8 

233.8 
233.8 
233.8 

233.8 
233.8 
239.3 

255.6 
255.6 
255.6 

255.6 
255.6 



104 
170 

177 
177 
177 



101 
180 



178.0 
185.8 
185.8 



187 
187 
187 

194 
197 
198 



191.6 
191.6 
193.9 

196.0 
203.0 
203.0 

207.1 
207.1 
207.1 



102.2 
205.1 

216.5 
216.5 
216.5 

216.5 
222.6 
222.6 



225 
225 
225 



200 4 
202.2 



208 
209. 
215 

217 
217 



225 6 
225.6 
234.9 

234.9 
234 9 



109.1 
244.4 

264.1 
264.1 
269.8 

272.6 
276.0 
278.3 

281.7 
322.3 
322.3 

314.3 
314.3 
317.0 

317.0 
317.0 



100.0 

159.5 

168.8 
169.9 
173.1 

174.7 

175.5 
174.4 

175.9 
176.3 
185.1 

184.2 
183.4 
183.6 

184.8 
185.3 



NON-FERROUS 
METALS 

Lead Zinc 

and its and its 
products products 



NON-METALLIC MINERALS 



Total 



Clay and 

allied 
products 



Coal 



Coke 



Window Petroleum 
glass products Salt 



1935-39 = 100 



1939 
1950 


93 
299.6 


94.6 
334 9 


99.7 
164.8 


97.9 
172.6 


101.6 
167.9 


1950 O 
N 
D 


353.4 
369.1 
372.8 


399.9 
408.3 
412 


165.1 
164.1 

165.8 


180 6 
180.6 
180.6 


167.5 
167.4 
171.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


372 2 
372.0 
372.0 


417.0 
417.6 
416.1 


167.3 
168.3 
169.3 


182.1 
184.9 
185.1 


171 4 
173.9 
173 9 


A 

M 
J 


374.5 
377.1 
379.8 


421.5 
423.7 
426.6 


169.0 
169.6 
169.3 


186 8 
191.6 
189.6 


173.2 
172.5 
171.0 


J 

A 

S 


376.7 
374.2 
374.2 


423.5 
421.2 
421.7 


169.5 
170.7 
170.9 


189.6 
195.3 
195.3 


172.1 
172.3 
172.7 


O 
N 


392 6 
406 2 


443 
459 7 


170.8 
170.7 


195 3 
195 3 


172 7 
172 7 



109 
204.1 

211.4 
211.4 
211.4 

211.4 
213.5 
224.1 

224.1 
224.1 
224.1 

224 1 
224.1 
224.1 

224 1 
224.1 



95.4 
172.5 

164.4 
173.5 
173.5 

182.7 
182.7 
182.7 

195.1 

197.8 
197.8 

197.8 
197.8 
197.8 

197.8 
197.8 



96 4 
167.7 

166.6 
163.6 
163.6 

163.6 
162.7 
162.7 

162.7 
164.2 
164.3 

164.2 
166 2 
166.3 

166 3 
166 2 



127.1 
252.4 

252.4 
252.4 
252.4 

257.2 
257.2 
257.2 

257.2 
257.2 
257.2 

257.2 
257.2 
257.2 

257.2 
257.2 



Copper 
and its 
products 



101.9 
222.0 

243.7 
241.0 
243.5 

243.4 
243.8 
243.5 

246.6 
247.5 
275.6 



275 
274 
274 



273.7 
271.9 



Cement 



93.5 
128.2 

134.3 
134.3 
134.3 

134.3 
134.9 
139.5 

139.8 
139.8 
139.8 

139.8 
145.8 
146.6 

146 8 
146.8 



24 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 18 -concluded 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRICES 



NON- 
METALLICS 



CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS 



Inorganic Organic Coal tar 
Asbestos Total chemicals chemicals products 



Dyeing Paints, 

materials Explosives prepared 



Drugs and 
pharma- Fertilizer 
ceuticals materials 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


102.6 
211.3 


100.3 
157.7 


99.4 
116.9 


95.0 
182.2 


100.3 
158.8 


101.6 
185.8 


97.5 
120.5 


97.8 
163.4 


100.7 
145.6 


107.5 
150.4 


1950 O 
N 
D 


213.4 

213.4 
213.6 


169.9 
170.8 
173.0 


116.9 
118.5 
121.5 


226.8 
227.0 
227.0 


159.7 
164.5 
173.0 


202.1 
202.1 
202.1 


127.4 
127.4 
127.4 


168.1 
168.1 
168.1 


170.3 
172.0 
173.9 


150.5 
151.6 
151.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


232.5 
232.5 
233.9 


179.7 
183.1 

184.8 


123.4 
126.1 
128.0 


259.8 
259.8 
260.6 


177.9 
177.9 
177.9 


202.1 
202.1 
202.1 


134.5 
134.5 
134.5 


176.1 
176.1 
176.1 


181.4 
181.9 
192.2 


155.3 
158.5 
158.1 


A 
M 

J 


233.9 
233.9 
233.9 


187.5 
188.0 
189.1 


129.6 
129.6 
130.0 


260.6 
260.6 
267.9 


177.9 
177.9 
177.9 


202.1 
202.1 
202.1 


134.5 
134.5 
134.5 


184.2 
184.2 
184.2 


200.9 
206.2 
206.2 


158.1 
158.1 
158.1 


J 

A 

S 


233.9 
233.9 
233.9 


190.2 
189.6 
189.3 


130.1 
131.3 
134.1 


267.9 
267.9 
267.9 


187.5 
187.5 
187.5 


202.1 
202.1 
202.1 


134.5 
134.5 
134.5 


184.2 
184.2 
184.2 


206.2 
207.9 
207.9 


164.2 
168.4 
168.4 


O 

N 


233.9 
233.9 


190.3 

187.7 


134.4 
134.3 


264.8 
264.8 


187.5 
187.5 


202.1 
202.1 


134.5 
134.5 


184.2 
184.2 


207.9 
207.9 


168.4 
168.4 



TABLE 19 



CLASSIFICATION BY PURPOSE OR USE 



Canadian Farm Products* 



Raw and Fully and 
partly man- chiefly man- 
ufactured ufactured 
goods goods 



Iron and 
General Residential non-ferrous 
Industrial building building metals and 
materials materials materials products 



Total 



Field 



Animal 



Farm prices 
of agricul- 
tural 
products* 1 ' 













1935-39 = 


100 










1939 
1950 


94.9 
212.8 


101.9 
211.0 


99.0 
244.6 


102.0 
249.9 


102.3 
242.7 


102.0 
190.8 


92.6 
236.7' 


83.7 
191.9' 


101.5 
281.4 


91.8 
260.4' 


1950 O 
N 
D 


220.0 
221.9 
225.1 


220.8 
223.2 
225.7 


269.3 
275.6 
280.9 


267.0 
265.2 
268.1 


260.4 
262.1 
263.3 


202.8 
204.2 
207.3 


237.3' 
239.2' 
243.3' 


187. 8' 
187.9' 
188. 2' 


286.8 
290.5 
298.4 


261.3' 
264. r 
268.7' 


1951 J 
F 
M 


231.1 
237.1 
238.8 


233.6 
240.0 
244.1 


294.0 
303.4 
305.3 


279.7 
287.4 
291.5 


269.6 
274.9 
282.6 


210.9 
214.3 
213.7 


251.0' 
262.5' 
273. r 


191.1' 
195.5' 
198.8' 


310.9 
329.6 
347.2 


273.8' 
284. 6' 
293.6' 


A 
M 
J 


238.6 
238.9 
242.9 


244.9 
244.4 
243.7 


305.4 
305.4 
303.9 


293.9 
294.2 
290.2 


287.2 
289.5 
289.2 


216.2 
217.4 
224.1 


265.4' 
265.3' 
272.6' 


199. 2' 
194. 6' 
192.0' 


331.6 
336.1 
353.1 


291. 6' 
292.4' 
300.2' 


J 

A 

S 


242.5 
237.1 
235.8 


246.6 
245.1 
243.7 


297.0 
287.4 
285.8 


289.8 
290.4 
291.2 


289.8 
290.4 
290.9 


226.0 
226.2 
227.9 


277.1' 

256.4 

253.9 


195.4' 

164.6 

168.5 


358.9 
348.3 
339.2 


307.2' 
284.8' 
283.9' 


O 

N 


236.3 
237.0 


242.7 
241.4 


289.4 
287.5 


291.4 
289.5 


290.8 
289.3 


229.7 
230.9 


252.6 
258.4 


175.0 
188.2 


330.3 
328.5 


278.6 



* Revision incorporates the final payments for wheat, oats and barley for crop year 1950-51. 

(1) Excluding Newfoundland. From August, 1950, to July, 1951, prairie farm prices for wheat, oats and barley are 
final prices. Since August, 1951, prairie grain prices are initial prices only. 

Source: Prices and Price Indexes, and Index Numbers of Farm Prices of Agricultural Products, D.B.S. 



25 



FUEL AND POWER 

TABLE 20 



JANUARY, 1952 



Electric Power 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



1939 
1950 

1950 O 

N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 

N 



1939 
1950 

1950 O 
N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 



PRODUCTION 



EXPORTS' » 



CONSUMPTION 



Hydraulic Thermal Total 



Primary Secondary 



Total Primary Secondary 



Million kilowatt hours 



2,320 
4,090 

4,229 
4,292 
4,512 

4,619 
4.231 
4,751 

4,745 
4,987 
4,574 

4,496 
4.450 
4.260 

4.750 

4,775 



41 
152 

166 
166 
163 

165 
145 
159 

150 
144 
133 

133 
146 
145 

169 
161 



2,362 
4,242 

4,395 

4,458 
4,674 

4,784 
4,376 
4,910 

4,895 
5,130 
4,707 

4,629 
4,596 
4,404 

4,920 
4,936 



1,735 
3,969' 


627 
273 


159 
160 


2,202 
4,082 


1,616 
3,840 


586 
241 


4,234 
4,267 
4,367 


161 

191 
306 


140 
143 
178 


4,255 
4.315 
4.497 


4,102 
4,143 
4,241 


153 

172 
255 


4,500 
4,105 
4,535 


284 
270 
376 


172 
165 
221 


4.612 
4,211 
4,690 


4,368 
3,982 
4,395 


244 
229 
295 


4.356 
4.541 
4,376 


539 
589 
331 


208 
231 
224 


4,687 
4.899 
4,483 


4.227 
4,407 
4,242 


460 
492 
241 


4,345 
4,446 
4,271 


284 
150 
133 


238 
160 
129 


4,391 
4,436 
4.276 


4.205 
4,315 
4.148 


186 
121 
128 


4,654 
4,609 


265 
327 


203 
204 


4.717 
4,733 


4,511 
4,471 


206 
262 



CONSUMPTION 



Canada 



New- 
foundland 



Prince 
Edward 
Island 



Nova 
Scotia 



New 
Brunswick Quebec 



Ontario 



Mani- 
toba 



Saskat- British 

chewan Alberta Columbia 



Million kilowatt hours 



2,202 
4,082 

4,255 
4,315 
4,497 

4,612 
4,211 
4,690 

4,687 
4,899 
4,483 

4,391 
4,436 
4,276 

4,717 

4,733 



8.80 

10.41 
10.51 
10.90 

10.76 

9.61 

10.12 



0.65 
1.77 

1.89 
1.98 
2.15 

2.08 
1.83 
1.94 



1.81 
1.81 
8 96 1.73 



9.36 
9 32 



1.88 

1 99 
10.87 1.88 



39 
22 



12.29 
12 55 



2.04 
2.11 



36 
64 

65 
69 
73 

76 

68 
74 

69 
72 
69 

68 
69 
70 

80 
80 



37 
55 



991 
1,802 



50 1 ,846 
61 1 ,809 
58 1,905 



63 
56 
63 



1.954 
1,793 
2.006 



52 2,142 

60 2.320 

59 2,033 

57 1,984 

63 1 ,994 

55 1.851 



58 
64 



2,002 
1,992 



788 
1,479 


148 
233 


14 
33 


21 
75 


166 
330 


1,566 
1.620 
1.679 


247 
261 
273 


35 
37 
41 


80 
85 
90 


354 
358 
365 


1,716 
1,574 
1.775 


283 
257 
275 


41 
36 
38 


91 
78 
84 


375 
337 
363 


1,716 
1,737 
1,664 


247 
239 
219 


35 
35 
34 


78 

80 
77 


337 
346 
318 


1,627 
1,624 
1,633 


203 
214 
211 


34 
36 
36 


78 
83 
82 


328 
342 
325 


1,822 
1.824 


244 
256 


41 
43 


91 
96 


364 
363 



26 Note: As of January, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 

'"Less imports. 
Source: Monthly Report, Central Electric Stations, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 21 



FUEL AND POWER 



Coal and Coke 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



COAL 



COKE<» 



Production 



Bitu- Sub-bitu- Nova 

minous ruinous Lignite Total Scotia 



Imports* 1 ' Exports C oal 2) Production 

Available 

British for 



Alberta Columbia 



Consumption 













Thousand tons 










1939 
1950 


1,051 
1,135 


176 
277 


80 
184 


1,308 
1,595 


588 
540 


460 
676 


141 
145 


1,250 
2,246 


31 
33 


2,456 
3,739 


201 
328 


1950 O 
N 
D 


1,186 
1,250 
1,134 


361 
494 
460 


269 
318 
334 


1,816 
2,061 
1,927 


584 
608 
498 


765 
920 
897 


136 
161 
145 


3,322 
2,809 
1,411 


28 
38 
18 


5,110 
4,833 
3,320 


342 
334 
343 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1,273 
1,107 
1,115 


377 
272 
180 


283 
228 
195 


1,933 
1,606 
1,490 


612 
527 
569 


315 
663 
537 


164 
141 
147 


1,212 

911 

1.039 


19 
13 
20 


3,126 
2,504 
2,508 


342 
312 
335 


A 
M 
J 


1,147 
1,164 
1,101 


139 
123 
140 


106 
61 
62 


1,393 
1,348 
1,303 


571 
592 
519 


517 
479 
512 


155 
158 
153 


2,358 
3,040 
2,978 


33 
32 
21 


3,718 
4,356 
4,259 


322 
328 
318 


J 

A 

S 


955 

978 

1,059 


91 
174 
249 


38 

95 
201 


1,084 
1,247 
1,509 


443 
335 
508 


448 
603 
616 


100 
153 
128 


2,510 
3,161 
2,669 


27 
26 
62 


3,567 
4,382 
4,116 


314 
322 
306 


O 

N 


1,187 


370 


319 


1,877 


583 


755 


154 


2,804 
2,574 


46 
69 


4,635 


336 
334 



(1, As of April, 1949, Newfoundland data are included. (2) Annual computation to 1950 entails considerable 

adjustments in production and external trade as described on page 19 of the Coal Report for 1950. 
Source: Monthly Report, Coal and Coke Statistics, D.B.S. 



TABLE 22 



Petroleum and Gas 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



CRUDE PETROLEUM 



NATURAL GAS 



Sales 



Imports 



Producers' 
Shipments 



Shipments 



Total 



Domestic 



Industrial 

and 
commercial 



MANUFACTURED GAS 
Sales 



Total Domestic"* Industrial 





Thousand barrels* 2 ' 








Million cu. it. 








1939 
1950 


3,090 
6,554 


652 
2,424 


2,932 
5,652 


4,842 


2,207 


2,618 


1,245 
2,253 


1,401 


360 


1950 O 
N 
D 


7,998 
7,586 
6,917 


2,980 
3,191 
2,603 


5,782 
7,450 
7,800 


3,963 
5,665 
7,296 


1,479 
2,424 
3,517 


2,441 
3,209 
3,768 


2,211 
2,347 
2,625 


1,353 
1,437 
1,587 


378 
368 
366 


1951 J 
F 
M 


7,099 
5,153 
5,840 


2,996 
2,801 
2,494 


9,038 
7,773 
8,014 


7,894 
8,094 
7,602 


3,870 
4,179 
3,744 


4,011 
3,898 
3,844 


2,655 
2,594 
2,462 


1,716 
1,691 
1,579 


378 
347 
346 


A 
M 
J 


6,909 
7,420 
6,697 


2,449 
4,474 
4,757 


6,004 
5,089 
4,846 


5,893 
4,174 
3,289 


2,817 
1,783 
1,238 


3,066 
2,382 
2,047 


2,490 
2,404 
2,263 


1,520 
1,426 
1,323 


347 
338 
341 


J 

A 

S 


8,510 
7,836 
7,658 


4,936 
5,324 
4,925 r 


4,305 
4,730 
5,399 


2,774 
2,803 
3,378 


867 

744 

1,044 


1,904 
2,055 
2,331 


2,083 
1,956 
2,039 


1,164 
1,056 
1,145 


337 
332 
314 


o 

N 


7,100 


4,882 


6,947 


4,877 
6,779 


1,719 
3,029 


3,152 
3,738 


2,281 


1,358 


321 



"'Includes gas used for house heating. (2) Barrels of 35 Imperial gallons. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Petroleum and Natural Gas Production; ImDorts entered for Consumption; Trade of Canada, 
D.B.S. 



27 



FUEL AND POWER 

TABLE 23 



JANUARY, 1952 



Refined Petroleum Products 

Monthly averages or calendar months 





CRUDE PETROLEUM 
Received Consumed 


NET PRODUCTION OF SALEABLE PRODUCTS 


DOMESTIC 
CONSUMPTION 




Total 






Fuels 




Fuels 




■ 


Motor 
iotal gasoline 


Heavy 
i fuel oils 


Light 
fuel oils 


Total 


Motor 
gasoline 












Thousand barrels 








1940 
1950 


4.255 
9.009 


4,163 
9,078 


3,882 
8,458 


3 
7 


635 1 ,947 
829 3,847 


1,067 
1,819 


462 
1,528 


3,927 

9,195 


2,071 
4,133 


1950S 


9.490 


9,912 


9,639 


8 


794 4,403 


1,911 


1,850 


9,990 


5,033 


O 
N 
D 


9.889 

10.346 

9.723 


10,107 
9,871 
9.146 


9,519 
8,967 

8,528 


8 
8 
8 


802 4.406 
440 4,165 
096 3.757 


1,964 
1.873 
2,030 


1,692 
1,586 
1,665 


9,757 
10,056 
10,771 


4,735 
3,956 
3,461 


1951 J 
F 
M 


8.353 
7,919 
7.771 


9.541 
8.301 
8.690 


8,671 
7,199 
8,145 


8 
6 
7 


126 3.659 
721 3,168 
589 3,560 


1,936 
1,443 
1,814 


1,568 
1,283 
1.355 


9,879 
9,388 
9,322 


3,016 
2,931 
3,161 


A 
M 

J 


9.740 
11,960 
12,165 


7,585 
11,624 
11,550 


6,956 
11,039 
11,207 


6,417 3,009 
10.239 4,967 
10,182 5,028 


1,696 
2,315 
2,247 


1.208 
2.078 
2.039 


8,897 
11,126 
10,161 


3,853 
6,030 
5,316 


J 

A 

S 


13,482 
12,986 
12.657 


11,763 
12,599 
11,795 


11,277 
12,163 
10,677 


10 

11 

9 


.262 5,122 
,012 5,489 
,720 4,753 


2,246 
2.459 
2.251 


2,195 

2,247 r 

1,837 


10,486 

11.078 

9,704 


5,831 
6,167 
5,063 


O 


12,504 


11,867 


11,552 


10 


,672 5.215 


2,415 


2,229 


12,000 


5,623 




DOMESTIC CONSUMPTK 
Fuels 


DN 




STOCKS AT ENI 


) OF PERIOE 


In Market C 










At Refinery 


Channels 






de oil 


Unfinished 
products 


Refined Products 


Total 
fuel 






Heavy 
fuel oils 


Light 
fuel oils 


Cn. 


Total 


Motor 
gasoline 


Motor 
gasoline 












Thousand barrels 






1940 
1950 


1,214 
2,248 


476 
1,852 


5 
5 


561 
097 


1,954 
3,130 


6.331 

11,656 


2,708 
4.259 


6.442 

12,571 


3,788 
5,377 


1950S 


2,668 


1,387 


4 


335 


3,014 


12,726 


3.604 


11,486 


4,894 


O 

N 
D 


2.172 
2.680 
2.825 


1,886 
2,275 
3.149 


4 
4 
5 


118 
593 
097 


2,990 
3.274 
3.130 


12.784 
12.547 
11,656 


3,544 
3,751 
4,259 


12,219 
13.067 
12,571 


5,207 
5,453 
5,377 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2.486 
2.144 
2.330 


2.842 
2.989 
2.615 


3 
3 
2 


908 
526 
607 


3.304 
3,725 
3,616 


12.615 
13.067 
14.327 


5.663 
6,815 
8,127 


11.398 
9.471 
7,757 


4.933 
4,088 
3,480 


A 

M 
J 


2.201 
2.642 
2.674 


2,005 
1,639 
1.517 


4 
5 
5 


,761 
.097 
,713 


3,736 
3,631 
3,435 


13,426 
13,530 
14,408 


7,300 
6.079 
5,808 


7,891 

9,086 

10,442 


4,015 
4,383 
4,631 


J 

A 

S 


2,894 
2,733 
2.437 


1,191 
1.521 
1.346 


7 
7 
8 


,431 
,818 
681 


3,495 
3,328 
3.855 


15,329 
15.925 
16.312 


5.386 
4.573 
3.825 


11,818 
13.012 
14,361 


4,630 
5,088 
5,872 


O 


3.088 


2.057 


9 


,317 


3.613 


16.346 


3.753 


14.456 


5,770 



28 



Source: Monthly Report on Refined Petroleum Products, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 24 



MINING 



Metals 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



COPPER 



NICKEL 



LEAD 



Production Exports Production Exports Production Exports Production 11 ' Exports Production Exports 



Total metal content 



Refined copper 



Total metal content 



Refined lead 



Million pounds 



1939 
1950 

1950 O 
N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 

J 

J 
A 

S 

o 

N 



50.7 
44.0 

44.5 
46.9 
45.5 

45.6 
40.6 
48.6 

47.7 
47.0 
45.2 

45.0 
45.3 
43.5 

41.8 
44.2 



45.2 
30.4 

28.6 
19.7 
26.6 

25.6 
20.4 
21.0 

35.9 
21.2 
24.0 

27.5 
18.8 
23.6 

21.4 
24.9 



38.6 
39.7 

41.7 
38.4 
39.7 

41.8 
36.8 
41.2 

40.8 
45.6 
42.7 

40.4 
43.6 
37.3 

42.6 
38.5 



27.6 
22.4 

19.9 
13.9 
17.5 

16.2 
13.2 
14.8 

24.7 
13.9 
16.2 

18.3 
13.0 
16.1 

13.9 
16.8 



18.8 
20.6 

20.7 
23.8 
20.6 

21.8 
19.3 
23.2 

21.1 
24.9 
23.6 

23.5 
24. 5 r 
23.2 

23.4 
23.0 



19.6 
20.3 

21.4 
18.9 
17.8 

24.4 
15.8 
22.4 

23.3 
18.7 
17.8 

24.5 
22.5 
20.7 

24.8 
23.3 



32.4 
27. 6 r 

37.1 
34.5 
23.3 

32.2 
24.0 
25.3 

20.1 
22.3 
27.6 

22.0 
27.6 
23.8 

30.1 
29.6 



30.8 
22.4 

39.5 
28.5 
35.6 

23.7 
13.9 
22.6 

17.9 
30.1 
12.3 

18.5 
16.4 
20.8 

18.1 
26.7 



31.8 
28.4 

34.7 
34.8 
36.4 

30.3 
27.4 
29.9 



28 
28 
28 

12 
29 



30.1 
19.2 

27.8 
27.8 
25.3 

20.2 
13.1 
21.7 

17.1 
29.6 
11.5 



28.0 

27.1 
26.8 



11 

9 

13 



17.3 
25.9 



ZINC 



ALUMI- IRON ORE 
NUM 



GOLD 



SILVER 



Production Exports Production Exports Imports of Producers' Production Mint Production Exports 

Bauxite Shipments Receipts 

Refined zinc Ore 



Total metal content 







Million pounds 






Thousand 
short tons 




Thousand 


fine ounces 




1939 
1950 


32.9 
52.2 


29.4 
46.1 


29.3 
34.1 


26.0 
24.5 


85.1 
310.9 


10.3 
300.4 


425 
370 


404 
367 


1,930 
1,935 


1,753 
987 


1950 O 
N 
D 


53.3 
51.8 
54.3 


40.5 
61.0 
39.8 


34.9 
34.8 
36.4 


24.2 
23.1 
23.9 


642.4 
653.5 
135.2 


564.0 
287.1 
175.1 


376 
378 
382 


369 
388 
365 


2,495 
1,960 
1,936 


530 
1,881 
1,200 


1951 J 
F 
M 


51.4 
50.4 
52.0 


56.5 
21.2 
38.8 


36.5 
33.4 
36.3 


26.6 

9.2 

24.4 


80.3 
48.8 
41.6 


44.4 
31.3 
36.5 


374 
347 
372 


363 
342 
322 


2,015 
1,589 
1,755 


1,398 
1,316 
2,142 


A 

M 

J 


51.2 
51.7 
54.2 


37.5 
44.6 
55.3 


35.0 
36.2 
36.4 


22.0 
27.6 
28.7 


120.4 
377.0 
454.2 


158.1 
521.8 
649.7 


363 
369 
363 


419 
376 
364 


1,468 
1,854 
2,405 


964 
1,474 
1,377 


J 

A 

S 


55.4 
60.3 
54.9 


72.5 
50.6 
58. l r 


36.5 
36.7 
35.9 


27.2 
23.3 
20.9 


582.3 
750.9 
707.5 


715.4 
691.1 
594.3 


344 
345 
359 


324 
357 
313 


1,794 
2,006 
1,896 


1,518 
1,777 
1,538 


O 

N 


56.3 
55.6 


56.2 
63.6 


37.6 
37.4 


32.7 
24.7 


880.7 


612.6 
347.7 


378 


314 


1,983 


889 
1,709 



Note: Iron ore shipments and silver and gold production include Newfoundland as of April and as of May, 1949 
respectively. ("Includes Newfoundland as of May, 1949. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Silver, Lead and Zinc; Gold; Copper and Nickel; Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



29 



MINING 



TABLE 25 



JANUARY, 1952 
Non Metallic Minerals: Production, Shipments and Exports 
Monthly averages or calendar months 





ASBESTOS 


GYPSUM 


FELDSPAR 

Producers' 
Shipments Exports 


CEMENT 


LIME 


SALT 




Producers' 
Shipments 


Exports 


Producers' 
Shipments 


Producers' 
Production Shipments 




Commer- 
cial 


For Use in 
Chemicals 




Producers' shipments 






Thousand tons 






Thousand barrels 


Thousand tons 


1926 


23.3 


23.2 


74 


3.0 


2.8 


753 


726 


34.5 


12.5 


9.4 


1929 


25.5 


24.3 


101 


3.1 


2.5 


1,021 


1,024 


56.2 


13.5 


14.0 


1933 


13.2 


12.4 


32 


0.9 


0.3 


201 


251 


27.0 


14.6 


8.7 


1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 


24.1 
30.4 
28.9 
39.8 
36.6 


24.1 
28.8 
28.0 
37.8 
35.6 


84 
118 
121 
133 

47 


1.2 
1.0 
1.8 
2.2 
1.9 


0.5 
0.6 
1.2 
1.1 
0.9 


466 
477 
579 
707 
720 


460 
478 
630 
697 
761 


40.6 
46.0 
59.7 
71.7 
73.7 


22.4 
19.7 
20.1 
25.2 
27.2 


14.2 
15.7 
18.7 
21.6 
27.3 


1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 


38.9 
34.9 
38.9 
46.5 
55.2 


36.9 
33.0 
36.7 
43.3 
53.1 


37 

50 

70 

151 

208 


2.0 
2.0 
2.5 
2.9 
3.0 


1.1 
1.1 
1.4 
1.6 
1.5 


669 
633 
653 
890 
1,018 


609 
599 
706 
963 
995 


75.6 
73.8 
69.4 
70.1 
81.5 


28.5 
27.1 
27.0 
24.2 
27.3 


28.8 
30.8 
29.0 
20.7 
33.5 


1948 
1949 
1950 


59.7 
47.9 
72.9 


57.5 
44.6 
69.2 


268 
251 
306 


4.6 
3.1 

3.0' 


2.6 
1.5 
1.3 


1,167 
1,338 
1,395' 


1,175 
1,325 
1,394 


87.8 
84.9 
93.7 


30.9 
30.8 
33.4 


30.9 
31.6 
38.2 


1949 O 
N 
D 


72.2 
77.4 
62.0 


71.2 
63.7 
64.1 


388 
250 
174 


2.9 
3.3 
3.5 


1.5 
1.6 
1.6 


1,487 
1,368 
1,303 


1,466 

1,383 

764 


90.3 
86.5 
83.6 


37.4 
36.1 
32.3 


31.2 
34.0 
28.8 


1950 J 
F 
M 


57.2 
58.0 
68.4 


54.8 
59.5 
65.7 


157 
142 
137 


1.3 
2.3 
2.2 


0.8 
0.4 
0.9 


1,253 
1,109 
1,303 


653 

790 

1,233 


79.0 
77.0 
86.0 


26.1 
29.0 
31.3 


34.3 
33.9 
35.5 


A 
M 

J 


68.7 
71.8 
67.8 


55.7 
73.9 
70.1 


201 
276 
357 


1.5 
1.8 
4.5 


0.8 
0.5 
1.9 


1,273 
1,445 
1,431 


1.382 
2.135 
1,848 


85.8 

90.7 

104.6 


25.3 
31.9 
36.4 


35.2 
38.6 
41.0 


J 

A 

S 


57.4 
71.5 
92.2 


50.3 
71.0 
80.9 


412 
450 
439 


3.0 
3.1 
3.8 


2.0 
2.4 
1.7 


1,595 
1,494 
1,445 


1,680 
1,613 
1,614 


96.8 
91.4 
98.2 


32.0 
30.8 
40.3 


34.8 
36.7 
41.6 


O 

N 
D 


96.6 
89.7 
76.2 


88.2 
86.4 
73.5 


471 
413 
213 


3.2 

2.8 
3.4 


1.4 
1.2 
1.5 


1,560 
1,413 
1,352 


1,556 

1,434 

791 


106.7 

108.6 

99.5 


42.2 
43.2 
32.4 


40.0 
41.5 
44.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


74.1 
71.5 
94 9 


77.5 
53.5 
99 8 


193 
178 
178 


2.6 
2.9 
2.5 


1.4 
1.4 
1.1 


1,262 
1,241 
1,409 


887 

908 

1,380 


98.0 

91.1 

103.6 


33.6 
32.2 
28.2 


44.1 
42.3 
47.0 


A 
M 

J 


86 8 
93.2 
83.0 


89.0 

83.2 
77.9 


222 

264' 

342' 


1.6 
3.1 
5.5 


0.1 
1.7 
2.6 


1,492 
1,525 
1,429 


1,533 
1,880 
1,681 


103 8 

110.5' 

103.7' 


32.2 
37.1 
40.7 


39.4 
43.2 
40.1 


J 

A 

S 


71 
80 4 
82 .5 


73.5 
81 1 
80.2 


449' 
465' 
452' 


3.0 
4.4 
3.6 


2.4 
2 8 
2.2 


1,538 
1,513 
1,479 


1,589 
1,754 
1,542 


102.6' 
108.8' 
100.8' 


46.6 
43.1 
39.9 


42.3 
40.8 
40.5 


O 

N 


82 .5 
85.6 


81.8 
65 6 


422 


4 

2.3 


2.7 
0.8 


1,527 
1,441 


1,649 
1.277 


114.8 


46.6 
54.7 


40.8 
40.7 



30 



Source: Monthly Reports: Production of Canada's Leading Minerals; Cement; Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 MANUFACTURING 

Indexes of Value of Inventories and Shipments (1) 

TABLE 26 Inventories as of end of period 











ALL INDUSTRIES 








» MISCELl 
FO 






Total 




Consumers Goods 




Capital 
Goods 


Producers' 
Materials 


Construction 
Materials 


LANEOUS 




Total 


Non- 
durable 


Semi- 
durable 


Durable 


ODS 




- Shipments Inventories 










Inventories 


















1947 average = 100 










1949 
1950 


134.3 
149.7 


140.4 
159.3 


156.5 
168.6 


122.4 
146.9 


118.3 
150.6 


106.2 
113.5 


130.5 
141.7 


152.9 
166.2 


132.0 
153.5 


111.9 
147.7 


1950S 


137.6 


143.7 


154.8 


129.7 


132.0 


108.0 


132.0 


165.3 


176.1 


127.7 


O 
N 
D 


139.9 
143.1 
149.7 


147.5 
151.0 
159.3 


160.1 
163.2 
168.6 


131.9 
135.3 
146.9 


133.1 
139.0 
150.6 


106.9 
112.1 
113.5 


135.7 
138.6 
141.7 


157.6 
153.8 
166.2 


152.9 
150.0 
148.1 


137.1 
142.9 
147.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


151.3 
154.8 
158.8 


160.5 
163.7 
167.6 


164.4 
164.9 
166.2 


154.2 
160.5 
166.7 


159.6 
166.0 
174.8 


119.1 
123.3 
130.3 


141.6 

141.3 
141.9 


166.4 
184.4 
191.8 


171.4 
173.0 
175.3 


148.0 
142.7 
153.7 


A 
M 
J 


163.3 
168.0 
177.5 


172.4 
176.1 
184.7 


168.3 
169.2 
176.0 


175.5 
180.6 
193.6 


184.3 
192. 5 r 
198.2 


134.1 
137.6 
144.2 


148.1 
155.6 
165.7 


185.8 
198.6 
222.5 


165.4 
165.1 
171.1 


160.2 
165.4 
169.3 


J 

A 

S 


182.8 
185.8 
189.2 


188.5 
189.1 
191.7 


180.5 
180.9 
187.5 


195.4 
194.5 
191.8 


203.6 
208.7 
207.4 


150.2 
154.5 
162.6 


174.6 
181.1 
188.2 


229.6 
242.7 
231.9 


158.8 
152.7 
175.1 


164.9 
164.7 
154.2 


o 

N 


192.2' 
189.6 


194. r 
189.8 


195. 9 r 
193.3 


186. l r 
178.5 


204. 5 r 
201.2 


169. 9 r 
175.1 


195. 2 r 
194.4 


217. 6 r 
207.6 


191. 5 r 
185.8 


148.7' 
142.7 




RUBBER GOODS 


COTTON YARN 
AND CLOTH 


WOOLLEN 
CLOTH 


HOSIERY AND 
KNITTED GOODS 


PRIMARY IRON 
AND STEEL 




Shipments 


Inventories 


Shipments 


Inventories Shipments Inventories Shipments Inventories Shipments 


Inventories 












1947 average = 100 










1949 
1950 


97.1 
121.3 


116.4 
• 155.8 


125.4 
159.8 


134.3 
165.9 


104.7 
104.0 


131.8 
167.9 


109.4 
110.5 


131.8 
139.8 


143.2 
159.0 


153.5 
160.5 


1950S 


136.8 


124.7 


160.3 


141.7 


113.5 


142.8 


161.4 


143.0 


183.0 


154.9 


O 
N 
D 


154.7 
150.9 
143.7 


126.7 
134.6 
155.8 


182.2 
182.5 
208.4 


145.0 
147.5 
165.9 


109.6 
113.4 
132.4 


154.9 
158.4 
167.9 


157.4 
155.8 
132.9 


133.1 
133.1 
139.8 


182.9 
188.3 
179.5 


159.1 
158.3 
160.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


182.7 
169.6 
179.5 


163.5 
172.2 
186.2 


202.2 
211.2 
221.4 


171.3 
171.8 
170.3 


127.5 
135.8 
138.0 


167.5 
173.2 
179.0 


101.3 
114.4 
149.1 


151.5 
165.4 
170.3 


196.1 
183.7 
207.9 


149.2 
141. 9 r 
136.2 


A 
M 
J 


193.3 
168.1 
154.0 


191.5 
209.1 
221.6 


192.5 
190.3 
163.8 


185.1 
187.5 
208.8 


131.5 
106.3 
101.8 


197.9 
184.8 
202.8 


136.4 

121.6 

99.7 


178.3 
188.5 
204.9 


199.5 
214.2 
212.0 


137.9 
150.9 
164.1 


J 

A 

S 


137.1 
136.6 
160.7 


221.4 
223.6 
216.8 


132.1 
155.9 
126.6 


189.7 
197.2 
194.4 


85.4 
136.9 
116.5 


221.9 
214.2 
223.8 


86.5 
144.3 
174.0 


209.2 
211.0 
203.0 


199.0 
202.5 
198.1 


181.4 
193.8 
209.6 


O 

N 


190.8 
166.1 


210.3 
202.7 


122. 9 r 
123.9 


195. l r 
175.7 


148.9 
142.8 


211.0 
211.5 


155. r 
150.6 


192. 8 r 
181.2 


231. 8 r 
225.7 


218. 7 r 
217.8 



(1) Estimated inventories for all industries and inventories and shipments for selected industries. 
Source: Monthly Report on Inventories and Shipments by Manufacturing Industries, D.B.S. 



31 



MANUFACTURING 



JANUARY, 1952 



Indexes of Value of Inventories and Shipments 

TABLE 26 - concluded Inventories as of end of period 



AGRICULTURAL 
IMPLEMENTS 



MACHINERY 



MOTOR 
VEHICLES 



RAILROAD AND 

ROLLING STOCK 

EQUIPMENT 



AIRCRAFT 
AND PARTS 



Shipments Inventories Shipments Inventories Shipments Inventories Shipments Inventories Shipments Inventories 













1947 avers 


ge 100 










1949 
1950 


184.9 
168.2 


133.7 
149.2 


131.2 
141.9 


110.6 
129.2 


124.1 
163.9 


126.5 
161.9 


190.0 
122.5 


134.7 
96.2 


274.9 
358.7 


67.4 
94.8 


1950 O 
N 
D 


117 9 
124.6 
114.6 


110.7 
112.3 
149.2 


169 .5 
170.8 
176.0 


130.3 
137.9 
129.2 


177.9 
161.8 
165.0 


130.5 
140.0 
161.9 


93.8 
110.7 
126.5 


86.2 
96.0 
96.2 


254.4 
394.2 
565.2 


83 2 
92.0 
94.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


186 6 
180.0 
228 5 


150.7 
154.9 
155.5 


168.9 
165.4 
188.0 


141.7 
148.2 
157.1 


202.4 
229.4 
268.9 


170.7 
174.9 
177.9 


114.8 
122.4 
130.9 


102.0 
103.9 
121.0 


135.7 
621.6 
835.4 


100.5 

96.6 

101.1 


A 
M 

J 


239.5 
255.6 
240.8 


157.2 
157.8 
159.3 


198.6 
193.9 
183.7 


161.2 
164.6 
174.3 


243.7 
252.9 
213.0 


190.6 
190.0 
196.2 


181.8 
186.9 
212.1 


125.3 
127.5 
132.4 


423.5 

1,207.1 

377.0 


109.7 
124.4 
140.3 


J 

A 

S 


245.0 
243.9 
163.1 


156.2 
153.5 
161.1 


169.9 
158.4 
178.9 


177.6 
187.2 
194.4 


176.2 
135.1 
168.6 


202.1 

206.4 
206.9 


184.3 
237.7 
228.2 


147.4 
149.3 
160.6 


1,132.4 

1.013.0 

608.9 


138.8 
147.0 
170.1 


O 

N 


145.4' 
145.4 


182.0' 
182.0 


225.8' 
188.9 


195.4' 
205.2 


181.9' 
179.8 


203. 1' 
205.0 


166.8 
255.1 


177.2 
173.5 


1,241.7' 
1.007.2 


166 8' 
188.5 



SHEET METAL 
PRODUCTS 



ELECTRICAL 

APPARATUS 

AND SUPPLIES' 



NON-FERROUS 

METAL SMELTING 

AND REFINING 



ACIDS, ALKALIS 
AND SALTS 



PAINTS AND 
VARNISHES 



Shipments Inventories Shipments Inventories Shipments Inventories Shipments Inventories Shipments Inventories 

1947 average = 100 



1949 
1950 


124.4 
144.3 


104.0 
104.1 


123.5 
141.3 


106.3 
136.6 


134.0 
150.5 


132.5 
157.2 


111.2 
132.6 


125.8 
125.5 


120.5 
133.8 


158.8 
189.4 


1950 O 
N 
D 


185.9 
186.1 
176.0 


110.2 
109.3 
104.1 


160.0 
173.3 
168.8 


124.0 
126.5 
136.6 


174.0 
179.3 
176.4 


158.7 
157.1 
157.2 


136.3 
148.5 
146.7 


111.8 
113.2 
125.5 


144.0 
135.0 
121.0 


166.9 
175.5 
189.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


116.9 
113.7 
126 .0 


108.3 
123.2 
130.0 


165.9 
157.2 
174.2 


137.4 
141.3 
152.6 


167.9 
146.0 
185.8 


162.8 
166.0 
162.9 


153.5 
146.5 
148.8 


119.8 
119.2 
119.4 


165.0 
154.8 
146.9 


193.8 
199.6 
205.4 


A 
M 

J 


128.2 
143.6 
150.4 


143.9 
153.7 
161.1 


182.9 
180.1 

173.7 


160.4 
173.2 
184.9 


171.9 
184.0 
180.3 


163.4 
170.8 
175.6 


160.5 
169.8 
162.7 


124.3 
128.3 
145.7 


175.3 
200.9 
181.7 


208.3 
207.9 
205.5 


J 

A 

S 


152.5 
193.6 

208.5 


162.2 
156.5 
143.6 


113.4 
149.3 
154.4 


189.3 
194.4 
197.1 


174.4 
193.2 
171.8 


187.6 
192.6 
202.6 


176.9 
169.9 
158.0 


134.4 
151.0 
164.1 


155.3 
137.6 
126.5 


202.4 
202.8 
206.5 


O 

N 


169.0 
152.9 


158.4 
142.6 


146. 6 r 

144.1 


198.5' 
195.2 


204.8' 
207.8 


207.6' 
205.4 


148.1 
143.8 


181.0 
189.6 


139.5' 
118.3 


204.9' 
213.8 



32 "Includes heavy electrical machinery, industrial machinery and machine tools, 

and parts, refrigerators and household appliances and miscellaneous. 



'-'Includes batteries, radios 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 27 



MANUFACTURING 



Tobacco and Beverages 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



TOBACCO 



BEVERAGES 



Releases for Consumption in Canada*" 



Stocks (2 > 



Production 



Cut 
tobacco 



Plug 
tobacco 



Snuff 



Unmanu- 
Cigarettes Cigars factured 



Beer< 3 > 



New Spirits 

spirits bottled 14 ' 



Stocks' 2 ' 

Distilled 
liquor 





Thousand' pounds 




Millions 


Million 
pounds 


Thousand 
barrels 


Mill 


ion proof gallons 


1939 
1950 


1,977 
2,159 


267 
194 


70 
79 


594 
1,431 


11.1 
16.6 


75 
154 


5 
5 


209.3 
593.5 


0.96 
1.83 


0.26 
0.78 


79.66 


1950 O 
N 
D 


2,316 
2,224 
2,061 


232 
198 
163 


83 

90 

74 


1,489 
1,386 
1,244 


19.3 
19.7 
17.7 


154 


5 


620.3 
566.8 
487.9 


2.19 
2.26 
2.30 


0.98 
1.30 
0.89 


79.01 
78.97 
79.66 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2,326 
2,154 
2,362 


190 
163 
188 


89 
78 
85 


1,518 
1,477 
1,578 


17.7 
14.9 
15.9 


193 


4 


456.1 
459.6 
603.2 


2.40 
2.42 
2.31 


0.83 
0.90 
1.21 


80.59 
81.60 
81.88 


A 
M 
J 


1,804 
2,733 
2,566 


130 
205 
196 


79 

109 

90 


1,429 
1,487 
1,357 


17.0 
17.8 
13.7 


176 





681.9 
727.2 
714.0 


2.12 
2.19 
1.75 


0.94 
0.73 
0.69 


82.64 
83.69 
84.12 


J 

A 

S 


1,857 
2,242 
1,681 


141 
130 
123 


34 

46 

1 


1,013 
932 
754 


9.4 
8.5 
6.3 


156 


8 


781.2 
782.8 
590.0 


1.40 
1.81 
1.78 


0.67 
1.02 
0.99 


84.31 
84.59 
84.65 


O 

N 


2,763 
2,682 


205 
205 


99 
81 


1,835 
1,381 


16.4 
16.9 






593.6 
564.8 


2.43 
2.40 


1.34 
1.28 


84.97 
85.24 



(1> Releases of domestically manufactured tobacco for consumption in Canada. (2, End of period. <3, The 
production of beer is shown in thousand barrels of 25 gallons each. Commencing with April, 1949, Newfoundland 

is included. < 4, Includes bottling of imported liquors. 

Source: Department of National Revenue: and Quarterly Report, Stocks and Consumption of Unmanufactured 
Tobacco, D.B.S. 



TABLE 28 



Rubber 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRO- 
IMPORTS DUCTION 



CONSUMPTION 



CONSUMPTION OF NATURAL 
AND SYNTHETIC 



STOCKS 



Natural* 1 ) Synthetic Natural Synthetic Reclaim Total 



Tires and 
Tubes 



Foot- 
wear 



Wire 
and 



End of Period 



Cable Natural Synthetic 



Million pounds 



1939 
1950 


6.07 
8.64 


10'91 


5.90 
8.61 


4'22 


1.40 
2.61 


12.83 


8'61 


1.43 


0^38 


7.66 


6.75 


1950 O 
N 
D 


6.83 

9.55 

10.21 


11.52 
11.69 
11.74 


9.86 

9.85 

10.09 


5.07 
4.74 
4.86 


2.91 
3.09 
3.09 


14.93 
14.59 
14.96 


10.24 

9.78 

10.16 


1.67 
1.86 
1.48 


0.38 
0.46 
0.38 


8.92 
7.72 
7.66 


6.81 
6.38 
6.75 


1951 J 
F 
M 


16.37 

9.16 

13.20 


11.85 
10.59 
11.82 


9.68 

9.72 

10.36 


4.99 
4.98 
5.07 


3.28 
3.33 
3.60 


14.67 
14.70 
15.43 


9.81 

9.86 

10.25 


1.71 
1.68 
1.83 


0.45 
0.38 
0.40 


9.23 

9.30 

11.18 


7.09 
5.99 
6.74 


A 
M 

J 


8.54 

11.21 

8.88 


10.38 

8.46 

10.09 


10.68 

10.17 

7.47 


5.42 
4.80 
4.10 


3.74 
3.67 
2.78 


16.10 
14.96 
11.56 


10.67 

10.11 

7.37 


1.93 
1.75 
1.45 


0.41 
0.42 
0.43 


10.95 
10.26 
12.26 


6.87 
6.83 
7.36 


J 

A 

S 


8.02 

10.29 

4.58 


12.17 
11.28 
12.47 


7.36 
6.34 
7.12 


4.17 
4.35 
5.11 


2.59 
2.45 
2.48 


11.53 
10.70 
12.23 


8.16 
6.40 
8.22 


1.01 
1.70 
1.36 


0.22 
0.46 
0.44 


12.05 
14.56 
14.53 


8.23 
8.15 
9.88 


O 

N 


6.10 


13.52 
13.16 


7.31 
6.61 


5.31 
5.35 


2.83 
2.41 


12.62 
11.95 


8.76 
8.59 


1.40 
1.03 


0.44 
0.48 


12.36 
8.26 


10.27 
9.86 



(1 'Includes crude rubber, Gutta-percha unmanufactured, Latex and Balata crude. 
Source: Monthly Report on Consumption, Production and Inventories of Rubber, D.B.S. 



33 



MANUFACTURING 

TABLE 29 



JANUARY, 1952 



Leather 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



1940 
1950 

1950 A 
S 

O 
N 
D 



1940 
1950 

1950 A 
S 

O 

N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 



HIDES AND SKINS 



Stocks: End oi Period 



Wettings 



Cattle 
hides 



Call and 
kip skins 



Goat and 
kid skins 



Thousands 



Sheep and 
lamb skins 

Thousand 
dozen 



Cattle 

hides 



Call and 
kip skins 



Goat and 
kid skins 



Thousands 



Sheep and 
lamb skins 

Thousand 
dozen 



Horse 
hides 



Thousands 



627 
368 

329 
321 

337 
357 
368 



591 
467 

564 
557 

531 
512 
467 



1951 J 
F 
M 


345 
311 
286 


432 
417 
408 


A 
M 

J 


294 
312 
347 


441 
479 
596 


J 

A 

S 


352 
337 
335 


626 
676 
687 


O 


313 


689 



87 
64 

38 
30 

36 
81 
64 

44 
57 
56 

40 

80 

101 

128 
128 
139 

122 



69 
52 

39 
40 

48 
53 
52 

47 
39 
39 

37 
38 
42 

48 
47 
55 

64 



146 
143 

148 
147 

161 
176 
179 

185 
171 
162 

152 
139 
108 

85 

113 

96 

103 



111 
86 

97 
93 

110 

102 

76 

92 
80 
67 

67 
72 
42 

20 
22 
25 

57 



25 
20 

10 
11 

12 
25 
24 

25 
11 
25 

31 
22 
11 

2 

1 

17 



13 

14 

15 
13 

16 
16 
11 

16 
16 
17 

16 

11 

8 

7 

9 

10 

10 



4.7 
0.7 



0.1 
0.1 
0.2 

0.1 
0.2 
0.1 

0.2 
0.1 
0.2 

0.1 



0.1 



PRODUCTION OF FINISHED LEATHER 



Cattle Leather 



Sole 
leather 

Thousand 
pounds 



Glove and 
Upper garment 
leather leather 



Bag, case 

and strap 

leather 



Harness 
leather 



Thousand square ieet Thousand sides 



Call and 
Kip Skin 

Upper 
leather 

Thousand 
square ieet 



Goat and 

Kid 
Leather 



Thousand 
skins 



Sheep and Lamb 
Leather 



Glove and 
garment 
leather 



Shoe 
leather 



Dozen skins 



Horse 
Hide 

Glove and 
garment 
leather 

Thousand 
square Ieet 



2,056 
1.469 

1,414 
1,281 

1,427 
1,443 
1,938 

1,607 
1,589 
1,596 

1,469 
1,451 
1,268 

819 
996 
906 

995 



3,168 

3,179 
3,563 

3,955 
4,207 
3,872 

4,395 
3,743 
3,781 

3,173 
2,941 
2.361 

1,712 
2.393 
2,017 

2,911 



414 

349 
452 

516 
488 
434 

435 
338 
361 

327 
179 
237 

195 
264 
209 

325 



13 

9 
13 

14 
13 
11 

15 
15 
18 

18 

15 

9 

4 

5 

12 

13 



2 
3 

4 
7 
5 

8 
6 
5 

4 
4 
3 

2 
5 

7 



897 

806 
823 

1,051 
1,038 
1,104 

1,123 
983 
817 

812 
781 

679 

179 
388 
245 

422 



26 

24 
18 

14 
16 
14 

38 
31 
35 

28 
23 
19 

5 
14 
13 



5,198 4,797 



4,906 
5,563 

6,211 
6,966 
6,279 

6,825 
5,643 
7,367 

5,937 
4.293 
3,198 

3,476 
3,551 
3,877 



5,622 
5,584 

3,877 
4,504 
3,469 

4,279 
4,190 
4,696 

4,475 
2,990 
2,013 

1,078 
1,981 
1,993 



8 3,099 3,047 



169 

161 
183 

207 
211 
186 

226 
281 
387 

457 
465 
324 

180 
265 
273 

279 



34 



Source: Statistics ol Hides, Skins and Leather, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 29 -concluded 



MANUFACTURING 



Leather 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION OF BOOTS AND SHOES 



Men's 



Women's 



Boys' and 
Youths' 



Misses' and Babies' and 
Children's Infants' 



Total 
All Kinds 



Leather or 
Fabric 
Uppers 



All Other 











Thousand 


pair 








1939 
1950 


623 
669 


978 
1,349 


104 
130 


268 
443 


93 

237 


2,067 

2,828 


1,779 
2,296 


289 
531 


1950S 


736 


1,578 


131 


501 


248 


3,194 


2,347 


846 


O 
N 
D 


798 
791 
634 


1,536 
1,448 
1,165 


135 
136 
133 


528 
560 
391 


274 
291 
214 


3,270 
3,227 
2,538 


2,432 
2,364 
2,054 


838 
862 
484 


1951 J 
F 
M 


646 
702 
798 


1,392 
1,455 
1,671 


110 
135 
163 


450 
441 
517 


213 
233 
263 


2,812 
2,967 
3,412 


2,509 
2,677 
2,977 


303 
290 
435 


A 
M 

J 


791 
793 
584 


1,589 
1,556 
1,234 


146 
130 
110 


516 
468 
444 


245 
231 
219 


3,287 
3,179 
2,590 


2,885 
2,714 
2,143 


402 
465 
448 


J 

A 

S 


451 
667 
587 


894 
1,404 
1,255 


91 

125 
106 


303 
456 
424 


163 
243 
214 


1,902 

2,895 
2,586 


1,467 
2,318 
1,995 


435 
577 
591 


O 


702 


1,189 


117 


458 


260 


2,726 


2,094 


632 



Note: As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 
Source: Production of Leather Footwear, D.B.S. 



TABLE 30 



Primary Textiles: Cotton, Wool and Rayon 
Monthly averages or calendar months"" 



Raw Cotton' 1 ' 



Broad Woven Woollen and 

Cotton Cotton Worsted Worsted Broad Woven 

Yarn Fabric Yarn Fabrics Rayon Fabric 



Imports 



Bale Openings 



Production 



Shipments Production 





Thousand 


Number of 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 


Thousand 








pounds 


bales< 2 > 


pounds'" 


pounds 


yards 


pounds 


Thousand yards 


1940 


18,052 


37,930 


18,950 


16,412 


25,774 


1,306 


2,199 


4,821 


1950 


19,054 


37,914 


18,697 


17,630 


26,540 


1,328 


1,883 


9,445 


1950 O 


21,147 


40,438 


19,647 ] 






( 1,418 ] 






N 


24,853 


44,161 


21,741 


19,261 


28,995 


1,524 , 


2,015 


10,486 


D 


26,413 


39,665 


19,693 J 






I 1,393 J 






1951 J 


23,255 


39,838 


19,833 1 






f 1,578 ) 






F 


14,704 


41,441 


20,447 


19,646 


29,574 


1,487 


2,099 


10,599 


M 


25,753 


45,473 


22,653 J 






I 1,492 j 






A 


23,103 


44,518 


22,182 1 






[ 1,469 ) 






M 


25,250 


44,498 


22,208 


20,192 


30,397 


1,350 ' 


1,831 


10,769 


J 


14,140 


41,257 


20,568 J 






( 1,277 j 






J 


6,490 


28 , 106 


13,995 1 
13,873 






f 907 1 






A 


7,824 


27,882 


13,853 


20,854 


1,111 


• 1,423 


8,156 


S 


9,747 


33,384 


16,613 J 






1 1,127 J 






O 


12,607 


35,642 


17,783 












N 




33,708 


16,796 













U) Monthly data include estimate for non-reporting companies. <2) Bales of 500 pounds gross weight, 
weight. < 4 > Quarterly data for the last five columns are monthly averages. 



(3) Invoice 35 



MANUFACTURING 



JANUARY, 1952 



Production of Factory Clothing 



TABLE 31 






C 


quarterly averages or 


quarters 














• 




WOMEN'S AND MISSES' 












Coats 


Suits 




Dresses 




Skirts 


Blouses 


Slips 
and 




Wool and 

wool 
mixtures 


Rayon and 

rayon 
mixtures 


Cotton, 

linen and 

other 


Wool and Rayon and 

wool rayon 
mixtures mixtures 


Cotton 


Rayon and 

rayon 

mixtures 


Petti- 
coats " 










Thousands 








Thousand dozen 


1950 

1950 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 


408.0 

551.7 
359.1 

437.4 
284 .0 

527.6 
292.1 


217.1 

405.5 
197.1 
160.7 
105 1 

389.6 

163.8 


90.2 

21.3 

22.0 

218.0 

99.6 

23.3 
17.8 


1.815.0 

2,047.3 
1.844.0 
1,640.7 
1,727.8 

2,049.7 
1,891.1 


1,410 3 

1,788.2 
1,884.1 

885.7 
1,083.1 

1,523.2 
1,682.0 


209.0 

257.5 
90.3 

278.4 
209.8 

212.1 
105.8 


228.2 

390.7 
132.4 
178.9 

210.9 

365 7 
175 4 


26.6 

32.9 

41.6 
16.6 

15.1 

35.2 

61.8 


96.9 

110.9 
67.8 

112.8 
96.1 

117.0 
61.6 


170.8 

179.0 
172.8 
145.5 
185.8 

196.1 
184.9 




CHILDREN'S 










BOYS' 










Coats 


Suits 


Dresses, 

All 
Kinds 


Suits 


Overcoats 

and 
Topcoats 


Trousers 

and 

Slacks, 

Fine 


Overalls, 

Bib and 

Waist 




Shirts 






Dress, 

Fine, 

Cotton 


Sport, 
Fine 


Work 








Thousands 








Thousand dozen 




1950 

1950 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 


170.6 

209.5 
126.9 
180.9 
165.2 

205.1 
129.0 


22.4 

34.3 
14.0 

17.2 
24.2 

40.0 1 
16.7 


748.3 

915.9 
715.4 
652.5 
709.4 

,118.1 
927.2 


70.8 

100.0 
71.1 

56.7 
55.5 

89.0 
60.2 


15.9 

7.0 

4.1 

21.7 

30.8 

10.0 
13.6 


364.8 

357.5 
405.7 
382.3 
313.8 

455.4 
389.0 


19 .1 

19.9 

27.6 
13.2 
15.9 

24 .2 
28.4 


16.5 

16.1 

20.3 
18.0 
11.6 

15.6 
15.8 


8.9 

11.1 

15.8 

2.7 

5.9 

10.6 
12.4 


8 1 

7.5 
7.2 
8.7 
8.9 

6.4 
5.3 












MEN'S AND YOUTHS' 
















Dress Clothing 








Work Clothing 






Suits 


Overcoats 

and 
topcoats 


Trouse 
and 
slacks 
fine 


rs 


Shirts 




Overalls 


Work 
- pants 


Work 
shirts 




, Dress 


or business, 
fine 


Sport, 
fine 


Bib and 
waist 


Combin- 
ation 






Cotton Other 12 ' 








Thousands 








Thousand dozen 






1950 

1950 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 


424.2 

446.2 
476 8 
335.9 
437 7 

477.1 
456 9 


175.8 

144.9 
117.5 
201 9 
239 1 

195.2 
133.7 


731. 

804. 
810 
611. 
699 

814 
770. 


2 158. 

3 174 

2 144 

3 146 

169 

9 169 

1 148 


7 

6 

1 

7 
5 

9 13.5 
8 11.4 


49 .9 

56.0 
90.1 

27.5 
25.7 

87.2 
89.4 


61.4 

57.2 
59.4 
61.9 
67.0 

86.5 
81.1 


7.6 

9 3 
6.5 
6.3 
8.2 

10.4 

12.5 


67.8 

60.5 
69.7 
70.3 
70.8 

80.5 
82.5 


87.9 

96.0 
82.7 
82.3 
90.8 

97.8 
96.2 



36 New series: preliminary, subject to revision. 
: Includes children's. '"Includes boys'. 

Souice: Quarterly Production of Factory Clothing (Selected Garments), D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 32 



MANUFACTURING 



Wood and Paper Products 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



SAWN LUMBER 


Canada 








East of Rocky Mountains 




British 




Total 


Prince 
Edward 
Island 


Nova 
Scotia 


New 
Bruns- 
wick Quebec Ontario 


Mani- 
toba 


Columbia 

Saskat- 
chewan Alberta 













Million feet, 


board measure 










1939 
1950 


331.4 

538.0 


141.7 
250.9 


0.4 
0.9 


12.7 
24.1 


17.6 
24.2 


54.7 
86.8 


40.1 
75.8 


5.1 

4.8 


3.2 

5.6 


8.0 
28.6 


189.7 
287.2 


1950 O 
N 
D 


555.5 
418.7 
398.6 


206.9 

94.5 

123.5 


0.8 
0.7 
0.9 


16.3 
13.7 
12.5 


11.5 
4.4 
6.2 


79.3 
29.4 
20.7 


87.5 
27.7 
21.5 


3.1 
0.4 
0.5 


0.4 
1.8 
4.9 


8.0 
16.5 
56.3 


348.5 
324.2 
275.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


431.8 
479.3 
502.6 


151.0 
212.1 
235.4 


0.4 
0.3 
1.1 


17.3 
27.8 
27.2 


10.1 
24.1 
40.6 


37.9 
58.4 
59.3 


17.4 
14.8 
25.7 


1.9 
2.3 
2.5 


12.0 
10.2 
16.2 


54.1 
74.1 
62.8 


280.8 
267.2 
267.2 


A 
M 
J 


400.2 
595.5 
813.3 


128.9 
282.2 
480.8 


2.0 
1.5 
1.9 


18.3 
38.2 
47.3 


22.2 
24.4 
42.9 


49.9 
114.7 
197.9 


24.1 

90.9 

166.9 


2.9 

4.0 

12.0 


5.0 
4.9 
1.9 


4.5 
3.5 
9.9 


271.3 
313.3 
332.5 


J 
A 

S 


747.3 
696.3 
554.3' 


454.7 
404.6 
295.0 


1.1 
0.9 
1.5 


42.3 
26.6 
21.8 


34.7 
24.3 
21.0 


190.1 
161.8 
102.4 


164.3 
169.4 
133.6 


7.4 

10.5 

5.9 


3.8 
2.0 
1.3 


10.9 
9.0 
7.7 


292.6 
291.6 
259.3' 


o 


479.3 


176.7 


1.2 


15.4 


18.2 


66.4 


66.6 


2.6 


0.7 


5.6 


302.6 





WOOD PULP< 1 > 








NEWSPRINT 








Production 


Exports 


Produc- 
tion 




Shipments 




Stocks 
End of 
Period 


Total 


Mechanical Chemical 


Total 


Domestic 


Export 



Thousand tons 



1939 
1950 


347.2 
706.1' 


228.2 
409.2' 


111.9 
288.0' 


58.8 
153.8 


243.9 

443.2' 


238.4 
442.6 


15.8 
29.6 


222.6 
413.0 


169.5 
89.1 


1950 O 
N 
D 


735.1 
745.3 
698.4 


418.3 
429.0 
404.0 


306.9 
305.7 
284.5 


180.8 
181.5 
172.2 


456.4 
456.7 
430.6 


465.3 
477.7 
448.8 


32.2 
31.4 
32.3 


433.0 
446.3 
416.5 


128.3 

107.4 

89.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


737.0 
697.4 
773.0 


422.7 
394.6 
438.3 


303.7 
292.7 
323.4 


175.6 
149.6 
185.4 


453.0 
425.1 
473.0 


423.3 
400.8 
473.5 


28.4 
28.1 
32.0 


394.9 
372.7 
441.5 


118.8 
143.1 
142.5 


A 
M 
J 


740.4 
805.1 
773.3 


412.9 
455.7 
436.5 


316.1 
337.4 
325.3 


176.1 
188.6 
191.2 


447.6 
485.7 
464.3 


443.3 
486.3 
475.0 


27.7 
32.4 
29.2 


415.6 
453.9 
445.8 


146.8 
146.2 
135.5 


J 

A 

S 


746.6 
803.1 
716.4 


424.0 
449.3 
401.3 


311.1 
341.9 
304.5 


201.6 
211.0 
186.1 


452.5 
484.6 
431.1 


443.0 
480.6 
427.7 


29.1 
29.9 
28.5 


413.9 
450.7 
399.3 


145.0 
149.0 
152.3 


o 

N 


809.4 
775.0 


452.8 
435.9 


344.7 
328.5 


202.6 
187.6 


492.5 
471.7 


497.4 
491.0 


33.0 
30.6 


464.4 
460.4 


147.4 
128.1 



Note: Newfoundland is included as of April, 1949, in data for wood pulp and newsprint. 

C1) Total pulp production covers "screenings" which are already included in exports. "Screenings" are excluded 
throughout from mechanical and chemical pulp. 

Source: Production, Shipments and Stocks on Hand of Sawmills, D.B.S. 

Bulletins of Canadian Pulp and Paper Association and Newsprint Association of Canada. 



37 



MANUFACTURING JANUARY, 1952 

Shipments of Primary Iron and Steel Shapes to Consuming Industries 



TABLE 33 



(Carbon and Alloy) 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



Automotive 
Industries 



Agricultural 
Implements 
and Other Building 

Farm Construction Containers 



Machinery Merchant 
and Trade 

Tools Products 



Mining 

and 

Lumbering 



Pressing, 
Forming 
National and 

Defence Stamping 



Thousand tons 



1949 
1950 


12 5 
16.7 


10.1 
10.9 


30.2 

29 8 


17.1 
21.8 


9 7 
9.7 


29 3 
29.8 


7.5 
11.0 


0.2 
0.3 


12.2 
15.6 


1950S 


18.4 


12 8 


32.7 


27.2 


12.3 


29 5 


9.0 


0.3 


16.2 


O 
N 
D 


18.1 
21.2 
19 6 


11.9 
11.3 
12 9 


34.8 

30.8 
30.8 


24.7 
24.6 
20.2 


10.1 
11.2 
10.2 


31.0 

33.3 
30.9 


8 6 

9.2 

11.8 


0.4 
0.3 

0.3 


17.0 
16 3 
13.0 


1951 J 
F 
M 


18.5 
21.0 
21.6 


12.2 
12.5 
13.9 


35.8 
30.1 
34.8 


26.6 
24.1 
23.6 


13.3 

11.4 
12 8 


38 .5 
28.1 
35.7 


13.5 
9.0 

10.6 


0.9 
0.8 
2.0 


13.7 
15.0 
17.1 


A 
M 

J 


24.9 
29.2 
21 4 


11.9 

10.6 
13.4 


28.5 
36.4 
34.4 


24.8 
28.3 
26.2 


16.0 
14.1 
12.1 


35.1 
35.3 
34.0 


9.0 
10.8 
11.1 


4.0 
4.4 
4.4 


15 .6 
16.8 
16.1 


J 

A 

S 


23.6 

16.1 
17 5 


12 .5 
9.5 
9.2 


32.0 

27.1 
28 8 


25.3 
26.7 
24.2 


13.7 
13.4 
13.0 


30.5 
34.9 
33 


10.9 
14.4 
10 7 


3.6 

5.0 
6.3 


15.2 
14.3 
11.6 


O 


20.4 


14.1 


36.6 


24.3 


14.2 


38.1 


11.9 


6.7 


14.8 



Public 
Works 

and 
Utilities 



Railway 
Operating 



Railway 
Cars and 

Loco- 
motives 



Ship- 
building 



Whole- 
salers and 
Ware- 
houses 



Net Total Producers' Export 
Miscel- Domestic Inter- Ship- 

laneous Shipments change ments 



Total 













Thousar 


id tons 










1949 
1950 


1.6 
1.1 


31.5 
35.8 


13.0 

5.9 


1.7 
1.9 


29.6 
26.2 


1.2 
1.2 


207.4 
217.8 


79.5 
116.7 


18.3 

18.2 


305.2 
352.8 


1950S 


0.9 


35.2 


7.7 


1.1 


29.5 


1.3 


233.9 


123.6 


20 8 


378.3 


O 
N 
D 


1.9 

1.0 

11 


30.0 

24.0 
28.3 


9.6 
12 9 
12.1 


0.9 
0.7 
1.4 


31.9 
30.1 

28.0 


1.1 

1.7 
1.2 


231.9 
228.6 

221.8 


123.5 
125.5 
107.2 


25.9 
27.0 
28.5 


381.3 
381.1 
357.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


0.7 
0.8 
1.2 


37.5 
37 4 
38.5 


18.0 

16.1 
17.3 


1.2 
4.3 

3.6 


29.3 
28.4 
30.1 


14 
2.1 
3.5 


261.1 
241.1 
266.1 


143 4 
122.1 
150.1 


6.6 

4.2 
2.0 


411.2 

367.4 
418.2 


A 
M 

J 


1.9 

5.2 
4 5 


41.2 
39.9 

35 1 


15.9 

15 7 
14 8 


4.0 
3.5 
2.6 


30.1 
30.6 
28.4 


1.7 
1.5 
1.9 


264.7 

282.2 
260.4 


145.5 
161.6 
135.5 


2.1 
3.1 
3.4 


412.3 
446.9 
399.3 


J 

A 

S 


2.2 
16 
3.2 


31.9 
28.3 

28.1 


12 7 

13 6 
13.6 


2.6 

4.2 
3 8 


21.7 
24 .5 
21.4 


15 
1.2 

1.0 


239 . 8 
234.9 
225.5 


131.7 
146.2 
138 2 


2.8 
10.5 
10.4 


374.3 
391.6 
374 . 2' 


O 


2 7 


29 3 


15.5 


3.5 


26.8 


17 


260 . 5 


136.2 


9.0 


405 . 8 



38 



Source: Monthly Report on Primary Iron and Steel, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 33 - concluded 



MANUFACTURING 



Primary Iron and Steel 

Monthly averages or calendar months 









PRODUCTION 






PRIMARY IRON AND STEEL SHAPES 




Pig' 1 ' 
Iron 


Ferro- 
Alloys 




Steel 






Shipments 








Total 


Ingots 


Castings 


Total") 


Export (3) 


Domestic 


Imports (4) 










Thousand net tons 








1939 
1950 


70.5 
193.1 


7.1 
15. r 


129.3 
282.0 


124.2 
274.8 


5.1 

7.1 r 


236 !l 


21.4 
18.2 


217i8 


39.9 
92.2 


1950 O 
N 
D 


205.8 
208.3 
198.2 


17.0 
16.9 
15.3 


293.9 
289.5 
290. 7 r 


285.7 
279.8 
281.5 


8.3 
9.7 
9.2 r 


257.8 
255.6 
250.3 


25.9 
27.0 
28.5 


231.9 
228.6 
221.8 


118.8 

130.1 

85.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


201.1 
193.2 
220.6 


19.1 
14.9 
19.5 


309.7 
281.4 
314.8 


299.4 
271.2 
304.3 


10.2 
10.2 
10.5 


267.7 
245.3 
268.1 


6.6 
4.2 
2.0 


261.1 
241.1 
266.1 


108.4 

85.1 

117.6 


A 
M 
J 


211.1 
219.0 
213.2 


19.6 
23.5 
19.8 


312.0 
313.3 
293.5 


301.8 
302.9 
283.7 


10.2 

10.4 

9.9 


266.8 
285.3 
263.8 


2.1 
3.1 
3.4 


264.7 
282.2 
260.4 


147.7 
153.8 
143.1 


J 

A 

S 


210.3 
203.2 
212.5 


17.6 
25.3 
23.0 


274.6 

286.8 
268.2 


266.6 
277.9 
257.9 


8.0 

8.9 

10.4 


242.6 
245.4 
236.0 


2.8 
10.5 
10.4 


239.8 
234.9 
225.5 


145.7 
154.2 
150.8 


o 

N 


224.5 
223.5 


21.2 
24.9 


309.4 
307.1 


298.2 
295.5 


11.3 
11.6 


269.5 


9.0 


260.5 


180.1 
166.5 



(1) As of January, 1950 includes some silvery pig iron formerly included with ferro-alloys. "'Excluding producers' 
interchange. (3) Prior to 1946, exports include pigs, ingots, blooms, billets and rolling mill products. (4) Prior to 
1946, imports include castings and forgings and rolling mill products. Since 1946, they include, in addition to all other 
shapes, wire and wire rope. 

Source: Primary Iron and Steel, D.B.S. 



TABLE 34 



Motor Vehicles: Production and Sales 

Monthly averages or calendar months 





Total 

Motor 

Vehicles 


Commercial 

Including 

Military 






PASSENGER CARS 








Production'" 


Imports 

less 

Re-exports 


Total 
Supply 




Sales' 2 ' 




Domestic 

Sales 
Financed 




Production (l) 


Total 


Export 


Domestic 










Thousands 










Number 


1939 
1950 


12.95 

32.57 


3.92 
8.84 


9.03 
23.73 


1.37 
6.81 


10.40 
30.54 


10.72 
29.08 


3.21 
2.01 


7.50 
27.08 


8,088 


1950 O 
N 
D 


35.57 
30.32 
30.74 


9.64 
6.90 
7.21 


25.93 
23.42 
23.53 


7.40 
8.25 
4.24 


33.34 
31.67 
27.77 


28.64 
27.91 
24.64 


2.38 
3.08 
1.99 


26.26 
24.83 
22.65 


8,238 
7,476 
6,637 


1951 J 
F 
M 


39.20 
40.59 

47.78 


11.00 
11.35 
12.90 


28.21 
29.24 
34.88 


4.45 
4.46 
5.40 


32.65 
33.70 
40.28 


26.65 
33.83 
40.32 


0.52 
0.63 
2.44 


26.13 
33.20 
37.89 


6,133 
6,463 
9,811 


A 
M 
J 


41.06 
42.91 
36.23 


12.38 
12.62 
10.38 


28.68 
30.30 
25.85 


8.45 
8.26 
5.88 


37.13 
38 55 
31.72 


39.11 

28.50 
24.74 


4.18 
2.66 
1.72 


34.93 
25.84 
23.03 


8,451 
6,890 
7,216 


J 
A 

S 


30.29 

21.83 
29.86 


9.27 

7.99 
10.67 


21.02 
13.84 
19.19 


3.11 
1.00 
0.49 


24.13 
14.84 
19.68 


24.40 

17.28 
23.03 


3.71 
2.82 
4.42 


20.69 
14.46 
18.61 


7,526 
7,044 
5,681 


o 

N 


32.46 
29.46 


11.99 
10.80 


20.47 
18.66 


-0.15 


20.32 


18.93 
19.23 


5.39 
5.46 


13.54 
13.77 


5,763 
5,775 



D.B.S 



'"Monthly data are shipments subsequent to 1946. <2) As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 

Source: Motor Vehicle Shipments, Sales of New Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Financing, and Trade of Canada, 



39 



MANUFACTURING 



TABLE 35 



JANUARY, 1952 



Refrigerators and Washing Machines 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



ELECTRIC REFRIGERATORS" 



DOMESTIC WASHING MACHINES 



Domesbc Types 



All Types 



Factory Produc- 

Produchon Shipments stocks 12 ' Imports Exports faon 



Ship- Factory 

ments 3 stocks 1 - 31 Imports Exports 



Thousands 



1939 
1950 


4.29 
28.88 


28.86 


1950 O 

N 
D 


33 . 26 r 
35.43 r 
31.34 


33 32 r 
36.19' 
32.70 


1951 J 
F 
M 


34.69 
31.45 
35.40 


33.19 
31.25 
33.60 


A 
M 

J 


34.22 
32.95 
26.93 


33.68 
30.13 
19.58 


J 

A 

S 


16.55 
17.32 
14.26 


10.74 
9.93 
8.61 


O 

N 


13.44 
12.82 


7.46 
9.46 



3.01 

5.56 
4.80 
3.01 

4.35 
4.54 
6.34 

6.88 

9.70 

17.04 

22.85 
30.25 
35.89 

41.87 
45.22 



1.11 
0.92 

1.84 
2.45 
1.16 

8.82 

9.06 

10.02 

16.65 
18.60 
15.06 

11.43 
9.27 
3.61 

4.11 



0.78 
0.20 

0.01 
0.70 
0.54 

0.17 
0.08 
0.18 

0.13 
0.68 
0.61 

0.43 
0.37 
0.22 

0.03 
0.05 



8.66 
23.46 

27.82 
28.08 
25.24 

30.71 
27.02 
29.90 

29.94 
27.24 
19.22 

13.32 
13.31 
12.25 

13.12 
12.23 



23.93 10.41 



28.68 
27.75 
25.22 

29.75 
25.56 
29.53 

28.30 
22.01 
14.52 



11 
9 



86 
86 



9.88 
10.21 
10.41 

11.36 
12.82 
13.20 

14.84 
20.07 
24.77 

26.22 
29.67 



10 59 31.34 



14.26 
12.86 



30.19 
29.56 



1.71 
0.15 

0.47 
0.28 
0.31 

0.68 
0.45 
0.60 

0.23 
0.49 
0.37 

0.23 
0.15 
0.27 

0.44 



1.68 
1.05 

0.99 
1.28 
0.68 

0.50 
1.17 
1.12 

1.93 
1.74 
2.67 

1.59 
2.38 
2.21 

1.08 
1.27 



Radio and Television Receiving Sets 1 

Monthly averages or calendar months 





Estimated 
Production* 5 ' 


Domestic 
Shipments 




Factory Stocks 
End of Period 


Imports 
(t) 


Exports 


Val 
Factory 

Radios 


ue of 
Shipments 

Television 
sets 


Average 

Price per 

Set"' 




Radios 


Tele- 
vision - 
sets 


Radios 


Tele- 
vision 
sets 


Radios 


Tele- 
vision 
sets 






Total 


Table 














Thousands 








Thousand dollars 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


29 
68.4 


2.7 


30.9 
63.2 


21.1 
38.8 


2.5 


60.9 
145.2 


2.7 


4.9 
3.9 


0.1 
3.1 


1,667 
4.930 


1,079 


32 
34 


1950 O 
N 
D 


74.9 
71.1 
66.2 


3.8 
6.0 
5.2 


81.0 
91.0 
84.5 


55.8 
65.4 
58.1 


4.3 
4.9 
5 5 


188.5 
165.3 
145.2 


1.9 

3.1 

2.7 


5.7 
4.2 
3.2 


2.3 
2.1 
4.6 


7,051 
7,425 
7,248 


1.854 
2,352 
2,706 


35 
35 
31 


1951 J 
F 
M 


64.9 

69.3 
48.9 


4.0 

4.3 
5.8 


50.7 
56.8 
66.0 


29.8 
33.0 
38.2 


3.8 

4.5 
5.4 


158.5 
168.5 
145.9 


2.9 
2.7 
3.1 


3.4 

2.0 
5.4 


2.4 
1.5 
2.8 


4,405 
4,853 
5,351 


1,956 
2.387 
3.251 


32 
35 
33 


A 
M 

J 


72.4 

68.1 
66.4 


5.0 

5 7 
3.5 


57.5 
38.8 

32 9 


31 6 
16 5 
111 


4.4 
11 
0.5 


158 6 
184.7 
217.3 


3.6 
8.2 

11 3 


4.4 
3.3 
3.8 


2.5 
1.4 
2.4 


4,843 
3,529 
2,829 


2.528 
542 
235 


37 
39 
36 


J 

A 

S 


36.2 

42.1 
51 4 


3 1 
2 3 
5.3 


28 8 
36.3 
42 4 


13.1 
17.5 
26.2 


0.3 
0.9 
3.1 


223.1 
222.3 
221.3 


14.1 
15.5 
17 7 


5.0 

8.4 
6.4 


1.6 

2.4 
8.8 


2,630 
3.663 
4,038 


159 

488 

1,591 


42 
38 
34 


O 
N 


19 4 


4.0 


39.3 


26.8 


4.9 


196.6 


16.8 


5 7 


4.3 

3 9 


3.940 


2,471 


37 



40 



\M of May 1949 Newfoundland is included. ; End of period. Does not include apartment-type machines. 

« Electric and other Factory shipments adjusted for change in stocks. ' Includes television sets. '"Manu- 

facturers' list prices of Table Model electric standard broadcast radios. raT , a j a 

Source: Monthly Reports, Domesbc Type Electric Refrigerators. Domestic Washing Machines, Trade of Canada, 

and Radio Receiving Sets, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 36 



Value of Building Permits 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



CONSTRUCTION 



NOVA 
CANADA SCOTIA 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



Montreal- 
58 Muni- Maison- Sher- Three Fort Port 

cipalities Halifax neuve Quebec brooke Rivers William Hamilton Kitchener London Ottawa Arthur 













Thousand dollars 












1939 
1950 


5,023 
44,467 


94 
1,233 


771 
9,410 


208 
1,060 


98 
470 


84 
501 


44 
166 


189 
1,521 


65 

551 


158 
900 


171 
3,008 


37 
283 


1950 O 
N 
D 


52,554 

41,828 
33,425 


2,829 

1,498 

246 


9,721 
7,459 
9,475 


771 

666 

1,422 


271 
263 
254 


329 
193 
193 


133 

20 

158 


1,213 

1,175 

947 


385 
370 
180 


1,559 

841 

1,459 


2,523 
4,777 
3,381 


158 

251 

11 


1951 J 
F 
M 


24,954 
29,957 
38,504 


372 
236 
260 


3,941 
4,826 
8,208 


183 
120 
420 


187 
331 
488 


34 

45 
80 


52 
49 
42 


641 
2,193 
1,467 


486 
232 
354 


196 
298 
506 


1,599 
1,564 
7,046 


22 

109 
16 


A 
M 
J 


46,825 
54,676 
36,588 


590 
663 
636 


7,846 
9,591 
6,355 


790 
724 
523 


397 
649 
630 


346 
816 
413 


132 
494 
192 


3,174 
2,848 
1,306 


934 
510 
458 


930 

1,160 

861 


2,436 
3,695 
1,258 


163 
520 
213 


J 

A 

S 


48,029 
33,439 

27,776 


710 
251 
438 


5,940 
5,306 
3,865 


920 
373 
436 


1,254 

{234} 


225 
246 
300 


84 

1,355 

64 


1,138 
1,351 
1,709 


571 
375 
230 


1,348 
456 
322 


3,300 
1,362 
3,505 


236 

144 

99 


o 

N 


38,251 
24,731 


852 
219 


5,459 
5,945 


918 
900 


449 
125 


189 
127 


50 
6 


7,137 
1,150 


299 
325 


299 
582 


3,450 
551 


131 
85 



ONTARIO 



MANI- 
TOBA SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



St. York and 

Catha- East York Winni- 

rines Toronto Windsor Townships peg 



Regina 



New 
Saska- Edmon- Leth- West- Van- 

toon Calgary ton bridge minster couver Victoria 















Thousand dollars 














1939 
1950 


50 
286 


859 
4,370 


77 
776 


170 
1,567 


215 
1,621 


50 
539 


21 

564 


89 
2,166 


139 
3,882 


39 
376 


98 
216 


524 
2,912 


67 
472 


1950 O 
N 
D 


435 
197 
339 


2,403 
4,386 
4,860 


1,379 
812 
377 


1,309 

1,229 

477 


4,969 

1,590 

337 


330 
604 
103 


751 

124 

1,712 


2,997 

1,635 

867 


9,450 

1,967 

389 


301 

298 

86 


224 

115 

50 


1,746 
3,359 
2,739 


249 
267 
280 


1951 J 
F 
M 


198 

1,199 

300 


5,845 
2,496 
2,403 


341 

539 

1,351 


3,134 
1,168 
1,078 


411 
1,026 
2,071 


40 

72 

312 


19 

22 

109 


1,181 
1,873 
1,544 


1,516 
3,471 
1,513 


211 
764 
639 


210 
646 
216 


1,454 
1,943 
2,085 


481 
907 
161 


A 
M 
J 


296 

440 

1,189 


2,430 
3,098 
3,863 


1,071 

4,233 

659 


1,371 
1,894 
1,276 


1,902 
2,461 
1,591 


421 
940 
565 


523 
643 
522 


3,440 
2,448 
1,873 


6,244 
4,612 
3,777 


674 
288 
279 


198 
215 
193 


2,657 
2,836 
1,542 


231 
287 
229 


J 

A 

S 


386 
141 
231 


9,394 
3,456 
1,972 


382 
498 
233 


1,725 

1,734 

733 


1,780 

824 

1,620 


1,169 
599 
404 


396 
563 

455 


1,742 
2,353 
1,493 


3,967 
2,672 
2,649 


559 
236 
452 


142 

200 

91 


1,851 
2,087 
1,057 


213 

796 
188 


O 

N 


288 
170 


2,842 
2,472 


480 
1,270 


818 
695 


1,716 
834 


343 
982 


265 
124 


1,770 
1,936 


3,425 
1,110 


437 
219 


83 
36 


1,804 
1,032 


292 
172 



Generally, the twenty-four municipalities for which data are shown were selected as being leaders in the amount 
of permits issued during the period 1926-1946. Annual statistics for 58 municipalities are available historically in 
the Canada Year Book. Monthly reports on the subject were discontinued in December, 1946. 



41 



CONSTRUCTION 



TABLE 36 - concluded 



JANUARY, 1952 



Value of Building Permits 

By Province. 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



New- Prince 

found- Edward Nova New 

( anada land Island Scotia Brunswick 



Quebec Ontario 



Saskat- 
Manitoba chewan 



Alberta 



British 
Columbia 



Thousand dollars 



1949 
1950 

1950 O 
N 
D 

1951 J 

F 
M 

A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 

N 



62,102 
79,833 

92,718 
71,830 
55,158 

42,253 
53,435 
74,186 

93,131 
109,860 

80,583 

88,209 
68,978 
65,520' 

73,678' 
53,971 



461 



60 
83 



1,298 52 

350 29 

293 20 

206 

77 20 
166 

470 136 
1,364 195 

471 31 

359 19 

370 33 

311 70 

486' 38 

394 111 



1,102 
2,288 

5.162 

1.742 

751 

697 

475 

2,715 

1,562 
1,258 
1,773 

1,235 

715 

3,399 

1,146 
818 



716 
1,228 

595 

3,709 

413 

184 

363 

1,370 

808 
1,609 
1,305 

869 
852 
676 

863 
1,202 



14,141 
19,695 

21,523 
16,155 
16,654 

6,986 

8,122 

13,316 

19,463 
22,798 
15,129 

18,077 
14,418 
12,639' 

15,576' 
12,604 



27,831 
36,148 

36,569 
34,646 
26,566 

25,328 
26,693 
41,547 

44,422 
55,009 
40,508 

44,153 
33,980 
31,345 

39.135' 
27,774 



2,679 
3,140 

5,873 

2,984 

984 

578 
1,402 
3,530 

3,756 
5,306 
2,936 

6,186 
2,555 
2,921 

2,523 
1,783 



1,568 
1,900 



6,291 
7,222 



7,715 
7,667 



1,854 13,385 6,407 
1,066 4,190 6,960 
2,126 1,386 5,964 



171 3,123 
183 6,361 
681 3,953 

1,455 11,497 
3,838 8,850 
2,154 7,856 

2,230 7,382 
1,998 6,344 
1,414 5,493 

6,974' 
3,595 



1.055 
1,433 



4,981 
9,738 
6,908 

9.563 
9,632 
8,421 

7,699 
7,714 
7,253 

5,882' 
4,258 



By Types (1) 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



RESIDENTIAL 



New 



Repair 



INDUS- COM- INSTITU- OTHER 
TRIAL MERCIAL TIONAL 



Total 



Atlantic 
Provinces 1 " Quebec 



Ontario 



Prairie British 
Provinces Columbia 



Thousand dollars 



1949 
1950 

1950 O 

N 
D 

1951 J 
F 

M 

A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 



34,328 
40,649 1 

44,069 
28,898 
17,280 

17,161 
22,678 
37,455 



657 
,179 

827 
638 
695 

464 
375 
593 



55,913 1,415 
58.445 1,445 
45,727 1,702 



38.209 
34.383 
26,770' 

29,102' 
21,655 



938 
943 
830 

562' 
319 



7,923 
10,637 

12,577 
7.623 
5,372 

3,652 
4,659 
6,449 

12,427 

12,145 

9.162 

8.014 
7,253 
6,009' 

6,992 
5,488 



15,928 
18,593 

19,414 

14,648 

8,622 

9,557 
12,397 
22,403 

27,235 
30,227 
22,456 

19,766 
17,493 
12,161 

15.062 
10,899 



5.980 
6,331 

8,195 

3,337 

908 

1,359 
1,411 
4,508 

9,950 
9.775 
7,988 



,299 
,273 



4,895 

4.413' 
2,851 



3,841 
3,909 

3.057 
2,652 
1,684 

2,130 
3.837 
3,502 

4.887 
4.853 
4.419 

3.192 
3,420 

2.875 

2.073' 
2,097 



2,780 
3,615 



3,355 12,486 
5,305 20,044 



8,599 
9,194 



552 
1,027 

1,240 

1,812 

276 



5,978 5,520 20,381 15,530 

2,915 5,530 20,559 12,116 

1.240 6,361 17,827 12,174 

1.542 8,301 11,536 3,312 400 

1,773 6,590 13,007 9,138 248 

2 391 7.275 16.443 10,239 383 

4 605 9,744 11,204 11,057 608 

5.693 13.464 16,062 15.779 416 

4.845 5,931 11,528 12.128 424 

4 804 6.507 18,426 19,928 335 

4 413 8,556 11,203 9.906 517 

4.133' 8,619 13, 471' 12,018 510 

3, 982' 17. 433' 11. 117' 11,140' 904 

2.584 8,798 8,963 11,646 325 



42 "The coverage was extended to 507 municipals in 1948, and now stands at 546, minor ^vision sh 11 be ng 

requued in the table, due to the non-rece.pt of returns from a few small places No account is tak en, ^« h « bu JJ^ 
activity outside of registration areas. Actual operations normally follow the granting of permits but a number ot projects 
are not undertaken or abandoned. The amount depends upon the statement of the applicant and con S1 derable change 
may develop before the completion of the operation. 

"s of January, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 37 



CONSTRUCTION 



Building Materials 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION 



CEMENT PRODUCTS m 



Cement 
Concrete Concrete Pipe and 
Brick Blocks^ 2 ' Tile 



CLAY PRODUCTS 



ASPHALT PRODUCTS 



Building Brick«> 

Producers' 
Production' 31 stocks 



Vitrified 

Sewer 

Pipe 



Smooth- Mineral- 
Asphalt surfaced surfaced and 
Shingles Rolls Rolls Sheathings 



RIGID 
— INSU- 
LATING 
Felts BOARD 





Thousands 


Thousand 
tons 


Millions 


Thousand 
feet 


Thousand squares 


Thousand 
tons 


Million 
sq.ft. 


1939 
1950 


3,878 


5,227 


10.97 


13.75 
29.48 


22.44 


400 


43 
203 


82 
100 


30 
105 


2.61 
5.45 


8.17 
18.94 


1950 O 
N 
D 


5,592 
5,244 
2,975 


6,356 
5,797 
4,266 


13.15 

10.70 

8.99 


35.19 
33.28 
28.81 


24.04 
21.94 
22.44 


490 
429 
381 


278 

145 

62 


148 

106 

84 


182 
97 
38 


6.90 
6.74 
5.78 


21.54 
24.30 
24.10 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3,706 
3,320 
3,423 


4,803 
4,149 
5,166 


10.94 

9.45 

16.47 


29.43 
23.42 
27.85 


23.58 
23.59 
23.49 


316 
434 
340 


141 
181 
188 


79 

82 

125 


66 

74 
86 


5.60 
5.54 
6.89 


23.35 
22.12 
25.64 


A 
M 
J 


4,506 
5,159 
5,243 


5,638 
6,625 
7,845 


20.63 
23.39 
25.34 


28.71 
35.91 
35.67 


25.06 
25.09 
25.37 


299 
304 
325 


197 
253 
231 


116 
92 
85 


99 
113 
123 


6.76 
6.36 
5.47 


24.19 
25.48 
22.36 


J 

A 

S 


3,546 
2,877 
3,265 


6,450 
6,466 
5,428 


20.79 
27.35 
22.85 


36.54 r 
33.81 r 
32.21 


27.00 r 
26.43 r 
28.48 


366 
323 
316 


216 
237 
187 


118 
121 
126 


147 
149 
157 


4.70 
5.51 
4.72 


24.19 
27.03 
24.34 


O 

N 


3,029 
2,166 


5,719 
4,778 


24.98 
19.11 








189 
106 


129 
106 


137 
65 


4.97 
4.90 


27.38 
24.72 



PRODUCERS' SALES 



PRODUC- 
TION EXPORTS' 6 ' IMPORTS 



PRODUCTION 



FACTORY 
SALES 



Cement 



Thousand 
barrels 



Building Structural 
Brick w Tile w< 6 > 



Drain 
Tile' 4 ' 



Sawn Lumber 



Window Cast Iron Steel 
Glass Soil Pipe Pipes 
. and Tubes and 
Fittings Fittings 



Wire Paints, 
Nails Varnishes, 
Lacquers 

(7) 



Millions 



Thousand 

tons Thousands 



Thousand 
Million board feet square feet 



Thousand tons 



Thousand 
dollars 



1939 
1950 

1950 O 
N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

o 

N 



478 
1,394 

1,556 

1,434 

791 

887 

908 

1,380 

1,533 
1,880 
1,681 

1,589 
1,754 
1,542 

1,649 
1,277 



13.8 
30.0 

36.5 
35.4 
28.3 

28.3 
23.4 
27.9 

27.2 
35.9 
35.4 

34.9 

34.4' 

30.2 



7.2 
14.6 

17.1 
13.8 
13.0 

13.8 
11.4 
16.1 



13 
17 
19 

19 

17 
15 



1,197 
1,503 

2,219 

1,892 

911 

856 
836 
868 

1,371 
1,796 
2,168 

1,996 
2,051 r 
2,172 



331.4 
538.0 

555.5 
418.7 
398.6 

431.8 
479.3 
502.6 

400.2 
595.5 
813.3 

747.3 
696.3 
554. 3 r 

479.3 



176.1 
297.9 

417.4 
304.2 
229.2 

264.1 
241.2 
296.9 

303.7 
286.1 
265.7 

318.6 
315.2 
281.8 

318.1 
285.3 



4,067 
5,711 

6,525 
9,838 
5,066 

3,524 
3,790 
3,886 

7,922 
6,355 
6,814 

7,465 
7,501 
6,778 

5,787 



1.4 
4.5 

5.7 
6.1 
6.6 

5.1 

4.7 
5.5 

5.5 
5.8 
5.6 

3.1 
4.6 
4.1 

3.8 



8.4 
19.6 

20.5 
20.7 
19.5 

21.6 
22.0 
20.1 

22.9 
22.9 
19.2 

15.2 
23.4 
19.7 

22.1 



5.5 
7.1 



2,155 
7,342 



8.1 7,634 

7.6 7,361 

6.4 6,575 

7.8 8,345 
6.6 7,618 
7.6 8,172 

7.1 9,749 

8.2 10,515 

7.9 10,101 

6.5 8,696 
6.9 8,031 
7.1 6,874 

8.6 
6.3 



7,213 



'^Figures cover the production of firms which normally account for 85 per cent of the total for Canada. 

<2, Since January, 1949, includes concrete chimney blocks. (3) Prior to 1947 data on producers' sales were used 
to indicate production. Data for 1950 and 1951 are obtained by adjusting producers' sales for changes in inventories. 
'■"Includes Newfoundland as of May, 1949. (5) Hollow blocks including hreproofing and load-bearing tile. ""Planks and 
boards. (7) Prior to 1946 figures represent gross value of production. Figures from 1946 to the present are factory 
sales of firms which normally account for 96% of total Canadian production. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Concrete Building Blocks and Cement Pipe; Products made from Canadian clays; 
Asphalt Roofing; Rigid Insulating Board; Iron Castings and Cast Iron Pipes and Fittings; Steel Wire and Specified Wire 
Products; Sales of Paints, Varnishes and Lacquers and Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



43 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 39 



Farm Cash Income ' 

Quarterly averages or quarters 



GRAINS, SEEDS AND HAY 



LIVE 
VEGETABLES AND OTHER FIELD CROPS <» STOCK 



Wheat Oats Other 

Including Including Grains, 

Total Participa- Participa- Seeds 

i ish tion tion and Vege- 

Income Total Payments Payments Hay Total Potatoes tables Tobacco Total 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 

1950 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 



179.25 

555.88 



62.90 
140.99 



54.48 
96.99 



2.98 
14.91 



5.44 
29.09 



15.98 
38.46 



475.97 76.36 

600.46 181.58 

735.95 252.61 

478.29' 72.95' 

763.02' 288. 24' 

623.55 148.22 



61.21 6.68 

142.36 10.69 

143.49 37.25 

35.47 13.95' 

251.46 17.23' 

105.21 13.23 



8.47 10.61 

28.53 36.82 

71.87 46.76 

23 .53 56 . 57' 

19.54' 10.45' 

29 .77 37 . 32 



4.95 
9.94 

5.68 
12.69 
11.66 

8.33' 
4.58' 
9.00 



4.75 
10.72 

3.67 
23.38 
11.92 

3.75' 

3.96' 

27.09 



4.86 
14.35 



50.57 
223.99 



218.04 

220.67 

13.33 271.86 



40.81 



226.41' 
267.18' 
244.33 



LIVE STOCK 



OTHER FARM PRODUCTS 



Cattle 

and 

Calves 



Hogs 



Sheep 

and 
Lambs 



Poultry 



Dairy 
Products 



Fruits 



Eggs 



Other 
Products (t > 



Forest 
Products 



Fur 
Farming 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 

1950 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 



23.60 
121.99 

118.13 
130.02 
139.42 

120.08' 
150.09' 
135.14 



19.09 1.68 
79.23 4.03 



82.82 
69.99 
91.50 



0.93 
5.22 
8.21 



92.64' 1.95' 
97.63' 1.15' 
82 . 70 5 67 



6 . 20 28 . 45 

18.74 81.94 

16.17 95.05 

15.44 101.46 

32.73 71.36 

11 75 61.25 

18.32 106.95 

20 83 119.26 



4.32 
10.16 

6.37 
18.13 
13.16 

3.11' 

5.50' 

19.37 



6.86 
25.87 



4.94 
13.90 



26.81 18.09 

23.60 13.63 

29.19 15.36 

26 .39' 9 . 66' 

33 33' 23.55' 

34 02 15.95 



3.78 
18.68 

22.47 

4.01 
33.11 

17.54 

26.46 

4.48 



1.45 
1.91 

2.19 
0.57 
2.54 

4.40 
1.36 
0.59 



Prince 

Edward 

Island 



Nova 
Scotia 



New 
Bruns- 
wick 



Quebec Ontario Manitoba 



Saskat- 
chewan 



Alberta 



British 
Columbia 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


1.75 
5.53 


3 57 
9.89 


1950 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 


6.32 
4.41 
5.90 


10.07 

8 98 

12 58 


1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 


5.67' 
6 55' 
5 49 


10 07' 

11 25' 
10.49 



3.40 
11.68 

11.11 

9.83 

15.92 

9.75' 
11.65' 
10.39 



24.90 
90.41 



52.34 
169.86 



16.20 
48.99 



39.57 
101.90 



30.01 
92.20 



98.43 159.24 29.40 

94 78 171.27 49.90 

103.55 174.73 93.40 

79.83' 189 13' 38 43' 

113 78' 200 00' 69 96' 

110.63 201.31 54 94 



71.72 69 02 
131.59 101.62 
163.72 129 75 



52.34' 
196.31' 
113.75 



72 . 49' 

132.37' 

83.98 



7.51 
25.43 

20.67 
28.09 
36.40 

20.60' 
21.16' 
32.57 



Does not include Supplementary Government Payments made under Prairie Farm Assistance Act, Prairie Farm 
Income Act and Wheat Acreage Reduction Act. -Includes barley and barley participation payments, rye, ilax 

flax adjustment payments, corn, clover and grass seed, hay and clover. ludes in addition sugar beets and 

fibre flax. (4) Includes wool, honey, maple products and miscellaneous farm products. 
Source: Farm Cash Income, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Inspected Slaughterings of Live Stock and Cold Storage Holdings of Meat 

and Poultry 

TABLE 41 Monthly averages or calendar months 

INSPECTED SLAUGHTERINGS 



Cattle 



Sheep and 
Calves Lambs 



Hogs 



COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS AS OF END OF PERIOD 




Veal 


Mutton 
and Lamb 




Pork 




Beef 


Total 


Cured or 
in cure 


Poultry 







Thousands 










Million 


pounds 










1939 


73 


57 


65 


302 


29 


6 


4.2 


6.3 


44.0 


23 


3 


15 


4 


1950 


107 


64 


43 


367 


21 


8 


3.3 


3.9 


30.8 


14.0 


19 


6 


1950 O 


119 


55 


113 


398 


18 


4 


4.6 


3.0 


27.5 


15 


2 


12 


5 


N 


141 


54 


102 


452 


24.8 


4.9 


4.0 


29.8 


16.9 


17.9 


D 


94 


29 


31 


381 


21 


8 


3.3 


3.9 


30.8 


14.0 


19 


6 


1951 J 


104 


29 


27 


402 


22 


4 


2.3 


2.9 


34.6 


13 


2 


18 


1 


F 


78 


26 


16 


340 


20 


5 


1.7 


2.0 


40.4 


16 


4 


14.5 


M 


78 


45 


17 


364 


17 


3 


1.7 


2.1 


42.1 


13.4 


11 


8 


A 


94 


82 


14 


362 


17.7 


2.7 


1.4 


45.9 


13 


6 


10.2 


M 


109 


94 


8 


407 


17.5 


4.0 


0.9 


47.9 


15 


.3 


8 


.2 


J 


109 


67 


9 


323 


14 


8 


4.3 


0.9 


41.5 


14 


7 


7 


9 


J 


97 


53 


18 


285 


15 


3 


4.3 


0.6 


33.9 


14 


2 


8 


A 


100 


48 


46 


300 


14.0 


4.3 


0.8 


25.2 


12 


6 


11 


8 


S 


95 


40 


73 


281 


16 


1 


4.5 


1.1 


19.6 


11 





16 


1 


O 


116 


45 


102 


460 


18 


6 r 


5.2 r 


2.1 r 


26. 9 r 


13 


7 r 


22 


2 r 


N 


107 


35 


83 


529 


23 


6 


5.2 


3.6 


37.8 


18 


2 


31 






Prices and Price Ratios: Live Stock and Live-Stock Feeds 



Price index 
numbers of 

commo- 
dities and 
services 
used by 
farmers 


Index of 

live-stock 

feed 

prices 


Index of 
animal 

product 
prices 



PRICES 



1935-39 = 100 







Ratio of 


Hog- 


Ratio of 


price of 


barley 


price of 


beef 


ratio 


beef cattle 


cattle to 


Winnipeg 


to price 


price of 


(i) 


of hogs <2) 


lambs 



Cattle, 






steers Hogs 






good up Bl 


Barley 


Oats 


to 1050 lbs dressed 


No. 1 


No. 2 


Toronto Toronto (3) 


feed<« 


C.W. 



Dollars per hundred 
pounds 



Dollars per bushel 



1939 
1950 


99. 
197. 


1950 O 
N 
D 




1951 J 
F 
M 


203. 


A 
M 
J 


218. 


J 

A 

S 


227 i 


O 

N 





85.4 
249.5 

238.9 
243.7 
243.9 

250.0 
258.9 
260.4 

256.4 
242.6 
228.1 



216 
219 
224 

235 
246 



101.5 
281.4 

286.8 
290.5 
298.4 

310.9 
329.6 
347.2 

331.6 
336.1 
353.1 

358.9 
348.3 
339.2 

330.3 
328.5 



27.0 
16.7 

16.7 
16.1 
17.4 

17.0 
17.2 
17.4 

16.4 
20.2 
24.3 

26.1 
25.1 
21.2 

17.0 
15.2 



73.4 
115.8 

121.5 
120.1 
121.1 

121.9 
118.7 
122.1 

136.9 
125.0 
118.2 

114.4 
123.5 
136.1 

149.4 
152.5 



71.4 
89.6 

104.5 
96.0 
94.9 

85.7 
84.6 
79.4 

80.9 
82.4 
82.6 

91.9 

95.7 

102.2 

102.6 
103.8 



6.91 
25.84 

27.17 
26.74 
27.79 

29.25 
31.09 
32.06 

32.94 
32.73 
33.69 

33.91 
33.48 
33.61 

33.77 
33.62 



8.83 
29.05 

29.16 
29.02 
29.92 

31.32 
34.26 
34.33 

31.42 
34.24 
37.35 

38.86 
35.48 
32.25 

29.48 
29.14 



0.384 
1.375 

1.355 
1.396 
1.340 

1.439 
1.531 
1.518 

1.454 
1.244 
1.171 

1.159 
1.170 
1.236 

1.358 
1.432 



0.308 
0.968 

0.901 
0.964 
0.994 

1.051 
1.101 
1.063 

1.048 
0.939 
0.839 

0.805 
0.831 
0.869 

0.951 
1.085 



("Includes advance equalization payment on barley until March, 1947, and subsidy on hogs from 1944 to date. 
(2) Based on price for hogs including Dominion premium. A rise in ratio favours production of beef. (3) Prior to 1941, 
prices were quoted on a live weight basis. <4 'Prior to August, 1939, Barley No. 1 feed was designated as Barley No. 3 
C.W. 

Source: Live-Stock Market Review, Dept. of Agriculture, Canadian Coarse Grains, Quarterly Review, and Cold 
Storage Holdings, D.B.S. 



45 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Exports of Live-Stock Products 

TABLE 41 - concluded Monthly averages or calendar months 



JANUARY, 1952 











EXPORTS 










Beef and 

Veal, Fresh 

Chilled and 

Frozen 


Bacon, 
Hams and 
Shoulders 


Canned 
Meats 


Cheese 


Concentrated 

Milk 

Products 


Eggs 
in the 
Shell 


Dried 
Eggs 

Million 


Poultry 








Million pounds 






Million dozen 


pounds 


1939 
1950 


0.32 
7.00 


15.65 
6.54 


39 
74 


7.58 
5 26 


2.87 
4.75 


0.11 
0.66 


0.17 


23 
0.05 


1950 O 
N 
D 


6.58 
8.17 
6.99 


5 46 
6.51 
4.55 


0.44 

1.16 
95 


7 90 
4.33 

1.04 


7.29 
3.97 
1.33 


0.34 

0.23 
2.00 


— 


0.02 
02 
02 


1951 J 
F 
M 


4.33 
2.65 

2.65 


2.37 
0.48 
38 


1.24 

84 
0.59 


0.45 
0.69 
0.29 


1 04 
1.25 
1.42 


2 50 
0.80 
30 




0.01 
0.01 
02 


A 
M 

J 


6.08 
15.12 
17.73 


0.60 

45 
0.30 


0.36 
0.82 

0.79 


0.18 
0.11 
1.33 


1.92 
3.91 
3.93 


13 
0.10 
0.10 


— 


01 
0.09 


J 

A 

S 


15.43 
7.78 
7.13 


0.24 
0.16 

0.11 


0.63 
0.70 
0.92 


2.64 

4.63 
6.21 


4.96 
6.54 
4.00 


0.12 
0.08 
0.14 




0.06 
06 
23 


O 

N 


8 95 
4 43 


0.20 
0.34 


0.78 
1 06 


8.10 
5.09 


3.38 
5.40 


0.19 
0.48 


— 


21 
16 



Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



Milk and Milk Products: Production, Stocks and Sales 



TABLE 42 




Monthly averages or calendar months 


PRODUCTION 


FLUID 
SALES 


PRODUCTION OF DAIRY FACTORIES 


Total 
Milk - 


Milk and 
Cream 


Concentrated 
Creamery Cheddar Milk Ice 
Butter Cheese Products Cream 



COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS'" 

Concentrated 
Creamery Factory Milk 

Butter 1 " Cheese" Products 









Million pounds 






Thousand 
gals. 




Million pout 


ds 


1939 
1950 


1,315 
1,370 


251 
346 


22.30 
21.80 


10.46 
8.03 


13.97 
31.85 


754 
1,980 


41.00 
39.23 


25.73 
28.10 


18.08 
33.09 


1950 N 
D 


1.051 
941 


348 
352 


13.34 
9.52 


4.18 
3.13 


20.78 
16.44 


1,285 
1,157 


52.84 
39.25 r 


28.39 
28.05 r 


40.29 
34.74 r 


1951 J 
F 
M 


894 

816 

1.040 


354 
330 
373 


8.09 

7.11 

10.09 


1.98 
1.19 
1.62 


17.09 
15.29 

22.96 


1,163 
1.122 
1.525 


25.58 

17.25 

9.79 


27.07 
24.34 
20.04 


26.01 
16.65 
12.52 


A 

M 

J 


1,293 
1,701 
1.999 


348 
362 
356 


16.87 
28.48 
40.04 


3.67 

8 73 
14.18 


35.00 
53.73 
65.86 


1,830 
2,915 
3,300 


10.18 
16.30 
32.16 


18.02 
21.00 
27 27 


17.83 
31.21 
62.21 


J 

A 

S 


1.873 
1.765 
1,556 


348 
347 
343 


36 49 
34.41 
28.99 


13.80 
13.05 

11 47 


56.85 
49 91 
41.36 


3.925 
3.404 
2,148 


46.10 
55.48 
62.61 


37.06 
40.89 
45.00 


83.94 
92.13 
95.02 


O 
N 
D 


1,399 


361 


23 57 
13.83 
10.15 


8.64 

3.68 

2.05 


34.85 
22.05 
18.38 


1.603 
1.210 
1 ,"199 


66.06 
56.59 
45.37 


41 95 r 
36 99' 
33 74 


88.51 
75 14 



46 'As at end of period. Last month is preliminary. Milk equivalents of cottage cheese and factory cheese 

other than cheddar, though not included in the monthly figures, are included in the monthly averages. Includes 

butter and cheese imported and "In Transit". 

Source: Monthly Reports, Dairy Production; Milk Production and Utilization; Cold Storage Holdings of Dairy Pro- 
ducts, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 43 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 
Fish: Landings, Exports and Stocks 
Monthly averages or calendar months 





LANDINGS 


EXPORTS OF FISH PRODUCTS 


STOCKS 




Seafish 


By Countries ' 


Selected Types 


Storage 

Holdings 

End of 

Period' 3 ' 


Total 
value' 1 ' 


Maritimes 

Total and British 

quantity' 1 * Quebec* 1 ' Columbia' 1 ' 


United 
Total States Other 


Salmon Lobster 



Thousand 
dollars 



Million pounds 



1939 
1950 


1,436 
5,629 


81.2 
111.0 


46.4 
60.5 


34.8 
50.5 


27.5 
45.9 


14.5 
28.9 


13.0 
17.0 


6.2 
6.7 


1.2 
2.1 


31.5 
46.5 


1950 O 
N 
D 


6,508 

4,890 r 

4,459 


75.9 
153. r 
114.8 


39.2 
31. l r 
23.6 


36.7 

121. 9 r 

91.3 


63.3 
63.9 
41.1 


43.3 
33.2 
20.2 


20.0 
30.7 
20.9 


19.1 

20.0 

7.7 


0.5 
0.3 
2.4 


61.4 
55.0 
46.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3,219 
1,779 
1,614 


127.1 
49.4 
30.1 


19.7 
17.1 
20.9 


107.4 

32.3 

9.2 


55.3 
38.7 
37.3 


30.1 
21.3 
18.6 


25.2 
17.4 
18.7 


5.3 
4.1 
3.8 


2.3 

1.6 
1.3 


39.0 
31.5 
25.3 


A 
M 
J 


2,288 
8,526 
7,337 


62.4 
142.5 
116.5 


56.8 
121.5 
101.5 


5.5 
21.0 
15.0 


34.8 
33.5 
36.8 


18.4 
24.3 
24.0 


16.5 

9.2 

12.8 


2.2 
2.4 
2.3 


2.3 

4.6 
4.2 


25.2 
35.7 
38.0 


J 
A 

S 


10,978 

14,067 

8,629 


122.7 
170.4 
114.0 


83.7 
86.3 
67.7 


39.1 
84.1 
46.2 


41.2 
41.8 
43.9 


27.8 
32.2 
29.8 


13.4 

9.5 

14.1 


2.7 
3.4 
6.8 


3.4 
1.4 
1.3 


43.2 
49.3 
51.0 


o 

N 


5,007 
3,730 


80.0 
106.7 


53.1 
38.6 


26.9 
68.1 


65.2 

55.5 


44.1 
36.7 


21.1 
18.9 


12.5 
12.0 


0.5 
0.4 


57.8 
50.6 



'"Monthly totals of 1950 are not equivalent to annual data due to receipt of additional statistics which cannot be 
allocated by months. (2) Does not include bait, offal, meal, livers, tongues or roe. (3) As of April, 1949, Newfound- 
land is included. 

Source: Monthly Review of Canadian Fishery Statistics, D.B.S. 



TABLE 44 



Manufactured Food 

Monthly averages or calendar months; quarterly averages or quarters 



Wheat Flour 



Margarine 



Production 



P.C. of 
capacity 



Million 
barrels 



Exports' 1 ' 



Million 
barrels 



Produc- 
tion 121 



Stocks 
End of 
Period 



■ Oatmeal Cereals 
and Rolled Ready to Macaroni, 
Oats Serve etc. Dry 



Yeast, 
Baking Fresh and Dried 
Powder Dried Eggs' 3 ' 



Production 



Million pounds 



1939 
1950 


63.2 
71.1 


1.40 
1.75 


0.45 
0.84 


7.84 


2.40 


14.82 
8.33 


17.14 
17.11 


12.19 
16.21 


2.64 
2.81 


3.69 
5.76 


0.05 


1950 O 
N 
D 


87.8 
83.9 
81.3 


2.13 
2.14 
1.96 


0.81 
1.26 
0.92 


8.37 
9.49 
6.58 


1.94 
2.77 
2.40 


13.32) 
10.34 
6.37J 


12.66 


17.59 


3.27 


5.88 




1951 J 
F 
M 


78.6 
85.8 
87.1 


1.97 
1.98 
2.19 


1.27 
1.05 
1.16 


9.79 

9.60 

10.84 


1.98 
2.59 
3.00 


9.081 

7.06 

6.52J 


16.60 


19.04 


2.02 


5.71 




A 
M 
J 


86.4 
83.7 
81.4 


2.10 
2.11 
2.10 


1.29 

1.48 
1.07 


9.54 
7.73 
7.38 


3.85 
3.85 
3.32 


3.55) 

6.42 

7.25J 


21.96 


17.64 


2.26 


6.12 


0.25 


J 

A 

S 


57.4 
64.4 
76.1 


1.41 
1.70 
1.80 


0.93 

0.57 r 

0.49 


6.27 
7.80 
8.33 r 


2.45 
1.88 
2.37 


6.17) 
11.54[ 
13.12] 


19.97 


15.38 


2.47 


6.26 


0.17 


O 

N 


75.9 
77.1 


1.93 
1.94 


0.87 
0.90 


10.15' 
9.32 


2.80 r 
2.48 


12.89 
11.23 













'"Beginning August, 1945, customs exports are adjusted to reflect actual physical movement of wheat flour from 
Canada. Data shown for the last three months are not so adjusted. (2) Includes Newfoundland. < 3) Eggs, dried and 

powdered. 

Source: Canadian Milling Statistics, Margarine Report and Quarterly Report on Processed Foods, D.B.S. 



47 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Manufactured Food: Production 
TABLE 44 concluded Quarterly averages or quarters 



JANUARY, 1952 



Biscuits 
Soda 



Biscuits 

Plain 

and Fancy 



Million pounds 



Chewing 
Gum 

Million 
boxes 



Cocoa 
Powder 
(for sale) 

Million 
pounds 



Chocolate Sugar 
Chocolate Confection- Confection- 



Bars 



ery 



ery 



lams 

and 

Jellies 



Marir.a- 

l.ulos 



Soups 
Canned 



Million 
dozen 



Million pounds 



1939 
1950 

1950 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 



7.03 
10.65 



20.86 
41.68 



10 


29 


46.85 


10 


17 


37 


37 


13 


16 


38 


56 


10 


11 


43 


95 


10 


20 


47 


60 



1.71 
3.30 

3.40 
2.82 

3.11 
3.42 
2.83 



1.55 
2.76 

2.25 
2.84 

3.04 
2.51 
1.98 



5.06 
16.04 

16.05 
8.85 

9.58 
8.12 
9.79 



9.54 
9.49 

7.70 
13.27 

6.92 
4.85 
6.49 



11.61 
19.52 

19.58 
26.60 

14.15 
14.32 
16.73 



10.87 
19.92 

27.90 
17.31 

14.26 
20.76 
19.56 



2.98 
4.88 

4.95 

4.48 

5.60 
4.42 
3.96 



24.16 
40.77 

58.22 
45.84 

31.04 
30.06 
70.55 



Infants' 

Foods Baked 
Prepared Beans 



Million pounds 



Pickles, 

Relishes 

and Sauces 

Thousand 
gallons 



Process 
Cheese 



Peanut 
Butter 



Spiced Pork Beef Tea, 

Peanuts, and Spiced Stews and Blended, 

Salted and Ham, Boiled Packed, 

Roasted Canned Dinners etc. 



Carbo- 
Cofiee nated 
Roasted Beverages 



Million pounds 



Million 
gallons 



1939 
1950 

1950 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 



0.90 

7.12 

6.60 
11.10 



19.63 
22.91 

19.02 
27.08 



0.46 
1.50 

1.48 
1.58 



4.58 
9.06 

8.41 
10.10 



3.10 
5.50 



7.06 26.64 
6.52 21.21 
9.42 12.60 



1.14 10.34 
1.05 9.31 
1.13 8 87 



39 
82 

21 
88 
69 



1.97 
3.91 

3.38 
5.30 

4.11 
4.32 
3.69 



4.39 



.16 
64 

.74 
70 
92 



2.76 

2.44 
4.10 

3.76 
2.74 
2.53 



8.94 
11.01 

10.39 
10.06 



9.58 
15.85 

18.38 
15.90 



10.66 
25.21 

31.72 
20.05 



11.78 18.10 17.40 

11.10 16.63 25.89 

9.19 16.14 28 48 



SUGAR: PRODUCTION, SALES AND STOCKS 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



RAW CANE SUGAR 



REFINED SUGAR 



Production 



Domestic Sales 



Stocks 



Receipts 



Stocks end 
of period 



Granulated 



Yellow and 
brown 



Total 



Beet 



Cane 



Total 



End of 
period 



Million pounds 



1939 
1950 


82.1 
105.9 


1950 O 
N 
D 


203.8 

148.2 

69.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


28 7 
35.6 
49.0 


A 

M 

1 


73.3 

162.4 
137.3 


J 

A 

S 


108.9 
145.2 
128.8 



o 

N 



89.4 
55.0 



74.5 
162.3 

112.7 
155.4 
162.3 

131.8 
93.4 
68.5 

69.8 
114.2 
132.9 

138.3 
168.5 
198.8 

180.9 
139 8 



83.6 
115.8 

201.1 
205.8 
145.2 

55.8 
60.0 
66.9 

59.6 

99.8 

104.4 



89 

104 

89 

173 
170 



10.2 
10.9 

13.0 
13.5 
11.5 

6.8 

9.0 

12.1 

7 4 
12.7 
11.9 

9 1 
9.8 
8.6 

12.7 

16 5 



93.8 
126.7 

214.1 
219.3 
156.7 

62.6 
69.0 

78.9 

67.0 
112.4 
116.3 

98.4 

114.3 

98.4 

186.1 

1S7.4 



17.8 

15.6 
23.3 
19.6 

27.4 
25.7 
23.8 

22.8 

33.7 
31.6 

23.7 
17.1 
16.0 

24.1 
27.3 



98.5 

79.3 
74.6 
60.9 

72.5 
65.6 
73.4 

72.8 

94.4 

113.2 

93.7 
102.0 
109.4 

96 4 
86.2 



94.5 
116.4 

94.8 
97.9 
80.5 

100.0 
91.3 
97.2 

95.6 
128.1 
144.8 

117 5 
119.1 
125.4 

120.5 
113.5 



248.5 
347.1 

151.7 
271.4 
347.1 

309.2 
286.2 
267.7 

238.8 
222.3 
193.7 

174.6 
169.0 
142.0 

208.2 
282.2 



48 '■ Bulk and packages. 

Source: Quarterly Report on Processed Foods, and The Sugar Situation in Canada, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 45 



DOMESTIC TRADE 



Value of Retail Trade 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



1951 J 
F 
M 

A 

M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 

N 



BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 





Grocery 










Garages 


Total 


and Com- 




Country 


Depart- 


Motor 


and 


All 


bination 


Meat 


General 


ment 


Variety Vehicle 


Filling 


Stores 11 ' 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores Dealers 


Stations 



Clothing 
Stores l 



Shoe 
Stores 



Lumber 

and 
Building 
Materials 

and 
Hardware 













Million dollars 












1941 
1950 


286.4 
789.0 


47.3 
120.8 


6.7 
15.2 


17.8 
39.5 


31.5 
72.7 


7.1 
14.2 


30.0 
129.5 


17.1 
41.5 


18.7 
41.1 


3.7 
7.7 


12.7 
45.6 


1950 O 
N 
D 


830.4 
831.8 
976.4 


119.9 
121.9 
142.2 


16.0 
15.9 
18.5 


42.0 
41.8 
46.8 


83.7 

98.2 

118.9 


13.9 
15.0 
31.6 


134.0 
129.0 
117.4 


44.6 
41.0 
39.2 


44.9 
47.8 
69.3 


7.4 

8.4 

12.1 


54.7 
49.3 
46.3 



703.8 
694.3 
851.5 

859.2 
931.1 
940.2 

865.8 
897.4 
891.2 

898. 7 r 
906.7 



119.1 
118.1 
141.1 

128.0 
139.2 
151.2 



139 

144 



144.5 

140. 8 r 
145.8 



15.1 
14.5 
17.1 

16.0 
17.2 
18.0 

15.4 
17.5 
17.6 

18. r 
17.7 



32.2 
32.5 
38.5 

39.5 
49.3 
48.9 

48.4 
49.3 
47.9 

49. 3 r 
47.2 



58 
58 
72 

75 

76. 

69 



54.5 
61.5 
72.4 

81.3 
101.9 



9.6 127.2 

9.6 145.2 

14.4 178.3 

13.1 186.9 

15.7 183.1 

16.5 172.9 

14.9 158.1 

14.4 148.5 

15.1 145.3 



16.0 

17.4 



139. 9 r 
129.2 



37.3 
33.5 
39.0 

42.7 
49.7 
51.5 

53.8 
51.3 
49.0 

50. 9 r 

44.3 



32.2 
27.7 
42.3 

43.0 
46.5 
48.3 

38.0 
36.9 
44.1 

47. l r 
51.0 



5.5 
4.5 
7.3 

8.2 

9.2 

10.4 

7.7 
7.5 
9.1 

8.1 
9.8 



36.0 
31.8 
36.1 

45.8 
57.5 
58.0 

53.0 

54.5 
51.4 

53. 5 r 
47.0 



BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 



BY ECONOMIC AREAS 



Furniture 
Stores 



Radio and 
Appliance Restau- 
Dealers rants 



Coal and 

Wood 

Dealers 



Drug 
Stores 



Jewellery 
Stores 



Mari- 
times 



British 
Quebec Ontario Prairies Columbia 













Million dollars 












1941 
1950 


5.3 
13.3 


3.8 
12.1 


10.6 

28.3 


8.2 
16.2 


8.4 
17.3 


3.2 
6.6 


23.6 
54.5 


68.2 
183.8 


117.3 
303.7 


51.7 
158.6 


25.8 
88.4 


1950 O 
N 
D 


14.5 
12.9 
16.5 


13.3 
12.5 
16.2 


31.2 
29.1 

28.4 


19.1 
17.9 
19.1 


17.4 
17.0 
24.3 


6.4 

6.4 

17.1 


55.3 
54.8 
71.3 


190.6 
199.2 
224.4 


315.6 
316.4 
389.2 


177.3 
172.9 
183.9 


91.7 

88.6 

107.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


11.2 

11.2 
13.3 


12.6 

11.7 
12.6 


25.4 
22.5 
26.8 


21.1 
20.0 

16.6 


17.4 
18.2 
19.1 


4.5 
4.2 
5.3 


48.6 
45.6 
59.1 


158.5 
154.9 
204.8 


286.4 
282.2 
343.9 


130.5 
129.4 
146.8 


79.9 
82.2 
97.0 


A 
M 
J 


14.4 
13.3 
13.8 


15.3 
10.7 
10,3 


27.1 
30.9 
30.9 


10.7 
10.6 
11.9 


17.1 
18.2 
18.6 


5.2 
5.3 
6.1 


57.5 
60.9 
63.3 


210.9 
223.6 
222.5 


325.6 
353.5 
362.3 


170.9 
195.9 
192.3 


94.2 
97.2 
99.9 


J 
A 

S 


12.0 

12.5 
13.2 


9.6 

9.4 
9.6 


35.0 
35.9 
33.4 


11.8 
14.1 
16.7 


17.4 
18.6 
18.7 


5.2 
6.1 
5.9 


58.2 
59.3 
57.9 


200.9 
209.1 
211.2 


329.2 
335.6 
337.8 


183.1 
196.1 
188.9 


94.5 
97.3 
95.6 


O 

N 


12.5 
13.9 


10. 6 r 
10.8 


33.3 
30.1 


20.9 
22.1 


19. 6 r 
18.6 


6.0 r 
6.9 


58. 4 r 
59.7 


212. 6 r 
219.6 


341. 7 r 
342.8 


192. 3 r 
187.9 


93. 7 r 
96.7 



Note: Series revised to account for the effect of changes in the number of stores in 1950. Figures for 1951 are based 
on 1950 final revision. 

(1) Total value of sales by retail outlets, including "Tobacco" and "All Other Trades". "'Includes "Men's Clothing", 
"Family Clothing" and "Women's Clothing". 

Source: Monthly Report on Retail Trade. 



49 



DOMESTIC TRADE 

TABLE 46 



JANUARY, 1952 



Retail Sales and Stocks 

Monthly averages or calendar months ' 



DEPARTMENT STORES 



Total 

All 

Depai tmenta 



Men's and Boys' 
Ladies' Apparel Clothing, 

and Furnishings 

Accessories and Shoes 



Food and 
Kindred 
Products 



Piece Goods, 

Linens 

and 

Domestics 



Home Furnishings, 
Furniture, Radio 
and Appliances 



Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks 



Million dollars 



1950 
1950S 

O 

N 
D 

1951 J 

F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 

N 



72.7' 177.4 

78.3 186.7 24.8 



10.3 



4.5 



5.4 



14.7 



83.9' 
98.2 
118.9 

58.3 
58.4 
72.6 

75.2 
70.6 
69.5 

54.5 
61.5 
72.4 

81.3 
101.9 



207.3 
204.3 
177.4 

187.1 
213.7 
240.4 

239.0 
235.2 
221.5 

221.6 

232.9 
234.9 

241.5 



26.4 
28.9 

14.0 
14.3 
22 5 

22.9 
23.7 
19.8 

13.6 
17.0 
23.4 

27.0 
30.6 





12.2 
15.1 




4 9 
6.0 




5.5 
5.5 




14.8 
14.5 




47.7 
57.9 
64.7 


6.0 
6.0 

8 7 


24.2 
29.2 
32.3 


4.7 
5.1 
6.0 


5.1 
5.8 
5.4 


5 9 
4.9 

4.5 


15.5 

18.2 
19.4 


12.5 
12.7 
13.2 


42.9 
45.5 
55.4 


63.9 
58.6 
52.4 


9.0 

9.2 
8.9 


32.3 
33.1 
30.7 


4.7 
4.9 

4.7 


5.1 
5.0 
4.5 


4.3 
4.3 
4.2 


19.6 
19.5 
18.2 


14.8 
13.7 
11.8 


53.4 
54.4 
52.9 


54.7 
62.5 
62.6 


6.0 
6.6 
9.2 


30.7 
34.5 
36.9 


4.5 
4.8 

4.7 


4.5 
4.7 
4.4 


3.7 
4.3 
4.7 


17.7 
18.4 
17.7 


10.2 
11.4 
11.8 


51.6 
49.9 
48.2 


62 4 


12.1 
15.8 


37.6 


5.3 

6.6 


4.9 


5.1 

5.5 


17.6 


11.9 
13.5 


48.2 



CHAIN STORES— SIX TRADES 



Food 
Stores 



Women's 
Clothing 



Shoe 



Hardware 



Drug 



Variety 



Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks 



Million dollars 



1949 
1950 


36.3 
42.2 


32.4 
38.3 


3.0 

3 1 


1950S 


44.2 


35.4 


3.1 


O 

N 
D 


42.4' 
45.0' 
51.6 


39 3' 
39.6 
38.3 


3.0' 
30' 
5.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


44.0 
45.1 
55.7 


38.3 
39 7 
41.0 


2.4 
2.2 
3.0 


A 
M 
J 


48.7 
53.5 
55.8 


40.5 
41.0 
40.7 


3.0 
3.6 

3.8 


J 

A 

S 


49.1 
52.7 
53.3 


42.9 
42.1 
43.0 


3.4 
3.0 

3 1 


O 

N 


53.4 
57.2 


47.7 


3.3 

3.6 



6.2 
6.0 

7.3' 

8.0' 

9.1 

6.0 

6.7 
8 
8.5 

8.9 
8 9 
8 3 



2.7 
2.7 



15.0 
14.5 



2.9 15. 3' 



9 
1.0 

1.1 



9 9 



2.6' 

32' 
4.6 

1.8 
1.6 
2.7 

2.6 
3.4 

3 7 

2 9 
2.8 
3.3 

2.9 

4 



16 5 r 



16 
14 



13.8 
15.2 
16.4 

17.0 
18.5 
17.9 

16.7 
18.2 
18.3 

19.2 



1.0 
0.9 
0.8 

10 
1.2 
1.2 

1.1 
1.0 
1.2 

14 
1.2 



3.3 
4.8 

4.5' 

4.7' 
4 6 
4.8 

4 6 

5 3 
4.9 

4 8 
5.1 

4 1 

4.4 
4.1 

4.2 

4 2 



2.3 
2.3 

2.4 

2.4' 
2.3 
3 3 

2.3 

2 4 
2.5 

2.2 
2.3 
2.4 

2.3 

2.3 
2 4 

2 6 

2 4 



7.4 
7.8 

7.9' 

8.1' 

9.0 

7.8 

8.2 

8.0 
8.0 

8 2 
8.1 
8 3 



11.8 
12.4 



29.7 
32.5 



12.2 35.7' 



12.1 

13.1' 

27.5 



40 3' 

46.5 

32.5 



8 
8. 
12 

11 
13 
14 



33 
38 
42 

46 
47 



8.5 
8.9 



12.8 
12.5 
13.0 

13 9 
14.9 



46.3 

45.0 
46.3 
47.9 

51.3 



50 ("Stocks at end of period at selling value. 

Source: Department Store Sales and Stocks, and Chain Store Sales and Stocks, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 47 



DOMESTIC TRADE 



Retail Consumer Credit 

Quarterly averages or quarters (1) 



COMBINED TRADES 



Sales and Percentage Composition 



Accounts. Receivable 05 



Cash 



Credit 



Total 
Sales 



Total 



Instalment 



Charge 



Sales Percent Sales Percent Sales Percent Sales Percent Total 



Instal- 
ment 



Charge 









Million dollars 


or percentages 












1949 
1950 


2,107.0 1,548.1 
2,271.9 1,654.2 


73.5 
72.8 


558.9 
617.7 


26.5 

27.2 


128.7 
168.6 


6.1 
7.4 


430.2 
449.1 


20.4 
19.8 


467.5 
546.6 


139.8 
169.5 


327.7 
377.1 


1950 3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 


2.428.6 1,766.2 

2.537.7 1,856.6 


72.7 
73.2 


662.4 
681.1 


27.3 
26.8 


182.5 
190.9 


7.5 
7.5 


479.9 
490.2 


19.8 
19.3 


475.8 
546.6 


144.6 
169.5 


331.2 
377.1 


1951 Istqtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 


2,161.3 1,528.5 
2,599.8 1,898.3 
2,543.3 1,855.9 


70.7 
73.0 
73.0 


632.8 
701.5 
687.4 


29.3 
27.0 
27.0 


172.4 
185.0 
184.3 


8.0 
7.1 
7.2 


460.4 
516.5 
503.1 


21.3 
19.9 
19.8 


491.9 
478.3 
460.6 


143.2 
121.8 
104.3 


348.7 
356.5 
356.3 



SELECTED TRADES 



Department Stores 



Clothing Stores 



Furniture, Radio and Appli- 
ance Stores 



Motor Vehicle Dealers 



Total 
Sales 



Credit Accounts Total 
Sales receivable* 1 ' Sales 



Credit Accounts Total 
Sales receivable* 1 ' Sales 



Credit Accounts Total Credit Accounts 
Sales receivable"' Sales Sales receivable*" 













Million dollars 












1949 
1950 


213.9 
218.3 


63.3 
67.7 


83.7 
93.6 


127.5 
121.7 


22.6 
23.0 


27.3 
30.1 


69.9 
73.9 


40.3 
43.4 


56.3 
76.4 


257.6 117.0 
348.1 153.8 


55.8 
72.4 


1950 3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 


194.5 
300.9 


62.3 
91.9 


74.6 
93.6 


111.9 
160.1 


20.1 
30.8 


24.4 
30.1 


76.6 
83.3 


45.5 
48.1 


63.6 
76.4 


392.2 178.9 
339.0 148.8 


68.3 
72.4 


1951 1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 


189.3 
221.3 
188.4 


57.3 
62.6 
53.8 


74.7 
66.3 
59.4 


98.9 
135.4 
117.5 


21.3 
25.3 
21.5 


26.4 
25.9 
25.8 


69.9 
77.4 
63.1 


41.1 
43.4 
36.5 


65.3 
60.2 
55.7 


410.8 189.5 
479.8 205.5 
403.5 193.2 


76.5 
79.7 
66.5 



(1) Accounts receivable as at end of period. 
Source: Retail Consumer Credit, D.B.S. 



TABLE 48 



Indexes of Wholesale Sales 

Monthly averages or calendar months 





General 
Index 


Auto Parts 

and 
Equipment 


Drugs 


Clothing 


Footwear 


Dry 
Goods 


Groceries 


Fruits and 
Vegetables 


Hardware 


Tobacco 
and Con- 
fectionery 










1935-39 = 


LOO 










1939 
1950 


109.1 
306.7 


112.8 
429.2 


111.0 

312.5 


106.1 
247.3 


111.5 
283.2 


105.8 
246.0 


108.6 
274.7 


107.7 
272.7 


110.6 
404.7 


113.4 
381.3 


1950 O 
N 
D 


339.4 
326.9 

282.4 


529.2 
479.5 
374.6 


348.7 
360.5 
322.8 


349.1 
304.0 
201.3 


429.1 
330.1 
244.6 


334.3 
305.7 
173.6 


282.0 
277.0 
242.4 


234.9 
240.5 
267.9 


487.4 
482.3 
411.9 


397.0 
390.2 
384.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


308.6 
303.1 
333.6 


493.7 
459.2 
431.5 


341.7 
337.7 
334.8 


238.3 
258.5 
321.8 


235.0 
312.0 
416.6 


239.6 
292.3 
307.4 


283.3 
271.6 
281.1 


218.8 
240.4 
280.9 


424.3 
407.6 
480.2 


387.1 
320.9 
382.9 


A 
M 

J 


340.9 
361.7 
343.7 


565.4 
513.0 
505.3 


340.2 
365.3 
315.9 


249.7 
229.4 
203.3 


324.8 
317.4 
236.5 


276.7 
252.5 
197.6 


281.2 
319.0 
322.7 


290.1 
364.6 
339.7 


502.8 
518.0 
474.2 


436.0 
414.5 
436.3 


J 

A 

S 


328.9 
362.3 
348.0 


474.9 
542.9 
595.4 


330.3 
366.5 
336.7 


159.3 
262.9 
296.7 


203.9 
434.9 
432.1 


154.0 
259.5 
300.8 


322.4 
336.6 
318.8 


315.4 
315.2 
270.8 


420.5 
450.1 
447.5 


436.5 
453.2 
379.8 


o 

N 


375. 4 r 
354.0 


580. 9 r 
532.2 


406.9 
389.0 


300. 6 r 
311.3 


414.9 
381.3 


291. 5 r 
276.7 


344. r 
322.2 


270. 4 r 
289.6 


490. 3 r 
471.2 


453. 8 r 
415.6 



Source: Monthly Report on Wholesale Sales, D.B.S. 



51 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



TABLE 49 



Merchandise Exports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



JANUARY, 1952 



IniK \ 

Ol lllll<\ 

Declared of 

Values Prices 



Index 

(if Total Fruits 

Physical Domestic and 

Volume Exports Vegetables Wheat 



Wheat 
Flour 



Other 

Grain 

Products 



Beef and Other 
Cattle Veal, Fresh Meats 







1 ')is = 100 










Million 


Dollars 








1939 
1950 


30 . 1 
101.4 


45.1 
108.5 


66.7 
93.5 


77.1 
259.9 


1.7 
2.0 


9.1 
27.1 


1.4 
7 8 


2.5 
5.8 


1.3 
6 6 


2.9 


2.9 

3.4 


1950 O 
N 
D 


123.0 
114.2 
113.1 


112.0 
112.7 
112.8 


109.8 
101.3 
100.3 


315.2 
292.7 
289 . 9 


3 2 
2.4 

2 1 


32.4 
29 3 
30.1 


6 7 
9.3 
7.8 


6.4 
8.6 

14.8 


6.9 
9 4 
7.5 


2.6 
3.4 
3.1 


3.2 
4.1 
2.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


111.3 
91.3 

113.2 


116.4 
118.2 
119.8 


95.6 
77.2 
94.5 


285.1 
233.9 
290.2 


2.2 
1.9 
1.6 


19.2 
18.1 
23 


11 8 

8 7 

10.6 


6.5 
5.0 
4.9 


5.5 
5.5 
7.6 


2.1 
1.3 
1.4 


2.4 
1.2 
1.0 


A 
M 

J 


115.2 
126.2 
121.9 


121.5 
122.3 
123.7 


94.8 

103.2 

98.5 


295.2 
323.4 
312.5 


1.3 

2.2 
1.6 


20 6 
27.1 
40.6 


12.1 

14.2 

9.4 


4.9 
14.2 
17.2 


6.9 

7.0 
4.9 


3.4 

8.4 

10.2 


12 
1.7 
1.8 


J 

A 

S 


146.1 
136.5 
124.9 


124.4 
126.4 
126.0 


117.4 

108.0 

99.1 


374.5 
349.8 
320.1 


1.4 
2.2 
2.3 


51.7 
44.4 
36.6 


11 7 
6.9 

4.8 


18.7 
12.8 
13.6 


3.0 
4.4 
5.7 


8.6 
4.1 
3.8 


1.3 
2.0 
2.0 


O 

N 


144.8 
148.1" 


126.5 
126.5' 


114.5 
117. 1" 


371.0 
379.5 


2.5 
2.7 


37 9 
58.8 


8.3 
8.6 


16.9 

20.2 


5 5 
4.8 


4.8 
2.3 


2.7 
2.3 



Fish and Dairy Alcoholic Rubber 
Products Products Beverages Products 



Furs 

and 

Products 



Hides, 

Skins 

and 

Leather 



Other 

Animal 

and 

Vegetable 



Million dollars 



Fibres 

and 
Textiles 



Planks 

and 
Boards 



Shingles Pulpwood 



1939 
1950 


2.4 
9.4 


1.5 
2.3 


0.7 
3.6 


1.3 
1.0 


1.2 
2.1 


1.0 
1.9 


2.3 

7.7 


1.2 
2.5 


4.0 
24.2 


0.7 
2.7 


1.0 
2.9 


1950 O 
N 
D 


11.8 
12.6 

9.0 


3 4 
2.0 

0.7 


4.1 
6.0 
4.4 


0.9 
1.4 

1.5 


0.5 
0.4 
5.4 


1.9 
2.1 
1.7 


9.1 
10.2 

10.6 


3.2 

2.4 
2 5 


37.4 
27.6 
20.8 


4.5 
2.7 
2.2 


4.2 
3.7 
3.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


10.6 
8.8 

8.8 


0.5 
6 
6 


4.2 
3.4 

5.3 


1.6 
1.8 
2.1 


6.5 
4.4 
2.6 


2.9 
2.2 

1.8 


14 4 
9.4 
8.8 


2.7 
2.4 
2.7 


24 
21 3 
26.5 


2.4 
2.6 
3.2 


3.8 

3.9 

4.7 


A 
M 

J 


7 5 
8.6 

8.9 


6 
1.3 

1.7 


4.4 
4.3 
3.2 


2.1 
2.3 

2.1 


2.3 

1.9 
1.9 


17 
1.8 
2.0 


9 1 
4.8 
4.7 


2.7 

4 
3.1 


27.5 
26.6 
24.7 


3.5 
2.7 

1.6 


3.5 
2.7 
5 8 


J 

A 

S 


10 
9.1 

10.1 


2 1 
2.9 
2.8 


4.0 
4.7 
5.6 


3.0 
2.6 

3 1 


17 
1.1 
2.0 


2.4 
14 
1 8 


5.5 
5.7 
4.0 


3.4 
3.5 
2.3 


28.7 
28 9 
25.4 


1.8 
1.9 
2.2 


7.7 
8.0 
7.1 


O 

N 


12 8 
10.9 


3 7 
3.2 


6.0 

5.8 


2.6 
2.2 


0.6 
0.6 


2.2 

1.6 


7 2 
8.7 


3.4 

3.0 


29.1 
25.9 


2.4 
1.8 


8.7 
6.6 



52 Note: Commencing with April, 1949, the Trade of Canada includes that of Newfoundland. 

'"Does not include re-exports. 
Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 49 - concluded 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



Merchandise Exports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 









Other 












Auto- 










News- 


Wood 






Primary 




Other 


mobiles 


Other 


Aluminum 




Wood- 


print 


and 


Iron 


Ferro- 


Iron and 


Farm 


Machinery 


and 


Iron and 


and 




pulp 


paper 


Paper 


Ore 


Alloys 


Steel"' 


Machinery 




Parts 


Steel 


Products 












Million Dollars 










1939 


2.6 


9.6 


2.3 




0.2 


0.6 


0.6 


0.9 


2.1 


0.8 


2.2 


1950 


17.4 


40.5 


5.1 


1.1 


1.4 


2.7 


7.3 


2.1 


3.4 


2.9 


8.9 


1950 O 


21.6 


49.0 


6.0 


2.5 


1.5 


4.0 


6.6 


2.1 


3.3 


1.9 


14.8 


N 


21.9 


40.6 


6.9 


2.0 


1.8 


3.5 


6.0 


2.7 


4.2 


2.0 


3.6 


D 


21.2 


42.2 


8.3 


0.3 


1.7 


3.7 


5.8 


3.1 


3.7 


2.6 


13.2 


1951 I 


24.0 


40.7 


6.4 





2.2 


2.6 


8.5 


2.7 


1.7 


2.0 


10.3 


F 


21.6 


35.8 


5.9 


— 


2.0 


1.0 


5.8 


2.8 


1.9 


1.9 


7.4 


M 


27.2 


43.3 


7.1 


■ — 


2.3 


1.4 


13.7 


2.8 


4.0 


2.3 


10.8 


A 


26.6 


42.3 


6.6 


0.6 


2.4 


3.1 


10.8 


3.4 


6.4 


2.6 


12.7 


M 


31.5 


47.2 


6.7 


1.0 


2.3 


1.8 


10.7 


3.8 


4.2 


2.6 


12.1 


J 


32.4 


39.2 


7.3 


2.4 


2.4 


2.3 


10.4 


2.7 


3.5 


2.5 


3.5 


J 


34.3 


51.3 


7.6 


2.2 


2.9 


2.6 


9.2 


2.5 


5.6 


2.5 


14.5 


A 


35.7 


51.5 


7.9 


3.2 


3.5 


2.7 


7.6 


2.3 


5.9 


2.4 


16.1 


S 


31.4 


44.0 


7.1 


2.4 


2.4 


2.9 


6.2 


3.5 


9.2 


2.3 


9.8 


O 


34.6 


50.1 


8.1 


3.5 


3.5 


4.0 


8.3 


4.3 


12.3 


4.2 


11.2 


N 


32.5 


49.6 


8.3 


. 1.9 


3.2 


3.8 


7.5 


4.0 


12.7 


4.3 


9.5 










Precious 




Other 




Other 






Miscel- 




Copper 


Lead 




Metals 


Zinc 


Non- 


Asbestos 


Non- 




Other 


laneous 




and 


and 




(except 


and 


Ferrous 


and 


Metallic 




Chemical 


Commo- 




Products 


Products 


Nickel 


gold) 


Products 


Products 


Products 


Products 


Fertilizers 


Products 


dities 












Million dollars 










1939 


4.4 


0.8 


4.8 


1.4 


0.8 


0.8 


1.3 


1.1 


0.8 


1.3 


1.4 


1950 


7.3 


3.2 


8.8 


2.8 


4.9 


2.3 


5.3 


3.3 


3.2 


5.1 


5.1 


1950 O 


8.5 


6.4 


10.2 


3.0 


5.3 


2.8 


6.6 


3.6 


2.8 


6.2 


3.9 


N 


6.9 


4.9 


8.8 


5.2 


7.4 


3.4 


6.8 


4.1 


3.1 


5.5 


3.4 


D 


7.4 


5.9 


8.4 


2.3 


5.4 


2.3 


5.8 


3.2 


3.4 


6.1 


3.5 


1951 J 


6.6 


3.9 


11.8 


4.9 


7.4 


2.7 


6.3 


3.5 


3.2 


6.2 


4.4 


F 


5.4 


2.4 


7.7 


5.4 


2.6 


2.2 


4.3 


2.9 


3.1 


6.0 


3.5 


M 


5.5 


3.9 


10.7 


3.3 


5.4 


4.3 


8.5 


3.5 


2.1 


6.5 


4.2 


A 


9.3 


3.2 


11.2 


2.8 


5.0 


3.3 


7.8 


3.8 


2.7 


7.8 


5.5 


M 


5.6 


5.2 


9.0 


4.1 


6.2 


2.7 


7.2 


4.2 


4.1 


7.7 


7.8 


J 


6.6 


2.2 


9.1 


4.2 


7.6 


3.1 


6.7 


3.7 


3.7 


7.3 


4.3 


J 


7.7 


3.4 


12.7 


5.6 


9.6 


4.5 


6.9 


4.6 


2.5 


9.1 


5.9 


A 


5.6 


3.1 


13.3 


4.2 


6.8 


2.6 


7.4 


4.1 


3.0 


9.7 


4.6 


S 


7.4 


3.9 


11.4 


3.1 


7.5 


3.2 


6.7 


4.8 


2.9 


8.3 


4.7 


o 


7.0 


3.4 


13.7 


3.0 


8.8 


4.5 


7.2 


5.0 


2.4 


8.9 


5.9 


N 


7.9 


5.1 


12.8 


2.8 


9.8 


4.6 


5.5 


5.2 


3.1 


10.3 


4.8 



(1) Does not include re-exports. "'Includes pigs, ingots, blooms and billets, castings and forgings and rolling mill products. 53 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



TABLE 50 



Merchandise Imports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



JANUARY, 1952 



Inili \ 

[ndei 
D. > tared of 
\ slues Pi u ea 



Index 

of 

I* 1 1 > rical 

\ olume 



Tea, 

Fruits, Grains Sugar Coffee, Rubber Furs 

Total Nuts and and and Vegetable Cocoa and and and 

Imports Vegetables Products Products Oils Chocolate Products Products 







1949 100 










Million 


dollars 








1939 
1950 


28.4 
120.4 


47.2 
110.7 


60.2 
108.8 


62.59 
264.52 


2 89 
11.49 


74 
3 28 


1.95 
7.25 


0.78 
2.85 


1.42 
7.26 


1.34 
4.06 


0.59 
1.83 


1950S 


127.4 


113.0 


112.7 


279 . 67 


9.37 


4 51 


7 36 


2.31 


8.48 


5 56 


2.15 


O 

N 
D 


146.0 
14«).l 
121.3 


114.2 
113.9 
117.0 


127. S 
130.9 
103.7 


320 . 57 
327.'H 
266 . 29 


10 59 
11.88 
10.66 


4.30 
4.71 
5.99 


15.05 

11.19 

6.55 


4.03 
3 75 
2.74 


9.14 
7 91 
5.76 


4.58 
6.35 

7.24 


3.06 
1.90 
1.36 


1951 J 
F 
M 


149.0 
124.9 
156.0 


120.4 
1 23 . 1 
125.3 


123.8 
101.5 
124.5 


327.19 
274.17 
342.50 


11.80 
10.09 
12.86 


2 31 
1.91 

2.86 


3.83 
1.86 
3.16 


4.15 
3.04 

4.47 


7.66 
6.90 
8.44 


11.85 
7.30 
9.92 


4.66 
3.07 
2.57 


A 
M 

J 


179.0 
184.2 
163.8 


128.6 
129.6 
130.0 


139.2 
142.1 
126.0 


393.04 
405.07 
360.42 


13.48 
14.90 
14.96 


5.28 
6.15 

3.47 


5.88 

10.40 

9.21 


7.43 
6.42 
3.85 


7.91 
6.80 
6.43 


7.65 
9 37 
7.95 


2.37 
1.61 
1.29 


J 

A 

S 


168.7 
162.1 
141.5 


129.9 
127.6 
126.6 


129.9 
127.0 
111.8 


370.64 
357.47 
311.50 


13.69 

11.90 

9.26 


2.31 

2.11 
2.10 


8.43 

14.16 

9.86 


2 67 
1.36 

1.32 


7.89 
5.25 
4.68 


6.60 
7.12 
3.98 


1.38 
71 
0.92 


O 


156.1" 


124.3" 


125. 6" 


344.15 


11.33 


4.01 


9 58 


1.58 


6.49 


4.71 


1.03 





Other 




Vegetable 


Hides 


and 


and 


Animal 


-eather 


Products 



Cotton 



Wool 



Raw and 
unmanu- 
factured 



Manu- 
factured 



Flax, 






Synthetic 


Hemp, 


Raw and 




Fibres 


Jute and 


Unmanu- 


Manu- 


and 


Products 


factured 


factured 


Products 



Books and Paper 
Other Printed and 

Textiles Matter Products 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


1 .01 
2 34 


2.65 

7.26 


1.40 
7.55 


1.65 

5.57 


0.77 

2 13 


0.88 

4.61 


1.30 
4.37 


0.45 

1.77 


1.94 

4.37 


1.26 
3.54 


0.72 

1.95 


1950S 


2.45 


7.09 


9 98 


4.84 


2.28 


4.52 


4.23 


1.66 


4.34 


3.79 


1.93 


O 
N 
D 


3.15 

3 25 
2 79 


9 37 
12.70 
10.11 


9.37 

10.82 
11.99 


6.11 
6.53 

5.51 


2.24 
2.43 

1.74 


5.23 
6.00 

6 04 


5 02 
4.39 
3.88 


2 14 
2 36 
2 04 


5 67 
5.65 
4.30 


4.19 

4.14 
3 36 


2.18 
2 52 
2.22 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3.68 
3.08 

3 50 


10.58 

9 .17 

12.13 


10.69 

7.15 

12.42 


9.82 
8.58 
9.56 


2.46 
1.32 

2.24 


6 63 
7.41 
8.55 


6.22 
5.88 

5.77 


3.09 
2.54 
3.49 


6.43 

5.49 
7 24 


4.23 
3.36 

4.10 


2.84 
2.65 
3.08 


A 
M 
J 


3.62 

2 .81 
3.07 


9 95 
9 92 
8 52 


11.41 

12 54 
7 07 


11.96 
8.18 
6 21 


2 80 
2 59 
4.04 


13.19 
9.71 
9 87 


8.95 
6.63 

5.50 


4 94 
4.02 

3 24 


7 31 
7.43 
5.41 


4.70 
4.21 
3.80 


3.02 

2 85 
2.61 


J 

A 

S 


2.61 
2.21 

1 93 


9 99 
10.47 
10.91 


3.23 

3 65 
4.33 


6 59 
6 27 
4.64 


4.84 
2 83 
2.16 


14.80 

11.60 

6.58 


6 56 
6.54 
4.98 


3 .14 
2 78 
2 18 


5.50 
5.49 
5.62 


4 07 
4.44 
4.53 


2.71 
2.83 
2.64 


O 


1 97 


14.53 


5 31 


5.36 


1 68 


2.39 


4 39 


2.38 


5.13 


5 03 


3 54 



54 Note: As of April, 1949, The Trade of Canada includes that of Newfoundland. 

Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 50 concluded 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



Merchandise Imports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Wood, 










Unmanu- 










factured 






Pipes, 




and 




Primary 


Tubes and 


Engines 


Manu- 


Iron 


Iron and 


and 


and 


factured 


Ore 


Steel' 1 ' 


Fittings 


Boilers 



Precious 
Automobiles Other Aluminum Metals 
Farm Other and Iron and and (except 

Machinery Machinery Parts Steel Products gold) 













: 


Million dollars 










1939 
1950 


0.82 
2.87 


0.35 
1.40 


4.00 
9.00 


0.20 
2.95 


0.63 
4.55 


1.74 
13.41 


3.57 
18.85 


3.42 
20.36 


1.36 
11.10 


0.50 
1.56 


0.29 
2.62 


1950S 


2.94 


3.34 


10.43 


2.68 


3.71 


8.92 


17.32 


19.89 


10.98 


2.38 


5.14 


O 

N 
D 


3.56 
3.38 
2.74 


2.91 
2.24 
0.54 


12.20 

13.79 

9.71 


2.68 
2.69 
2.04 


4.80 
4.32 
4.22 


9.62 
9.37 
8.61 


21.95 
21.92 
18.96 


23.01 
24.57 
18.89 


13.46 
14.03 
11.61 


2.45 
2.60 
1.85 


3.56 
2.75 
2.92 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3.76 
3.88 
4.98 


0.01 
0.01 
0.03 


12.73 
10.66 
14.67 


3.10 

2.14 
3.07 


6.32 
5.56 
7.10 


12.15 

13.46 
16.51 


25.67 
20.77 
25.96 


25.43 
23.61 
27.95 


14.97 
12.08 
15.91 


1.90 
1.27 
2.04 


3.04 
2.04 
2.92 


A 
M 
J 


5.01 
4.96 
5.30 


0.38 
1.32 
3.17 


17.46 
17.47 
16.91 


3.64 
4.93 
3.98 


8.37 
7.58 
6.62 


21.23 
21.48 
17.98 


29.89 
31.77 
29.42 


33.36 
29.92 
25.94 


19.68 
18.69 
15.97 


1.89 
2.70 
2.70 


2.69 
3.58 
3.31 


J 

A 

S 


4.93 
4.30 
3.53 


3.70 
4.13 
3.35 


18.60 
18.16 
18.48 


4.02 
4.12 
2.98 


6.94 
5.67 
7.80 


18.76 
19.63 

14.19 


30.99 
27.74 
26.01 


22.71 
14.69 
16.04 


15.38 
15.65 
14.06 


2.61 

2.84 
3.14 


2.75 
2.43 
1.57 


O 


3.99 


3.99 


21.55 


4.72 


8.62 


15.57 


28.04 


16.82 


15.78 


3.41 


2.02 





Other 






Non- 


Clay 


Electrical 


Ferrous 


and 


Apparatus 


Products 


Products 



Other Refrige- 

Coal Petroleum Non- Chemicals rators 

and Glass and and Metallic and Allied and 

Products Glassware Products Products Products Parts 



Other 
Miscella- 
neous 
Tourists' Corn- 
Purchases modifies 













] 


Slillion dollars 












1939 
1950 


1.15 
6.88 


1.57 
6.90 


0.66 
2.81 


3.82 
15.86 


0.66 
2.35 


4.66 
25.66 


1.27 
4.30 


3.64 
13.19 


0.10 
1.28 


0.79 
2.76 


3.62 
10.32 


1950 S 


6.49 


7.52 


2.86 


19.51 


2.26 


33.18 


4.69 


13.62 


1.15 


4.26 


9.56 


O 
N 
D 


7.96 
8.30 
7.21 


7.85 

10.25 

7.27 


3.44 
3.29 
2.83 


21.24 
19.80 
13.19 


2.68 
3.00 
2.33 


33.14 
31.56 
27.47 


6.29 
6.49 
3.43 


14.84 
16.22 
11.95 


1.73 
1.96 
1.51 


4.25 
3.59 
2.48 


11.55 
13.31 
10.25 


1951 J 
F 
M 


9.46 

7.81 

10.38 


8.13 

8.13 

12.20 


3.59 
2.65 
3.35 


14.02 
13.12 
10.51 


2.79 
2.21 
2.82 


27.20 
20.11 

23.75 


3.62 
3.46 
3.86 


17.60 
13.99 
17.36 


3.15 
2.68 
3.44 


1.98 
1.35 
2.37 


13.65 
12.39 
14.93 


A 
M 
J 


11.44 
11.02 
10.27 


9.76 

10.94 

8.71 


4.34 
4.03 
3.87 


12.73 
16.76 
17.81 


3.41 
3.08 
2.74 


25.16 
34.26 
30.21 


5.46 
6.23 
6.60 


18.83 
18.48 
15.47 


4.72 
4.70 
3.87 


3.97 
2.92 
3.58 


17.75 
21.73 
19.47 


J 

A 

S 


9.90 

11.20 

9.72 


8.82 

10.74 

6.55 


4.16 
4.11 
3.20 


17.00 
18.64 
16.76 


2.90 
2.57 
2.37 


38.61 
34.54 
33.56 


6.74 
6.79 
6.53 


16.89 
15.30 
14.11 


2.60 
2.05 
1.13 


4.17 
6.77 
5.83 


20.46 
23.70 
17.96 


o 


10.91 


10.01 


3.75 


21.19 


2.59 


31.92 


5.46 


15.97 


1.01 


6.14 


20.23 



Includes pigs, ingots, blooms and billets, castings and forgings, ferro-alloys and rolling mill products. 



55 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 51 



Merchandise Exports and Imports by Areas 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Ml COUN1 KM s 



COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES 



Total 



United Kingdom 



Australia 



India'-' 



I \|>urt\ Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 

Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


77.08 
259.87 


62 . 59 

264.52 


35.90 
54.59 


15.74 
53.80 


27.34 
39.16 


9 50 
33.68 


2.67 
2.95 


94 
2.73 


0.43 
2.63 


0.82 
3.11 


1950 O 
N 
D 


315.24 

292.70 
289.91 


320.57 
327.91 
266 . 29 


64.73 
53.89 
56.60 


69.20 
70.13 
51.59 


47 71 
38.58 
39.56 


41.67 
40.15 
32.03 


3.34 
3.24 
4.10 


6.29 
6.44 
2.24 


1 57 
2.67 
5.65 


3 39 
3.08 
2.81 


1951 J 
F 
M 


285.13 
233.91 

290.16 


327. 19 
274.17 
342.50 


56.05 
47.67 
60.00 


55.93 
42.62 
55.44 


40.05 
33.59 
39.65 


33.92 
27.81 
30.41 


2.46 
1.39 

4.60 


1 44 
0.78 
1.85 


4.99 
4 89 
6.29 


4.29 
1.67 
4.16 


A 
M 

J 


295.18 
323 . 36 
312.50 


393.04 
405.07 
360.42 


61.32 
67.63 
66.12 


71.15 
75.65 
70.62 


41.72 
47.24 
51.27 


48.94 
43.60 
39.93 


4.27 
5 27 
1.43 


2.71 
6.19 

5 62 


3.65 
0.96 
1.48 


3 53 
3.53 
6.55 


J 

A 

S 


374.47 
349.76 
320.09 


370.64 
357.47 
311.50 


100.65 
86.10 
68.55 


82.01 
79.96 
55.57 


73.93 
66.40 
52.51 


43.30 
39.05 
28.56 


5.42 
4.74 
2.38 


7.52 
7 39 
6.57 


1.94 
1.50 

0.57 


5 31 
2.29 
1 97 


o 

N 


371.03 
379.54 


344.15 


90.99 
81.93 


53.98 


63.96 
57.99 


32.73 


6 .15 
5 40 


3.21 


3.70 

2.80 


1.92 



COMMONWEALTH 
COUNTRIES 

Union oi ' 
South Africa 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



Total 



United States 



Latin America 



Europe 



Exports 



Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 













Million dollars 










1939 
1950 


1.50 
3.55 


0.33 

0.41 


41.18 
205 . 27 


46.85 
210.72 


31.70 
168.42 


41.41 
177.54 


1.68 

11.95 


1.33 
17.80 


4.49 
16.98 


3.08 
8.61 


1950 O 
N 
D 


5.47 
2.84 
2.40 


0.49 
0.82 
0.21 


250 52 
238.81 
233.31 


251.38 
257 . 78 
214.71 


204 . 44 
191.96 
191 51 


208 33 
214.77 
182.28 


14.97 
13.78 
12.96 


21.94 
20.27 
15.91 


24.69 
25.26 
23.21 


11 25 

15.12 

9 31 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2.72 
2.54 
3.67 


0.22 

41 
52 


229.08 
186.24 
230.17 


271.26 
231.55 
287.06 


186.95 
152.43 

190.21 


233.31 
199.03 

245.71 


14.04 
10.67 

11.99 


22.03 
17.03 

22.45 


16.43 
13.49 

17.14 


9.49 
9.61 

11.13 


A 
M 

J 


4.31 
5.60 

4.34 


53 
0.81 
0.57 


233.86 
255 . 73 
246 . 38 


321.89 
329.42 
289.80 


183.18 
208.68 

188.40 


278.41 
273.17 
241.47 


14.32 
17.53 
11.21 


22.15 
27.12 
23.02 


19.54 
15.81 
32.20 


14.71 
18.64 
16.14 


J 

A 

S 


8.16 
4.10 
4.05 


55 
0.45 
0.29 


273.81 
263 66 
251.54 


288 . 63 
277.51 
255.93 


201.93 
192.84 

186.73 


234 74 
229 46 
211.60 


16 35 
17.69 
18.21 


23.52 
23.63 
21.48 


41.42 
41.93 
36.88 


18.48 
17.05 
15.07 


O 

N 


5 47 
4 01 


0.41 


280 04 
297.61 


290.16 


207.13 

209 26 


238 27 


21.01 

26.63 


26.50 


38.55 
39.49 


18.99 



56 Note: Prior to January, 1950, Ireland is included with Commonwealth countries but has since been shown with 

European and Foreign countries. 

' Does not include re-exports. Includes Pakistan prior to 1948. U) Prior to 1947 includes "other British 

South Airica" and Northern Rhodesia. 
Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 52 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



Factors in the Balance of Payments 

Monthly averages or calendar months (1) 



Balance of Merchandise Trade" 1 * 



All 
countries 



United United 
Kingdom States 



Net Returning 

Exports Foreign Canadian 

of Non- Tourist Tourist 

Monetary Auto Automo- 

Gold Entries' 3 ' biles 



Security Sales Between Canada 
and Other Countries* 



Official 

Holdings 

of Gold 

and 

U.S. 

Net sales(+) Net purchases( — ) Dollars'" 



All 
countries 



United 
Kingdom 



United 
States 







Million dollars 




Thousand cars 




Million dollars 


Million 
U.S. dollars 


1939 
1950 


16.1 
0.8 


18.8 
5.8 


-10.7 
- 3.9 


15.3 
13.6 


105.8 
171.7 


33 .2 


6.0 
19.9 


-0.5 
-1.9 


4.8 
21.3 


404.2 
1,741.7 


1950 O 
N 
D 


- 1.7 

-31.5 

27.2 


6.3 

- 1.4 

7.9 


- 0.9 

-19.7 

12.0 


16.4 
12.3 
11.3 


143.1 
80.1 
58.1 


43.7 
25.6 
21.2 


17.3 

3.4 

-1.6 


-4.2 
-1.3 
-0.5 


20.4 
3.5 


1,826.8 
1,787.4 
1,741.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


-38.4 
-37.3 
-48.5 


6.2 
5.9 
9.3 


-43.0 
-44.1 
-52.4 


17.3 

11.7 

8.4 


40.9 
38.9 
62.7 


12.6 
11.5 
28.4 


13.2 

18.0 

8.9 


-1.8 
-1.6 
-0.6 


11.0 

15.2 
6.7 


1,743.6 
1,741.9 
1,653.4 


A 
M 
J 


-92.9 
-78.1 
-44.6 


-7.1 

3.8 

11.5 


-92.3 
-61.7 
-50.6 


16.2 
13.0 
13.8 


86.3 
148.3 
290.5 


28.5 
34.5 
43.9 


2.7 

-2.9 
2.7 


-0.5 
-1.6 
-1.3 


0.9 
-3.2 

1.4 


1,664.3 
1,681.6 
1,683.0 


J 

A 

S 


7.9 

-3.9 

12.0 


30.8 
27.6 
24.2 


-29.8 
-33.7 
-22.1 


13.4 
11.0 
10.8 


489.1 
504.1 
281.2 


97.8 

103.7 

70.5 


1.1 

2.8 

-3.0 


-0.2 

0.6 

-1.0 


0.2 

0.4 

-5.0 


1,668-7 
1,561.8 
1,610.1 


O 

N 


31.5 


31.5 


-27.4 


8.2 


147.6 
76.0 


54.2 


-30.2 


— 


-31.4 





'"Official holdings of Gold and U.S. dollars are given as of end of year and month in Statistical Summary of the 
Bank of Canada and Annual Report of Foreign Exchange Control Board. ' 2, Annual results are from the Canadian 

Balance of International Payments and monthly totals as given in Trade of Canada. ' 3, As of January, 1950, New- 
foundland is included. 

*For explanatory notes see April issue, pages 96 and 97. 

TRANSPORTATION 



TABLE 53 



Shipping and Aviation 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



MERCHANT SHIPPING AT SIX MAJOR PORTS'" 



CANALS CIVIL AVIATION' 3 ' 



Freight Freight 
Loaded Unloaded 



Foreign 

Thousand short tons 



Net Registered Tonnage of Vessels Cleared' 4 ' 

Quebec, Vancouver, 
Montreal, Saint John, 
Total Foreign Coasting Toronto' 2 ' Halifax 



Total' 2 ' 

Cargo 

Traffic 



Thousand tons 



Revenue Revenue 
Passenger Ton 
Miles Miles 

Millions Thousands 



1939 
1950 


671 
643 


690 
1,193 


2,852 
3,173 


1,445 
1,590 


1,407 
1,582 


1,845 
1,770 


1,469 
1,845 


2,599 
3,049 


1.8 
39.5 


535 


1950S 


761 


1,645 


3,832 


1,871 


1,961 


2,195 


1,637 


3,696 


49.2 


503 


O 
N 
D 


655 
899 
538 


1,633 

1,817 

729 


3,494 
3,605 
2,259 


1,859 
2,002 
1,272 


1,635 

1,603 

987 


1,811 

1,902 

360 


1,683 
1,703 
1,898 


3,819 

3,280 

814 


44.9 
36.7 
38.2 


559 
504 
597 


1951 J 
F 
M 


636 
585 
614 


473 
420 
494 


2,057 
1,841 
2,182 


1,137 
1,000 
1,203 


919 
840 
979 


17 


2,057 
1,841 
2,165 


E 


36.9 
33.3 
42.0 


542 
524 
634 


A 
M 
J 


641 

881 

1,144 


1,008 
1,434 
1,457 


2,685 
3,645 
3,995 


1,438 
2,000 
2,053 


1,247 
1,646 
1,942 


765 
1,727 
2,092 


1,920 
1,918 
1,903 


1,981 
3,698 
3,822 


42.6 
49.6 


633 
690 


J 

A 

S 


1,192 
887 
735 


1,677 
1,347 
1,437 


4,747 
4,463 
3,874 


2,239 
2,036 
1,863 


2,508 
2,427 
2,011 


2,468 
2,329 
1,987 


2,279 
2,134 
1,887 


3,842 
3,946 
3,842 






o 

N 


1,194 


1,193 


3,824 


2,068 


1,756 


1,911 


1,913 


3,981 
3,345 







'"Prior to 1941 statistics are for shipping year ended March 31. l2) Annual data are averages of nine months. 
< 3 'Excludes Canada-United Kingdom Route. ' 4 'Annual data include tugs. 



57 



TRANSPORTATION JANUARY, 1952 

Car loadings of Revenue Freight on Canadian Railways 

TABLE 54 Monthly averages or calendar months 





TOTAL 


FARM PRODUCTS AND FOODS 




FOREST PRODUCTS 




METALS 




Revenue 

Cars 
Loaded 


Grain and 

Grain 

Products 


Fresh 
Fruits 
and 
Vege- 
tables 


Live Stock, 
Meats and 

Packing- 
house 

Products 


All 
Other 


Pulpwood 


Woodpulp 

and 

Paper 


Lumber, 
Lath and 
Shingles 


All 

Other 


Ores, Con- 
centrates 
and 

Reiined 












Thousand cars 










1949 
1950 


325.5 
325.5 


42.6 
37 .0 


5.1 
4.6 


10.2 
9.4 


6.9 
7.0 


14.5 

13.6 


17.0 
18.8 


14.9 
18.7 


6.6 

6.5 


15.8 
17.2 


1950 N 
D 


369.2 
314.2 


52.8 
42. 6' 


6.7 
4.6 


13.3 
8.5 


10.7 
6.5 


11.1 
13. r 


19.8 
19. r 


19.5 
14.8 


8.9 
7.2 


20.2 
13.9 


1951 J 
F 
M 


331.4 
294.3 
336.2 


39.6 
29.1 
32.6 


5.7 
4.5 
4.4 


7.8 
6.5 
7.1 


6.6 
5.6 
6.1 


26.5 
24.8 
29.4 


22.2 
21.1 
24.2 


15.8 
15.8 

19.2 


5.6 
5.0 
6.3 


13 
10.8 
12.6 


A 
M 
J 


337.1 
380.4 
370.0 


45.9 
58.2 
52 3 


4.9 
3.6 
2.5 


7.7 
8.1 
7.7 


5.0 
5.3 
5.2 


15.4 
24 3 
30.2 


21.0 
21.0 
19.7 


17.4 
19.7 
22.1 


6.3 
7.6 
7.6 


15.3 
20.1 
21.8 


J 

A 

S 


350.2 
363.0 
349.7 


51.1 
54.5 
49.0 


1.8 
2.8 
5.2 


6.9 
7.8 
8.6 


5.5 
5.1 
6.4 


28.7 
26.0 
20 .5 


18.5 
19.9 
18.7 


20.9 
19.5 
18.6 


6.3 

6.0 
6.2 


21.7 
24.4 
21.0 


O 
N 
D 


389.8 
366.9 
314.6 


63.8 
64.1 
52.3 


7.5 
6.7 
4.2 


11.2 

10.0 

6.5 


11.4 

10.3 

6.2 


17.6 
14.5 
18.7 


20.7 
20.4 
21.1 


19.2 
17 4 
13.3 


7.3 
9.6 
7.2 


21.0 
16 8 
12.4 




NON-METALLIC MINERALS 


IRON AND STEEL 


Fertilizers 


OTHER 

Other 
Manufac- 
turing and 
Miscel- 
laneous 


Merchan 

dise 

L.C.L. 


Cars 




Coal and 
Coke 


Petroleum 

and 
Gasoline 


Building 
Materials 


All 
Other 


Primary 
Products 


Autos, 
Machinery, 
Implements 
and Parts 


from 
Connec- 
tions 












Thousand cars 










1949 
1950 


28.6 

29.8 


21.4 
22.9 


18.0 
18.0 


6.2 
7.3 


7.3 

7.7 


7.8 
8.8 


3.0 
3.1 


22.6 
23.6 


77.0 
71.4 


132.9 
137.3 


1950 N 
D 


37.3 
35.1 


21.6 
20.4 


19.3 
12.5 


8.2 

6.1 


8.3 
8 


7.5 
8.0 


3.0 
3.0 


25.5 
22. 9 r 


75.7 
68. r 


148.0 
143.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


32.2 
27.4 
25.2 


22.2 
19.7 
19.7 


12.1 
11.7 
15.5 


7.0 
6.3 
7.8 


9.5 

8.2 

10.4 


9.1 

8.7 

11.8 


3.3 

3.2 
3.5 


23.7 
21.6 
25.9 


69.5 
64.3 

74.5 


155.0 
144.5 
171.7 


A 
M 

J 


23.3 
24.6 
26.2 


17.1 
23.0 
22.5 


19.2 

24.1 
23.7 


7.5 
8.6 
9.2 


9.3 

9.6 
9.5 


12.2 

11.2 

9.9 


4.8 
5.3 
2.1 


27.1 
28.0 
27.5 


77.6 
77.9 
70.3 


150.1 
157.4 
145.6 


J 

A 

S 


23.5 
25.3 
30.3 


23.2 
25.3 
21.5 


23.6 
25.8 
24.0 


7.5 
7.8 
8.1 


8.3 
8.1 
8.7 


9.0 

7.5 
8.1 


1.7 
2.4 
2.3 


25.4 
25.3 
25.1 


66.7 
69.5 
67.3 


138.1 
148.0 
138.7 


o 

N 
D 


35.2 
35.7 
31.7 


22 3 
21.2 
21.3 


24.4 
19.0 
13 2 


8.8 
7.7 
6.0 


9.4 
9.0 
8.1 


7.9 
7.8 
6.6 


2.5 
2.8 
3.5 


26.3 
24.1 
21.4 


73.4 
69.7 
60.9 


154.6 
144.8 
140.3 



58 Note: Based on weekly carloadings reported by major lines only. 

Source: Weekly Report, Carloadings, D.B.S. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TRANSPORTATION 



TABLE 55 



Operating Statistics of Canadian Railways 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Operating Revenues 



Total 



Freight Passengei 



Operating Operating 
Expenses Income (y 



Revenue 



Tons 
carried 



Tons 

carried 

one mile 



Passengers Passengers 
Carried Carried 
One Mile 



Million dollars 



Millions 



1939 
1950 


30.6 
79.9 


23.8 
64.1 


3.0 
6.5 


25.4 
69.5 


4.0 
6.7 


7.9 
13.7 


2,622 
4,608 


1.7 
2.6 


146 
235 


1950 A 
S 


64.9 
90.8 


50.5 
73.4 


6.4 
7.4 


56.4 
71.1 


4.6 
12.7 


11.0 

14. 2' 


3,466 
5,235 


2.0 

2.3 


232 
266 r 


O 
N 
D 


92.5 
89.9 
84.3 


77.1 
72.2 
64.8 


6.0 
5.7 
7.5 


72.4 
72.6 
72.8 


15.8 
13.5 

7.7 


16.1 
15.0 
13.6 


5,542 
5,222 
5,191 


2.2 
2.1 
2.6 


213 
203 
261 


1951 J 
F 
M 


81.6 
76.5 
88.1 


67.3 
63.7 
72.3 


6.0 
5.4 
6.8 


73.3 
72.1 
79.0 


3.3 
0.3 
6.4 


14.0 
12.8 
14.0 


4,968 
4,582 
5,122 


2.4 
2.2 
2.8 


209 
187 
239 


A 
M 
J 


88.1 
92.4 
91.6 


73.1 
75.4 
72.5 


5.8 
6.7 
8.4 


80.0 
83.5 
81.8 


4.0 
5.1 
5.9 


14.2 
15.1 
15.5 


5,190 
5,629 
5,456 


2.3 
2.1 
2.3 


200 
231 
298 


J 
A 

S 


91.8 
93.8 
91.4 


71.3 
73.2 
72.2 


9.6 
9.5 
7.8 


82.3 
86.1 
80.2 


4.7 
4.0 
5.4 


15.0 
15.4 
14.4 


5,337 
5,405 
5,320 


2.6 
2.6 
2.2 


340 
335 
268 



CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 



CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY 
CANADIAN LINES 



Operating Revenues 



Total 



Freight Passenger 



Operating Operating <2) 
Expenses Income 



Operating Revenues 
Total Freight Passenger 



Operating Operating (2) 
Expenses Income 













Million dollars 










1939 
1950 


12.7 
31.5 


9.9 
25.5 


1.3 
2.9 


9.9 
27.0 


2.4 
3.2 


14.4 
39.9 


11.1 
31.6 


1.4 
3.1 


13.1 
36.3 


0.9 
2.7 


1950 A 
S 


25.7 
36.7 


19.8 
29.9 


2.9 
3.4 


21.5 
27.0 


2.7 
4.9 


31.7 
45.6 


24.6 
36.5 


2.9 
3.5 


29.7 
38.4 


0.9 
6.4 


O 

N 
D 


36.7 
35.1 
33.8 


30.8 
29.0 
26.9 


2.7 
2.5 
3.2 


28.1 
28.0 
27.4 


6.6 
6.0 
4.9 


47.0 
46.0 
43.5 


39.0 
36.1 
32.1 


2.8 
2.7 
3.8 


38.6 
38.8 
39.8 


7.6 
6.1 
2.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


32.7 
31.0 
34.5 


27.7 
26.1 
28.3 


2.6 
2.4 
3.0 


28.9 
27.4 
31.2 


1.4 
1.7 
2.9 


40.4 
37.6 
45.0 


32.8 
30.5 
36.4 


2.9 
2.5 
3.4 


38.9 
39.3 
42.0 


0.7 

Dr2.5 

2.2 


A 
M 
J 


34.9 
37.4 
36.4 


29.5 
31.2 
29.2 


2.5 
2.9 
3.7 


30.8 
34.9 
33.2 


2.6 
1.0 
1.9 


44.2 
46.2 
46.5 


35.8 
36.8 
36.0 


2.9 
3.4 
4.2 


43.0 
42.3 
42.4 


0.3 
3.0 
2.9 


J 
A 

S 


35.8 
36.3 
36.0 


28.2 
28.7 
28.8 


4.0 
4.0 
3.3 


32.5 
34.7 
30.3 


1.1 
0.3 
1.9 


47.5 
48.8 
46.7 


36.2 
37.5 
36.3 


4.9 
4.8 
3.9 


43.8 
45.2 
43.8 


2.6 
2.6 
2.2 



Beginning with April, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 

(l) In the upper section of this table, the annual statistics embrace all steam railways, while monthly data refer to 
railways with annual operating revenues of $500,000 or over. ''^Operating income equals operating revenues less 

operating expenses adjusted for tax accruals and rent of equipment and joint facilities. 

Source: Operating Revenues, Expenses and Statistics, Railways in Canada, D.B.S. 



59 



FINANCE 

TABLE 56 



JANUARY, 1952 



Bank of Canada 

As of end of period 



LIABILITIES 



Chartered Bank Cash 



Deposits 
Notes in at Bank of 

tills Canada Total 



Gold 



Govern- 




Foreign ' 


Notes in 




Total 


ment 


Other 


Currency 


Hands of 


All Other 


Liabilities 


Deposits 


Deposits 


Liabilities 


Public 


Accounts 


or Asm Is 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


70.6 
231.3 


217 
578.6 


287.6 
809.9 


46 3 
24.7 


17.9 
207.1 


133.6 


162 
1,136 


13 3 
39.0 


527 
2,350 


1950 N 
D 


204.1 
231.3 


578 9 
578 6 


783 
809.9 


45 3 
24.7 


221.0 
207.1 


149.7 
133.6 


1.119 
1,136 


56.3 
39.0 


2,375 
2,350 


1951 J 
F 
M 


219.6 
202.8 
185.1 


537.6 
550.5 
552.9 


757.3 
753.3 
738 1 


68.3 
69.5 
70.5 


204.4 
204.6 
206.7 


136.0 

128.9 

88.5 


1,075 
1,093 
1,134 


53.3 
39.8 
28.7 


2,294 
2,289 
2,267 


A 
M 

J 


203.1 

214.8 
177.1 


556.1 
530.1 
590.7 


759.2 
744.9 
767.8 


56.9 
76.2 
75.3 


215.1 
221.5 
220.1 


137.7 
129.9 
132.8 


1,120 
1,123 
1,174 


58.9 
38.8 
32.2 


2,348 
2,334 
2,402 


J 

A 

S 


226 
189.7 
195 2 


558 2 
580 4 
579 4 


784.2 
770.1 
774 6 


91.1 
115.0 
105.6 


212.6 
185.7 
140.0 


146.7 
143.0 
116.3 


1,145 
1,181 
1,193 


56.2 
62.8 
38.5 


2,435 
2,458 
2,368 


O 

N 
D 


232 2 
195.1 


588 3 
633.8 
619 


820.6 
828 9 


210.3 
66 
94 .9 


83.3 
92.5 
66.1 


102 1 
135.1 
155.6 


1,174 
1,212 


62.9 
54.4 
44.4 


2,453 
2,389 
2,444 



ASSETS 



Reserve 



Securities 



Federal-Provincial 



Silver 



Foreign' 1 ) Total' 1 ' 
currencies reserve 



Under 
two years 



Ind. Dev. 
Bank 



Over Bank Other 

two years Cap. Stock Securities 



Total 



All Other 
Accounts 











Million 


dollars 










1939 
1950 


225.7 


64.3 
111.7 


290.0 
111.7 


182 
1,229 


50 
712 


25.0 


247.9 


232 
2,215 


5.5 
24.0 


1950 N 
D 


— 


127.4 

111.7 


127.4 
111.7 


1.170 
1,229 


662 
712 


25 
25.0 


328.1 
247.9 


2,185 
2,215 


62.1 
24.0 


1951 J 
F 
M 





118.1 
117.5 

80.2 


118 1 

117 .5 

80.2 


1,171 
1,165 
1,342 


731 

757 
674 


25.0 
25 
25.0 


200.3 
168.7 
114.4 


2,128 
2,116 
2,155 


48.2 
55.1 
31.6 


A 
M 

J 





129.0 

125 4 
117.0 


129.0 
125.4 
117.0 


1,328 
1,314 
1.335 


722 

777 
846 


25.0 
25.0 
25.0 


70 .6 
45.3 

58.8 


2,146 
2,161 
2,265 


73.0 
47.4 
20.1 


J 

A 

S 




117.0 
100.1 

87.1 


117.0 
100.1 

87.1 


1.327 
1.350 
1.298 


872 
888 
896 


25 
25.0 
25.0 


51.4 
44.1 
31.2 


2,276 
2.307 
2,250 


41.9 
50.6 
30.8 


o 

N 
D 


— 


96.6 

128.9 
117.9 


96.6 
128.9 
117.9 


1.317 

1.138 
1,142 


956 
1.043 
1.049 


25.2 
25.0 

25.0 


8.2 

18 8 
89.0 


2,307 
2,225 
2,305 


49.7 
35.4 

21 .0 



60 '"Includes foreign exchange items for account of foreign clients and also the Government ol Canada and the Foreign 

Exchange Control Board since March 31, 1949. Liabilities payable in pounds sterling, United States dollars and other 
foreign currencies. 

Source: Statistical Summary of Bank of Canada. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 57 



Canadian Chartered Banks 

Averages of month-end figures or end of month 



FINANCE 



ASSETS 



Securities 



Canadian 
Cash 



Federal-Provincial 



Canadian 



Reserve' 1 ' Under 2 yrs Over 2 yrs municipal 



Foreign 
govern- 
ment 



Other 



Gold, Coin 

and 
Total Foreign 
securities Currency 



Notes of 

and 
Cheques Balances 
on Other at Other 
Banks Banks 













Million dollars 










1939 
1950 


268 
754 


516 
925 


718 
2,638 


101 
176 


78 
226 


126 
398 


1,540 
4,363 


43 
86 


120 
379 


219 
243 


1950 O 
N 
D 


834 
783 
810 


892 
930 
939 


2,685 
2,567 
2,555 


184 
190 
194 


201 
205 
193 


388 
389 
405 


4,349 
4,280 
4,286 


60 
59 
56 


451 
476 
450 


255 
269 
259 


1951 J 
F 
M 


757 
753 
738 


937 
788 
755 


2,517 
2,497 
2,420 


192 
192 
192 


188 
190 
210 


413 
426 
409 


4,248 
4,093 

3,986 


61 
61 
56 


402 
448 
376 


243 
243 
263 


A 
M 
J 


759 
745 
768 


743 
732 
721 


2,366 
2,358 
2,325 


190 
186 
183 


208 
190 
192 


416 
420 
415 


3,924 

3,886 
3,838 


55 
58 
53 


499 
467 
395 


248 
263 
267 


J 

A 

S 


784 
770 
775 


735 
717 
769 


2,317 
2,317 
2,318 


180 
179 
175 


195 
210 
208 


413 
409 
406 


3,840 

3,832 
3,876 


59 
58 
56 


468 
497 
387 


267 
310 
259 


O 

N 


821 
829 


779 
833 


2,288 
2,268 


174 
170 


226 
214 


408 
407 


3,876 
3,894 


57 
53 


544 
552 


267 
253 



Call 



ASSETS 



Loans 



Canada 



Abroad 



Current 
public 



Provincial- 
municipal 



Call 



Current 



Letters 

of 
Credit 



All Other 
Assets 



Total 

Assets 



LIABILITIES 



Notes in 
Circulation 



Million dollars 



1939 


55 




855 


133 


48 


145 


54 


113 


3 


,592 


94 


1950 


111 


2 


,330 


115 


93 


222 


201 


118 


9 


,015 


— 


1950 O 


115 


2 


,449 


116 


117 


230 


227 


121 


9 


,323 


— 


N 


164 


2 


,611 


126 


96 


234 


232 


119 


9 


,450 


— 


D 


134 


2 


,651 


125 


100 


247 


258 


120 


9 


,496 


— 


1951 J 


118 


2 


,671 


124 


113 


252 


269 


123 


9 


,379 


— 


F 


109 


2 


736 


136 


114 


256 


281 


124 


9 


,354 


— 


M 


94 


2 


856 


152 


96 


252 


289 


126 


9 


,284 


— 


A 


87 


2 


,886 


161 


97 


271 


290 


128 


9 


,403 


— 


M 


92 


2 


,896 


170 


99 


281 


282 


131 


9 


,370 


— 


J 


82 


2 


,898 


164 


110 


281 


269 


132 


9 


,256 


— 


J 


84 


2 


,890 


153 


112 


285 


246 


135 


9 


323 


— 


A 


90 


2 


912 


161 


119 


262 


230 


136 


9, 


378 


— 


S 


107 


2 


901 


144 


131 


273 


228 


139 


9, 


276 


— 


O 


111 


2 


,893 


141 


82 


290 


222 


138 


9 


440 


— 


N 


96 


2 


975 


149 


90 


285 


232 


137 


9 


544 


— 



Note: Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949. 

(I) Since 1935, includes notes of, and deposits with, the Bank of Canada. 

Source: Department of Finance. 



61 



FINANCE 



TABLE 57 - concluded 



JANUARY, 1952 



Canadian Chartered Banks 

Averages of month-end figures or end of month 













LIABILITIES 


















Deposits 








Total 
I labil- 
ities 


Daily 




Federal Provincial 
Government Government 


Demand 


Notice 


External and 

in currencies 

of other 

countries 


Other 
banks 


Total 


Canadian 
deposits 1 " 


Average 

Ratio 

Cash to 

Deposits' 3 ' 












Million dol 


ars 










1939 
1950 


92 
193 


53 
187 


742 
2.563 


1,699 
4.548 


474 
731 


83 
228 


3,144 
8,449 


2,630 
7.597 


3,578 
8,997 


10.4 
10.1 


1950 O 
N 
D 


152 
288 
339 


206 
164 
161 


2.822 
2.824 
2.770 


4.559 
4,543 
4,558 


706 
716 
735 


279 
309 
304 


8,724 

8 , 845 
8,867 


7.887 
7,995 
7,997 


9,303 
9,432 
9,478 


10.4 

9.9 

10.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


358 
271 
318 


175 
175 
205 


2,638 
2.612 
2,487 


4,577 
4,618 
4,614 


724 
734 
719 


267 
294 
283 


8,739 
8,702 
8,625 


7,885 
7.841 
7,753 


9,361 

9,336 
9,266 


10.2 
9.4 
9.8 


A 

M 
J 


180 
231 
266 


180 
174 
189 


2,725 
2.692 
2.578 


4,598 
4.589 
4,559 


749 
747 
763 


309 
285 
264 


8,742 
8,718 
8,618 


7,856 
7,829 
7.697 


9,385 
9,352 

9,238 


10.0 
9.8 

10.0 


J 

A 

S 


235 
269 
227 


168 
141 
164 


2.675 
2.675 
2.651 


4.580 
4,583 
4,595 


753 
808 
769 


294 
300 
268 


8,705 
8,775 
8,674 


7.809 
7.799 
7,724 


9,306 
9,360 
9 , 258 


10.4 

10.3 
10.5 


O 

N 


126 
134 


144 
142 


2.907 
2,936 


4,575 
4.616 


784 
784 


298 
314 


8,833 
8,927 


7.913 
8.015 


9,423 
9,527 


10.4 
11.0 



! Deposits payable in Canadian currency, 
deposits. 



•' Includes all other liabilities. 



Ratio of cash in Canada to Canadian 



TABLE 58 



Currency and Active Bank Deposits 

End of period 



CURRENCY OUTSIDE BANKS 



ACTIVE BANK DEPOSITS 



Chartered Banks 



Notes" Coin-' Total 



Demand 



Active 

notice 13 ' 



Other 

(«) (5) 



Deduct 
float (6 > 



Net 
total 



Bank of 
Canada 

"Other" 
deposits 



Total 



Total 

Currency 

and 

Active 

Hank 

Deposits 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 
1950 O 

N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 
A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 



247 
1,136 
1.110 
1.119 
1,136 
1.075 
1,093 
1,134 
1,120 
1.123 
1,174 
1.145 
1,181 
1.193 



34 281 
78 1,214 



O 1.174' 
N| 1.212 



77 
77 
78 
76 
76 
78 
78 
79 
81 
80 
81 
82 
82 
84 



1,187 

1,196 

1,214 

1,151 

1,169 

1,212 

1.198 

1.202 

1.255 

1,225 

1.262 

1.275 

1.256 r 

1.296 



853 
2.770 
2.822 
2.824 
2,770 
2,638 
2.612 
2,487 
2.725 
2.692 
2.578 
2.675 
2.675 
2.651 
2.907 
2.936 



197 
697 
695 
694 
697 
702 
709 
711 
709 
707 
707 
709 
712 
715 
713 



157 
413 
437 
419 
413 
395 
415 
428 
429 
398 
385 
396 
381 
371 
380 



136 
450 
451 
476 
450 
402 
448 
376 
499 
467 
395 
468 
497 
387 
544 
552 



1.071 
3,430 
3,503 
3.461 
3.430 
3.333 
3.288 
3,250 
3.364 
3,330 
3,275 
3,312 
3,271 
3,350 
3,456 



18 
207 
235 
221 
207 
204 
205 
207 
215 
222 
220 
213 
186 
140 
83 
92 



1.089 
3.637 
3.738 
3,682 
3.637 
3.537 
3.493 
3.457 
3.579 
3,552 
3,495 
3.525 
3.457 
3.490 
3.539 



1,370 
4,851 
4,925 
4,878 
4,851 
4,688 
4,662 
4,669 
4,777 
4,754 
4,750 
4,750 
4,719 
4,765 
4,795 



62 Note: Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949. 

1 Note Circulation of Bank of Canada and chartered banks, excluding notes held by chartered banks. * bub- 
sidiary coin issued by the Mint less coin held by Bank of Canada and chartered banks in Canada. Chartered banks 

public notice deposits in Canada other than estimated aggregate quarterly minimum balances in personal savings 
accounts and non-personal notice deposits. ; Chartered banks' Canadian dollar deposits of provincial governments, 

Canadian, United Kingdom, and foreign banks. Excluding Government of Canada. Cheques on banks as 

shown in chartered bank month-end returns to the Minister of Finance. 
Source: Statistical Summary of Bank of Canada. 



JANUARY, 1952 FINANCE 

Federal Government Revenues and Expenditures 

TABLE 59 



1951 1950 


1951 1950 


1951-52 1950-51 


October 


November 


April 1 to November 30 


Million dollars 



REVENUES 

Ordinary Revenue 

Customs Import Duties 

Excise Duties 

Excise Taxes 

Income and Excess Profits Taxes 

Postal Revenue 

Sundry 

Total Ordinary Revenue 

Special Receipts 

Total Revenues 



EXPENDITURES 

Expenditure (by Departments) 

Agriculture 

Citizenship & Immigration 

Defence Production 

External Affairs 

Finance — 

Administration and General 

Grants to Municipalities (Lieu of Taxes) . . . 

Interest and Other Debt Charges 

Payments to Provinces (Subsidies, Tax 
Rental Payments, etc.) 

Flood and Other Emergency Assistance . . . 

Implementation of Guarantees 

Fisheries 

Justice 

Labour 

Legislation 

Mines & Technical Surveys 

National Defence 

Administration and General 

Naval Service 

Army Service 

Air Force Service 

Defence Research Board 

National Health & Welfare 

Administration & General 

Family Allowances 

Old Age Pensions and Pensions to the Blind 

General Health Grants to Provinces 

National Research Council 

National Revenue 

Post Office 

Public Archives 



32.4 


26.7 


27.4 


27.2 


234.3 


175.1 


22.5 


21.9 


22.1 


21.7 


147.3 


154.2 


79.6 


57.9 


74.1 


66.9 


575.8 


394.1 


201.7 


128.1 


166.9 


119.7 


1,370.5 


897.0 


7.5 


6.5 


8.8 


7.5 


62.8 


53.6 


8.5 


6.6 


7.4 


7.6 


63.9 


62.5 


352.3 


247.7 


306.7 


250.6 


2,454.7 


1,736.4 


2.3 


5.9 


1.4 


1.4 


13.3 


50.6 


354.6 


253.6 


308.1 


251.9 


2,468.0 


1,787.0 



5.9 


5.4 


6.1 


5.3 


41.4 


44.2 


3.0 


2.8 


2.8 


2.8 


19.6 


17.3 


4.0 


— 


1.9 


— 


17.6 


— 


0.8 


0.7 


0.7 


0.9 


8.5 


11.1 


1.7 


1.5 


1.5 


1.4 


11.3 


11.3 


0.1 


— 


0.3 


0.3 


0.6 


0.4 


20.8 


23.9 


63.4 


65.8 


249.9 


253.4 


2.9 


2.9 








75.1 


67.9 


— 


0.5 


0.3 


0.2 


0.9 


8.2 


1.3 


— 


— 


— 


1.3 


— 


0.8 


0.7 


0.8 


0.7 


5.6 


5.8 


1.3 


1.0 


1.2 


1.1 


9.1 


8.1 


4.9 


5.6 


6.2 


4.3 


38.6 


35.9 


0.4 


0.2 


0.5 


0.1 


3.0 


2.7 


3.2 


0.9 


2.5 


1.6 


16.6 


11.0 


1.1 


0.6 


1.4 


0.7 


9.6 


6.7 


14.0 


6.5 


16.0 


9.5 


89.3 


48.7 


31.0 


16.5 


31.1 


12.5 


213.6 


102.2 


52.3 


13.4 


56.8 


19.7 


338.0 


104.4 


2.3 


1.6 


2.8 


1.5 


16.6 


11.2 


0.7 


0.5 


0.8 


0.6 


5.5 


4.4 


26.7 


25.8 


26.8 


25.9 


212.4 


205.2 


26.9 


25.6 


— 


— 


53.4 


49.8 


1.5 


1.2 


1.7 


2.6 


9.2 


6.0 


2.9 


1.3 


2.5 


1.5 


14.1 


10.0 


3.7 


3.7 


3.7 


3.7 


29.9 


30.4 


8.2 


6.4 


7.6 


9.0 


56.9 


51.8 


— 


— 


— 


— 


0.2 


0.1 



Note: This statement does not include any receipts other than revenues nor any disbursements other than regular 
budgetary expenditures. Excluded, for example, are all receipts arising from repayments of loans and advances, or from 
accumulations on annuity, pension and insurance funds. Similarly excluded on the expenditure side, for example, are all 
Govt, outlays arising from increases in loans, advances and investments. 

Source: Canada Gazette. 



63 



FINANCE JANUARY, 1952 

Federal Government Revenues and Expenditures 

TABLE 59 concluded 



1951 



1950 



1951 



1950 



October 



November 



1951 52 1950-51 

April 1 to November 30 



Million dollars 



EXPENDITURES (concluded) 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Resources and Development 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State 

Trade and Commerce 

Transport 

Veterans Alfairs 

Administration and General 

Treatment Services 

Disability Pensions and Veterans 

Allowances 

Discharge Benefits and Credits 

Soldier Settlement and Veterans' Land Act 

Other Departments 

Total Expenditures 

Excess of Revenues over Expenditures 



LOANS, ADVANCES AND INVESTMENTS (,) 
Net Increase or Decrease (— ) 

Loans to, and Investments in, Crown Agencies 

Railway and Steamship Companies 

Miscellaneous 

Total Loans to, and Investments in Crown 
Agencies 

Other Loans and Investments 

United Kingdom and Other Governments 
United Kingdom Financial Agreement Act 

1946 

United Kingdom Loan under The War 

Appropriation Act, 1942 

Other Governments 

Total Loans to United Kingdom and Other 

Governments 

Soldier Settlement and Veterans' Land Act 

Miscellaneous 

Total Other Loans and Investments 

Total Working Capital Advances 

Net Total of Changes in Loans, Advances 
and Investments 



1 


— 


1 


0.1 


5 


0.3 


8.3 


7.0 


7 7 


6.4 


49 7 


44 3 


2.2 


2.3 


1.7 


2.0 


13 4 


14.1 


2 3 


1.6 


2.1 


1.9 


15 7 


11.5 


0.1 


0.2 


0.2 


0.1 


1.1 


1.0 


2.1 


1.8 


2.1 


2.1 


15.7 


14.0 


7.5 


6.9 


7 


6.5 


51 4 


46 8 


1.3 


1.3 


1.4 


14 


10.1 


10 4 


3.6 


3.0 


3 6 


3.1 


24 9 


22 5 


10.5 


9 8 


10.5 


10.1 


82 2 


79 1 


1.2 


2.2 


1.5 


2.7 


10 1 


17.0 


5 


0.6 


0.5 


0.5 


3.7 


4.1 


0.9 


0.5 


0.7 


0.3 


7 


8.0 


263.1 


186.4 


278.0 


209.2 


1,833.3 


1,381.0 


91 5 


67.3 


30.0 


42 8 


634.7 


406 



-0.9 
6 

5.1 



18.6 



9 
11.2 

10.3 



5 
5 



15.4 
15.4 



107.7 
47.1 

154.8 



10.8 



11.7 



16.5 



191.7 



-2.8 

76.4 

73.6 



20.0 



— 


— 


— 


— 


-21.6 


-19 5 


-1.6 


— 


-3.3 


-3.4 


-11.4 


-14.7 


-1.6 




-3.3 


-3.4 


-33 


-14.2 


0.3 


2.0 


2 


1.8 


7 8 


12.6 


0.2 


-0.1 


-0 2 


— 


-19 


-3.4 


- 1.1 


2 


-3.3 


-15 


-27.2 


-5.0 


14.6 


-15 


10.0 


2.7 


64.1 


5.8 



74.4 



64 Does not include advances to Foreign Exchange Control Board which are equivalent in substance to cash 

balances either in Canada or abroad, nor temporary investment of surplus cash in the Government's own securities. 
Note: Credit items are due to repayments and transfers between departments and classes of expenditure. 



JANUARY, 1952 

Cheques Cashed in Clearing House Centres 

TABLE 60 Monthly averages or calendar months 



FINANCE 



CANADA" 



BY REGIONS 



SELECTED CITIES 



Atlantic Prairie British Van- 

Provinces'" Quebec Ontario Provinces Columbia Montreal Toronto Ottawa Winnipeg couver 













Million dollars 










1939 
1950 


2,635 
8,386 


57 
221 


818 
2,426 


1,135 
3,596 


457 
1,441 


168 
704 


730 
2,175 


848 
2,523 


106 
345 


287 
747 


132 
575 


1950 O 
N 
D 


9,391 

11,008 

9,315 


232 
256 
247 


2,757 
3,354 
2,839 


3,860 
4,775 
3,835 


1,762 
1,768 
1,587 


780 
855 
806 


2,412 
3,082 
2,567 


2,780 
3,431 
2,701 


290 
519 
281 


971 
960 
873 


650 
706 
670 


1951 J 
F 
M 


9,002 
7,984 
8,830 


226 
200 
253 


2,843 
2,343 
2,779 


3,745 
3,527 
3,766 


1,397 
1,181 
1,250 


791 
733 
782 


2,562 
2,116 
2,441 


2,534 
2,391 
2,631 


335 
386 
275 


712 
584 
598 


643 
618 
657 


A 
M 
J 


9,017 
9,484 
9,500 


227 
247 
239 


2,492 
2,688 
2,647 


3,969 
3,925 
3,987 


1,525 
1,785 
1,744 


804 
839 
882 


2,181 
2,417 
2,369 


2,633 
2,692 
2,767 


463 
352 
321 


846 

1,012 

948 


655 
702 
724 


J 

A 

S 


9,032 
9,072 

8,775 


261 r 

224 

224 


2,607 
2,620 
2,647 


3,751 
3,754 
3,508 


1,589 
1,633 
1,603 


824 
839 
793 


2,302 
2,348 
2,361 


2,517 
2,485 
2,407 


344 
421 
313 


845 
844 
826 


676 
695 
628 


O 

N | 


10,619 
10,737 


277 
259 


2,965 
3,212 


4,423 
4,499 


2,066 
1,930 


888 
837 


2,646 
2,858 


3,097 
3,101 


420 
501 


1,153 
1,004 


740 
690 



(1) Commencing with April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 
Source: Cheques Cashed in Clearing Centres, D.B.S. 



TABLE 61 



Life Insurance Sales 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Canada 



Prince 
New- Edward 

foundland Island 



New 
Nova Bruns- 

Scotia wick 



Quebec Ontario 



Mani- 
toba 



Saskat- 
chewan 



British 
Alberta Columbia 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


39.7 
113.1 


0.34 
0.78 


0.17 
0.38 


1.67 
3.52 


0.97 
2.59 


11.45 
29.69 


16.76 
48.64 


2.45 
5.46 


1.20 
3.69 


1.73 

7.96 


2.99 
10.36 


1950 O 
N 
D 


123.5 
135.8 
119.4 


1.07 
0.83 
0.84 


0.51 
0.48 
0.52 


3.58 
4.35 
3.58 


2.80 
2.85 
2.58 


32.33 
36.23 
31.73 


53.50 
59.47 
50.74 


5.70 
6.27 
6.00 


4.33 
4.40 
3.41 


8.72 
8.72 
8.74 


10.96 
12.25 
11.29 


1951 J 
F 
M 


120.5 
118.7 
122.0 


0.63 
1.15 
0.97 


0.31 
0.32 
0.24 


3.49 
3.85 
3.51 


2.84 
2.83 
3.10 


32.91 
30.53 
35.16 


50.90 
51.44 
51.87 


6.26 
6.24 
6.03 


3.24 
3.10 
3.13 


9.58 
8.08 
8.13 


10.33 

11.14 

9.88 


A 
M 
J 


133.0 
130.5 
136.4 


0.79 
0.97 
0.97 


0.31 
0.30 
0.35 


3.90 
3.79 
4.12 


2.81 
3.32 
3.29 


36.53 
34.30 
36.41 


58.56 
56.62 
58.72 


7.22 
7.47 
7.33 


3.01 
3.39 
4.42 


8.28 
8.69 
9.26 


11.61 
11.65 
11.52 


J 

A 

S 


133.7 
106.6 
103.9 


0.92 
0.85 
0.79 


0.31 
0.44 
0.41 


4.80 
3.26 
3.48 


3.33 
2.70 
2.40 


33.48 
28.90 
27.80 


59.01 
43.40 
43.25 


7.05 
5.43 
5.38 


4.78 
3.54 
3.29 


9.06 
7.44 
6.87 


10.98 
10.68 
10.24 


O 
N 


132.1 
143.4 


1.04 
0.90 


0.36 
0.43 


4.13 
3.87 


3.13 
3.32 


35.04 
37.93 


57.77 
61.93 


6.24 
7.39 


3.87 
4.26 


8.99 
10.10 


11.53 
13.27 



Note — This series gives total new settled-for ordinary insurance sales in Canada, exclusive of revivals, increases, 
dividend additions, reinsurance acquired and pension bonds without insurance. Totals are estimates projected from 
the sales reported by 28 companies operating in Canada representing 91 per cent of new ordinary insurance sales. 

Source: Monthly Survey of Life Insurance Sales in Canada, Life Insurance Agency Management Association, 
Hartford, Conn. 



65 



FINANCE 



TABLE 61 



JANUARY, 1952 
Benefit Payments of Life Insurance Companies 

concluded Monthly averages or calendar months 





Death and 

Accidental 

Death 

Claims 


Matured 
Endow- 
ments 


Disability 
Benelits 
Income 

Payments 


Annuity 
Payments 


Surrender 
Values 


Dividends 
to 
Policy- 
holders 




Total Payments 






All 

policies 


Ordinary 


Industrial 


Group 












Million doll 


1X1 










1950 


7.11 


2 84 


31 


62 


4 98 


3.38 


19.23 


14.36 


2.94 


1.94 


1950S 


6.30 


2.16 


0.31 


51 


5 33 


4 39 


18.99 


13.36 


3.77 


1.86 


O 
N 
D 


7 26 
7.82 
6.48 


2 91 
3.23 

2.00 


27 
0.34 
0.22 


0.82 
0.71 
0.50 


4 87 
5.15 
4.49 


2 37 
3.21 
4 84 


18.50 
20.46 
18.52 


15.16 
15.73 
12.69 


1.26 
2.82 
3.74 


2.07 
1.91 
2.09 


1951 J 
F 
M 


8 67 
7 00 
8.28 


2.98 
2.74 
3.33 


0.37 
0.25 
0.29 


0.80 

0.60 
0.65 


5 .10 
4 58 
4.75 


3.61 
3.44 

4.03 


21.53 
18.62 
21.33 


15.95 
13.77 
16.10 


3.06 
2.75 
3.16 


2.53 
2.10 
2.07 


A 
M 
J 


7 .51 
7.70 
7.33 


2.86 
2.84 
2.71 


0.29 

0.32 
0.29 


0.72 
0.68 
0.72 


5.49 
5.91 
5.29 


3.46 
3.45 
3.82 


20.33 
20.90 
20.15 


15.20 
15.57 
14.97 


2.94 
3.13 
3.13 


2.19 
2.20 
2.06 


J 

A 

S 


7.61 
7.34 
7.19 


3.19 
2.22 
2.34 


0.29 
0.30 

27 


0.83 
0.55 
67 


5.00 
5.32 

4.66 


3.12 
3.35 
3 47 


20.04 
19.10 
18.59 


15.15 
14.22 
13.90 


2.71 
2.58 
2.72 


2.18 
2.30 
1 97 


O 


7.42 


2.96 


0.31 


0.70 


5.72 


3.62 


20.74 


15 91 


2.58 


2.24 



PAYMENTS TO BENEFICIARIES ON DEATH CLAIMS' 1 ' 

Quarterly averages or quarters 



Canada 



Nfld. P.E.I. 



N.S. 



N.B. Quebec Ontario Manitoba Sask. Alberta B.C. 















Million dollars 










1950 


21.32 






0.07 


0.71 


0.49 


6.17 


9.76 


1.13 


0.53 


0.87 


1.59 


1950 3rd 
4th 


19.93 
21.55 






0.09 
0.08 


0.76 
0.53 


0.50 
0.57 


6.37 
6.06 


8.26 
10.27 


1.15 
1.25 


0.55 
0.48 


0.89 
0.83 


1.35 
1.49 


1951 1st 
2nd 
3rd 


23.94 
22.54 
22.15 







18 
12 
14 


0.10 
0.04 
0.06 


0.67 
0.61 
0.49 


0.52 
0.40 
0.34 


6.74 
6.77 
6.62 


11.57 
10.64 
10.72 


1.05 
1.00 

0.96 


0.49 
0.42 
0.39 


0.84 
1.03 
1.01 


1.81 
1.52 
1.42 



11 Ordinary, Industrial and Group. 

Source: The Canadian Life Insurance Officers Association. 



Bond Issues and Retirements 



TABLE 62 








Years and Quarters 












FEDERAL"* 


PROVINCIAL* » 




CORPORATIONS 




TOTAL"' 


GOVERN- 
MFNT OF 




New 
Issues 


Retire- 
ments 


New 
Issues 


Retire- 
ments - 


New Issues 
New Refunding 


Retire- 
ments 


Net New 
Issues (+) 
or Retire- 
ments(— ) 


Net New 
Issues(+) 
or Retire- 
ments (—) 


CANADA 

SHORT 

TERM 

DEBT (3 > 










Par 


values 


in million Canadian dollars 






1939 
1950 

1950 2nd 
3rd 
4th 

1951 1st 
2nd 
3rd 


211 
2.192 

753 

68 

973 

20 
4 
2 


233 
2,283 

806 

97 

933 

117 

76 
114 


154 
409 

121 
77 
37 

29 
159 

101 


74 
253 

126 
15 
37 

62 
35 

35 


36 
400 

111 

43 

130 

83 
53 

109 


201 
54 

7 
19 
14 

1 
6 


271 
141 

37 
34 
43 

22 
22 

23 


33 
+313 

+ 81 

+ 28 
+ 101 

+ 62 
+ 37 

+ 86 


+ 25 
+ 379 

+ 23 
+ 61 

+ 141 

- 68 
+ 89 

+ 40 


470 
1,500 

1.300 
1.500 
1,500 

1,400 
1.400 
1,400 



66 ; Direct and Guaranteed. : Federal, Provincial and Corporation. '' Outstanding, end of period: 

Treasury Bills, Deposit Certificates and Short Term Issues sold directly to Bank of Canada and the Chartered Banks. 
Source: Statistical Summary of Bank of Canada. 



JANUARY, 1952 



TABLE 63 



FINANCE 



Index Numbers of Security Prices 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



COMMON STOCKS 



Investors' Index 



Industrials 



Total 

105 

stocks 



Total, Machinery 

82 and equip- Pulp and 

stocks ment paper 



Milling 



Oils 



Textiles Food and 

and allied Building 

clothing products Beverages materials 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


91.6 
131.6 


91.2 
127.6 


100.9 
295.5 


81.7 
362.2 


100.6 
87.9 


83.6 
94.2 


95.0 
264.1 


109.6 
122.0 


98.1 
389.0 


98.3 
185.8 


1950 N 
D 


144.5 
146.3 


142.7 
144.4 


355.1 
373.5 


446.2 
443.8 


91.1 
94.9 


102.6 
100.5 


302.4 
311.9 


123.4 
124.9 


430.6 
428.8 


211.3 
215.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


153.8 
166.5 
162.9 


154.8 
168.0 
165.0 


401.9 
422.2 
411.1 


481.6 
531.6 
513.3 


104.7 
110.5 
107.1 


110.1 
126.9 
133.6 


359.3 
399.6 
383.0 


125.6 
127.8 
124.4 


442.4 
463.4 
441.2 


244.8 
259.7 
251.6 


A 
M 
J 


165.6 
164.2 
160.7 


169.1 
168.3 
164.4 


415.8 
406.4 
396.4 


568.3 
579.2 
562.2 


106.1 
104.7 
104.1 


138.2 
138.9 
134.1 


369.0 
363.0 
359.8 


123.4 
121.0 
117.9 


445.4 
436.3 
425.6 


260.9 
264.2 
257.6 


J 

A 
S 


162.0 
169.7 

179.8 


165.8 
174.5 
185.4 


405.0 
419.2 

445.4 


568.1 
588.5 
609.8 


111.3 
117.7 
124.0 


135.1 
145.3 
156.6 


355.5 
366.6 
371.6 


115.2 
118.4 
119.7 


421.8 
419.9 
436.5 


264.6 
277.8 
308.8 


O 

N 
D 


183.3 
174.0 
177.3 


189.5 
178.8 
180.6 


462.5 
431.7 
430.4 


595.5 
562.3 
573.6 


122.6 
121.9 
119.3 


162.6 
150.8 
154.7 


346.3 
314.1 
308.2 


114.2 
110.9 
108.5 


445.9 
425.2 
405.9 


305.8 
284.7 
290.0 



COMMON STOCKS 



PREFERRED 
STOCKS 



Investors' Index 



Mining Index 



Industrials 

Industrial 
mines 



Utilities 



Total Telephone Power 

15 Trans- and and 

stocks portation telegraph traction 



Banks 

8 
stocks 



Total 

30 
stocks 



Gold 



Base 
metals 



Total 

37 
stocks 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


98.9 
98.3 


86.1 
132.5 


56.0 
208.8 


109.3 
103.5 


88.9 
123.7 


102.5 
147.4 


104.5 
89.9 


95.6 
67.4 


121.7 
134.9 


101.6 
156.7 


1950 N 
D 


108.3 
112.1 


137.1 
141.2 


229.3 
248.6 


101.8 
101.3 


126.4 
127.6 


154.8 
152.6 


90.0 

88.2 


61.1 
59.8 


148.6 
146.0 


161.1 
160.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


118.1 
125.6 
117.1 


148.6 
163.2 
158.9 


266.5 
315.2 
301.8 


102.5 
104.6 
104.0 


135.8 
146.0 
142.4 


155.6 
158.5 
150.0 


97.6 
104.7 
100.3 


68.8 
74.3 
71.2 


163.5 
174.5 
166.7 


166.0 
169.3 
166.0 


A 
M 
J 


118.3 
117.2 
117.0 


159.7 
156.0 
153.0 


304.7 
296.4 
290.7 


102.9 
102.0 
101.2 


143.9 
139.8 
136.0 


144.1 
141.7 
141.1 


96.7 
92.5 
90.6 


66.8 
63.7 
63.7 


165.3 
158.6 
152.3 


165.2 
164.3 
162.2 


J 
A 

S 


118.1 
127.1 
135.4 


155.4 
162.6 
172.3 


299.6 
328.8 
368.8 


101.2 
100.5 
100.8 


137.7 
142.1 
147.6 


140.0 
137.2 
140.2 


92.7 

97.7 

104.0 


65.5 
69.7 
73.7 


155.0 
161.7 
173.6 


163.1 
165.2 
166.4 


o 

N 
D 


141.0 
136.6 
140.2 


174.0 
167.2 
177.0 


378.4 
354.4 
402.1 


99.2 
99.2 
99.0 


149.1 
143.4 
146.0 


141.5 
141.0 
144.2 


107.5 
102.4 
103.4 


75.3 
71.9 
73.2 


181.2 
172.3 
172.4 


164.2 
162.8 



Note: The number of stocks has varied over the period, the totals shown representing the current coverage. 
Source: Prices and Price Indexes, D.B.S. 



67 



FINANCE 



TABLE 64 



JANUARY, 1952 



Commercial Failures 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



FAILURES 3 ' 



LIABILITIES INVOLVED -' 



Total 



Trade 



Manu- 
factures 



Other Total 



Atlantic 
Provinces 



Quebec Ontario 



Prairie 
Provinces 



Number 



Thousand Dollars 



British 
Columbia 



1939 


116 


55 


18 


43 


1 


,257 


78 




556 


409 


135 


80 


1950 


109 


42 


21 


45 


2 


,073 


101 


1 


,339 


392 


94 


147 


1950 A 


85 


23 


19 


43 


1 


956 


110 


1 


317 


412 


28 


66 


S 


86 


38 


11 


37 


1 


,813 














O 


111 


36 


24 


51 


2 


,171 














N 


137 


52 


25 


60 


2 


,504 


37 


1 


,512 


520 


84 


57 


D 


86 


37 


15 


34 


1 


,957j 














1951 I 


137 


61 


33 


43 


2 


,282 














F 


134 


55 


21 


58 


2 


,025 \ 


24 


1 


,456 


498 


59 


104 


M 


129 


52 


25 


52 


2 


,H2J 














A 


124 


56 


20 


48 


2 


374 














M 


97 


42 


22 


33 


1 


787, 


49 


1 


,224 


521 


32 


118 


J 


97 


37 


16 


44 


1 


674J 














J 


105 


50 


16 


39 


2 


401 














A 


119 


53 


22 


44 


2 


293 


106 


1 


460 


379 


72 


97 


S 


88 


29 


18 


41 


I, 


647 















'Assignments made under the Bankruptcy and Winding Up Acts. 
Quarterly data for the last five columns are monthly averages. 

- In the Bankruptcy Act of 1949, provision is made for proposals from insolvent persons. Since July, 1950, agreements 
made under this method are not included with the statistics of bankruptcies. Liabilities of insolvent persons making proposals 
are not available. 

Source: Commercial Failures Under the Provisions of the Bankruptcy and Winding Up Acts, D.B.S. 






TABLE 65 



Miscellaneous Financial Statistics 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Government 
of Canada 
Theoretical 

15-year 
Bond Yield 



Three- 
Month 
Treasury 
Bill 
Yield 



Montreal Stock Exchange and Curb Market 



Toronto Stock Exchange 



Dividend 
Payments ' 



Brokers' 
loans 



Ratio to 
value of 
stocks 



Industrial 
shares 
traded 



Value of 

listings 



Borrow- Ratio to' 3) 
ings on quoted 
collateral values 



Quoted 

market 

Sales values'' 









Million dollars 




Thousand 
shares 


Billion 
dollars 


Million 
dollars 




Million 
shares 


Billion 
dollars 


1939 
1950 


3.16 
2 78 


0.707 
0.552 


25.43 
41 82 


11.34 
20.63 


0.23 
23 


707 
1.748 


7.01'-' 
8 97 


16.8 
36.3 


0.36 
0.41 


10.1 
42.2 


4.77 
8.88 


1950 O 
N 
D 


2.75 
2 88 
2 99 


0.623 
0.624 
0.626 


33.82 

11.15 
117.92 


22.77 
23.43 
26.88 


23 
23 
0.25 


2.619 
2.089 
1.531 


9 41 
9.36 
9.95 


39.5 
41.0 

38.5 


0.41 
0.43 
0.37 


57.4 
48.8 
26.9 


9.59 

9 50 

10.19 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3 02 
3.02 

3 25 


0.626 
0.728 
0.755 


59 57 
31 26 
56.26 


22.46 
26.23 
25.68 


.19 
23 
22 


3,442 
2.639 
1.275 


10.99 
11.02 
10.89 


37 6 
37.8 
33.1 


0.33 
0.34 
0.30 


70.6 
49.3 
29.5 


11.23 
11.22 
11.10 


A 
M 

J 


3 24 
3 24 
3 25 


0.755 
0.755 
0.754 


36.79 
11.63 
72 39 


25.87 
25.49 
24.45 


0.22 
23 
0.23 


1,954 
1.753 
1.078 


11.19 
10.94 
10.63 


36.2 
37.9 
35.8 


0.31 

0.34 
0.33 


27.2 
28.7 
21.9 


11.58 
11.30 
10.91 


J 

A 

S 


3 23 
3 24 
3 24 


0.771 
0.786 
880 


50 .01 
25.14 
53 98 


24.82 
27.49 
30.55 


22 
23 
0.25 


1.071 
1,581 
1.667 


11.39 
11.97 
12.29 


36.8 
38.1 
52.7 


32 
31 
0.32 


29.2 
42.0 
70.7 


11.66 
12.39 
12.66 


o 

N 
D 


3 26 
3.38 


0.927 
0.916 


35 92 

13 06 

107.04 


34.86 
31.40 


0.29 
0.26 


1.624 

1,087 

940 


12.11 


44.0 


0.35 


99.8' 
47.6 


12.46 
12.33 



G8 ; As reported by Financial Post. As of December 31. Annual data obtained by averaging monthly ratios. (4) As 

of end of month. Annual data are end of month averages. 

Souce: Statistical Summary, Bank of Canada; Financial Post; Monthly Review, Montreal Stock Exchange; Monthly Review, 
Toronto Stock Exchange. 



LIST OF STATISTICAL TABLES 



INTRODUCTION 

1 Selected Economic Indicators: Canada. . . . 

2 Significant Statistics of United Kingdom. . 

3 Significant Statistics of United States 

4 Population, Births, Marriages and Deaths. 



Page 
1 
2 
3 
4 



5 National Accounts: Income and Expenditure. 6 

6 Industrial Production: Volume Indexes 6 

LABOUR 

7 Canadian Labour Force 10 

8 Canadian Labour Income 10 

9 Employment and Earnings: By Industries 11 

10 Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 14 

11 Employment and Earnings: By Cities 16 

12 Average Hourly Earnings 17 

13 Average Hours Worked per Week 19 

14 Percentage of Women in Reporting Establish- 

ments: By Industries 20 

13 Unemployment Insurance 20 

16 Time Lost In Labour Disputes 21 

PRICES 

17 Living Costs in Canada 22 

18 Wholesale Price Indexes: Component Material 

Classification 22 

19 Wholesale Price Indexes: Other Classifications 25 

FUEL AND POWER 

20 Electric Power: Production, Exports and Con- 

sumption 26 

: Consumption by Provinces. . . 26 

21 Coal and Coke 27 

22 Petroleum and Gas 27 

23 Refined Petroleum Products 28 

MINING 

24 Metals 29 

25 Non-Metallic Minerals 30 

MANUFACTURING 

26 Indexes of Value of Inventories and Shipments 31 

27 Tobacco and Beverages 33 

28 Rubber 33 

29 Leather: Stocks and Wettings of Hides and 

Skins 34 

: Production of Finished Leather 34 

: Production of Boots and Shoes 35 

30 Primary Textiles 35 

31 Production of Factory Clothing 36 

32 Wood and Paper Products 37 

33 Primary Iron and Steel Shapes: Shipments to 

Industries 38 

Primary Iron and Steel 39 

34 Motor Vehicles: Production and Sales 39 

35 Refrigerators and Washing Machines 40 

Radio and Television Receiving Sets 40 



CONSTRUCTION Page 

36 Value of Building Permits: 

By Municipalities 41 

By Provinces and Types 42 

37 Building Materials: Production, Imports and 

Sales 43 

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

38 Production and Acreage of Principal Field 

Crops. See April issue, page 82. 

39 Farm Cash Income 44 

40 Grain Supply and Disposition — See April issue, 

page 85. 

41 Inspected Slaughterings of Live Stock and 

Cold Storage Holdings of Meat and Poultry 45 

Prices and Price Ratios: Live Stock and Live- 
stock Feeds 45 

Exports of Live-Stock Products 46 

42 Milk and Milk Products: Production, Stocks 

and Sales 46 

43 Fish: Landings, Exports and Stocks 47 

44 Manufactured Food: Production 47 

: Sugar: Production, Sales 
and Stocks 48 

DOMESTIC TRADE 

45 Value of Retail Trade 49 

46 Retail Sales and Stocks 50 

47 Retail Consumer Credit 51 

48 Indexes of Wholesale Sales 51 

EXTERNAL TRADE 

49 Merchandise Exports: By Commodities 52 

50 Merchandise Imports: by Commodities 54 

51 Merchandise Exports and Imports: By Areas 56 

52 Factors in the Balance of Payments 57 

TRANSPORTATION 

53 Shipping and Aviation 57 

54 Carloadings of Revenue Freight on Canadian 

Railways 58 

55 Operating Statistics of Canadian Railways 59 

FINANCE 

56 Bank of Canada: Assets and Liabilities 60 

57 Canadian Chartered Banks: Assets and Liabi- 

lities 61 

58 Currency and Active Bank Deposits 62 

59 Federal Government Revenues and Expend- 

itures 63 

60 Cheques Cashed in Clearing House Centres . . 65 

61 Life Insurance: Sales 65 

: Benefit Payments 66 

62 Bond Issues and Retirements 66 

63 Index Numbers of Security Prices 67 

64 Commercial Failures 68 

65 Miscellaneous Financial Statistics 68 



Note: Symbols used: Throughout the Review (. .) means "not available"; ( — ) means "nil" or "less than can be shown with number 
of digits used"; (p) signifies "preliminary" and ( r ) indicates "revised". In some cases the annual data for 1949 and 1950 are 
provisional. 



i . . i > a . i) s r . i'i Intel to the Klng'a Moal Excellent Majesty, 1991. 



CANADIAN 



STATISTICAL 






REVIEW 




FEBRUARY 1952 



Mytffiiiin.|[y>mwiwiiiwwpw 



^\BR 



i/ A 



% 



^^SlTYon^ 



VOLUME XXVII NUMBER 2 



DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS, OTTAWA, CANADA 



CANADIAN 

STATISTICAL 

REVIEW FEBRUARY 1952 

(FORMERLY MONTHLY REVIEW OP BUSINESS STATISTICS) 

Contents: 

Current Economic Conditions Page i 

Statistical Tables Page 1 

List of Statistical Tables Inside Back Cover 

Published by Authority 

of theRt. Hon. C. D. HOWE 

Minister of Trade & Commerce 



Annual subscription: $3.00 
Single copies: 35 <* eacb 



Subscription orders should be sent to the King's Printer, Ottawa, Ontario, 
and remittances made payable to the Receiver General of Canada. 



Current Economic Conditions 



A recent publication on National Accounts 
presents revised fiaures from 1926 to 1950 
together with an analysis of the period and a 
description of the numerous statistical sources 1 . 
The present article examines some of the im- 
portant National Accounting aggregates for 
1951 2 in the light of long run changes shown 
in the above publication, as well as in terms 
of the immediate situation. 

Between 1928 and 1950, total output of 
goods and services increased by over 90 per 
cent, implying a compounded rate of growth of 
3 per cent per year. The 1950 to 1951 increase 
in total real output, estimated at between 5 and 
6 per cent, was therefore larger than the long 
run rate. It may be noted that population growth 
between 1928 and 1950 was at the rate of 1.6 
per cent per year, with the result that per capita 



1. National Accounts, Income and Expenditure, 1926-1950, 

2. National Accounts, Income and Expenditure, Preliminary 1951. 



growth in real output was 1.3 per cent per year. 
This increase in output has been achieved with 
less working time per worker, to the extent that 
the average number of man-hours worked per 
week declined during the period. The employed 
labour force, ("persons with jobs"), grew at a 
rate only slightly less that that of population. 
However, between 1950 and 1951, the employed 
labour force increased by 2.5 per cent (see 
below p. 10). 

Utilization of Output 

Turning to the manner in which the above 
increase in real production was utilized, per- 
sonal expenditure on consumer goods and 
services rose by 93 per cent in real terms 
between 1928 and 1950. On a per capita basis, 
Canadians consumed 38 per cent more goods 
and services in 1950 than in 1928, indicating 
a very substantial gain in the material standard 
of living. Between 1950 and 1951, personal 



GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE ON GOODS AND SERVICES 
AND NET GOVERNMENT RECEIPTS*AS A PERCENTAGE OF 

GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT 

926 — 1950 




1926 1930 1934 1938 1942 1946 

Net Government receipts equals total Government revenue less transfer payments and subsidies 



'50 



expenditure in current dollars increased by 10 
per cent, but as prices of consumer goods and 
services advanced this much, there was no 
increase in real terms. The durable goods 
category of personal expenditure was consider- 
ably reduced, in real terms, while the volume 
measurement of non-durables was unchanged 
and that of services was somewhat higher. 

The physical volume of output represented 
by investment in housing, plant and equipment 
was 54 per cent larger in 1950 than in 1928. 
Insofar as this percentage increase is less than 
that shown by total output, it appears that a 
greater proportion of total real output was de- 
voted to these forms of investment in 1928 than 
in 1950. On the other hand, investment in the 
form of additions to inventories was much 
larger in 1950 than in 1928, even after allowing 
for the effects of price changes on inventory 
valuations. The post-war level of investment 
in real capital assets was nevertheless very 
high and it was continued into 1951, but in the 
latter year there were important changes in 



components. The volume of residential con- 
struction declined, while investment related to 
defence and to primary resource development 
expanded considerably. There was a further 
large addition to inventories which occurred 
particularly during the first three quarters of 
1951. 



The smallest percentage increase from 1928 
to 1950 was shown by both exports and imports, 
indicative of greater relative dependence on 
domestic sources of supply and markets at 
present than a quarter-century ago. Between 
1950 and 1951 however, the volume of exports 
and imports (of goods and services) increased 
by 8 and 12 per cent respectively. 



The role of government revenue and ex- 
penditures during the past quarter century is 
illustrated in the accompanying chart. The 
deficits of the great depression and of World 
War II are shown, together with the surpluses 



PER CENT 
35 | — 



30 



25 



20 



I 5 



PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION 

OF 

NATIONAL INCOME BY INDUSTRY 



928 and 1950 




AGRICULTURE SERVICE RETAIL TRADE CONSTRUCTION 

MANUFACTURING TRANSPORTATION FINANCE GOVERNMENT 

PUBLIC UTILITY INSURANCE 



MINING 
QUARRYING 
OIL WELLS 



OPERATION 



REAL ESTATE 



WHOLESALE TRADE FORESTRY 



I I 



of the late twenties and the post-war period 1 . 
Government expenditure on goods and services 
in 1951 increased by almost one-third over 
1950, largely a result of the rise in federal 
defence spending, which amounted to $0.5 
billion in 1950 and $1.2 billion in 1951. 



Industrial Distribution of National Income 

Important changes in the industrial structure 
of the economy occurred in the period 1928 to 
1950. Manufacturing became much more im- 
portant, accounting for almost one-third of the 
National Income in 1950, compared with 23 per 
cent in 1928. The distributive outlets- whole- 
sale and .retail trade-also became relatively 
more important. On the other hand, transpor- 
tation, storage, communication, and public 
utilities declined in relative position from 13 
per cent to 10 per cent, and services from 12 



1. It should be noted that the conventional accounting 
statements of the various governments have been adjusted to 
include only those transactions which have relevance for the 
National Accounts. Thus, the figures of revenue, expenditure, 
deficit and surplus used here are different from those of the 
budgetary statements. 



per cent to 8 per cent. Income originating in 
agriculture, which in the period 1926 to 1929 
inclusive averaged 16 per cent of the National 
Income, declined to 13 per cent for the period 
1947 to 1950. The number of persons with jobs 
in agriculture also declined from 29 per cent 
of the labour force in 1931 (the nearest year to 
1928 for which labour force figures are availa- 
ble), to 20 per cent in 1950. These declines 
are associated with the growing mechanization 
on farms and the increasing industrialization 
of the economy. 



Sources and Disposition of Personal Income 

Turning to an analysis of personal income, 
the largest single component is wages, salaries, 
and supplementary labour income, which in- 
creased from 59 per cent of personal income in 
1928 to 62 per cent in 1950. Transfer payments 
from governments (that is, family allowances, 
veterans' pensions, mothers' allowances and 
so on) have become much more important; in 
1950 they accounted for 8 per cent of total 
personal income, compared with 2 per cent in 
1928. On the other hand, interest, dividends 



DISPOSITION OF PERSONAL INCOME, 1926-1951 



I2CO 



IOOO 



800 



600 



400 



200 



r 



1926 




DISSAVING 



PER CAPITA 



1930 



1934 



938 



1942 



1946 



'51 
1950 



III 



and net rental income of persons has shown 
a relative decline as a source of personal 
income, from 13 per cent in 1928 to 9 per cent 
in 1950. On a per capita basis, the increase in 
personal disposable income (income after 
personal direct taxes) was from $464 in 1928 
to $916 in 1950, a rise of 97 per cent. Since 
the implicit price index used to arrive at the 
constant dollar expenditures on consumer goods 
and services rose by 46 per cent, a very con- 
siderable increase in real disposable income 
per capita is indicated. Direct personal taxes 



absorbed a substantially greater share of 
personal income in 1950, amounting to 6 per 
cent, compared with 1 per cent in 1928. 

Personal income in 1951 was 18 per cent 
higher than in 1950, while expenditure on 
consumer goods and services was only 10 per 
cent higher. The difference is accounted for 
by higher personal direct tax payments (up by 
38 per cent) and by a very high level of personal 
saving (including the large increase in farm 
inventories) which in total was more than 
double the 1950 figure. 



BILLION 

S 20 

1 5 

1 

5 

O 
19 


GROSS NATIONAL EXPENDITURE IN CURRENT 

AND • 
CONSTANT (1935-1939) DOLLARS 

1926 - 1950 


















CUI 


RRENT DOLLAR 


S — £^"" 


^' 










ONSTANT (1935 ■ 


■ I939)D0LLARS 


1 1 ' 


1 ! 


1 1 1 


I 1 I 


1 1 1 


1 1 1 


26 1930 1934 1938 1942 1946 "50 






I V 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 1 



INTRODUCTION 



Selected Economic Indicators 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION 



Index of 
Industrial 



Steel 

Ingots 

and 



News- 



Power by 

Central 
Electric (1) 



EMPLOYMENT IN 
MANUFACTURING 

Average 

Hourly 
Non- Earnings 
Automo- Total Durable durable in Manu- 



Production Gold (1) Copper Castings print 11 ' Stations biles' 2 ' Index Goods Goods factures 





1935-39 
= 100 


Thousand 
fine ounces 


Million 
pounds 


Thousand tons 


Million 
kwh. 


Thou- 
sands 




1939 = 100 


Cents 
per hour 


1939 


109.3 


425 


50.7 


129 


244 


2,362 


13.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


42.7 


1950 


.198.3 


370 


44.0 


282 


443 r 


4,242 


32.6 


177.5 


211.4 


155.4 


103.6 


1950 N 
D 


210.6 
209.2 


378 
382 


46.9 
45.5 


289 
291 


457 
431 


4,458 
4,674 


30.3 
30.7 


185.4 
185.3 


222.4 
223.1 


161.3 
160.7 


106.4 
107.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


210.0 
214.0 
217.1 


374 
347 
372 


45.6 
40.6 
48.6 


310 
281 
315 


453 
425 
473 


4,784 
4,376 
4,910 


39.2 
40.6 
47.8 


182.4 
184.5 
186.3 


223.3 
226.9 
229.9 


155.8 
156.9 
157.9 


109.0 
110.4 
111.4 


A 
M 
J 


218.2 
223.4 
218.8 


363 
369 
363 


47.7 
47.0 
45.2 


312 
313 
294 


448 
486 
464 


4,895 
5,130 
4,707 


41.1 
42.9 
36.2 


188.8 
189.9 
192.0 


234.8 
237.0 
240.9 


158.8 
159.2 
160.2 


112.8 
114.1 
115.9 


J 

A 

S 


208.0 
205.4 
208.2 


344 
345 
359 


45.0 
45.3 
43.5 


275 
287 
268 


452 
485 
431 


4,629 
4,596 
4,404 


30.3 
21.8 
29.9 


193.9 
194.0 
194.1 


242.9 
242.0 
242.1 


162.1 
162.8 
162.9 


118.4 
119.1 
120.6 


o 

N 
D 


212. 6 r 
207. 9» 
204. 1p 


378 
372 


41.8 
44.2 
44.1 


309 
307 
297 


492 
472 
435 


4,920 
4,936 
5,111 


32.5 
29.5 
22.1 


194.2 

190.8' 

189.2 


240.2 
238. 4 r 
237.5 


164.4 
160. r 
157.9 


121.9 
123.5 
124.5 



Civil- 
ian 
Labour 
Force (3) 



Thou- 
sands 



Percentage of 

Paid 
Workers 
and Un- 



Ordinary 

Claimants 

on Live 

employed Unem ' 
' ployment 

Seeking Work"" Register'" 



Civilian 
Labour 
Force 



Value of Retail 
Trade 



Percentage 



Thou- 
sands 







New 










Railway 


Dwelling 


Building 




Index of 


Total 


Revenue 


Units 


Permits: 


Depart- 


Whole- 


Labour 


Freight 


Com- 


58 Muni- 


ment 


sale 


Income 


Loadings 
Thou- 


pleted < 6) 


cipalities 
Thou- 


Total stores 


Sales 








Million 


sand 




sand 




1935-39 


dollars 


tons 


Number 


dollars 


Million dollars 


= 100 



1939 
1950 


4,598 
5,233 


11.4 
2.9 


4 


'o 


165.3 


215 
689 


5,233 
9,016 


4,308 
7,646 


5,023 
44,467 


789^0 


72'7 


109.1 
306.7 


1950 N 
D 


5,201 


2.2 


3 


.1 


124.8 
183.3 


744 
738 


10,432 
9,032 


8,766 
11,290 


41,828 
33,425 


831.8 
976.4 


98.2 
118.9 


326.9 
282.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


5,172 


3^3 


4 


5 


220.5 
208.0 
184.5 


730 
733 
745 


9,338 
8,280 
9,144 


6,950 
6,712 
5,859 


24,954 
29,957 
38,504 


703.8 
694.3 
851.5 


58.3 
58.4 
72.6 


308.6 
303.1 
333.6 


A 
M 

J 


5,332 


i.6 


2 


2 


136.8 
88.9 
86.5 


763 
792 
821 


9,413 
10,738 
10,902 


5,688 
6,876 
6,609 


46,825 
54,676 
36,588 


859.2 
931.1 
940.2 


75.2 
76.6 
69.5 


340.9 
361.7 
343.7 


J 

A 

S 


5,421 


1.4 


2 





83.9 
80.9 
83.1 


827 
833 
848 


10,678 
10,913 
10,016 r 


4,926 
7,183 
7,002 


48,029 
33,439 
27,776 


865.8 
897.4 
891.2 


54.5 
61.5 
72.4 


328.9 
362.3 
348.0 


o 

N 
D 


5,210 


L9 


2 


6 


99.8 
153.7 
239.0 


855 


12,047 r 

11,031* 

8,981» 


8,164 
8,842 


38,251 
24,731 
26,777" 


898.7 

906. l r 

1005.7 


81.3 
101.9 
119.8 


375.4 
353. 4 r 
294.8 



(1) For newsprint, gold and power, Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949, May, 1949 and January, 1950 
respectively. "'Monthly data are producers shipments. (3) Data exclude persons in certain remote parts of 
several provinces and Indians on reservations. Newfoundland included as of March, 1950. (4 'Includes only those 

not at work and seeking work. '"Newfoundland included as of April, 1949. '"Conversions are included with 

*nnual data only. 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 1 - concluded 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Selected Economic Indicators 

Montlily averages or calendar months 



Cost of 

Living 
Index 



Price 
Index 
of Resi- 
dential 
Building 
Materials 



Wholesale Price Index 

Cana- 
dian 
iarm 
General products 



Federal Cheques 

Exports Government 1 " Cashed 

of Imports in 

Domestic of Total Clearing 

Commod- Merchan- expend- Total Centres 

ities (,) dise itures revenues ( " 



Index. 

of 

Common 

Stock 

Prices 



Ir>dp~ 

Lonrj. 
Torn 

Yields 







1935-39 = 100 






Million dollar! 






1935-39 


= 10C 


1939 
1950 


101.5 
166.5 


102 .3 
242.7 


99.2 
211.2 


92 6 
236.7 


77 
260 


63 
265 


46 
204 


42 
215 


2,635 
8,386 


91.6 
131.6 


101.8 
91.3 


1950 D 


171.1 


263.3 


225.2 


243.3 


290 


266 


24 r , 


263' 


9,315 


146.3 


96.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


172.5 
175.2 
179.7 


269.6 
274.9 
282.6 


232.3 
238.5 
241.8 


251.0 
262.5 
273.0 


285 
234 
290 


327 
274 
343 


203 
168 


332 
269 


9,002 
7,984 
8,830 


153.8 

166.5 
162.9 


97.9 

97.7 

104.6 


A 
M 

J 


181.8 
182.0 
184.1 


287.2 
289.5 
289.2 


242.2 
241.9 
242.7 


265.4 
265.3 
272.6 


295 
323 
313 


393 
405 
360 


97 
199 
234 


218 
353 
295 


9,017 
9,484 
9,500 


165.6 
164.2 
160.7 


104.9 
104.9 
105.3 


J 

A 

S 


187.6 
188.9 
189.8 


289.8 
290.4 
290.9 


244.2 
241.5 
240.1 


277.1 
256.4 
253.9 


374 
350 
320 


371 
357 
312 


264 
221 
277 


336 
314 
288 


9.032 
9,072 
8,775 


162 
169.7 
179.8 


104.7 
104.9 
105.0 


O 

N 
D 


190 4 
191.2 
191.1 


290.8 
289.3 

289.1 


239.6 
239.1 
237.6 


252.6 
258.4 
260.2 


371 
380 
379 


344 
326 


263 
278 
249 


355 
308 
336 


10,619 
10,737 
10,134 


183.3 
174.0 
177.3 


105.7 
107.8 
112 


1952 J 


191.5 


















181.7 


113.4 



"'Annual totals are for fiscal years ended March 31 of p.riod shown. t2) As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 



Significant Statistics of United Kingdom 



TABLE 2 



PRODUCTION 



UNEM- IMPORTS*" 
CONSUMPTION PLOYED 1 " RETAINED EXPORTS ■» 



PRICES 



WAGE 
RATES 



Index of 
Industrial 
Production 



1946 = 100 



Steel Ingots 

and Raw 

Coal (,i Castings Cotton 

Weekly average 



Wool 



Insured 

Workers 

Registered 



Wholesale 



Interim 
Retail 
Prices Weekly 



Thousand ions 



Million 
pounds 



Thousands 



Including Munitions 

Index of volume 
1947 = 100 



June 17, June 30, 
1938 = 100 1947 = 100 1947 = 100 



1939 
1950 


140 


4,437 
4,160 


254 
313 


11.29 
8.72 


43.2 


1,251 
297 


114 


162 


101.4 
258.7 


114 


111 


1950 O 
N 
D 


152 
153 
140 


4,347 
4,404 
4,143* 


328 

336' 

296 


9.52 

9.28* 

8.02 


44.7 
43.6 
36.7 


327 ] 

326 

331 


■ Ill 


175 


( 275 6 
{ 285.0 
( 288.3 


115 
116 
116 


111 

113 
114 


1951 J 
F 
M 


140 
151 
141 


4,211 
4,517 
4,243* 


306* 

326 

318 


8.69* 

9.12 

8.25 


43.2 
37.4 
36.0 


367 

335 

305 J 


120 


160 


f 295.8 
\ 301.4 
( 309.2 


117 
118 
119 


115 
116 
117 


A 
M 
J 


151 

144 
149 


4,605 
4,199 
4,301* 


323 

305* 

308 


9.55 
8 79* 
8.82 


37.2 
36.4 
34.4 


281 
241 

215 J 


134 


173 


[ 314.3 

315.3 

[ 316.4 


121 
124 
125 


lie- 
ns 

119 


J 

A 

S 


140 

127 
146 r 


3.940 
3,462 
4,437* 


256 

266* 

303 


8.38 
8 30* 
8.61 


33.0 
29 .1 
28.8 


210 
228 
241 J 


140 


165 


1 315.4 
\ 319.0 
I 320.6 


126 
127 
128 


120 
120 
121 


O 

N 


151" 


4.507 
4,557 


301* 
316 


9 47* 


30.1 


290 
323 




175" 
179" 


324 . 2' 
321.8 


129 
129 


122 
125 



'Average of five weeks. '"Annual data as of middle of July Monthly data for dates varying from 8th to 17th 

of month. Average quarterly statistics are given in the monthly section, except the recent data for exports which 

are monthly estimates. Great Britain. Monthly average or calendar months. 

Source: Monthly Digest of Statistics and Statistical Abstract for the United Kingdom. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 3 



Significant Statistics of United States 

Monthly averages or calendar months'" 



INTRODUCTION 



INDEX OF 
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 

Manufactured Goods 



LABOUR FORCE 



CONSTRUC- 
TION CON- PASSENGER 

TRACTS AUTO- 

AWARDED MOBILES 



Total Total 



Dur- 
able 



Non- 
durable 



Em- Un- 

ployed employed 



Factory 
Sales 



MANUFACTURING 



Inventories 
New End of 

Orders Sales Period 



1935-39 = 100 
seasonally adjusted 



Million persons 



Billion 
Million dollars Billion dollars 

dollars Thousands unadjusted seasonally adjusted 



1939 
1950 


109 
200 


109 
209 


109 
237 


109 
187 


45.8 
60.0 


9.5 
3.1 


296 
1,208 


238.9 
555.5 


20^6 


5.1 
19.1 


11.5 
33.3 


1950 N 
D 


215 
218 


224 
229 


260 
268 


195 
197 


61.3 
60.3 


2.2 
2.2 


1,087 
1,168 


504.4 
521.4 


21.4 
22.9 


20.5 
21.0 


32.2 
33.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


221 
221 
222 


231 
232 
234 


268 
271 
277 


201 
201 
199 


59.0 
58.9 
60.2 


2.5 
2.4 
2.1 


1,043 
1,141 
1,267 


478.6 
505.9 
617.4 


28.2 
25.8 
28.5 


22.6 
22.3 
22.6 


34.1 
34.7 
35.6 


A 
M 

J 


223 
222 
221 


234 
233 
231 


279 
276 
274 


198 
198 
197 


60.0 
61.2 
61.8 


1.7 
1.6 
2.0 


1,375 
2,573 
1,409 


503.0 
511.9 
482.0 


23.8 
23.6 
24.1 


22.5 
23.4 
22.1 


36.9 
38.1 
39.0 


J 

A 

S 


212 
217 
219 


222 
226 
228 


265 
267 
272 


187 
193 
192 


62.5 
62.6 
61.6 


1.9 
1.6 
1.6 


1,380 
1,263 
1,083 


381.4 
426.9 
365.9 


21.6 
23.0 
21.2 


21.3 
21.8 
20.7' 


39.9 
40.6 
41.1' 


O 

N 
D 


218 

219' 

218» 


226 

228' 

227^ 


274 

277' 

280* 


188 
188 
185" 


61.8 
61.3 
61.0 


1.6 
1.8 
1.7 


1,051 

932 

1,234 


414.5 
356.8 


24.0' 
22.9 


22.6' 
22.6 


41.4' 
41.5 



Average 
Hourly 
Wholesale Consumers Earnings 
Personal Commodity Price Manufac- 
Income (1 > Prices Index hiring 



Merchandise 

Exports 
including 
re-exports' 21 Imports 



Consumer 
Credit Out- 
standing, 

End of 
Period. (3) 



Department Stores* 

Common 

Stock 
Prices' 41 
Sales Stocks 402-416 





Billion 
dollars 


1926=100 


1935-39 = 
100 


Dollars 


Million dollars 


Billion 
dollars 


1947-1949 = 100 
seasonally adjusted 


1935-39 = 
100 


1939 
1950 


72.6 
224.7 


77.1 
161.5 


99.4 
171.9 


0.633 
1.465 


265 
856 


193 
738 


7.0 
17.9 




122 


94.2 
146.4 


1950 N 
D 


'236.4 
244.4 


171.7 
175.3 


176.4 
178.8 


1.514 
1.543 


978 
1,065 


854 
867 


19.4 
19.1 


103 
110 


122 
122 


156.1 
158.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


243.6 
243.3 
245.5 


180.1 
183.6 
184.0 


181.5 
183.8 
184.5 


1.555 
1.561 
1.571 


974 
1,076 
1,284 


1,023 

909 

1,099 


19.9 
19.5 
19.4 


125 
115 
105 


127 
129 
133 


168.6 
174.7 
170.3 


A 
M 
J 


249.0 
249.8 
251.0 


183.6 
182.9 
181.7 


184.6 
185.4 
185.2 


1.578 
1.586 
1.599 


1,372 
1,355 
1,292 


1,032 

1,018 

930 


19.1 
19.2 
19.3 


104 
104 
105 


138 
136 
136 


172.3 
173.9 
171.7 


J 

A 

S 


252.4 
253.7 
253.6 


179.4 
178.0 
177.6 


185.5 
185.5 
186.6 


1.600 
1.596 
1.612 


1,190 
1,267 
1,232' 


893 
879 
718 


19.1 
19.3 
19.4 


105 
109 
107 


138 
134 
128 


172.8 
181.5 
187.3 


O 

N 
D 


257.5 
256.5 
257.1 


178.1 
178.3 
177.8 


187.4 
188.6 
189.1 


1.615' 
1.625' 
1.635 


1,155' 

1,386 

1,436 


832 
818 
801 


19.6' 
20.0 


108 
112 
109 


121 
117 
119p 


185.0 
177.7 
182.5 



(1) Personal income is given on an annual basis for months as well as for years. (2) Includes army civilian supply 3 

exports from February, 1947. (3> Annual totals are averages of end-of-month figures. l4) Standard and Poor's 

Corporation. 'Revised series. Data prior to Nov. 1950 will be shown later. 

Source: Survey of Current Business U.S. Department of Commerce. 



INTRODUCTION 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 4 



Population, Births/ Marriages and Deaths 

Monthly averages or calendar months w 



CANADA" 



NEWFOUNDLAND 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages 



Thousands 



Number 



Thousands 



Number 



Thousands 



Number 



1939 


11 


267 


19 


,122 


8 


,638 


9 


,079 


94 


177 


53 


1950 


13 


,845 


29 


,686 


10 


,158 


10 


,064 355 


96 


238 


52 


1950 O 






30 


,24.? 


12 


,831 


9 


,573 




217 


88 


N 






28 


,261 


12 


,334 


9 


,820 




218 


55 


D 






29 


,634 


8 


,516 


10 


,546 




162 


50 


1951 J 






27 


118 


5 


928 


10 


297 




280 


23 


F 






26 


498 


5 


220 


10, 


889 




186 


21 


M 






30 


475 


5 


205 


12 


275 




205 


22 


A 






30 


,880 


7 


,475 


11 


,207 




224 


26 


M 






32 


371 


9 


,847 


10 


,284 




316 


35 


J 






33 


991 


14 


,152 


9 


,080 




220 


77 


J 






31 


134 


16 


559 


8 


,847 




219 


68 


A 






32, 


746 


13 


791 


9 


926 




212 


72 


S 






29, 


059 


14, 


179 


8, 


585 




219 


75 



o 

N 



33,532 
29,348 



13,971 

10,738 



10,015 

10,487 



255 
202 



76 
64 



P.E.I. 



NOVA SCOTIA 



NEW BRUNSWICK 



QUEBEC 



Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births 





Number 


Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 


Number 


1939 
1950 


94 
75 


561 
658 


985 
1,451 


419 
428 


527 
563 


447 
522 


940 
1,403 


311 
363 


424 
414 


3 
3 


230 
976 


6,635 
9,752 


1950 O 
N 
D 


63 
72 
71 




1,476 
1,580 
1,253 


537 
533 
328 


522 
552 
492 




1,287 
1,438 
1,180 


508 
478 
247 


353 
511 
353 






10,216 

8,886 

11,446 


1951 J 
F 
M 


93 
95 
91 




1,544 
1,292 
1,319 


371 
332 
249 


488 
507 
661 




1,269 
1,193 
1,417 


241 
198 
178 


400 
419 
630 






6,563 

8,220 

10,536 


A 
M 

J 


97 
59 

74 




1,269 
1,513 
1,408 


194 
411 
861 


610 
397 
327 




1,346 
1,733 
1,297 


241 
372 

435 


474 
449 
331 






9,499 
10,924 
10,804 


J 

A 

S 


45 
95 
66 




1,439 
1,383 
1,441 


594 
363 
572 


407 
437 
483 




1.305 
1,666 
1,288 


486 
569 
519 


288 
413 
396 






10,917 
9,890 
9,745 


O 

N 


63 
60 




1,519 
1,627 


219 
690 


333 
567 




1.288 
1,507 


432 
448 


377 
468 






9,910 
8,649 



Note. — Until the end of 1949, annual and monthly data for births, deaths and marriages are based on tabulated 
figures by month of occurrence on the basis of residence. Figures for 1950 and 1951 are provisional and represent 
registrations filed in Provincial Vital Statistics offices during the month under review, regardless of the month of 
occurrence. 

1 Estimates are given by years as of June 1, and in Canada as a whole, as of the first day of the last month of each 

?uarter. : Exclusive of stillbirths. I3 Not applicable to figures on population. (4, Yukon, North- West 

erritories and Newfoundland not included in figures for births, marriages and deaths. 
Source: Monthly Report of Births, Marriages and Deaths, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



INTRODUCTION 



Population, Births, Marriages and Deaths 

TABLE 4 - concluded Monthly averages or calendar months <3) 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



MANITOBA 



SASK. 



Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population 





Number 


Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 


Number 




Thousands 


1939 
1950 


2,409 
2,778 


2,782 
2,735 


3,708 
4,512 


5,344 
9,046 


2,888 
3,668 


3,128 
3,676 


726 
795 


1,132 
1,614 


640 
580 


513 
547 


906 
874 


1950 O 
N 
D 


3,247 
3,771 
2,483 


2,484 
3,096 
3,064 




9,569 
8,559 
8,567 


4,978 
3,376 
2,699 


3,511 
3,283 
3,783 




1,608 
1,477 
1,595 


765 
806 
626 


457 
529 
545 




1951 J 
F 
M 


908 

939 

1,104 


2,475 
3,019 
3,462 




9,139 
8,843 
9,159 


2,148 
2,163 
2,103 


3,880 
4,174 
4,282 




1,585 
1,353 
1,634 


501 
320 
290 


677 
554 
663 




A 
M 
J 


1,476 
2,467 
4,154 


3,147 
2,770 
2,417 




10,234 

9,119 

11,644 


3,259 
3,678 
5,065 


4,111 
3,789 
3,531 




1,720 
1,669 
1,910 


383 
471 
800 


627 
586 
569 




J 

A 

S 


5,335 
4,796 
4,496 


2,559 
2,986 
2,283 




9,625 

10,124 

9,083 


6,103 
3,996 
5,495 


3,268 
3,276 
3,022 




1,729 
1,760 
1,663 


858 
797 
678 


459 
498 
457 




O 

N 


3,995 
2,913 


3,044 
2,611 




11,065 
10,072 


4,995 
3,496 


3,536 
4,067 




1,757 
1,523 


919 
908 


561 
552 





SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths 







Number 




Thousands 


Number 




Thousands 




Number 




1939 
1950 


1,505 
1,770 


610 
598 


503 
513 


786 
895 


1,373 
2,155 


653 
771 


482 
579 


792 
1,138 


1,031 
2,258 


655 
921 


626 
963 


1950 O 
N 
D 


1,692 
1,367 
1,872 


905 
955 
610 


519 
407 
568 




1,951 
2,187 
1,729 


830 

1,386 

613 


785 
320 
803 




2,227 
2,549 
1,830 


973 
974 
860 


879 

1,050 

867 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1,660 
1,608 
2,031 


307 
245 
259 


589 
561 
608 




2,628 
1,853 
1,900 


735 
428 
311 


610 
671 
628 




2,450 
1,950 
2,274 


694 
574 
689 


1,085 

889 

1,250 


A 
M 
J 


1,914 
1,904 
2,023 


403 
738 
711 


510 
563 
445 




2,505 
2,572 
2,322 


720 
714 
977 


673 
659 
488 




2,169 
2,621 
2,363 


773 

961 

1,072 


958 

1,012 

898 


J 

A 

S 


1,688 
1,964 
2,064 


808 
853 
452 


593 
449 
439 




2,026 
2,979 
1,263 


1,091 

1,066 

775 


359 
815 
613 




2,186 
2,768 
2,293 


1,216 
1,279 
1,117 


869 
957 
826 


O 

N 


1,874 
1,306 


1,416 
350 


570 
503 




3,221 
2,273 


875 
1,005 


507 
697 




2,643 
2,189 


1,044 
864 


1,024 
962 



"'As of June 1. 



("Exclusive of stillbirths. 



"Not applicable to figures on population. 



INTRODUCTION FEBRUARY. 3 

National Accounts: Income and Expenditure 

TABLE 5 

NET NATIONAL INCOME AT i ACTOR CO?T \ND GROSS M - • - 



Salaries, 
wages and 
supplemen- 
tary labour 
income 



Net Income of 
Unincorporated Business 



Military 

pay and Investment Farm 
allowances income operator?' 1 



Other 

corporated 
business 



Not 

rial 

in< i me at 

factor 

cost 



Depreciation 

allow i-^.-Bt 

Indi. .1 and similai Residual 

taxes loss business erro; of 

subsidies costs 1 ' estimate 



aati< 

Jt 
at n. i t 
nru . 













Million dollars 










1939 


2.575 


32 


917 


385 


464 


4,473 




610 


- 9 


• 


1949 


7.761 


115 


2,445 


1,504 


l.o69 


1 ! 194 


1,8 


1. 


+ 1 




1950 


8.271 


137 


2,921 


1,579 


1 498 


14,406 


^86 




4-23 




1951" 


9,660 


201 


3,494 


2.102 


1.640 


17,097 


>o^ 




-26 


2\ . 



GROSS NATIONAL EXPENDITURE AT MARKET FfliCES 



Gross Domestic Investment' 3 ' 



Personal Government- 
expenditure expenditure 
on consumer on goods 
goods and and 

services services' 



New Construction 



Residential 



New 

machinery Change 
Non and in 

residential equipment inventories 



Exports 

of goods 

and 



Imports of 
goods and 



G ;>ss 
nat' 

expo d- 
Residual iture a1 
error of market 
estimate pri 



Million dollars 



1939 


3,904 


735 


185 


166 


254 


331 


1.451 


-1,328 


+ & 


5,7< 


1949 


10,963 


2.128 


742 


903 


1.323 


231 


4.011 


-3.837 


- 2 


16, 


1950 


11,862 


2.314 


801 


1,010 


1.378 


995 


4,173 


-4,482 


-22 


1 ,0 


1951'' 


13,062 


3.112 


796 


1,240 


1,845 


1,707 


5,060 


5,632 


+ 27 


21,3 



Note: Newfoundland is included as of 1949. 

Accrued net income from farm production. - Includes outlay on new d^iable assets such as building and highwaj 

construction by governments, other than government business enterprises. Also includes the change in inventories of government 
commodity agencies and of the Defence Production Revolving Fund. Excludes shipments, under NATO, of previously produced 
military equipment but includes replacements of new equipment. ' Includes capital expenditures by private and government 

business enterprises, private non-commercial institutions and outlays on new residential construction by individuals and busiJi^s 
investors. 

Source: National Accounts, Income and Expenditure 1926-1950 and "Preliminary li) "I", D.B.S. 



TABLE 6 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = i00 (1! 



INDUSTR.AL 
PRODUCTION 



MINING 



MANU- 
FACTURES 



Metals 



Fuels 





Total 


Total 


Total 


Gold 


Copper 


Nickel 


Total 


Coal 


Non-Metals 


TorM 


1939 


109.3 


118.4 


119.1 


122.4 


120.0 


117.3 


117.3 


104.7 


113 9 


107.8 


1950 


198.3 


147.5 


110.2 


106.0 


102.3 


127.2 


213.3 


126.0 


272.7 


207.6 


1950 N 


210.6 


162.1 


117.1 


106.1 


110.0 


148.9 


258.0 


141.2 


307.0 


221.0 


D 


209.2 


154.6 


112.4 


111.7 


103.2 


124.8 


228.0 


136.1 


283.7 


219.6 


1951 J 


210.0 


158.3 


111.7 


105.2 


103.8 


132.5 


238.8 


127.6 


336.6 


218.9 


F 


214.0 


157.6 


110.5 


105.6 


102.5 


129.5 


230.2 


117.4 


355.8 


224.3 


M 


217.1 


156.5 


112 9 


104 6 


110.6 


140.7 


210.4 


109.6 


332.9 


227.9 


A 


218.2 


153.8 


111 3 


106.1 


112.3 


132.0 


215.9 


122.6 


287.6 


228.5 


M 


223.4 


167.6 


111.6 


99.9 


107.0 


150.9 


278.0 


119.3 


304.8 


231.9 


J 


218.8 


174.0 


114 5 


101.9 


106.4 


148.1 


299.9 


122.5 


310.8 


225.9 


J 


208.0 


165.9 


109.8 


100.6 


102.4 


142.5 


290.1 


111.1 


280.5 


213.5 


A 


205.4 


168.1 


109 2 


93.3 


103.2 


148.3 


309.6 


115 2 


296.6 


210.5 


S 


208.2 


174.4 


115.6 


109.2 


102 5 


145.5 


311.6 


126.3 


294.7 


214.1 


O 


212. 6 r 


172.5 


112.8 


106.3 


95 3 


141 7 


316.3 


137.7 


294.9 


219. 4 r 


N 


207.9" 


170.0" 


114. 4 r 


104.6 


104.0 


144.1 


288 4 


140.0 


290 . 7" 


2«4 


D 


204.1" 








100.5 


137.0 




121 ^ 


250 5" 


?'J9.6" 



Only series with definite seasonal patterns are adjusted. 



EBRUARY, 1952 

AF-LE £ - continaed 



INTRODUCTION 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



TOTA. 



Foods and Beveiages 



Total 



Foods 



Total 



Meat products 



Dairy products 



Cattle Hog slaught- 
Total slaughterings erings Total 



Butter and Concen- 
cheese trated milk 



Flour and 
feed 

Total 



1939 
I960 


108.0 
187.9 


111.7 
192.6 


110.2 
173.3 


105.1 
136.4 


101.4 
146.1 


108.2 
138.8 


111.4 
124.9 


109.6 
102.2 


124.2 
268.0 


118.7 
142.1 


L950N 

D 


196.7 
194.2 


197.8 
193 5 


176.1 
178 5 


112.5 
110.5 


108.1 
99.5 


118.5 
122.8 


130.8 
148.6 


102.0 
123.9 


308.2 
284.5 


163.2 
169.8 


1951 J 

F 
M 


189.3 
193.9 
197.4 


180.4 
184.5 
194.5 


166.1 
165.8 
169.3 


125.7 
117.3 
126.9 


134.2 
131.0 
143.9 


126.7 
116.0 
127.7 


129.1 
120.5 
117.9 


103.6 
91.2 
89.3 


286.0 
280.2 
223.4 


150.5 
163.2 
172.6 


A 
M 
J 


199.3 
202.5 
196.4 


197 
202.6 
203.1 


170.1 
182.5 
181.3 


135.7 
162.3 
158.9 


184.3 
220.1 
206.4 


118.6 
141.5 
145.3 


107.9 
119.8 
120.5 


85.8 
90.2 
91.9 


268.2 
315.6 
322.0 


160.1 
156.4 
162.8 


J 

A 

S 


191.6 
191.4 
189.8 


204.7 
212.1 
203.8 


179.1 
187.9 
184.5 


134.9 
148.0 
142.5 


142.7 
122.8 
122.7 


144.1 
177.3 
166.2 


114.6 
121.5 
124.9 


87.0 

94.9 

100.7 


321.6 
319.8 
292.2 


130.6 
143.8 
153.4 


O 

N 
D 


196.4 
189. V 
184.4* 


209.0 
200. l r 
195.8 


188.4 
179.2' 
178.6 


140.0 
114 4 
109.5 


121.6 
85.1 
75.3 


162.3 
138.7 
139 


130.1 
132.3 
147.6 


106.8 
103.4 
117.5 


290.4 
328.7 
330.8 


152.6 
156.6 
156.2 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



Foods and Beverages 



Tobacco Products 



Foods 



Beverages 



Flour and 



Rubber 
Products 





feed: 
Wheat flour 


Sugar 


Tota! 


Liquors 


Beer 


Total 


Cigars 


Cigarettes 


Cut 
tobacco 




1939 
1950 


114.9 
143.7 


108.1 
159.2 


117.8 
237 J 


125.3 
234.9 


104.6 
294.2 


111.7 
216.] 


106.2 
153.5 


112.9 
273.5 


113.6 
124.2 


108.7 
278.8 


3950 N 
D 


168.1 
178.7 


170 
134 .8 


282.0 
251.9 


360.2 
281.7 


275.0 
246.6 


199.0 
197 5 


165.1 
155.7 


244.5 
240.0 


123.6 
132.6 


314.6 
335.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


155.2 
174.8 
179.0 


85. S 
113.1 
142.8 


235.6 
257.0 
292.2 


261.0 
298.4 
343.1 


222.7 
242.9 
294.5 


219.9 
235.6 
255.7 


167.0 
135.7 
140.2 


270.4 
305.5 
327.5 


141.5 
128.2 
150.5 


319.4 
340.2 
336.7 


A 
M 
J 


174.3 
165.6 
167.3 


147.9 
186.1 
172.4 


301.5 
280.6 
287.7 


286.2 

-222.5 

209.4 


346.2 
341.7 
348.7 


230.9 
230.5 
216.9 


151.6 
171.2 
138.5 


305.3 
281.1 
264.5 


108.5 
154.9 
151.1 


357.2 
299.6 
246.3 


J 

A 

S 


121.2 
138.8 
146.8 


142.6 
144.7 
107.6 


303.9 
305.7 
278.7 


201.2 
273.7 
300.5 


396.6 
367.8 
311.8 


187.8 
147.2 
108.7 


100.6 
89.4 
56.2 


238.1 
173.8 
131.1 


116.8 

118.5 

84.8 


262.2 
222.6 
288.9 


O 

N 
D 


146.9 
155.3 
158.8 


182.8 

149.0' 

94.8 


239.3 
281.3 
262.2 


374.9 
361.8 
280.4 


289.8 
275.8 
273.8 


226.4 
203.8 
157.0 


129.9 
142.5 
135.7 


290.9 
244.0 
175.3 


129.7 
149.0 
136.7 


281.6 
263.3 
279.8 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 6 - continued 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 


Leather Products 


Textiles ex. Clothing 




Clothing 


Paper Products 


Boots 
and 
Total Tanneries shoes 


Cotton 
con- Wool, yarn 
Total sumption and cloth 


Silk 

and 

rayon 


Pulp and 
paper: 
Total Total 



1939 
1950 


109.3 
127.7 


108.4 
113.6 


109.9 
137.5 


106.3 
172.4 


110.8 
145.2 


101.6 
196.8 


99 9 
242 3 


106.9 
138.2 


99.5 
195.7 


96.7 
183.4 


1950 N 
D 


142.8 
133 6 


134.6 
128.8 


148.5 
136.9 


187.6 
183.4 


166.6 
151.6 


208.6 
209.5 


254.1 
260.6 


145.6 
145.6 


206.4 
201.5 


194.9 
191.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


143.5 
145.9 
138.0 


134 9 
133.8 
112.9 


149.5 
154.4 
155.7 


184.1 
186.5 
190.8 


153.1 
158.1 
175.2 


208.2 
209.9 
209.5 


263.6 
262.9 
253.1 


140.4 
146.4 
148.5 


202 9 
207.5 
207.1 


192.1 
197.4 
197.6 


A 

M 

J 


135.3 
125.0 
104.9 


107.9 
99.4 
73.7 


154.5 
143.0 
126.9 


192.9 
193.1 
179 6 


173.7 
173.3 
161.2 


212.6 
212.6 
192.0 


261.7 
262.6 
249.7 


149.8 
148.5 
138.1 


212.3 
214.6 
213.3 


202.5 
204.0 
204.6 


J 
A 

S 


85 5 
112.0 
101.8 


52.4 
63.4 
63.5 


108.8 
146.2 
128.7 


156.9 
151.3 
158.4 


114.4 
110.9 
130.8 


185.3 
172.5 
170.7 


238.9 
237.2 
234.9 


129.0 
127.0 
130.4 


211 3 
213.5 
212.5 


201.1 
204.4 
202.7 


o 

N 
D 


106 8 
100.8 


78 
70.0 


127.0 
122.4 


161.2 
154.8 
142.0 


139.9 
131.8 
106.2 


174.2 
168.8 
169.6 


227.2 
218.4 
209.3 


130.1 

123.4' 

121.6 


214.9 

210.7' 

203.5 


205.7 
204.8 
199.1 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



Paper Products 
Pulp and paper 



Printing 

and 

Publishing 



Petroleum and Coal Products 



Chemical Products 



Pulp 



Paper 



Total 



Coke and 

gas 
products 



Petroleum refining 



Total Gasoline 



Heavy 
fuel oils 



Total 



Paints and 
varnishes 



1939 
1950 


97.6 
195.4 


95.1 
162.8 


104.1 
176.0 


106.7 
225.8 


99.2 
170.7 


115.5 
289.8 


266 .5 


196^4 


112.7 
190 3 


111.1 
377.6 


1950 N 
D 


209.6 
203.7 


169.8 
171.2 


184.2 
185.3 


237.7 
225.0 


174.3 
182.2 


311.5 
274.9 


293.9 
254.8 


205.2 
215.1 


192.9 
189.9 


361.8 
336.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


208.0 
215.4 
211.9 


165.0 
166.7 
173.2 


173.1 
178.8 
176.4 


225.7 
223.3 
219.8 


177.1 
185.5 
167.8 


282.2 
267.3 
280.5 


251.7 
236.5 
240.8 


204.9 
169.3 
192.0 


196.7 
199.3 
197.6 


392.4 
387.7 
384.2 


A 

M 

J 


221.1 
220.5 
220.7 


170.8 
175.8 
177 2 


167.0 
177.1 
170.5 


210.4 
274.4 
283.7 


177.3 
173.8 
169.3 


249.6 
391.6 
416.8 


211.9 
337.0 
352.4 


185.5 
245.0 
245.8 


212.5 
216.2 
216.2 


455.9 
455.1 
454.3 


J 

A 

S 


220.6 
221.9 
222 .5 


168.1 
174.7 
169.0 


170.2 
173.2 
168.4 


275.2 
285.3 
263.2 


170.4 
163.4 
164 4 


397.1 
427.2 
378 2 


346.5 
370.7 
335.0 


237.7 
260.3 
246.3 


207.0 
198.0 
199.9 


406.6 
347.6 
334.6 


o 

N 
D 


223.6 
222.1 
215.9 


175.2 
175.3 
170.6 


180.5 
177. 3 r 
174.0 


268.3 
257.7 


175.5 
172.1 
180.0 


376.3 
357.4 


351 2 
335 4 


255 .6 
269.6 


197.9 
194. 7' 
192.1" 


324 4 
289.0 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 6 -concluded 



INTRODUCTION 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 











DURABLE MANUFACTURES 










TOTAL 


Wood 
Products 






Iron and Steel Products 




Transportation 
Equipment 




Total 


Primary iron and steel 


Iron 
castings 


Wire and 

wire 
products 


Total 


Motor 
vehicles 




Total 


Pig iron 


Steel 


1939 


107.5 


107.8 


108.7 


110.3 


104.4 


115.1 


99.1 


114.7 


94.5 


93.4 


1950 


241.2 


171.5 


226.1 


268.0 


281.7 


222.3 


302.1 


158.5 


269.8 


251.6 


1950 N 


262.6 


196.1 


248.7 


298.5 


309.3 


249.3 


359.8 


163.5 


263.0 


231.2 


D 


263.1 


216.5 


242.5 


269.4 


284.7 


242.5 


350.9 


151.9 


275.2 


243.4 


1951 J 


269.8 


197.6 


252.6 


300.4 


288.5 


256.5 


372.7 


170.9 


309.6 


299.6 


F 


276.4 


202.0 


249.4 


308.1 


307.3 


265.2 


354.8 


158.8 


340.0 


336.3 


M 


280.3 


197.8 


252.6 


316.1 


316.6 


261.8 


369.3 


166.3 


358.0 


365.8 


A 


278.5 


151.0 


263.5 


321.5 


313.1 


266.6 


394.9 


183.4 


340.4 


323.7 


M 


282.4 


184.4 


261.7 


321.5 


314.2 


259.7 


359.3 


175.1 


339.5 


314.1 


J 


276.5 


207.2 


254.2 


306.7 


316.2 


252.4 


348.2 


170.0 


317.7 


273.3 


J 


251.0 


176.6 


237.3 


286.3 


301.7 


219.3 


264.4 


145.5 


300.9 


241.0 


A 


243.3 


176.4 


238.9 


286.1 


291.6 


233.1 


306.5 


138.8 


257.1 


161.3 


S 


255.6 


166.4 


249.3 


305.3 


315.2 


240.8 


336.8 


172.7 


319.9 


244.6 


O 


258. 7 r 


168.0 


258. 7 r 


317. l r 


322.2 


263.7 


351.4 


182.4 


321.4 


243.2 


N 


256. 60 


177.7 


254. 5 r 


326.6 


331.5 


273.8 


336.8 


155.3 


313. 5 r 


220.0 


D 


252. 8" 


183.7 


252.2? 


302.0" 


316.5 


245.5 






298.7 


190.1 










DURABLE MANUFACTURES 








Electric 
Power 




Non-Ferrous Metals 
and Products 


Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Electric 

refrig- 

Total Radios erators 


Non-Metallic Mineral Products 






Total 


Smelting 

and 
refining 


Total 


Cement 


Lime and 
gypsum 
products 


Clay 
products 




1939 


119.5 


121.0 


102.0 






106.1 


109.5 


118.7 


119.3 


108.4 


1950 


237.2 


150.6 


369.6 


310.3 


787.4 


237.8 


326.4 


278.5 


237.0 


194.4 


1950 N 


270.2 


156.7 


415.8 


299.4 


966.2 


251.1 


314.4 


306.4 


233.3 


192.0 


D 


266.0 


156.1 


395.1 


345.6 


873.0 


246.8 


363.3 


285.5 


234.9 


201.0 


1951 J 


265.8 


157.1 


399.5 


300.1 


936.1 


250 8 


321.2 


293.7 


282.5 


211.3 


F 


266.0 


157.2 


406.8 


341.9 


914.0 


262.1 


394.0 


293.3 


266.8 


210.3 


M 


268.0 


150.8 


400.2 


234.8 


999.5 


269.6 


378.6 


300.3 


271.1 


216.0 


A 


285.8 


169.0 


418.6 


345.4 


955.2 


273.4 


362.1 


303.8 


262.9 


229.2 


M 


293.3 


166.0 


392.2 


305.1 


851.4 


276.8 


368.5 


297.6 


258.9 


236.2 


J 


292.8 


168.8 


362.3 


300.4 


723.0 


267.3 


294.8 


300.0 


244.1 


226.8 


J 


270.8 


158.8 


283.1 


175.2 


461.9 


255.2 


319.1 


268.5 


230.6 


227.5 


A 


266.1 


164.0 


284.1 


183.8 


447.6 


260.4 


309.5 


329.1 


246.8 


219.5 


S 


253.7 


152.6 


312.3 


263.4 


414.3 


256.4 


316.3 


322.4 


229.7 


209.3 


O 


262.6 


147.5 


291. 7 r 


192. 6 r 


360.8 


254. 4 r 


311.9 


307.1 


239.0 


215.3 


N 


258.0' 


137.6 


292.6' 


228.3 


344.1 


251. 9p 


320.6 


283.4 




213.1 


D 


254. 6> 


137.6 








244.8r> 


341.8 






220.4 



LABOUR 



TABLE 7 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



The Canadian Labour Force 



1947 



1948 



1949 1950" 1950 



1951 



CLASSIFICATION 



Survey Averages 



Nov. 4 March 3 June 2 Aug. 18 Nov. 3 



Thousands of persons 14 years of age and over 



Non-institutional 
tion 



Civilian Popula- 



CJvillan Labour Force. 

Agricultural 

Non-agricultural 



With jobs 

At work — 35 hours or more 
At work — 15 to 34 hours. . . 

At work — 1 to 14 hours 

Not at work but with jobs . . . 



Paid workers 

Agricultural. . . . 
Non-agricultural . 



Without jobs and seeking work 
Persons not in the Labour Force . . . 



8,960 9,132 9,324 9,709 9,751 9,800 9,854 9,887 9,790 



4,908 

1,119 
3,789 

4,810 

4,222 

318 

114 

156 

3,262 

119 

3,143 

98 



4,982 
1,100 
3,882 

4,879 

4,301 

337 

109 

132 

3,372 

134 

3,238 

103 



4,052 4,150 



5,090 

1,094 
3,996 

4,957 
4,377 

348 
97 

135 

3,469 

144 

3,325 

133 

4,234 



5,216 

1,038 
4,178 

5,046 

4,422 

373 

100 

151 

3,571 

112 

3,459 

170 

4,493 



5,201 

974 
4,227 

5,084 

4,513 

378 

94 

99 

3,683 

102 

3,581 

117 

4,550 



5,172 

854 
4,318 

5,000 

4,245 

433 

111 

211 

3,665 

69 

3,596 

172 

4,628 



5,332 
1,017 
4,315 

5,247 

4,699 

339 

117 

92 

3,802 

114 

3,688 

85 

4.522 



5,421 

1,090 
4,331 

5,343 
4,646 

312 
81 

304 

3,849 

133 

3,716 

78 

4,466 



5,210 

880 
4,330 

5,110 
4,458 

451 
82 

119 

3,800 

90 

3,710 

100 

4,580 



Note. — These estimates are derived from a sample survey and are subject to sampling error. In general the smaller 
the estimate the larger is the relative sampling error. 

'"Newfoundland included in estimates from March, 1950. 
Source: Labour Force Bulletin, D.B.S. 



TABLE 8 



Canadian Labour Income 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



SALARIES AND WAGES 



Agriculture, 

Logging, 

Fishing, 

Trapping, 

Mining 



Manufacturing Construction 



Public Utilities, 

Transportation, 

Communications, 

Storage 

Trade 



Finance, 

Services 

(including 

government) 



SUPPLEMEN- 
TARY 
LABOUR 
INCOME 



TOTAL 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


23 
53 


62 

229 


8 
50 


58 
178 


59 
156 


5 
23 


215 

689 


1950 J 
A 
S 


55 
57 
59 


230 
232 
241 


57 
58 
58 


181 
171 
186 


160 
157 
159 


23 
24 
25 


706 
699 

728 


O 
N 
D 


61 
62 
60 


244 
247 
250 


58 
56 
51 


188 
193 
190 


160 
161 
162 


25 
25 
25 


736 
744 
738 


1951 J 
F 
M 


59 
59 
55 


252 
254 
260 


47 
46 
46 


187 
188 
191 


160 
162 
168 


25 
24 
25 


730 
733 r 

745 


A 
M 

J 


55 
61 
67 


266 
269 
276 


53 
59 
64 


196 
202 
208 


166 
174 
179 


27 
27 
27 


763 
792 

821 


J 

A 

S 


66 
68 
70 


276 
279 
284 


68 
71 
74 


209 
211 
214 


178 
176 
178 


30 
28 
28 


827 
833 
848 


O 


74 


283 


73 


216 


180 


29 


855 



10 Source: Monthly Estimates of Canadian Labour Income, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 9 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



INDUSTRIAL COMPOSITE 



FORESTRY 



MINING 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly Employ- Aggregate Weekly 

ment payrolls earnings* ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
168.0 


100.0 

321.8 


23.44 
44.84 


100.0 
160.1 


100.0 
388.2 


17.37 
42.01 


100.0 
112.2 


100.0 
211.2 


28.69 
53.95 


1950 N 
D 


178.1 
179.2 


351.7 
356.3 


46.29 
46.63 


233.7 
260.5 


587.5 
647.5 


43.66 
43.04 


116.0 
116.8 


226.0 
230.5 


55.89 
56.60 


1951 J 
F 
M 


175.3 
172.3 
172.3 


338.2 
351.5 
353.8 


45.27 

47.87 
48.19 


256.0 
248.3 
244.1 


632.1 
609.0 
633.7 


42.58 
42.45 
44.94 


115.1 
114.9 
114.7 


217.0 
233.1 
235.2 


54.08 
58.22 
58.85 


A 

M 

J 


173.3 
175.6 
180.3 


357.8 
367.9 
379.0 


48.43 
49.17 
49.34 


208.0 
167.9 
188.6 


549.8 
472.8 
539.8 


45.76 
48.74 
49.54 


114.7 
115.0 
116.4 


230.1 
237.4 
238.3 


57.56 
59.20 
58.74 


J 

A 

S 


183.6 
184.3 
185.4 


392.5 
394.0 
400.2 


50.17 
50.16 
50.66 


197.6 
180.5 
181.8 


589.7 
495.2 
505.5 


51.66 
47:49 
48.15 


119.0 
120.0 
119.5 


250.2 
254.2 
252.3 


60.32 
60.77 
60.77 


O 

N 
D 


186.5 
186. 4 r 
186.4 


410.0 
413. 4 r 
415.7 


51.59 

52.05 r 

52.34 


214.6 

262.3' 

288.1 


630.2 

820.3' 

900.4 


50.83 

54.14 r 

54.10 


120.1 

121.4 r 

122.2 


263.0 
264. 7 r 
269.8 


63.01 

62.74' 

63.56 



MANUFACTURING 



Total 



Durable Goods (1 > 



Non-durable Goods <2) 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 

177.5 


100.0 
360.1 


22.79 
46.21 


100.0 
211.4 


100.0 
431.6 


24.28 
49.52 


100.0 
155.4 


100.0 
308.4 


21.82 
43.28 


1950 N 
D 


185.4 
185.3 


389.7 
394.6 


47.90 

48.51 


222.4 
223.1 


472.0 
478.5 


51.52 
52.07 


161.3 
160.7 


330.0 
333.7 


44.65 
45.28 


1951 J 
F 
M 


182.4 
184.5 
186.3 


373.1 
402.1 
405.3 


46.60 
49.64 
49.56 


223.3 
226.9 
229.9 


457.1 
497.4 
501.3 


49.72 
53.23 
52.94 


155.8 
156.9 
157.9 


312.1 
332.9 
335.6 


43.68 
46.27 
46.35 


A 
M 
J 


188.8 
189.9 
192.0 


414.6 
423.7 
429.0 


50.03 
50.84 
50.90 


234.8 
237.0 
240.9 


542.5 
530.8 
537.6 


53.47 
54.39 
54.20 


158.8 
159.2 
160.2 


329.0 
345.9 
350.1 


46.72 
47.39 
47.67 


J 

A 

S 


193.9 
194.0 
194.1 


440.0 
440.1 
446.1 


51.70 
51.68 
52.37 


242.9 
242.0 
242.1 


552.0 
550.2 
559.8 


55.24 
55.25 
56.17 


162.1 
162.8 
162.9 


358.8 
355.5 
363.9 


48.25 
48.22 
48.71 


O 
N 
D 


194.2 

190.8' 

189.2 


454.4 

451.4' 

451.8 


53.31 

53.89' 
54.39 


240.2 

238.4' 

237.5 


567.5 

569.5' 

573.0 


57.40 

58.04' 

58.61 


164.4 
160. r 
157.9 


372.6 

366.0' 

364.1 


49.42 

49.87' 

50.27 



Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. Statistics throughout Tables 9 to 11 are compiled 
from data which relate to the last pay period of the preceding month. 

'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

(1 includes wood products, iron and steel products, transportation equipment, non-ferrous metal products, 
electrical apparatus and supplies, and non-metallic mineral products. (2) Includes foods and beverages, tobacco 

and tobacco products, rubber products, leather products, textile products except clothing, clothing, paper products, 
printing, publishing and alHed industries, products of petroleum and coal, chemical products, and miscellaneous 
manufacturing industries. 

Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



11 



LABOUR 



TABLE 9 continued 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



MANUFACTURING 



Textile Products except Clothing 



Clothing 



Wood Products 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings" 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


^100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
149.6 


100.0 
330.6 


18.00 
39.75 


100.0 
139.4 


100.0 
273.7 


17.15 
33.63 


100.0 
171.1 


100.0 
365.7 


19.32 
41.21 


1950 N 
D 


155 1 
157.3 


357.4 
372.1 


41.47 
42.57 


144.5 
145.0 


295.8 
294.8 


35.10 
34.86 


182.3 
175.9 


413 4 
398.6 


43.81 
43.75 


1951 J 
F 
M 


157.6 
159.4 
160.0 


346.6 
384.4 
381.5 


39.57 
43.40 
42.91 


140.8 
147.1 
150.4 


262.9 
311.1 
319.5 


32.02 
36.28 
36.43 


170.7 
172.8 
175.0 


359.7 
393.3 
399.6 


40.70 
43.96 
44.09 


A 
M 

J 


161.3 
160.8 
158.5 


390.4 
393.5 
378.7 


43.56 

44.04 
43.00 


152.0 
150.2 
146.2 


323.1 
320.1 
301.5 


36.48 
36.54 
35.35 


177.2 
177.9 
184.2 


406.4 
422.1 
428.6 


44.29 
45.81 
44.93 


J 
A 

S 


156.1 
152.8 
150.9 


370.3 
352.6 
355.0 


42.68 
41.52 
42.35 


140.8 
137.1 
138.5 


287.5 
284.5 
293.8 


35.02 
35.57 
36.37 


187.1 
188.3 
187.3 


448.6 
449.6 
454.9 


46.30 
46.09 
46.88 


•o 

N 
D 


149 5 
147.7 
145.1 


362.9 
357. 3 r 
357.0 


43.68 
43 53 r 
44.29 


137.2 
135.4 
133.2 


296.9 
289.5 
285.2 


37.10 

36.67' 
36.73 


181.2 

175.5' 

167.4 


454.6 
443 . r 
427.0 


48.43 
48 . 77 r 
49.26 



MANUFACTURING 



Paper Products 



Iron and Steel Products 



Transportation Equipment 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
171.1 


100.0 
348.1 


26.87 
54.60 


100.0 
215.7 


100.0 
437.5 


25.14 
50.92 


100.0 
215.5 


100.0 
427.4 


26.73 
53.01 


1950 N 
D 


177 5 
176.4 


372.2 
381.2 


56.34 
58.07 


227.5 
229.2 


481.8 
488.7 


53.22 
53.59 


221.5 
225.6 


452.1 
472.9 


54.56 
56.02 


1951 J 
F 
M 


172 5 
172 .2 
172.9 


359.8 
376.9 
377.0 


56.05 
58.78 
58.57 


230.8 
234.0 
236.1 


468.5 
500.5 
505.3 


51.03 
53.93 

53.95 


229.4 
235.0 
240.4 


462.6 
519.1 
520.6 


53.90 
58.85 
57.69 


A 
M 

J 


175.4 
177.7 
184.5 


379.2 
390.1 
423.9 


58.07 
58.99 
61.74 


240.6 
243.2 
245.6 


525.4 
545.1 
548.4 


55.05 
56.55 
56.34 


248.4 
250.8 
255.8 


531.8 
534.4 
547.4 


57.04 
56.75 
57.00 


J 

A 

S 


192.4 
193.6 
194.9 


464.0 
470.1 
475.4 


64.78 
65.21 
65.52 


246.7 
244.6 
245.3 


559.4 
558.3 
563.9 


57.34 
57.71 
58.13 


258.7 
259.8 
261.7 


561.3 
553.8 
578.6 


57.81 
56.80 
58.85 


O 
N 
D 


192.9 

189.8' 

186.7 


475.0 
466.2' 
462.7 


66.16 
65 98 r 
66.59 


247.0 

245.4' 

247.3 


581.4 

584.1' 

597.1 


59.54 

60.23' 

61.08 


261.0 
263 . 3' 
266.5 


586.1 
595 . 7' 
599.5 


59.78 

60.21' 

59.87 



12 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 9 -continued 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



MANUFACTURING 


CONSTRUCTION 


Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 


Chemical Products 


Total 




Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate 
ment payrolls 

1939=100 


Weekly 
earnings* 


1939=100 Dollars 


1939 = 100 Dollars 


Dollars 



1939 
1950 


100.0 
287.6 


100.0 
593.2 


24.38 
50.16 


100.0 
215.0 


100.0 
381.4 


28.14 
49.90 


100.0 
165.0 


100.0 
379.9 


18.83 
43.27 


1950 N 
D 


308.2 
314.4 


657.6 
668.2 


52.02 
51.97 


220.6 
220.9 


402.3 
406.7 


51.31 
51.81 


185.8 
180.4 


444.8 
427.0 


45.08 
44.53 


1951 J 
F 
M 


316.0 
318.1 
320.2 


628.2 
686.7 
691.4 


48.62 
52.79 
52.79 


217.7 
221.0 
222.6 


403.2 
420.3 
424.2 


52.12 
53.51 
53.63 


158.1 
145.1 
139.7 


343.8 
359.8 
353.8 


40.82 
46.56 
47.56 


A 
M 
J 


326.2 
328.7 
331.6 


720.3 
735.3 
749.1 


53.99 
54.69 
55.22 


225.2 
229.5 
232.3 


436.7 
449.9 
454.6 


54.57 
55.16 
55.08 


141.9 
163.4 
182.7 


352.0 
408.9 
459.3 


46.59 
46.99 
47. 15 


J 
A 

S 


333.1 
325.8 
323.5 


759.7 
748.9 
749.5 


55.74 
56.18 
56.62 


234.4 
234.6 
236.6 


465.7 
469.4 
477.7 


55.92 
56.30 
56.82 


190.4 
199.5 
206.7 


495.7 
526.3 
556.0 


48.81 
49.48 
50.44 


O 

N 
D 


322.5 

317.6' 

313.5 


758.4 
762. 2" 
769.7 


57.48 

58.65 r 

60.01 


235.3 
237. 0" 
236.2 


481.3 
489.4 
488.7 


57.57 

58.11" 

58.22 


206.1 
203. l r 
194.4 


570.8 

559.0" 

542.3 


51.95 

51.60* 

52.31 



CONSTRUCTION 


AND COMMUNICATION 


PUBLIC UTILITY OPERATION 


Buildings and Structures 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 




Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
356.8 


100.0 
683.0 


24.29 
46.33 


100.0 
167.2 


100.0 
286.5 


28.68 
49.15 


100.0 
183.6 


100.0 
317.9 


29.53 
51.14 


1950 N 
D 


400.0 
391.6 


800.2 
781.2 


48.54 
48.32 


173.9 
173.1 


305.9 
309.8 


50.46 
51.34 


185.5 
183.3 


324.9 
329.6 


51.77 
53.11 


1951 J 
F 
M 


347.8 
338.0 
334.6 


614.2 
687.5 
688.2 


42.73 
49.22 
49.77 


168.1 
165.0 
165.7 


299.6 
302.7 
303.8 


51.07 
52.55 
52.53 


179.8 
180.1 
178.3 


321.2 
326.1 
331.1 


52.76 
53.48 
54.85 


A 
M 
J 


339.7 
363.0 
398.2 


681.0 
763.8 
827.8 


48.51 
50.92 
50.23 


166.7 
171.5 
176.5 


308.8 
317.6 
331.2 


53.05 
53.03 
53.72 


179.4 
183.2 
190.9 


331.5 
343.3 
359.2 


54.57 
55.36 
55.57 


J 

A 

S 


415.4 
427.5 
449.2 1 


899.7 

941.9 

,011.3 


52.32 
53.22 
54.39 


183.2 
186.4 
189.0 


346.2 
352.9 
361.3 


54.12 
54.20 
54.74 


193.8 
195.8 
195.3 


369.3 
373.7 
371.0 


56.22 
56.32 
56.03 


O 
N 
D 


449.7 1 
448.1*1 
432.5 1 


,047.8 
, 033.4" 
,017.9 


56.29 

55.72" 

56.86 


186.7 

186.4" 

185.0 


359.2 

360.5" 

359.2 


55.06 

55.35" 

55.55 


191.8 

190.7' 

190.8 


375.8 
377. 9' 
385.9 


57.79 

58.47" 

59.67 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



13 



LABOUR 



TABLE 9 - concluded 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



TRADE 



FINANCE, INSURANCE 
AND REAL ESTATE 



SERVICE 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate Weekly 
payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 


100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100 
167.2 


100.0 
297.4 


21.83 

38.81 


100.0 
155.3 


100 
233.7 


29.59 
43.90 


100.0 
177 7 


100.0 
320.1 


16.33 

29.50 


1950 N 
D 


174.2 
181.8 


317.1 
328.1 


39.74 
39.40 


159.9 
159.6 


245.3 
245.9 


44.73 
44.72 


176.7 
173 4 


326.8 
324.1 


30.20 
30.50 


1951 J 
F 
M 


184.4 
169.5 
168.1 


333.9 
317.4 
319.5 


39.55 
40.91 
41.58 


159.8 
160.8 
161.7 


246.5 
251.2 

252.1 


44.78 
45.35 
45.28 


172.9 

173.3 
172.5 


318.7 
327.1 
330.8 


30.23 
30.97 
31.45 


A 
M 
J 


170 .9 
171.0 
172.8 


325.6 
332.9 
338.4 


41.60 
42.51 
42.77 


167.5 
170.8 
171.0 


264.6 
271.3 
272.0 


45.91 

46.16 
46.23 


172.9 
175.9 
180.9 


332.0 
340.9 
350.4 


31.50 
31.79 
31.77 


J 

A 

S 


173.3 
170.8 
171.0 


345.5 
342.9 
342.4 


43.53 
43.85 
43.74 


172.0 
172.6 
173.0 


273 6 

274.7 
276.1 


46.23 
46.27 
46.40 


188.8 
193 4 
193.7 


363.7 
368.0 
369.3 


31.60 
31.21 
31.28 


O 
N 
D 


175.5 
176 7 r 
183.7 


354.4 
358. l r 
368.3 


44.17 
44 . 34 r 
43.85 


173.3 
176.4 
176.6 


280.9 
289 6 r 
289.9 


47.11 

47.72 r 

47.73 


187.9 
183. 2 r 
179.7 


367.0 
363 . 7 r 
358.8 


32.07 

32.59' 

32.79 



Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 



TABLE 10 Monthly averages or first of month 




PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND NOVA SCOTIA 


NEW BRUNSWICK 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 





1939- 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 

173.1 


100.0 
301.1 


19.79 
34.44 


100.0 
142.5 


100.0 
261.8 r 


21.42 

39.40 


100.0 
169.9 


100.0 
325.8 


20.21 
38.76 


1950 N 
D 


198.9 
195.9 


347.5 
343.6 


34.59 
34.90 


152.0 
152.6 


282.0 
283.0 


39.74 
39.80 


178.8 
184 1 


354.4 
364.8 


40.06 
40.07 


1951 J 
F 
M 


184.2 
165.3 

160.1 


318.5 
298.6 
298.2 


34.42 
35.96 
37.06 


149.1 
142.2 

135 7 


264.1 
271.6 

265.9 


37.99 
40 97 
42.02 


187.5 
179.3 
179.0 


362.4 
368.5 
371.3 


39.08 
41.56 
41.94 


A 
M 

J 


152.0 
161.8 
178 1 


289.9 
304.4 
338.9 


37.95 
37.43 
37.87 


140.3 
140.3 
149.4 


279.4 
280.9 
293.7 


42.70 
42.93 
42.15 


177.1 
171.7 
171.6 


372.6 
357.2 
357.2 


42.53 
42.06 
42.09 


J 

A 

S 


186.9 
188.7 
192.4 


353.5 
363.4 
365.9 


37.63 
38.32 
37.85 


149.6 
155.3 
157.8 


303.7 
314.5 
313.2 


43.52 

43.44 
42.56 


174.9 
179.9 

182.3 


377.1 
387.3 
394.2 


43.60 
43.63 
43.85 


O 
N 
D 


188 6 
182.6 
179.9 


362 9 
356.3 
348.8 


38 29 
38.82 
38.59 


158.6 
158.4' 
155 7 


323.1 

324 . 7 r 
321.2 


43.67 

43.95' 
44.22 


183 6 

186 2 r 
190 


407.3 
422. 6 r 
419.1 


44.97 

46.02' 

44.71 



14 'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. 
Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 10 - concluded 



Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 
Monthly averages or first of month 



LABOUR 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



MANITOBA 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939 = 100 



Dollars 



1939 = 100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939 = 100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



1939 
1950 

1950 N 
D 



100.0 
155.0 

166.0 
167.0 



100.0 
312.9 

343.7 
348.8 



21.26 
42.89 

44.02 
44.45 



100.0 
177.7 

187.3 
189.1 



100.0 
338.8 

369.4 
376.4 



24.45 
46.58 

48.22 
48.74 



100.0 
168.0 

175.5 
177.9 



100.0 
286.8 

309.1 
313.6 



25.69 
43.84 

45.23 
45.35 



1951 J 
F 
M 


162.3 
159.9 
161.0 


327.8 
343.1 
349.6 


42.99 
45.67 
46.21 


186.9 
185.6 
185.7 


361.4 
379.5 
378.6 


47.34 
50.07 
49.92 


171.2 
165.5 
164.3 


296.8 
298.1 
302.6 


44.61 
46.35 
47.41 


A 
M 
J 


160.3 
163.3 
167.9 


348.2 
359.8 
372.0 


46.23 
46.90 
47.16 


187.3 
188.5 
191.9 


386.6 
395.0 
402.3 


50.53 
51.31 
51.34 


165.2 
167.5 
172.6 


302.6 
309.2 
324.7 


47.13 
47.51 
48.42 


J 
A 

S 


171.0 
171.6 
173.2 


381.8 
387.0 
396.1 


47.52 
47.99 
48.66 


194.7 
193.5 
194.1 


416.4 
413.6 
417.8 


52.38 
52.34 
52.72 


177.6 
179.7 
180.4 


339.2 
344.3 
348.7 


49.15 
49.31 
49.69 


O 
N 
D 


175.3 
178. r 
178.6 


406.5 

414.4' 

421.2 


49.33 

49.54' 

50.19 


195.4 

193.9' 

194.4 


428.5 
428. 8' 
431.2 


53.73 

54.18' 

54.35 


178.6 
178. 4 r 
178.1 


348.5 
349. 0' 
348.6 


50.17 

50.30' 

50.33 



SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Employ- Aggregate 
ment payrolls 

1939 = 100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939=100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939 = 100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



1939 
1950 


100.0 
140.8 


100.0 
249.6 


24.18 
42.86 


100.0 
188.5 


100.0 
338.7 


25.39 
45.61 


100.0 
180.7 


100.0 
332.0 


26.01 
47.70 


1950 N 
D 


152.1 
150.9 


275.4 
272.8 


43.80 
43.82 


196.7 
197.7 


368.1 
368.9 


47.51 
47.45 


191.3 
189.6 


366.4 
362.8 


49.81 
49.76 


1951 J 
F 
M 


144.4 
134.9 
133.3 


262.8 
249.9 
250.8 


44.13 
44.89 
45.60 


193.7 
186.5 
186.7 


355.8 
356.9 
362.3 


46.73 
48.69 
49.37 


180.4 
177.0 
176.9 


331.3 
342.6 
347.6 


47.78 
50.36 
51.10 


A 

M 

J 


135.3 
137.9 
149.8 


256.8 
258.5 
288.1 


4&.01 
45.43 
46.62 


187.0 
192.9 
202.5 


356.1 
373.0 
395.9 


48.44 
49.19 
49.74 


181.0 
187.2 
192.3 


353.2 
378.1 
390.9 


50.74 
52.49 
52.82 


J 

A 

S 


154.6 
157.5 
157.8 


298.0 
307.9 
310.0 


46.71 
47.37 
47.61 


208.9 
218.0 
219.0 


418.3 
434.3 
441.3 


50.93 
50.68 
51.28 


197.4 
198.1 
198.9 


408.2 
400.3 
412.1 


53.76 
52.52 
53.86 


O 
N 
D 


156.9 

157.7' 

156.7 


312.8 

315.5' 

315.7 


48.32 
48.48' 
48.82 


214.0 
211. 3' 
210.3 


446.2 

441.6' 

440.3 


52.77 

53.16' 

53.27 


201.0 

197.9' 

195.2 


426.1 

433.6' 

430.8 


55.12 

56.97' 

57.37 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



15 



LABOUR 



TABLE 11 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Employment and Earnings: By Cities 
Monthly averages or first of month 



HALIFAX 



MONTREAL 



QUEBEC CITY 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939 = 100 



Dollars 



1939 - 100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939 = 100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



1939 
1950 

1950 N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 

M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 
D 



100.0 
186.6 

191.6 

195.1 

199.2 
192.5 
192.6 

209.1 
195.7 
198.6 

202.5 
200.0 
211.8 

212.3 

214. 8' 
214.6 



100.0 
289.9 

301.6 
301.8 

303 4 
308.9 
316.6 

349.9 
328.6 
329.6 

346.0 
348.6 
366.4 

376.5 

381.1' 

380.6 



23.42 
36.35 

36.87 
36.29 

35.71 
37.64 
38.50 

39.20 
39.33 
38.87 

40.02 
40.84 
40.52 

41.54 

41.55' 

41.53 



100.0 
165.4 

171.6 
172.7 

168.8 
167.5 
168.2 

170.9 
173.6 
174.6 

176.3 
174.8 
175.8 

178.0 

178.6' 

179.5 



100.0 
315.9 

338.8 
342.3 

320.1 
336.9 
343.1 

346.8 
361.1 
361.5 

367.6 
366.7 
377.1 

386.5 

392.3' 

399.0 



22.82 
43.58 

45.05 
45.28 

43.33 
45.97 
46.60 

46.36 
47.55 
47.31 

47.65 
47.93 
49.00 

49.60 
50.18 
50.79 



100.0 
147.5 

153.5 
153.2 

146.2 
142.6 
142.7 

144.6 
148.1 
152.0 

155.4 
159.1 
159.3 

158.6 

158.2' 

156.8 



100.0 
296.6' 

315.4 
320.9 

295.1 
301.0 
299.9 

301.4 
317.6 
333.0 

339.5 
351.8 
355.7 



361 
357 



361.5 



18.62 
37.40 

38.25 
38.95 

37.14 
39.29 
39.13 

38.80 
39.88 
40.77 

40.70 
41.18 
41.59 

42.41 

42.11' 

42.94 



TORONTO 



OTTAWA-HULL 



HAMILTON 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
183.6 


100.0 
341.0 


25.05 
46.49 


100.0 
180.1 


100.0 
317.3 


23.17 
40.81 


100.0 
187.5 


100.0 
379.6 


24.19 
48.91 


1950 N 
D 


191.1 
194.5 


368.5 
375.6 


48.33 
48.46 


187.0 
187.6 


338.5 
340.5 


41.90 
42.04 


194.5 
198.2 


404.3 
416.9 


50.28 
50.88 


1951 J 
F 
M 


194.0 
191.0 
191.1 


362.0 
377.4 
376.9 


46.81 

49.58 
49.48 


188.7 
183.6 
181.7 


335.0 
339.3 
338.3 


41.12 
42.80 
43.13 


197.4 
196.2 
196.7 


403.8 
421.3 
420.8 


49.49 
51.96 
51.84 


A 
M 
J 


194.1 
195.4 
196.2 


390.0 
401.1 
401.8 


50.40 
51.49 
51.37 


183.5 
186.6 
190.4 


343.5 
356.2 
372.6 


43.36 
44.22 
45.32 


199.5 
205.9 
208.6 


434 3 
459.8 
468.8 


52.74 
54.09 
54.45 


J 

A 

S 


197.9 
194.4 
195.5 


412.3 
407.4 
413.9 


52.27 
52.57 
53.20 


192.8 
192.5 
192.1 


382.5 
387.0 
387.2 


45.93 
46.57 
46.73 


211.8 
210.5 
206.8 


483.1 
482.1 
470.4 


55.26 
55.47 
55.11 


O 
N 
D 


197.3 

197.4' 

198.7 


425.7 

426.8' 

431.0 


54.21 
54.35 
54.51 


192.4 
194.6 
194.4 


390.7 
394.5 
394 4 


47.09 
47.02 
47.03 


206 9 
201.5 
203.6 


477.0 

463.9' 

479.7 


55.89 

55.80' 

57.12 



16 Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. 'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 11 - concluded 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Cities 

Monthly averages or first of month 



WINDSOR 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


100.0 
217.0 


100.0 
427.7 


27.79 
54.60 


100.0 
168.0 


100.0 
283.4 


24.29 
40.94 


100.0 
198.6 


100.0 
362.2 


25.07 
45.68 


1950 N 
D 


221.7 
223.5 


455.6 
470.9 


55.81 
58.59 


175.3 
179.2 


303.9 
312.1 


42.12 
42.35 


202.8 
206.4 


383.6 
388.0 


47.41 
47.18 


1951 J 
F 
M 


231.2 
234.6 
237.9 


457.7 
524.5 
530.9 


55.15 
62.28 
62.25 


173.3 
168.1 
166.8 


295.1 
298.3 
302.8 


41.41 
43.15 
44.17 


199.4 
195.9 
197.2 


361.2 
375.2 
378.8 


45.47 
48.07 
48.31 


A 
M 

J 


240.2 
235.8 
237.3 


509.2 
480.7 
493.1 


59.14 
56.84 
57.97 


167.9 
168.7 
172.5 


304.4 
308.8 
319.4 


44.09 
44.52 
45.18 


201.0 
203.7 
204.8 


384.7 
402.3 
403.9 


47.97 
49.48 
49.41 


J 

A 

S 


235.7 
231.9 
223.7 


477.5 
452.0 
460.5 


56.51 
54.37 
57.38 


175.3 
174.5 
175.1 


332.5 
331.3 
333.8 


46.29 
46.32 
46.49 


208.4 
207.4 
207.8 


423.4 
424.1 
430.8 


50.90 
51.23 
51.94 


o 

N 
D 


211.8 
211. 4 r 
212.3 


439.9 
449. r 
454.5 


57.91 

59.22 r 

59.69 


173.9 
174. 8 r 
176.4 


335.2 
339. 4 r 
342.2 


46.97 

47.33 r 

47.29 


207.3 
203. 9 r 
203.8 


435.2 
432 . 4 r 
430.3 


52.59 

53.13 r 

52.92 



Average Hourly Earnings 



TABLE 12 






Monthly averages or first of month 














MINING 










MANUFACTURING 










Total 


Metal 
Mining 


Coal 
Mining 


Total 


Durable 
Goods 


Non- 
durable 
Goods 


Foods and 
Beverages 

Total Meat 
products 


Tobacco 

and 
Tobacco 
Products 


Rubber 
Products 


Leather 
Products 












( 


I!ents per 


hour 










1949 
1950 


117.2 
121.4 


115.9 
121.1 


128.3 
130.1 


98.6 
103.6 


106.5 
112.0 


90.6 
95.2 


86.0 
89.8 


105.9 
111.4 


85.7 
94.6 


104.5 
110.2 


74.9 
78.5 


1950 N 
D 


123.7 
124.8 


124.4 
125.2 


130.3 
130.5 


106.4 
107.8 


115.2 
116.4 


97.5 
99.0 


91.2 
93.6 


116.5 
117.7 


100.7 
100.0 


112.3 
111.9 


80.6 
81.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


127.1 
127.7 
130.1 


127.9 
128.1 
130.0 


131.0 
131.8 
135.5 


109.0 
110.4 
111.4 


117.1 
119.0 
119.9 


100.5 
101.2 
102.3 


95.1 
95.5 
96.6 


117.9 
118.9 
120.7 


96.6 
94.3 
93.7 


114.6 
118.8 
120.9 


82.1 
82.4 
82.9 


A 
M 
J 


130.5 
131.5 
131.6 


130.2 
131.6 
132.0 


136.3 
137.6 
137.3 


112.8 
114.1 
115.9 


121.6 
122.9 
123.8 


103.4 
104.6 
107.2 


98.5 

98.6 

100.4 


121.3 
120.7 
128.0 


100.8 
110.9 
110.5 


122.6 
123.6 
123.5 


83.9 
84.8 
86.2 


J 

A 

S 


133.3 
136.1 
137.1 


134.3 
139.3 
140.4 


139.0 
137.4 
138.7 


118.4 
119.1 
120.6 


127.0 
128.2 
130.0 


109.1 
109.4 
110.6 


100.1 

99.2 

100.8 


127.8 
126.9 
132.9 


114.6 
112.1 
112.2 


122.7 
125.2 
127.7 


86.4 
85.9 
86.3 


o 

N 
D 


138.2 
138.3 
139.3 


141.2 
140. 4 r 
141.7 


138.5 

138.7' 

138.7 


121.9 
123.5 
124.5 


132.1 

133. 3 r 
134.6 


111.2 
113.0 
113.6 


99.7 
102. 8 r 
104.2 


133.6 
135. 7 r 
136.1 


122.4 
125. 9 r 
116.5 


129.7 
131.9 
133.2 


87.5 
88. 7 r 
88.8 



Data are for hourly rated wage earners of firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. Statistics throughout 
Tables 12 and 13 are compiled from data which relate to the last pay period of the preceding month. 
Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 



17 



LABOUR 



TABLE 12 - concluded 



Average Hourly Earnings 

Monthly averages or first of month 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



MANUFACTURING 



Textile Products 
except Clothing 

Total Cotton 

goods 



Clothing 



Wood Products 


Paper Products 

Total Pulp and 
paper 
mills 


Printing Iron and Steel Products 

Publishing 

and Allied 

Industries Total Primary 
iron and 
steel 


Total Saw and Furniture 

planing 

mills 



Cents per hour 



1949 
1950 

1950 N 
D 



83.0 
86.0 

88.5 
91.1 



85 
87 



89.6 
95.8 



76.4 
79.3 

81.1 
80.5 



90.2 
95.0 

99.1 
99.7 



95.3 
100.7 

105.4 
106.2 



86.0 
89.0 

91.5 
92.3 



106.3 
110.8 

113.6 
116.8 



113.7 
118.1 

121.1 
125.4 



112.8 
121.8 

124.5 
125.7 



108.4 
115.5 

118.8 
119.9 



117.5 
126.5 

128.7 
131.7 



1951 J 


91.3 


95.7 


80.6 


99 8 


107.1 


91.7 


118.4 


126.5 


125.7 


119.9 


131.3 


F 


92.9 


97.9 


82.9 


99.7 


106.8 


92.7 


119.9 


128.2 


126.0 


122.0 


134.2 


M 


94.0 


99.4 


84.2 


101.1 


108.5 


93.4 


120.5 


128.2 


129.5 


123.6 


134.9 


A 


94 6 


99.7 


85.1 


103.9 


112.7 


93.9 


119.7 


127.2 


131.7 


125.3 


135.4 


M 


95.4 


100.3 


85.4 


105.5 


113.6 


96.2 


120.8 


128.4 


132.9 


127.4 


136.8 


J 


96 3 


100.8 


85.8 


105.0 


112.0 


96.8 


128.2 


136.7 


132 9 


128.8 


137.7 


J 


97.3 


99.9 


86.7 


105.9 


112.6 


97.2 


133.6 


142.9 


133.1 


131.1 


138.6 


A 


97.5 


99.8 


86.9 


105.5 


111.8 


97.4 


135.0 


143.9 


131 8 


133.1 


143.9 


S 


99.0 


101.3 


87.7 


108.8 


116.5 


98.3 


135.0 


143.8 


133.9 


134.8 


147.1 


O 


100 


101.4 


88.6 


110 8 


118.4 


99.7 


136.9 


146.3 


135.2 


137 


150.2 


N 


100.4 


101.2 


89.3' 


112.4' 


120.9' 


100. 9' 


137.7' 


147.1 


136.4' 


138.1 


151.8' 


D 


100.8 


100.4 


89.1 


112 9 


122.0 


101.2 


139.1 


148.8 


137.4 


139.5 


153.3 



MANUFACTURING 



CONSTRUCTION 



Iron and Steel Transportation Equipment Non-ferrous Electrical Non- Products of Chemical Total Buildings 

Products Metal Apparatus Metallic Petroleum Products and 

Total Railroad and Motor Products and Mineral and Coal Structures 

rolling stock vehicles Supplies Products 
equipment 



Agricultural 
implements 













Cents per hour 












1949 
1950 


114 5 
125.7 


116.0 
120.9 


114.0 
114.4 


130.7 
137.0 


106.9 
111.7 


109.1 
114.7 


96.2 
102.0 


122.6 
130.3 


98.6 
103.7 


101.2 
105.6 


107.9 
113.3 


1950 N 
D 


128.7 
131.5 


124.3 
125.8 


116.6 
116.7 


142.6 
145.3 


114.3 
115.1 


117.9 
117.6 


105.9 
106.9 


135.3 
138.0 


106.8 
107.5 


108.8 
109.5 


117.1 
117.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


130 8 
132.0 
133.0 


125.5 
128.7 
129.0 


118.4 
118.2 
119.5 


141.8 
148.5 
149.1 


118 8 
119.9 
119.9 


117.5 
120.4 
120.9 


108.0 
108.3 
109.5 


141.8 
140.1 
142.0 


110.4 
112.0 
113.1 


109.7 
113.5 
114.1 


118.7 
121.2 
122.1 


A 
M 

J 


140.3 
140.3 
146.5 


129.5 
129.6 
130.0 


119.2 
122.5 
121.9 


150.5 
146.3 
146.9 


121.5 
121.9 
122.3 


123.0 
125.3 
128.2 


111.3 
112.7 
114.7 


141.9 
148.4 
152.0 


114.2 
116.1 
116.9 


115.0 
115.4 
116.2 


122.5 
124.0 
125.9 


J 

A 

S 


149.5 
150.5 
150 .4 


136.6 
137.1 
137.7 


138.9 
139.1 

137.4 


147.0 
148.9 
148.1 


127.6 
132.9 
134.0 


130.0 
130.1 
131.7 


117.1 
117.9 
120.1 


149.6 
151.0 
159.7 


118.9 
120.8 
122.3 


117.5 
117.7 
120.3 


127.7 
127.9 
131.0 


O 

N 
D 


153.9 

151.5' 

155.7 


140.5 

140.1' 
141.1 


141.3 

139 2 
140.2 


151.3 
149.8 
149.6 


135 7 
137.8' 

138.6 


132.7 

134.6' 

135.3 


121.5 

123.3' 

124.7 


163 4 

163.0' 

161.4 


123.6 

124.7' 

125.1 


122.4 

123.9' 

125.3 


133.8 

134.9' 

136.0 



18 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 13 



LABOUR 



Average Hours Worked per Week 



MINING 



MANUFACTURING 



Total Metal 

mining 



Coal 
mining 



Total Durable Non- Foods and Rubber Leather 

goods durable beverages products products 
goods 



Textile 
products 

except 
clothing 



Clothing 



42.6 
43.0 

43.9 
43.9 

40.5 
44.1 
43.7 

42.5 
43.4 
43.0 

43.3 
43.0 
42.2 

43.9 
43.5 
44.2 



45.3 
45.1 

45.3 
45.2 

42.6 
45.4 
44.9 

44.4 
44.6 
44.3 

43.9 
43.3 
42.5 

44.2 
43.7 
44.8 



37.4 
38.1 

39.6 
40.2 

34.9 
40.6 
39.5 

36.4 
39.5 
38.0 

40.5 
41.2 
39.1 

41.2 
41.2 
41.6 



42.3 
42.3 

43.0 
43.1 

40.1 
42.9 
42.3 

42.2 
42.5 
41.9 

41.7 
41.4 
41.5 

41.9 
41.8 
41.9 



42.5 
42.5 

43.1 
43.1 

40.2 
43.1 
42.5 

42.3 
42.6 
42.1 

42.0 
41.4 
41.7 

42.0 
42.1 
42.2 



42.0 
42.2 

43.0 
43.1 

39.9 
42.6 
42.2 

42.1 
42.5 
41.6 

41.4 
41.3 
41.4 

43.0 
41. 5 r 
41.6 



42.4 
42.6 

42.8 
43.0 

40.4 
42.3 
42.0 

41.8 
42.2 
42.3 

42.5 
42.3 
41.8 

42.8 
42.7 
42.6 



40.9 
41.5 

43.4 
42.7 

38.4 
43.0 
42.7 

41.7 
42.8 
41.4 

40.8 
39.8 
40.6 

40.7 
41.6 
40.0 



40.1 
39.4 

39.9 
40.6 

37.0 
41.6 
41.4 

39.8 
40.4 
37.7 

37.1 
38.4 
38.2 

38.4 
37.1 
38.4 



42.7 
43.3 

44.3 
44.3 

40.4 
44.0 
43.0 

43.6 
43.7 
41.8 

41.1 
39.2 
39.5 

40.5 
40. r 
40.8 



38.2 
38.3 

39.9 
39.8 

35.0 
39.3 
39.0 

38.7 
38.9 
37.1 

35.8 
36.4 
37.3 

37.8 
36. 8 r 
36.9 



MANUFACTURING 



CONSTRUCTION 



Wood Paper Printing Iron and Transporta- Non-ferrous Electrical Non- Chemical 

products products publishing steel tion metal apparatus metallic products 

and allied products equipment products and mineral 

industries supplies products 



Total 



Buildings 

and 
structures 



1949 
1950 


41.3 
41.4 


46.4 
46.9 


40.6 
40.6 


42.9 
42.4 


42.2 
42.5 


43.2 
43.4 


41.1 
41.3 


44.9 " 
45.2 


43.5 
43.3 


39.7 
39.9 


40.1 
39.6 


1950 N 
D 


42.6 
42.3 


47.5 
47.8 


40.7 
40.9 


43.4 
43.2 


42.5 
42.8 


43.9 
43.8 


42.1 
41.9 


45.7 
45.8 


43.4 
43.5 


40.7 
40.1 


40.4 
40.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


38.3 
42.4 
41.9 


44.9 
46.8 
46.7 


39.4 
40.2 
39.7 


40.3 
42.5 
42.0 


41.2 
44.5 
43.3 


41.7 
43.6 
43.1 


38.0 
41.6 
41.3 


43.1 
45.4 
44.8 


42.3 
43.4 
42.7 


35.0 
40.1 
40.6 


33.7 
39.2 
39.4 


A 
M 
J 


40.9 
41.9 
41.0 


46.2 
47.0 
46.7 


40.2 
40.3 
40.2 


42.4 
43.0 
42.2 


42.6 
42.2 
42.4 


43.3 
43.8 
42.7 


41.4 
41.4 
40.8 


44.6 
45.6 
44.9 


43.4 
43.5 
43.0 


39.0 
39.8 
39.6 


37.9 
39.7 
38.7 


J 

A 

S 


42.1 
42.1 
41.3 


47.2 
47.3 
47.3 


40.3 
40.3 
40.1 


42.5 
41.9 
41.8 


40.9 
39.8 
41.5 


42.6 
42.1 
42.1 


40.8 
40.9 
40.8 


44.7 
44.5 
44.1 


42.6 
42.6 
42.6 


40.7 
41.5 
41.7 


40.0 
40.7 
40.9 


O 
N 
D 


42.3 
42. 2 r 
42.2 


47.2 
46. 7 r 
46.7 


40.6 
40.4 
40.4 


42.2 
42.4 
42.6 


41.4 
41.7 
41.2 


42.3 
41. 7 r 
41.7 


41.2 
41.5 
42.4 


44.8 
44.9 
45.0 


42.7 
42. 8 r 
42.7 


42.4 
41.5 
41.4 


41.6 
40.7 
41.2 



Data refer to hourly rated wage earners of firms customarily employing 15 persons or more as reported at the first of the month. 
Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 



19 



LABOUR FEBRUARY, 1952 

Percentage of Women in Reporting Establishments : By Industries 
TABLE 14 First of month 





TRANS- 










PORTATION 




FINANCE 






STORAGE AND 




INSURANCE 


INDUS- 




COMMUNI- 




AND REAL 


TRIAL 


MANUFACTURING 


CATION 


TRADE 


ESTATE 


SERVICE COMPOSITE 



Total 



Non- Textiles Clothing 

Durable Durable (except (Textile 

Goods Goods Clothing) and Fur) 



1944 O 


29.1 


19.4 


40.2 


48.0 


68.6 


12.2 


49.3 


53 9 


58.2 


27.1 


1950 N 
D 


23 7 
23.8 


11.4 
11.5 


34.8 
34.9 


36.9 
37 .1 


65.6 
65.7 


14 .0 
14.0 


38.0 
39.4 


48 3 
48.3 


50.6 
50 8 


22.3 
22.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


23.0 
23.3 
23.3 


11.4 
11.4 
11.5 


33.9 

34.4 
34.6 


37.1 
36.9 
36.8 


65 7 
65 7 
65.8 


14 .5 
14.5 
14.4 


39.2 
37.0 
36.3 


49.7 
49.6 
49.6 


50.4 
50 2 
50.1 


22.6 
22.5 
22.5 


A 
M 

J 


23.2 
23.0 
22.7 


11.4 
11.4 
11.3 


34.6 
34.3 
34.0 


36.5 
36.6 
36.6 


66.2 
66.5 
66.5 


14.6 
14.4 
14.3 


37.1 
36.9 
37.1 


49.1 
49.1 
48.9 


50.2 
50.1 
50.2 


22.7 
22.4 
22.1 


J 

A 

S 


22.4 
22.2 
22.3 


11.0 
10.9 
10.8 


33.5 
33.2 
33.5 


36.2 
35.5 
35.6 


65.9 
64.8 
65.0 


14.0 

14.0 
13.8 


37.3 
36.6 
36.2 


48.9 
48.9 
49.1 


50.4 
50.6 
50 8 


21.8 
21.6 
21.5 


O 
N 
D 


22.7 
22.3 
22.2 


10.7 
10.6 
10.5 


34.0 
33.6 
33.5 


35.8 
35.9 
35.4 


65.3 
65.3 

65.6 


13 8 
13.8 

14.0 


37.6 
37.8 
39.0 


48.9 
49.4 

49.4 


50.6 
50.2 
50 .2 


21.7 
21.5 
21.6 



Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



Unemployment Insurance 



TABLE 15 




Monthly averages or calendar months 




Ordinary 




Number of 




claimants 




persons Employer 




on live 


Number oi 


commenc- Number of and 


Balance in 


unem- 


persons 


ing the days' Amount of employee 


fund at 


ployment 


receiving 


receipt of benefit benefit contribu- Total 


end of 


register 1 " 


benefit 2 


benefit paid paid' 3 ' tions revenue 


period" 



Employment Offices' 1 ' 



Live 




applications 




for 


Unfilled 


employment 


vacancies 







Thousands 




Thousand 
days 




Million dollars 




Thousai 


ids 


1949 
1951 


135.6 
138.8 


130.3 

100.1 


54.99 
58.06 


2.574 
2.441 


5.78 
6.06 


8 83 
12 66 


11.76 
16.86 


552.2 
707.8 


197 
202 


35 
52 


1950 N 
D 


124.8 
183.3 


79 .1 
101.9 


49.53 
69.87 


1.782 
2,193 


4.18 
5.31 


11.44 
12.58 


15.06 
16.45 


636.6 
647.8 


187 
227 


46 
35 


1951 J 
F 
M 


220.5 
208.0 
184.5 


149.8 
158.0 
147.2 


104.67 
79.42 
68.45 


3.788 
3.853 
4.193 


9.37 

9.59 

10.47 


12.27 
12.22 
11.44 


16.09 
16.04 
17.11 


654.1 
659.4 
664.6 


301 
298 
291 


37 
40 
45 


A 
M 
J 


136.8 
88.9 
86.5 


109.4 
75 .9 
57.1 


54.74 
41.29 
31.28 


3.088 
2,323 
1.481 


7.68 
5.66 
3.51 


12 77 
12 81 
11.68 


16.72 
16.85 
15.46 


672.8 
683.9 
695.9 


218 
152 
140 


58 
71 
63 


J 

A 

S 


83 9 
80.9 
83.1 


57 .5 
60.1 
64 .3 


39.13 

37.88 
38.18 


1.417 
1.487 
1,378 


3.43 

3 67 
3.46 


12 .16 
16.25' 
12 57 


16.23 

20.95" 

16.64 


708.7 
726.0 (,) 
739 1 


131 

128 
133 


55 
61 
70 


O 
N 
D 


99.8 
153.7 
239 


72.3 

97 .5 
152.3 


46.10 
67.86 
87.74 


1.567 
2.033 
2.681 


3.90 
5 11 
6.92 


12 .21 
13 65 
11 84 


16.26 
18.02 
15.97 


751.5 
764.4 
773.5 


157 
210 
269 


57 
42 
30 



20 Note: Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949. In the first five columns "unemployment assistance" for 

that province is disregarded. 

1 Monthly data as of end of month while annual section is based on averages of month-end statistics. "'As of 

January 1950, the number of benefit payments (equivalent to the number of beneficiaries) in the week which includes 
the last day of the month has been substituted for the number of payments in the week which includes the third Friday 
of the month. Supplementary benefit payments are excluded. " Includes prepayment of $4,000,000 by Post 

Office. 

Source: Unemployment Insurance Commission and Monthly Report of Unemployment Insurance Branch, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 16 



LABOUR 



Time Lost in Labour Disputes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Total all 
industries - 



MANUFACTURING 



Food, 

animal and 

vegetable 

products 



Tobacco 

and 

beverages 



Rubber 



Fur and Textiles 

leather and 

products clothing 



Aircraft, 
Printing Logging, Automo- ship- 
Pulp and and lumber biles building 
paper publish- and its and and farm 
products ing products parts implements 



Thousand man-working days 



1939 
1950 

1950 N 
D 



18.7 
115.8 

49.5 
8.5 



0.2 
0.8 



3.5 
0.3 

0.1 



1.1 
1.3 



2.3 
4.6 

2.3 
1.5 



0.3 — 



0.1 
1.3 



1.4 



MANUFACTURING 



Other iron Electrical 
and steel apparatus 



Other 
Non- 
ferrous 



Non- 
metallics, 
chemicals 
and 
miscel- 
laneous 



Con- 
struction 



Fishing 

and 
Trapping 



Mining 



Coal 



Other 



The distribution of monthly data for metal products in the last month is on a preliminary basis. 
Source: Labour Gazette, Department of Labour. 



0.1 
0.9 



6.2 



1951 J 


16.8 


0.7 


. . 


0.3 


0.2 


0.4 














0.4 


F 


18.9 


■ — 


— 


1.6 


1.7 


0.3 


— 


0.1 


0.2 


— 


— 


M 


15.1 


1.3 


— 


0.4 


0.3 


1.1 


— 


0.4 


2.8 


0.3 


— 


A 


9.7 


0.6 


0.6 


— 


— . 


0.1 








2.6 


0.2 





M 


34.9 


— 


— 


4.4 


■ — ■ 


5.0 


: 


— 


3.5 


0.4 


— 


J 


128.2 


0.9 


— ■ 


35.4 


— 


7.1 


0.2 


— 


2.2 


3.3 


2.8 


J 


119.4 


0.1 


— . 


0.7 





0.8 


0.7 


. 


2.1 


0.6 


2.1 


A 


219.5 


— 


48.1 


— 


■ — 


0.5 


0.8 


0.8 


3.9 


— . 


— 


S 


105.2 


— 


55.0 


— 


0.6 


0.3 


5.3 


0.2 


1.6 


0.1 


1.5 


O 


49.3 


— 


2.5 


— 


5.2 





6.0 





6.8 


3.9 r 


6.7 


N 


38.3 


1.7 


9.7 


— 


0.4 


— 


7.4 


— 


2.9 


— 


0.7 


D 


117.0 


2.2 


2.0 


— 


0.3 


0.4 


0.6 


■ — 


0.6 


— 


0.9 



Transport Trade, 
and Public Finance 
Utilities and 

Service 











Thousand man 


-working days 








1939 
1950 


0.5 
7.1 


0.5 


2.4 


0.2 
0.3 


0.1 
2.4 


0.1 


9.3 
1.2 


0.9 
2.7 


84.0 


1.6 

4.8 


1950 N 
D 


36.9 
4.5 


1.0 


. — . 


0.2 


0.2 
0.1 


— 


0.2 
2.0 


— 


— 


0.5 
0.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1.1 

12.7 

2.3 


— 


5.9 
0.2 


0.2 
1.1 
0.1 


0.2 
0.9 
0.2 


— 


7.2 
0.2 
0.5 


— 


— 


0.2 
0.1 
5.2 


A 
M 
J 


1.5 
11.5 
59.9 


1.6 


0.6 
2.8 
5.3 


0.2 
0.6 


3.7 
8.3 


— 


1.8 
0.8 
0.7 


0.1 


0.2 
0.1 


1.6 
1.0 
1.3 


J 

A 

S 


48.6 
55.1 
5.8 r 


— 


2.4 

6.8 

21.4 


3.1 
0.9 
0.7 


25.0 

18.0 

7.4 


— 


25.5 


32.0 

58.0 

4.4 


0.8 
0.2 
0.1 


0.4 
0.9 
0.9 


O 
N 
D 


9.7 r 
5.8 
105.4 


0.1 r 


5.6 r 

0.9 

0.3 


0.4 


0.5 


— 


0.4 
0.2 
2.9 


1.0 
8.2 
1.0 


0.1 


0.7 
0.5 
0.4 



21 



PRICES 

TABLE 17 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Living Costs in Canada 

Monthly averages or first of month 



COST-OF-LIVING INDEX 



Total 



Food 



Rent 



Fuel and 
Lighting 



Base period iqo 31 
weight 



19 



Clothing 



12 



Home 
Furnishings 

and Miscel- 

Services laneous 



Index of 
Retail 

Prices; 
Commod- 
ities Only 



23 



The Index of Farm Living Costs is available for January, April and August only. 

Source: Prices and Price Indexes: Price Index Numbers of Commodities and Services Used by Farmers, D.B.S 



Index of 
Farm 
Living 
Costs 













1935-39 = 


100 










1939 
1951 


101.5 

184.5 


100.6 
241 1 


103 8 
140 


101.2 
147 1 


100 7 
203 1 


101.4 
194 4 


101.4 
141.3 


101.0 

214 5 


99 

198 


5 
6 


1950 D 


171.1 


218.8 


136.4 


140.7 


184.9 


176.4 


134.1 


195.6 






1951 J 
F 
M 


172.5 
175.2 
179.7 


220.2 
224.4 
233 9 


136.4 
136.4 
137.6 


141.5 
141.7 
146.5 


187.1 
192 4 
196.3 


179 8 
185 1 
188.6 


135.8 
137.0 
137.8 


197.3 
201.4 
207.9 


184 


1 


A 
M 

J 


181.8 
182.0 
184.1 


238 4 
235.4 
239.8 


137.6 
137.6 
139.8 


146.7 
146.2 
146.2 


198.8 
201 5 
202.5 


190.7 
194.9 
197.1 


138.8 
140.7 
141.0 


211.2 
211.3 
214.0 


197 


1 


J 

A 

S 


187.6 
188.9 
189.8 


249.7 
251.4 
251.1 


139 8 
139.8 
142.7 


147.2 
148.2 
149.5 


202.9 

204.6 
206.9 


197.4 
199.0 
199.1 


142 2 
143.7 
144.0 


219.6 
221.1 
221.6 


214 


7 


O 
N 
D 


190.4 
191.2 
191.1 


249.7 
250.2 
249 3 


142.7 
144.8 
144.8 


150.2 
150.8 
150 8 


213.8 
214.6 
215.5 


200.1 

199 9 

200 6 


144.3 
144.9 
144 9 


222.4 
223.0 
222.7 






1952 J 


191.5 


250.0 


144.8 


151.2 


215.3 


201.1 


145.7 


223.1 







TABLE 18 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



GENERAL 
INDEX 



VEGETABLE PRODUCTS 



Total 



Fresh 

fruits 



Grains 



Milled 




Rubber 


Sugar Tea, coffee 


cereal 


Bakery 


and its 


and its and 


foods 


products 


products 


products cocoa 



Potatoes 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


99.2 
211.2 


89.1 
202.0 


93 8 
178.3 


70.5 
219.4 


81.4 
188.6 


97.2 
155.2 


102.3 

178.1 


107.7 
185.9 


101.2 
326.8 


121.2 
143.5 


1950 N 
D 


222.4 
225.2 


209.3 
209.5 


188.1 
183 2 


207.6 
209.3 


197.7 
197.6 


161.7 
161.7 


231.1 
228.7 


202.7 
202.9 


344.8 
343.9 


108.0 
113.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


232.3 
238.5 
241.8 


214.1 
219.0 
220.6 


172 9 
183.6 
186.5 


213.0 
217.1 
219.0 


199.2 
200.8 
200.5 


161.7 
171.2 
171.7 


238.0 
241.8 
245.0 


203.1 
203.1 
203.8 


359.5 
374.0 
377.7 


123.2 
134.6 
140.0 


A 
M 

J 


242.2 
241.9 

242.7 


221.7 
220.0 
217.6 


176.6 
172.7 
154.4 


220.8 
215.1 
211.1 


200.5 
199.2 
200.2 


171.7 
171.7 
171.7 


248.8 
244.0 
240.1 


205.8 
220.9 
234.2 


374.5 
372.0 
371.3 


139.6 
134.5 
144.2 


J 

A 

S 


244.2 
241.5 
240.1 


216.1 
215.9 
217.1 


150 4 
167.6 
174 3 


213.3 
215.1 
217.6 


199.3 
201.3 
202.0 


174.8 
174.8 
174.8 


230.1 
230.1 
232.2 


230.6 
214.5 
211.6 


353.2 

357.8 
353.0 


187.7 
175.8 
192.0 


O 

N 
D 


239.6 
2.V) . 1 
237.6 


218.9 
220.') 
221.0 


171.3 
167.1 
171.6 


220.6 
223.2 

219.7 


202.9 
203 7 
202.9 


176.4 
176.4 
176.4 


231.9 
230.3 
228 


211.3 
204.8 
203 7 


347.8 
337.2 
346.0 


234.3 
348.6 
374 .3 



22 The data for 1950 and 1951 are subject to revision. 

Source: Prices and Price Indexes, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 18 -continued 



PRICES 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages 01 calendar months 



ANIMALS AND THEIR PRODUCTS 



Total 



Leather Milk 

Fishery Hides and unmanu- Boots and Live and its 

products skins factured shoes stock products 



Meats 



Eggs 



Fresh 



Cured 













1935-39 = 100 










1939 
1950 


100.6 
251.3 


102.2 
260.7 


103.8 
258.2 


102.8 
235.1 


101.8 
178.8 


104.1 
334.1 


97.6 
214.2 


94.8 
168.9 


107.8 
337.7 


100.0 
205.8 


1950 N 
D 


263.2 
268.7 


276.1 
279.6 


325.8 
337.6 


269.9 
279.8 


195.3 
195.3 


339.2 
352.2 


222.5 
227.1 


205.2 
200.2 


339.0 
355.1 


210.8 
196.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


281.2 
294.5 
302.4 


288.1 
287.1 
288.6 


380.3 
400.8 
403.1 


309.5 
327.9 
327.9 


200.4 
204.1 
211.4 


375.4 
402.2 
409.0 


228.6 
229.3 
247.9 


163.2 
173.6 
195.6 


383.5 
410.0 
414.8 


208.5 
216.7 
216.2 


A 
M 
J 


296.7 
299.1 
309.1 


288.4 
275.1 
267.1 


368.2 
351.4 
346.0 


324.4 
324.4 
318.1 


219.1 
224.8 
223.4 


402.6 
410.1 
434.4 


230.7 
231.6 
233.5 


204.4 
219.7 
236.3 


417.9 
418.9 
449.2 


209.5 
219.5 
227.7 


J 

A 

S 


312.7 
305.4 
300.9 


286.6 
281.4 
281.9 


312.7 
256.5 
257.2 


312.6 
298.8 
274.3 


223.4 
223.7 
222.8 


438.6 
422.6 
410.3 


235.6 
235.7 
234.5 


255.4 
253.7 
253.5 


453.4 
438.8 
435.4 


234.0 
239.7 
249.7 


O 

N 

D 


294.8 
289.4 
285.8 


280.9 
284.4 
290.4 


274.6 
208.2 
201.7 


274.3 
245.0 
234.1 


218.8 
216.3 
209.3 


397.5 
393.8 
397.5 


235.3 
240.9 
244.8 


243.2 
229.1 
176.2 


421.9 
413.2 
420.2 


238.5 
226.7 
190.9 



FIBRES, TEXTILES AND THEIR PRODUCTS 



Total 



Cotton 
fabrics 



Miscel- 
laneous 
fibres 
and 
products 



Rayon (1 > 
fabrics 



Rayon < 2) 
yarns 



Wool 

raw, 

domestic 



Hosiery 

and knit 

goods, 

chiefly 

wool 



Wool 
cloth 



WOOD, WOOD 

PRODUCTS AND 

PAPER 



Total Newsprint 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


98.9 
246.7 


95.2 
241.0 


99.1 
276.5 


112.8 
191.9 


97.3 
154.0 


95.6 
328.6 


103.0 
208.9 


98.6 
293.6 


107.5 

258.3 


116.3 
248.7 


1950 N 
D 


281.6 

285.0 


266.3 
267.3 


289.4 
303.6 


196.2 
199.4 


168.5 
168.5 


447.4 
468.2 


219.1 
219.1 


373.7 
369.8 


269.3 

273.8 


251.8 
255.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


298.8 
314.6 
327.1 


267.3 
277.3 
278.1 


312.1 
313.5 
341.4 


200.5 
200.5 
203.7 


168.5 
168.5 
187.3 


561.4 
644.9 
753.3 


219.1 
268.0 
283.3 


408.4 
434.3 
452.9 


284.5 
286.5 
289.0 


255.6 
254.9 
253.9 


A 
M 
J 


324.7 
316.5 
306.6 


278.1 
278.1 
278.1 


375.0 
375.0 
375.0 


203.7 
203.7 
203.7 


195.8 
195.8 
195.8 


649.2 
591.1 
532.2 


288.5 
286.6 
286.6 


463.3 
425.1 
387.8 


293.6 
294.3 

293.3 


255.1 
256.4 
258.0 


J 

A 

S 


294.1 
283.0 
270.2 


278.1 
278.1 
268.6 


368.0 
356.4 
373.4 


203.7 
199.4 
199.4 


195.8 
195.8 
195.8 


470.0 
390.2 
310.0 


286.6 
286.6 
286.6 


337.1 
328.0 
292.2 


303.7 
302.9 
302.4 


283.8 
282.3 
280.7 


O 

N 
D 


269.0 
270.6 
268.8 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


373.4 
372.5 
372.5 


199.4 
210.1 
210.1 


195.8 
195.8 
195.8 


310.0 
313.2 
304.5 


286.0 
286.0 
271.3 


280.0 
283.7 
283.5 


301.7 
299.0 
295.2 


279.9 
277.8 
272.6 



("Changed from silk fabrics to rayon fabrics in January, 1942. 
silk hosiery. 



(MFrom 1926 to 1941 rayon yarns and artificial 23 



PRICES 



TABLE 18 - continued 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



WOOD, WOOD 

PRODUCTS AND 

PAPER 



IRON AND ITS PRODUCTS 



NON-FERROUS 
METALS 



Lumber 

and 

timber 



Pulp 



Total 



Rolling 

mill 

Pig iron products Hardware 



Wire 



Scrap iron 
and steel 



Total 



Copper 
and its 
products 













1935-39 


- 100 










1939 
1950 


106.4 
388.2 


93.4 
195.1 


104.8 

183.6 


101 5 
218.1 


104.2 
170.6 


101.1 
180.4 


102.2 
205.1 


109.1 
244.4 


100.0 
159.5 


101.9 
222.0 


1950 N 
D 


412.0 
414.9 


212.2 
213.1 


190.6 
192.5 


228.4 
233.8 


177.2 
177.2 


191.6 
193.9 


216.5 
216.5 


264.1 
269.8 


169.9 
173.1 


241.0 
243.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


445.4 
455.2 
468.2 


233.7 
233.0 
232.2 


196.4 
201.4 
201.5 


233.8 
233.8 
233.8 


178.0 
185.8 
185.8 


196.0 
203.0 
203.0 


216.5 
222.6 
222.6 


272.6 
276.0 
278.3 


174.7 
175.5 
174.4 


243.4 
243.8 
243.5 


A 
M 

J 


469.8 
469.7 
459.6 


256.4 
257.6 
259.1 


204 5 
206.4 
206.8 


233.8 
233.8 
239.3 


187.6 
187.6 
187.6 


207.1 
207.1 
207.1 


225.6 
225.6 
225.6 


281.7 
322.3 
322.3 


175.9 
176.3 
185.1 


246.6 
247.5 
275.6 


J 

A 

S 


458.1 
456.4 
457.4 


257.3 
255.7 
255.6 


210.8 
212.0 
214.5 


255.6 
255.6 
255.6 


194.5 
197.3 
198.2 


208.7 
209.6 
215.0 


225.6 
225.6 
234.9 


314.3 
314.3 
317.0 


184.2 
183.4 
183.6 


275.5 
274.5 
274.7 


O 
N 
D 


456.1 
449.5 
445.4 


255.0 
253.2 
248.2 


215.7 
216.8 
216.8 


255.6 
255.6 
255.6 


200.4 
202.2 
202.2 


217.2 
217.2 
217.2 


234.9 
234.9 
234.9 


317.0 
317.0 
317.0 


184.8 
185.3 
183.4 


273.7 
271.9 
268.1 



NON-FERROUS 
METALS 

Lead Zinc 

and its and its 

products products 



NON-METALLIC MINERALS 



Total 



Clay and 

allied 
products Coal 



Coke 



Window 
glass 



Petroleum 
products 



Salt 



Cement 













1935- 


39 = 100 










1939 
1950 


93 
299.6 


94.6 
334.9 


99.7 
164.8 


97.9 
172.6 


101.6 
167.9 


109.0 
204.1 


95.4 
172.5 


96.4 
167.7 


127.1 
252.4 


93.5 
128.2 


1950 N 
D 


369.1 
372.8 


408.3 
412.0 


164.1 
165.8 


180.6 
180.6 


167.4 
171.1 


211.4 
211.4 


173.5 
173.5 


163.6 
163.6 


252.4 
252.4 


134.3 
134.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


372.2 
372.0 
372.0 


417.0 
417.6 
416.1 


167.3 
168.3 
169.3 


182.1 
184.9 
185.1 


171.4 
173.9 
173.9 


211.4 
213.5 
224.1 


182.7 
182.7 
182.7 


163 6 
162.7 
162.7 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


134.3 
134.9 
139.5 


A 

M 
J 


374.5 
377.1 
379.8 


421.5 
423.7 
426.6 


169.0 
169.6 
169.3 


186.8 
191.6 
189.6 


173.2 
172.5 
171.0 


224 1 
224.1 
224 1 


195.1 
197.8 
197.8 


162.7 
164.2 
164.3 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


139 8 
139.8 
139.8 


J 

A 

S 


376.7 
374.2 
374.2 


423.5 
421.2 
421.7 


169.5 
170.7 
170.9 


189.6 
195.3 
195.3 


172.1 
172.3 
172.7 


224.1 
224.1 
224.1 


197.8 
197.8 
197.8 


164.2 
166.2 
166.3 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


139.8 
145.8 
146.6 


O 
N 

D 


392.6 
406.2 
406.5 


443.0 
459.7 
459 7 


170.8 
170.7 
171.3 


195.3 
195.3 
195.3 


172.7 
172 7 
173.6 


224.1 
224.1 
224.1 


197 8 
197.8 
197 8 


166 3 
166.2 
166.2 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


146.8 
146.8 
146.8 



24 



FEBUARY, 1952 
















PRICES 








Wholesale Price Indexes 








TABLE 18 - concluded 


Monthly averages or calendar months 










NON- 
METALLICS 






CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS 








Asbestos 


Total 


Inorganic 
chemicals 


Organic 
chemicals 


Coal tar 
products 


Dyeing 
materials ' 


Explosives 


Paints, 
prepared 


Drugs and 
pharma- 
ceuticals 


Fertilizer 
materials 












1935-39 


= 100 










1939 


102.6 


100.3 


99.4 


95.0 


100.3 


101.6 


97.5 


97.8 


100.7 


107.5 


1950 


211.3 


157.7 


116.9 


182.2 


158.8 


185.8 


120.5 


163.4 


145.6 


150.4 


1950 N 


213.4 


170.8 


118.5 


227.0 


164.5 


202.1 


127.4 


168.1 


172.0 


151.6 


D 


213.6 


173.0 


121.5 


227.0 


173.0 


202.1 


127.4 


168.1 


173.9 


151.6 


1951 J 


232.5 


179.7 


123.4 


259.8 


177.9 


202.1 


134.5 


176.1 


181.4 


155.3 


F 


232.5 


183.1 


126.1 


259.8 


177.9 


202.1 


134.5 


176.1 


181.9 


158.5 


M 


233.9 


184.8 


128.0 


260.6 


177.9 


202.1 


134.5 


176.1 


192.2 


158.1 


A 


233.9 


187.5 


129.6 


260.6 


177.9 


202.1 


134.5 


184.2 


200.9 


158.1 


M 


233.9 


188.0 


129.6 


260.6 


177.9 


202.1 


134.5 


184.2 


206.2 


158.1 


J 


233.9 


189.1 


130.0 


267.9 


177.9 


202.1 


134.5 


184.2 


206.2 


158.1 


J 


233.9 


190.2 


130.1 


267.9 


187.5 


202.1 


134.5 


184.2 


206.2 


164.2 


A 


233.9 


189.6 


131.3 


267.9 


187.5 


202.1 


134.5 


184.2 


207.9 


168.4 


S 


233.9 


189.3 


134.1 


267.9 


187.5 


202.1 


134.5 


184.2 


207.9 


168.4 


O 


233.9 


190.3 


134.4 


264.8 


187.5 


202.1 


134.5 


184.2 


207.9 


168.4 


N 


233.9 


187.7 


134.3 


264.8 


187.5 


202.1 


134.5 


184.2 


207.9 


168.4 


D 


234.5 


188.0 


134.3 


261.9 


187.5 


202.1 


134.5 


184.2 


207.2 


173.7 


TABLE 19 










CLASSIFICATION BY PURPOSE OR USE 








Raw and 
partly man- 
ufactured 
goods 


Fully and 

chiefly man 

ufactured 

goods 


Industrial 
materials 


General 
building 
materials 


Iron and 
Residential non-ferrou 
building metals an< 
materials products 


Canadian Farm Products 






s 
i 

Total 


Field 


Animal 


Farm prices 
of agricul- 
tural 
products* 1 ' 


1935-39 - 100 


1939 


94.9 


101.9 


99.0 


102.0 


102.3 


102.0 


92.6 


83.7 


101.5 


91.8 


1950 


212.8 


211.0 


244.6 


249.9 


242.7 


190.8 


236.7 


191.9 


281.4 


260.4 


1950 N 


221.9 


223.2 


275.6 


265.2 


262.1 


204.2 


239.2 


187.9 


290.5 


264.0 


D 


225.1 


225.7 


280.9 


268.1 


263.3 


207.3 


243.3 


188.2 


298.4 


268.7 


1951 J 


231.1 


233.6 


294.0 


279.7 


269.6 


210.9 


251.0 


191.1 


310.9 


273.8 


F 


237.1 


240.0 


303.4 


287.4 


274.9 


214.3 


262.5 


195.5 


329.6 


284.6 


M 


238.8 


244.1 


305.3 


291.5 


282.6 


213.7 


273.0 


198.8 


347.2 


293.6 


A 


238.6 


244.9 


305.4 


293.9 


287.2 


216.2 


265.4 


199.2 


331.6 


291.6 


M 


238.9 


244.4 


305.4 


294.2 


289.5 


217.4 


265.3 


194.6 


336.1 


292.4 


J 


242.9 


243.7 


303.9 


290.2 


289.2 


224.1 


272.6 


192.0 


353.1 


300.2 


J 


242.5 


246.6 


297.0 


289.8 


289.8 


226.0 


277.1 


195.4 


358.9 


307.2 


A 


237.1 


245.1 


287.4 


290.4 


290.4 


226.2 


256.4 


164.6 


348.3 


284.8 


S 


235.8 


243.7 


285.8 


291.2 


290.9 


227.9 


253.9 


168.5 


339.2 


283.9 


O 


236.3 


242.7 


289.4 


291.4 


290.8 


229.7 


252.6 


175.0 


330.3 


278.9' 


N 


237.0 


241.4 


287.5 


289.5 


289.3 


230.9 


258.4 


188.2 


328.5 


277.3 


D 


235.9 


239.7 


284.6 


289.5 


289.1 


230.1 


260.2 


191.3 


329.1 





(1) Excluding Newfoundland. From August, 1950, to July, 1951, prairie farm prices for wheat, oats and barley are 
final prices. Since August, 1951, prairie grain prices are initial prices only. 

Source: Prices and Price Indexes, and Index Numbers of Farm Prices of Agricultural Products, D.B.S. 



25 



FUEL AND POWER 



TABLE 20 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Electric Power 

Monthly averages or calendar months 







PRODUCTION EXPORTS*" 




CONSUMPTION 


Hydraulic 


Thermal 


Total Primary Secondary 


Total 


Primary Secondary 


Million kilowatt hours 



1939 
1951 


2,320 
4,631 


41 
152 


2,362 
4,783 


1.735 
4,459 


627 
325 


159 
197 


2,202 
4,586 


1,616 
4,325 


586 
261 


1950 N 
D 


4,292 
4,512 


166 
163 


4,458 
4,674 


4,267 
4,367 


191 
306 


143 

178 


4,315 
4,497 


4,143 
4,241 


172 
255 


1951 J 
F 
M 


4,619 
4,231 
4,751 


165 
145 
159 


4,784 
4,376 
4,910 


4,500 
4,105 
4,535 


284 
270 
376 


172 
165 
221 


4,612 
4,211 
4,690 


4,368 
3,982 
4,395 


244 
229 
295 


A 

M 
J 


4,745 
4,987 
4,574 


150 
144 
133 


4,895 
5,130 
4,707 


4,356 
4,541 
4,376 


539 
589 
331 


208 
231 
224 


4,687 
4,899 
4,483 


4,227 
4,407 
4,242 


460 
492 
241 


J 

A 

S 


4,496 
4,450 
4,260 


133 
146 
145 


4,629 
4,596 
4,404 


4,345 
4,446 
4,271 


284 
150 
133 


238 
160 
129 


4,391 
4,436 
4,276 


4,205 
4.315 
4.148 


186 
121 
128 


O 

N 
D 


4.750 
4,775 
4.931 


169 
161 
180 


4,920 
4,936 
5,111 


4,654 
4.609 
4.765 


265 
327 
346 


203 
204 
214 


4,717 
4,733 
4,896 


4,511 

4,471 
4,624 


206 
262 
272 



CONSUMPTION 



Canada 



New- 
foundland 



Prince 
Edward 
Island 



Nova 
Scotia 



New 
Brunswick Quebec 



Ontario 



Mani- 
toba 



Saskat- 
chewan 



British 
Alberta Columbia 













Million kilowatt hours 










1939 
1951 


2,202 

4,586 


10.47 


0.65 
1.95 


36 

73 


37 
60 


991 
2,010 


788 
1,714 


148 
244 


14 
38 


21 
85 


166 
349 


1950 N 
D 


4,315 
4,497 


10.51 
10.90 


1.98 
2.15 


69 
73 


61 
58 


1,809 
1,905 


1,620 
1,679 


261 
273 


37 
41 


85 
90 


358 
365 


1951 J 
F 
M 


4,612 
4,211 
4,690 


10.76 

9.61 

10.12 


2.08 
1.83 
1.94 


76 
68 
74 


63 
56 
63 


1,954 
1,793 
2,006 


1,716 
1,574 
1,775 


283 
257 
275 


41 
36 
38 


91 
78 
84 


375 
337 
363 


A 

M 
J 


4,687 
4,899 

4,483 


9 36 
9.32 
8 96 


1 81 
1.81 

1.73 


69 
72 
69 


52 
60 
59 


2,142 
2,320 
2,033 


1.716 
1,737 
1,664 


247 
239 
219 


35 
35 
34 


78 

80 
77 


337 
346 
318 


J 

A 

S 


4,391 
4,436 
4,276 


9.39 

9.22 

10 87 


1.88 
1.99 
1.88 


68 
69 
70 


57 
63 
55 


1,984 
1.994 
1,851 


1,627 
1.624 
1,633 


203 
214 
211 


34 
36 
36 


78 
83 
82 


328 
342 
325 


O 
N 
D 


4,717 

4,733 
4,896 


12 29 
12.55 
13.15 


2 04 
2.11 
2 30 


80 

80 
81 


58 
64 
66 


2,002 
1.992 
2,054 


1.822 
1.824 
1.860 


244 
256 
281 


41 
43 
48 


91 

96 

104 


364 
363 
389 



26 Note: As of January, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 

li) Less imports. 
Source: Monthly Report, Central Electric Stations, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 21 



FUEL AND POWER 



Coal and Coke 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



COAL 



COKE' 1 ) 



Production 



Bitu- Sub-bitu- 
minous ruinous Lignite Total 



Nova 
Scotia 



Imports'" Exports , , , 2) , Production 

Available 

British for 



Alberta Columbia 



Consumption 













Thousand tons 










1939 
1950 


1,051 
1,135 


176 
277 


80 
184 


1,308 
1,595 


588 
540 


460 
676 


141 
145 


1,250 
2,246 


31 
33 


2,456 
3,739 


201 
328 


1950 N 
D 


1,250 
1,134 


494 
460 


318 
334 


2,061 
1,927 


608 
498 


920 
897 


161 
145 


2,809 
1,411 


38 
18 


4,833 
3,320 


334 
343 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1,273 
1,107 
1,115 


377 
272 
180 


283 
228 
195 


1,933 
1,606 
1,490 


612 
527 
569 


815 
663 
537 


164 
141 
147 


1,212 

911 

1,039 


19 
13 
20 


3,126 
2,504 
2,508 


342 
312 
335 


A 
M 
J 


1,147 
1,164 
1,101 


139 
123 
140 


106 
61 
62 


1,393 
1,348 
1,303 


571 
592 
519 


517 
479 
512 


155 
158 
153 


2,358 
3,040 
2,978 


33 
32 
21 


3,718 
4,356 
4,259 


322 
328 
318 


J 

A 

S 


955 

978 

1,059 


91 
174 
249 


38 

95 

201 


1,084 
1,247 
1,509 


443 
335 
508 


448 
603 
616 


100 
153 
128 


2,510 
3,161 
2,669 


27 
26 
62 


3,567 
4,382 
4,116 


314 
322 
306 


O 

N 
D 


1,187 
1,241 


370 
475 


319 
328 


1,877 
2,044 


583 
589 


755 
919 


154 
153 


2,804 
2,574 
1,249 


46 
69 
67 


4,635 
4,548 


336 
334 



'"As of April, 1949, Newfoundland data are included. <2) Annual computation to 1950 entails considerable 

adjustments in production and external trade as described on page 19 of the Coal Report for 1950. 
Source: Monthly Report, Coal and Coke Statistics, D.B.S. 



TABLE 22 



Petroleum and Gas 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



CRUDE PETROLEUM 



NATURAL GAS 



Sales 



Imports 



Producers' 
Shipments 



Shipments Total 



Domestic 



Industrial 

and 

commercial 



MANUFACTURED GAS 
Sales 



Total Domestic* 1 ' Industrial 





Thousand barrels' 2 ' 








Million cu. ft. 








1939 
1950 


3,090 
6,554 


652 
2,424 


2,932 
5,652 


4,842 


2,207 


2,6i8 


1,245 
2,253 


1,401 


360 


1950 N 
D 


7,586 
6,917 


3,191 
2,603 


7,450 
7,800 


5,665 
7,296 


2,424 
3,517 


3,209 
3,768 


2,347 
2,625 


1,437 
1,587 


368 
366 


1951 J 
F 
M 


7,099 
5,153 
5,840 


2,996 
2,801 
2,494 


9,038 
7,773 
8,014 


7,894 
8,094 
7,602 


3,870 
4,179 
3,744 


4,011 
3,898 
3,844 


2,655 
2,594 
2,462 


1,716 
1,691 
1,579 


378 
347 
346 


A 
M 
J 


6,909 
7,420 
6,697 


2,449 
4,474 
4,757 


6,004 
5,089 
4,846 


5,893 
4,174 
3,289 


2,817 
1,783 
1,238 


3,066 
2,382 
2,047 


2,490 
2,404 
2,263 


1,520 
1,426 
1,323 


347 
338 
341 


J 
A 

S 


8,510 
7,836 
7,658 


4,936 
5,324 
4,925 


4,305 

4,682 r 

5,399 


2,774 
2,803 
3,378 


867 

744 

1,044 


1,904 
2,055 
2,331 


2,083 
1,956 
2,039 


1,164 
1,056 
1,145 


337 
332 
314 


o 

N 
D 


7,100 
6,544 
6,518 


4,882 
4,106 


6,947 
7,437 


4,877 
6,779 
7,500 


1,719 
3,029 
3,408 


3,152 
3,738 
4,046 


2,281 
2,288 
2,625 


1,358 
1,445 
1,626 


321 
325 
327 



'"Includes gas used for house heating. (2) Barrels of 35 Imperial gallons. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Petroleum and Natural Gas Production; Imports entered for Consumption; Trade of Canada, 
D.B.S. 



27 



FUEL AND POWER 



TABLE 23 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Refined Petroleum Products 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



CRUDE PETROLEUM 



NIT PRODUCTION OF SALEABLE PRODUCTS 



Fuels 



Received Consumed Total 



Motor Heavy Light 

Total gasoline fuel oils fuel oils 



DOMESTIC 
CONSUMPTION 

Fuels 

Motor 
Total gasoline 



28 



Thousand barrels 



1940 
1950 


4,255 
9,009 


4,163 
9,078 


3,882 
8,458 


3,635 
7,829 


1,947 
3,847 


1,067 
1,819 


462 
1,528 


3,927 
9,195 


2,071 
4,133 


1950 O 
N 
D 


9,889 

10.346 

9,723 


10,107 
9,871 
9,146 


9,519 
8,967 
8,528 


8,802 
8,440 
8,096 


4,406 
4,165 
3,757 


1,964 
1,873 
2,030 


1,692 
1,586 
1,665 


9,757 
10,056 
10,771 


4,735 
3,956 
3,461 


1951 J 
F 
M 


8,353 
7,919 
7,771 


9,541 
8,301 
8,690 


8,671 
7,199 
8,145 


8,126 
6,721 
7,589 


3,659 
3,168 
3,560 


1,936 
1,443 
1,814 


1,568 
1,283 
1,355 


9,879 
9,388 
9,322 


3,016 
2,931 
3,161 


A 
M 

J 


9,740 
11,960 
12,165 


7,585 
11,624 
11,550 


6,956 
11,039 
11,207 


6,417 
10,239 
10,182 


3,009 
4,967 
5,028 


1,696 
2,315 
2,247 


1,208 
2,078 
2,039 


8,897 
11,126 
10,161 


3,853 
6,030 
5,316 


J 

A 

S 


13,482 
12,986 
12,657 


11,763 
12,599 
11,795 


11,277 
12,163 
10,677 


10,262 

11,012 

9,720 


5,122 
5,489 
4,753 


2,246 
2,459 
2,251 


2,195 
2,247 
1,837 


10,486 

11,078 

9,704 


5,831 
6,167 
5,063 


O 

N 


12,504 
11,106 


11,867 
11,282 


11,552 

10,648 


10,672 
10,026 


5,215 
4,759 


2,415 
2,464 


2,229 
1,845 


12,000 
12,410 


5,623 
4,297 



DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION 



STOCKS AT END OF PERIOD 



At Refinery 



In Market Channels 



Fuels 



Refined Products 



Heavy 
fuel oils 



Light 
fuel oils 



Crude oil 



Unfinished 
products 



Total 



Motor 
gasoline 



Total 
fuel 



Motor 
gasoline 











Thousand barrels 








1940 
1950 


1,214 
2,248 


476 
1,852 


5,561 
5,097 


1,954 
3,130 


6,331 
11,656 


2,708 
4,259 


6,442 
12,571 


3,788 
5,377 


1950 O 
N 
D 


2,172 
2,680 
2,825 


1.886 
2,275 
3,149 


4,118 
4,593 
5,097 


2,990 
3,274 
3,130 


12,784 
12,547 
11,656 


3,544 
3,751 
4,259 


12,219 
13,067 
12,571 


5,207 
5,453 
5,377 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2.486 
2,144 
2,330 


2,842 
2,989 
2,615 


3,908 
3,526 
2,607 


3,304 
3,725 
3,616 


12,615 
13,067 
14,327 


5,663 
6,815 
8,127 


11,398 
9,471 
7,757 


4,933 
4,088 
3,480 


A 
M 

J 


2,201 
2,642 
2,674 


2,005 
1,639 
1,517 


4,761 
5,097 
5,713 


3,736 
3,631 
3,435 


13,426 
13,530 
14,408 


7,300 
6,079 
5,808 


7,891 

9,086 

10,442 


4,015 
4,383 
4,631 


J 

A 

S 


2,894 
2.733 
2,437 


1,191 
1,521 
1,346 


7,431 
7,818 
8,681 


3,495 
3,328 
3,855 


15,329 
15,925 
16,312 


5,386 
4,573 
3,825 


11,818 
13,012 
14,361 


4,630 
5,088 
5,872 


O 

N 


3,088 
3,528 


2.057 
3,049 


9,317 
9,142 


3,613 
3,707 


16,346 
15,233 


3.753 
3,937 


14,456 
14,990 


5,770 
6,211 



Source: Monthly Report on Refined Petroleum Products, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



"IABLE 24 



MINING 



Metals 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



COPPER 


NICKEL LEAD 


Production Exports Production Exports 
Total metal content Refined copper 


Production Exports Production* 1 - 1 Exports Production Exports 
Total metal content Refined lead 













Million pounds 










1939 
1950 


50.7 
44.0 


45.2 
30.4 


38.6 
39.7 


27.6 
22.4 


18.8 
20.6 


19.6 
20.3 


32.4 
27.6 


30.8 
22.4 


31.8 
28.4 


30.1 
19.2 


1950 N 
D 


46.9 
45.5 


19.7 
26.6 


38.4 
39.7 


13.9 
17.5 


23.8 
20.6 


18.9 
17.8 


34.5 
23.3 


28.5 
35.6 


34.8 
36.4 


27.8 
25.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


45.6 
40.6 
48.6 


25.6 
20.4 
21.0 


41.8 
36.8 
41.2 


16.2 
13.2 
14.8 


21.8 
19.3 
23.2 


24.4 
15.8 
22.4 


32.2 
24.0 
25.3 


23.7 
13.9 
22.6 


30.3 
27.4 
29.9 


20.2 
13.1 
21.7 


A 
M 

J 


47.7 
47.0 
45.2 


35.9 
21.2 
24.0 


40.8 
45.6 
42.7 


24.7 
13.9 
16.2 


21.1 
24.9 
23.6 


23.3 
18.7 
17.8 


20.1 
22.3 
27.6 


17.9 
30.1 
12.3 


28.3 
28.9 
28.2 


17.1 
29.6 
11.5 


J 

A 

S 


45.0 
45.3 
43.5 


27.5 
18.8 
23.6 


40.4 
43.6 
37.3 


18.3 
13.0 
16.1 


23.5 
24.5 
23.2 


24.5 
22.5 
20.7 


22.0 
27.6 
23.8 


18.5 
16.4 
20.8 


12.9 
29.7 
28.0 


11.6 

9.8 

13.9 


O 
N 
D 


41.8 

44.2 
44.1 


21.4 
24.9 
39.5 


42.6 
38.5 
40.8 


13.9 
16.8 
26.7 


23.4 
23.0 
22.6 


24.8 
23.3 
24.3 


30.1 
29.6 
31.1 


18.1 
26.7 
29.8 


27.1 
26.8 
28.0 


17.3 
25.9 
19.9 



ZINC 



ALUMI- IRON ORE 
NUM 



GOLD 



SILVER 



Production Exports Production Exports Imports of Producers' Production Mint Production Exports 
———————— ——^^——— Bauxite Shipments Receipts 

Refined sine Ore 



Total metal content 







Million pounds 






Thousand 
short tons 




Thousand fine ouncei 


i 


1939 
1950 


32.9 
52.2 


29.4 
46.1 


29.3 
34.1 


26.0 
24.5 


85.1 
310.9 


10.3 
300.4 


425 
370 


404 
367 


1,930 
1,935 


1,753 
987 


1950 N 
D 


51.8 
54.3 


61.0 
39.8 


34.8 
36.4 


23.1 
23.9 


653.5 
135.2 


287.1 
175.1 


378 
382 


388 
365 


1,960 
1,936 


1,881 
1,200 


1951 J 
F 
M 


51.4 
50.4 
52.0 


56.5 
21.2 
38.8 


36.5 
33.4 
36.3 


26.6 

9.2 

24.4 


80.3 
48.8 
41.6 


44.4 
31.3 
36.5 


374 
347 
372 


363 
342 
322 


2,015 
1,589 
1,755 


1,398 
1,316 
2,142 


A 

M 

J 


51.2 
51.7 
54.2 


37.5 
44.6 
55.3 


35.0 
36.2 
36.4 


22.0 
27.6 
28.7 


120.4 
377.0 
454.2 


158.1 
521.8 
649.7 


363 
369 
363 


419 
376 
364 


1,468 

1,854 

. 2,405 


964 
1,474 
1,377 


J 

A 

S 


55.4 
60.3 
54.9 


72.5 
50.6 
58.1 


36.5 
36.7 
35.9 


27.2 
23.3 
20.9 


582.3 
750.9 
707.5 


715.4 
691.1 
594.3 


344 
345 
359 


324 
357 
313 


1,794 
2,006 
1,896 


1,518 
1,777 
1,538 


O 
N 
D 


56.3 

56.0' 

58.3 


56.2 
63.6 
46.5 


37.6 
37.4 
40.5 


32.7 
24.7 
25.0 


880.7 
622.0 
151.3 


612.6 
347.7 
255.9 


378 
372 


314 
245 
234 


1,983 
1,977 


889 
1,709 
1,692 



Note: Iron ore shipments and silver and gold production include Newfoundland as of April and as of May, 1949 
respectively. < l 'Includes Newfoundland as of May, 1949. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Silver, Lead and Zinc; Gold; Copper and Nickel; Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



29 



MINING 














FEB 


RUAR 


tY, 1952 






Non Metallic Minerals: 


Production, Shipments and Exports 






TABLE 25 






Monthly averages or 


calendar months 










ASBESTOS 


GYPSUM 


FELDSPAR 


CEMENT 


LIME 


SALT 




Producers' 
Shipments 


Exports 


Producers' 
Shipments 


Producers' 
Shipments 


Exports 


Production 


Producers' 
Shipments 


Commer- 
cial 


For Use in 
Chemicals 


















Producers' shipments 








Thousand tons 




Thousand barrels 


Tho 


usand tons 


1939 
1950 


30 4 
72 9 


28.8 
69.2 


118 
306 


1 
3.0 


0.6 
1.3 


477 
1.395 


478 
1,394 


46 .0 

93.7 


19.7 
33.4 


15 7 
38 2 


1950 N 
D 


89 7 
76 2 


86.4 
73 .5 


413 
213 


2.8 
3.4 


1.2 

1.5 


1.413 
1,352 


1,434 
791 


108.6 

99 .5 


43 .2 

32 4 


41.5 
44.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


74.1 
71.5 
94.9 


77.5 
53.5 
99.8 


193 
178 
178 


2.6 
2.9 

2.5 


1.4 
1.4 
1.1 


1,262 
1.241 
1.409 


887 

908 

1,380 


98 

91.1 

103.6 


33 .6 
32.2 
28 2 


44.1 
42.3 
47.0 


A 
M 
J 


86.8 

93.2 
83.0 


89.0 
83 2 
77 9 


222 
264 
342 


1.6 

3.1 
5.5 


0.1 

17 
2.6 


1,492 
1,525 
1.429 


1.533 
1,880 
1,681 


103.8 

110.5 
103 7 


32.2 
37 .1 
40.7 


39.4 
43.2 
40.1 


J 

A 

S 


71 .0 
80.4 
82.5 


73.5 
81.1 
80.2 


449 
465 
452 


3.0 

4.4 
3.6 


2.4 
2 8 
2.2 


1,538 

1,513 
1,479 


1,589 
1,754 
1,542 


102.6 

108.8 
100.8 


46.6 

43 1 
39.9 


42.3 
40.8 

40.5 


O 
N 
D 


82 5 
85.6 


81.8 
65.6 


422 


4.0 
2.3 


2.7 
0.8 


1,527 
1,441 
1,272 


1,649 

1.277 

776 


114.8 
105.0 


46.6 
54.7 


40.8 

40.7 



Source: Monthly Reports: Production of Canada's Leading Minerals, Cement; Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



MANUFACTURING 

Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and Shipments 

TABLE 26 Monthly averages or calendar months 









OUTSTANDING BINDING ORDERS "—SELECTED INDUSTRY 


GROUPS 








Flour 
Milling 


Rubber 
Goods 


Textile 
Industries 


Clothing 
Industries 


Primary 

Iron and 

Steel 


Machinery 
and Tools 
Industries 


Other 

Iron and 

Steel 


Motor 
Vehicle 
Parts and 
Acces- 
sories 


Railway 
Rolling 
Stock 


Non- 
Ferrous 

Smelting 

and 
Refining 


Electrical 
Apparatus 












January, 1951 = 


100 










1950 


47.2 


94.3 


70.3 


63.0 


54.9 


69.5 


65.6 


67.8 


44.1 


55.8 


74.7 


1950 N 
D 


67.0 

54.2 


116.3 
89.6 


87.4 
94.5 


74.5 
81.0 


79.9 
87 2 


87.5 
95.1 


72.4 
87.3 


85.3 
92.7 


70.3 
88.9 


33.5 
53.0 


85.5 
90.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


100.0 
167.3 
128.5 


100.0 
100.7 
117.0 


100.0 

105.9 

97.5 


100.0 
96.7 

93.4 


100.0 

96 1 
95.3 


100.0 
112.5 
123.4 


100.0 
108.8 
107.7 


100.0 

100.9 

99.3 


100.0 
118.6 
124.4 


100.0 
99.8 
98.0 


100.0 

92.6 

109.3 


A 
M 

J 


111 
82 .6 
46.6 


113.3 

113.3 
120.0 


99.3 
94.0 

84 


84.1 
87.6 
98.4 


103 3 
102.1 
102.9 


131.6 

135.3 
135.8 


119.2 
113.2 
117.5 


92.5 
89.9 
84 8 


117.7 
109.1 
124.5 


90.9 
84.8 
76 


112.0 
116.4 
125.7 


J 

A 

S 


43 8 
58.0 
64.1 


108.9 
100.7 
137.8 


77.3 
66.4 
61.8 


81 6 
73.1 
54.7 


102.4 
100.3 
106.5 


150.0 
140.5 
151.1 


114.5 
128.4 
126.8 


77 3 
74.6 
74.7 


125.5 
127.0 
139.3 


73.8 
64.4 
65.9 


128.7 
133.7 
135.1 


O 

N 


101 1 
110.0 


119.3 


62.5 
62.5 


45.6 


115.9 
111.3 


156.5 
156.8 


141.4 
148.2 


76 
85.1 


137.3 

128.6 


176.5 
172.8 


137.5 
158.1 



30 Indexes of value of total outstanding binding orders (those for which acceptance when shipped is obligatory under normal 

circumstances) at the end of each month, as reported by co-operating firms and based on the values of the same firms in January, 
1951. 

Source: Monthly Report on Inventories and Shipments by Manufacturing Industries, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 MANUFACTURING 

Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and Shipments 

TABLE 26 — continued Monthly averages or calendar months 



INVENTORIES* 1 ' AND SHIPMENTS 



Inventories All Industries by Components 



Raw Goods in Finished 

Total Materials Process Products 



Inventories and Shipments by Economic Use Groupings 



Consumers' Goods 



All Industries 



Total 



Non-durable 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 







Million dollars 








1947 average = 100 






1949 
1950 


2,498.2 
2,781.8 


1,451.4 


472. i 


858^3 


134.3 
149.7 


125.1 
144.7 


140.4 
159.3 


123.0 
143.5 


156.5 
168.6 


125.4 
147.6 


1950 N 
D 


2,659.7 
2,781.8 


1,423.9 
1,451.4 


460.3 
472.1 


775.5 
858.3 


143.1 
149.7 


162.9 
153.3 


151.0 

159.3 


162.5 
148.9 


163.2 
168.6 


165.2 
148.9 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2,810.4 
2,876.3 
2,949.9 


1,487.2 
1,513.5 
1,531.3 


487.4 
516.7 
542.1 


835.8 
846.1 
876.5 


151.3 
154.8 
158.8 


160.9 
160.1 
175.0 


160.5 
163.7 
167.6 


159.0 
158.1 
169.4 


164.4 
164.9 
166.2 


157.5 
149.6 
155.5 


A 
M 

J 


3,033.6 
3,121.1 

3,297.8 


1,567.0 
1,588.9 
1,673.9 


555.1 
565.4 
589.5 


911.5 

966.8 

1,034.4 


163.3 
168.0 
177.5 


171.5 
186.4 

183.8 


172.4 
176.1 
184.7 


166.4 
174.2 
169.1 


168.3 
169.2 
176.0 


158.2 
177.4 
178.4 


J 

A 

S 


3,395.7 

3,452.8 
3,515.6 


1,753.9 
1,795.8 
1,813.0 


596.1 
626.8 
645.4 


1,045.7 
1,030.2 
1,057.2 


182.8 
185.8 
189.2 


173.3 
174.9 
165.5 


188.5 
189.1 
191.7 


154.3 
158.9 
151.8 


180.5 
180.9 
187.5 


173.0 
172.9 
157.3 


o 

N 


3,570.0 
3,523.0 


1,839.3 


634.2 


1,096.5 


192.2 

189.6 


184.3 
174.1 


194.0 
189.8 


173.7 
168.5 


195.9 
193.3 


188.4 
185.7 



INVENTORIES") AND SHIPMENTS 



Inventories and Shipments by Economic Use Groupings 



Consumers' Goods 



Semi-durable 



Durable 



Capital Goods 



Producers' Goods 



Construction Goods 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



1947 average = 100 



1949 
1950 


122.4 
146.9 


114.3 
125.1 


118.3 
150.6 


128.2 
159.0 


106.2 
113.5 


151.2 
142.2 


130.5 
141.7 


125.0 
140.1 


152.9 
166.2 


117.0 
182.9 


1950 N 
D 


135.3 
146.9 


145.6 
134.3 


139.0 
150.6 


181.2 
174.8 


112.1 
113.5 


151.4 
165.9 


138.6 
141.7 


160.8 
163.1 


153.8 
166.2 


182.8 
153.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


154.2 
160.5 
166.7 


144.6 
154.2 
167.4 


159.6 
166.0 
174.8 


191.1 
200.8 
232.3 


119.1 
123.3 
130.3 


158.7 
162.8 
190.6 


141.6 
141.3 
141.9 


164.2 
154.9 
175.3 


166.4 
184.4 
191.8 


169.3 
187.4 
203.2 


A 
M 
J 


175.5 
180.6 
193.6 


156.8 
142.4 
134.8 


184.3 
192.5 
198.2 


218.0 
217.2 
190.3 


134.1 
137.6 
144.2 


194.4 
221.3 
197.3 


148.1 
155.6 
165.7 


173.7 
185.0 
181.5 


185.8 
198.6 
222.5 


184.6 
254.7 
294.5 


J 
A 

S 


195.4 
194.5 
191.8 


104.6 
139.3 
133.7 


203.6 
208.7 
207.4 


162.7 
134.4 
160.1 


150.2 
154.5 
162.6 


200.9 
199.1 
188.9 


174.6 
181.1 
188.2 


162.2 
174.7 
170.5 


229.6 
242.7 
231.9 


327.4 
279.7 
240.5 


o 

N 


186.1 
178.5 


138.9 
128.3 


204.5 
201.2 


173.3 
166.4 


169.9 
175.1 


218.3 
210.0 


195.2 
194.4 


188.9 
187.1 


217.6 
207.6 


224.7 
152.1 



(1) As at end of period. 



31 



MANUFACTURING FEBRUARY r 195? 

Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and Shipments 

TABLE 26 -concluded Monthly averages or calendar months 



INVENTORIES'" AND SHIPMENTS 



Inventories and Shipments for Selected Industry Groups 



Foods 



Rubber 
goods 



Textiles 



Clothing 



Pulp dlid 
Paper Mills 



Iron and 

Steel 1 " 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship 













1947 average 


- 100 












1949 
1950 


146.5 
165.1 


127.6 
142.2 


116.4 
155.8 


97.1 
121.3 


132.3 
164.0 


119.8 
143.0 


118.5 
133.7 


119.1 
116.1 


210.1 
186.9 


98.7 
112.6 


136.3 
142 6 


128." 
138.8 


1^50 N 
D 


162.3 
165.1 


160.4 
137.5 


134.6 
155.8 


150.9 
143.7 


153.2 
164.0 


163.9 
170.1 


123.5 
133.7 


133.9 
109.7 


169.0 
186.9 


132.6 
123.4 


140.1 
142.6 


163.8 
169.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


154.4 
144.8 
146.2 


150.1 
137.7 
144.4 


163.5 
172.2 
186.2 


182.7 
169.6 
179.5 


168.9 

172.1 
176.0 


173.0 
180.1 
189.1 


142.8 
150.7 
156.4 


113.7 
133.8 
154.7 


178.4 
181.3 
186.5 


129.2 
124.3 
140.0 


141.1 
141 6 
141.8 


168.4 
157.1 
174.3 


A 
M 
J 


146.2 
155.4 
155.7 


150.4 
164.3 
171.7 


191.5 
209.1 
221.6 


193.3 
168.1 
154.0 


191.2 
189 9 
212.9 


169.3 
162 4 
150 3 


162.3 
168.4 
175.4 


143.0 
121.2 
122.8 


184.4 
191.1 
203.6 


140.6 
153.2 
149.5 


148.6 
157.7 
168.9 


170 7 
183.2 
187.7 


J 

A 

S 


163.1 
159.1 
172 6 


158.6 
149.5 
149 


221.4 
223.6 
216.8 


137.1 
136.6 
160.7 


214.1 
215.6 
215.9 


117.8 
146.8 
132.3 


179 
176.4 
171.3 


84.4 
127.0 
135.8 


218 1 
229.6 
244.8 


151.0 
165.6 
144.6 


180.0 
183.6 
186.6 


166.7 
178.4 
180.1 


o 

N 


188.7 
173.0 


170.0 
174.0 


210.3 
202.7 


190.8 
166.1 


210.7 
201.5 


131.2 
129.0 


164.4 
156.6 


134.1 
118.9 


253.4 
251.7 


166.7 
166.9 


196.4 
191.5 


193 4 
187.7 



Machinery (5) 



Motor 
Vehicles 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Other 
Transportation 

Equipment " 

Invt. Ship. 



Non-ferrous 
Metals 



Electrical 
Apparatus 1 " 



Petroleum 
Products 



Invt. 



Ship. Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. Ship. 



1947 Average = 100 



1949 
1950 


110.6 
129.2 


131.2 
141.9 


126.5 
161.9 


124.1 
163.9 


86.2 
74.0 


185.7 
137.9 


133.5 
147.8 


128.5 
144.6 


100.2 
135.9 


127.4 
154.4 


237 6 
285 8 


151.4 
269.4 


1950 N 
D 


137.9 
129.2 


170.8 
176.0 


140 
161.9 


161.8 
165.0 


77.2 
74.0 


134.0 
173.6 


143.4 
147.8 


172 
170.5 


127.1 
135.9 


197.4 
178.3 


273 .6 
285.8 


287.1 
253.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


141.7 
148.2 
157.1 


168.9 
165.4 
188.0 


170.7 
174 9 
177.9 


202.4 
229.4 
268.9 


73.2 
75.5 
84.3 


138.4 
161.3 
195.0 


156.1 
157.3 
156.9 


165.0 
154.8 
190.5 


137.1 
142.3 
155 


190.6 
180.1 
200.8 


272 .0 
269.2 
269.3 


269.6 
256.6 
235.5 


A 
M 
J 


161.2 
164.6 
174.3 


198.6 
193.9 
183 7 


190.6 
190.0 
196.2 


243.7 
252.9 
213.0 


86.9 
89 8 
95.4 


186.4 
270.0 
207.7 


158.5 
168.7 
174.1 


178.7 
188.1 
188.1 


161.0 
170.6 
183.3 


209.6 
195.9 
186.1 


277.8 
287.1 
307.6 


241.5 
326.4 
304.2 


J 

A 

S 


177.6 
187.2 
194.4 


169 9 
158.4 
178.9 


202.1 
206.4 
206.9 


176.2 
135.1 
168 6 


108.7 
109.2 
119.7 


266.7 
278.6 
234.5 


187.4 
191.7 
203.6 


169.4 
189.1 
169.6 


188.3 
195 2 
200.9 


140.6 
155.6 
171.5 


324.3 
337.7 
356 2 


312.5 
323.4 
365.3 


o 

N 


195.4 
205.2 


225.8 
188.9 


203.1 
205.0 


181.9 
179.8 


129.7 
133.5 


273 1 
296.1 


204.6 
201.7 


203.4 
209.8 


200.8 
203.6 


194 4 
177.6 


360.9 
352.7 


338.8 
330.1 



32 ( "As at end of period. ? Includes primary iron and steel, iron castings, sheet metal products and wire and wire products. 

("Includes heavy electrical machinery, office, household and store machinery and industrial machinery. '"Includes ship- 
building, railway rolling stock and aircraft. '"Excludes heavy electrical machinery. 

Source: Monthly Report of Inventories and Shipments by Manufacturing Industries, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 21 



MANUFACTURING 



Tobacco and Beverages 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



TOBACCO 



BEVERAGES 



Releases foi Consumption in Canada'" 



Stocks< s ' 



Production 



Stocks' 2 ' 



Cut 
tobacco 



Plug 
tobacco 



Unmanu- 
Snuif Cigarettes Cigars iactured 



Beer<»> 



thousand pounds 



Millions 



Million Thousand 
pounds barrels 



New Spirits Distilled 
spirits bottled" liquor 

Million proof gallons 



1939 
1951 


1,977 
2,275 


267 
168 


70 
72 


594 
1,306 


11.1 
14.1 


75 


5 


209.3 
624.5 


0.96 
2.09 


0.26 
0.96 


85.92 


1950 N 
D 


2,224 
2,061 


198 
163 


90 
74 


1,386 
1,244 


19.7 
17.7 


154 


5 


566.8 
487.9 


2.26 
2.30 


1.30 
0.89 


78.97 
79.66 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2,326 
2,154 
2,362 


190 
163 
188 


89 
78. 
85 


1,518 
1,477 
1,578 


17.7 
14.9 
15.9 


193 


4 


456.1 
459.6 
603.2 


2.40 
2.42 
2.31 


0.83 
0.90 
1.21 


80.59 
81.60 
81.88 


A 
M 
J 


1,804 
2,733 
2,566 


130 
205 
196 


79 

109 

90 


1,429 
1,487 
1,357 


17.0 
17.8 
13.7 


176 


.0 


681.9 
727.2 
714.0 


2.12 
2.19 
1.75 


0.94 
0.73 
0.69 


82.64 
83.69 
84.12 


J 

A 

S 


1,857 
2,242 
1,681 


141 
130 
123 


34 

46 

1 


1,013 
932 
754 


9.4 
8.5 
6.3 


156 


8 


781.2 
782.8 
590.0 


1.40 
1.81 
1.78 


0.67 
1.02 
0.99 


84.31 
84.59 
84.65 


O 
N 
D 


2,763 
2,682 
2,125 


205 
205 
134 


99 
81 
78 


1,835 

1,381 

906 


16.4 
16.9 
14.7 






593.6 
564.8 
539.4 


2.43 
2.40 
2.07 


1.34 
1.28 
0.92 


84.97 
85.24 
85.92 



(1) Releases of domestically manufactured tobacco for consumption in Canada. <2) End of period. (3) The 
production of beer is shown in thousand barrels of 25 gallons each. Commencing with April, 1949, Newfoundland 

is included. (1 Includes bottling of imported liquors. 

Source: Department of National Revenue: and Quarterly Report, Stocks and Consumption of Unmanufactured 
Tobacco, D.B.S. 



TABLE 28 



Rubber 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRO- 

IMPORTS DUCTION 



CONSUMPTION 



CONSUMPTION OF NATURAL 
AND SYNTHETIC 



STOCKS 



Natural") Synthetic Natural Synthetic Reclaim Total 



Tires and 
Tubes 



Foot- 
wear 



Wire 

and 

Cable 



End of Period 
Natural Synthetic 



Million pounds 



1939 
1951 


6.07 


11. 63 


5.90 
8.28 


4.93 


1.40 
2.95 


n.h 


8^94 


L47 


0^41 


9.90 


11.39 


1950 N 
D 


9.55 
10.21 


11.69 
11.74 


9.85 
10.09 


4.74 
4.86 


3.09 
3.09 


14.59 
14.96 


9.78 
10.16. 


1.86 
1.48 


0.46 
0.38 


7.72 
7.66 


6.38 
6.75 


1951 J 
F 
M 


16.37 

9.16 

13.20 


11.85 
10.59 
11.82 


9.68 

9.72 

10.36 


4.99 
4.98 
5.07 


3.28 
3.33 
3.60 


14.67 
14.70 
15.43 


9.81 

9.86 

10.25 


1.71 
1.68 
1.83 


0.45 
0.38 
0.40 


9.23 

9.30 

11.18 


7.09 
5.99 
6.74 


A 
M 
J 


8.54 

11.21 

8.88 


10.38 

8.46 

10.09 


10.68 

10.17 

7.47 


5.42 
4.80 
4.10 


3.74 
3.67 
2.78 


16.10 
14.96 
11.56 


10.67 

10.11 

7.37 


1.93 
1.75 
1.45 


0.41 
0.42 
0.43 


10.95 
10.26 
12.26 


6.87 
6.83 
7.36 


J 

A 

S 


8.02 

10.29 

4.58 


12.17 
11.28 
12.47 


7.36 
6.34 
7.12 


4.17 
4.35 
5.11 


2.59 
2.45 
2.48 


11.53 
10.70 
12.23 


8.16 
6.40 
8.22 


1.01 
1.70 
1.36 


.0.22 
0.46 
0.44 


12.05 
14.56 
14.53 


8.23 
8.15 
9.88 


O 

N 
D 


6.10 
4.69 


13.52 
13.16 
13.75 


7.31 
6.61 
6.58 


5.31 
5.35 
5.57 


2.83 
2.41 

2.29 


12.62 
11.95 
12.16 


8.76 
8.59 
9.08 


1.40 
1.03 
0.80 


0.44 
0.48 
0.37 


12.36 
8.26 
9.90 


10.27 

9.86 

11.39 



'"Includes crude rubber, Gutta-percha unmanufactured, Latex and Balata crude. 
Source: Monthly Report on Consumption, Production and Inventories of Rubber, D.B.S. 



33 



MANUFACTURING 



TABLE 29 



Leather 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



HIDES AND SKINS 



Stocks: End of Period 



Wettings 



Cattle 
hides 



Call and 
kip skins 



Goat and 
kid skma 



Sheep and 
lamb skins 



Cattle 
hides 



Call and 
kip skins 



Goat and 
kid skins 



Sheep and 
lamb skins 



PRODUCTION OF FINISHED LEATHER 



Horse 
hides 











Thousand 








Thousand 










Thousands 




dozen 




Thousands 




dozen 


Thousands 


1940 


627 


591 


87 


69 


146 


111 


25 


13 


4 


7 


1950 


368 


467 


64 


52 


143 


86 


20 


14 





7 


1950S 


321 


557 


30 


40 


147 


93 


11 


13 





3 


O 


337 


531 


36 


48 


161 


110 


12 


16 





1 


N 


357 


512 


81 


53 


176 


102 


25 


16 





1 


D 


368 


467 


64 


52 


179 


76 


24 


11 





2 


1951 J 


345 


432 


44 


47 


185 


92 


25 


16 





1 


F 


311 


417 


57 


39 


171 


80 


11 


16 





2 


M 


286 


408 


56 


39 


162 


67 


25 


17 





1 


A 


294 


441 


40 


37 


152 


67 


31 


16 





2 


M 


312 


479 


80 


38 


139 


72 


22 


11 





1 


J 


347 


596 


101 


42 


108 


42 


11 


8 





2 


J 


352 


626 


128 


48 


85 


20 


— 


7 





1 


A 


337 


676 


128 


47 


113 


22 


2 


9 






S 


335 


687 


139 


55 


96 


25 


1 


10 






o 


313 


689 


122 


64 


103 


57 


17 


10 





1 


N 


325 


650 


121 


56 


101 


41 


2 


10 





1 



Cattle Leather 



Glove and Bag, case 
Upper garment and strap Harness 
leather leather leather leather 



Sole 
leather 



Calf and 
Kip Skin 



Upper 
leather 



Goat and 

Kid 
Leather 



Sheep and Lamb 
Leather 

Glove and 
garment Shoe 
leather leather 



Horse 
Hide 

Glove and 
garment 
leather 





Thousand 
pounds 


Thousand 


square feet 


Thousand 


sides 


Thousand 
square feet 


Thousand 
skins 


Dozen skins 


Thousand 
square feet 


1940 
1950 


2,056 
1,469 


3,168 


414 


13 


3 




897 


26 


5,198 


4,797 


169 


1950S 


1,281 


3,563 


452 


13 


3 




823 


18 


5,563 


5,584 


183 


O 

N 
D 


1,427 
1,443 
1,938 


3,955 
4,207 
3,872 


516 
488 
434 


14 
13 
11 


4 
7 
5 


1 
1 
1 


,051 
,038 
,104 


14 
16 

14 


6,211 
6,966 
6,279 


3,877 
4,504 
3,469 


207 
211 
186 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1,607 
1,589 
1,596 


4,395 
3,743 
3,781 


435 
338 
361 


15 
15 
18 


8 
6 
5 


1 


,123 
983 
817 


38 

31 
35 


6,825 
5,643 
7,367 


4,279 
4,190 
4.696 


226 
281 
387 


A 
M 

J 


1,469 
1,451 
1,268 


3,173 
2,941 
2,361 


327 
179 
237 


18 

15 

9 


4 
4 
3 




812 

781 
679 


28 

23 
19 


5,937 
4,293 
3,198 


4,475 
2,990 
2,013 


457 
465 
324 


J 

A 

S 


819 
996 
906 


1.712 
2,393 
2,017 


195 
264 
209 


4 

5 

12 


2 
5 
7 




179 
388 
245 


5 

14 
13 


3,476 
3,551 
3,877 


1,078 
1,981 
1,993 


180 
265 
273 


O 
N 


995 
1,305 


2,911 
2.902 


325 
311 


13 
12 


7 
8 




422 
554 


8 
12 


3,099 
4,519 


3,047 
2,688 


279 
355 



34 



Source: Statistics of Hides, Skins and Leather, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 29 -concluded 



MANUFACTURING 



Leather 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION OF BOOTS AND SHOES 



Men's 



Women's 



Boys' and 
Youths' 



Misses' and Babies' and 
Children's Infants' 



Total 
All Kinds 



Leather or 
Fabric 
Uppers 



AUOther 











Thousand 


pair 








1939 
1950 


623 
669 


978 
1,349 


104 
130 


268 
443 


93 
237 


2,067 

2,828 


1,779 
2,296 


289 
531 


1950 O 
N 
D 


798 
791 
634 


1,536 
1,448 
1,165 


135 
136 
133 


528 
560 
391 


274 
291 
214 


3,270 
3,227 
2,538 


2,432 
2,364 
2,054 


838 
862 
484 


1951 J 
F 
M 


646 
702 
798 


1,392 
1,455 
1,671 


110 
135 
163 


450 
441 
517 


213 
233 
263 


2,812 
2,967 
3,412 


2,509 
2,677 
2,977 


303 
290 
435 


A 
M 

J 


791 
793 
584 


1,589 
1,556 
1,234 


146 
130 
110 


516 
468 
444 


245 
231 
219 


3,287 
3,179 
2,590 


2,885 
2,714 
2,143 


402 
465 
448 


J 

A 

S 


451 
667 
587 


894 
1,404 
1,255 


91 
125 
106 


303 
456 
424 


163 
243 
214 


1,902 

2,895 
2,586 


1,467 
2,318 
1,995 


435 
577 
591 


O 

N 


702 
689 


1,189 
1,086 


117 
111 


458- 
499 


260 
251 


2,726 
2,637 


2,094 
1,948 


632 
689 



Note: As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 
Source: Production of Leather Footwear, D.B.S. 



TABLE 30 



Primary Textiles: Cotton, Wool and Rayon 
Monthly averages or calendar months'*' 



Raw Cotton< 1 > 



Broad Woven Woollen and 

Cotton Cotton Worsted Worsted Broad Woven 

Yarn Fabric Yarn Fabrics Rayon Fabric 



Imports 



Bale Openings 



Production 



Shipments Production 





Thousand 
pounds 


Number of 
bales") 


Thousand 
pounds'" 


Thousand 
pounds 


Thousand 
yards 


Thousand 
pounds 


Thousand yards 


1940 
1950 


18,052 
19,054 


37,930 
37,914 


18,950 
18,697 


16,412 
17,630 


25,774 
26,540 


1,306 
1,328 


2,199 
1,883 


4,821 
9,445 


1950 N 
D 


24,853 
26,413 


44,161 
39,665 


21,741 \ 
19,693 / 


19,261 


28,995 


J 1,524 1 
\ 1,393 ; 


2,015 


10,486 


1951 J 
F 
M 


23,255 
14,704 
25,753 


39,838 
41,441 
45,473 


19,833 1 
20,447 
22,653 J 


19,646 


29,574 


f 1,578 ) 

1,487 
I 1,492 J 


2,099 


10,599 


A 
M 
J 


23,103 
25,250 
14,140 


44,518 
44,498 
41,257 


22,182 ) 
22,208 
20,568 J 


20,192 


30,397 


( 1,469 1 

1,350 
( 1,277 J 


1,831 


10,769 


J 

A 

S 


6,490 
7,824 
9,747 


28,106 
27,882 
33,384 


13,995 1 
13,873 
16,613 J 


13,853 


20,854 


( 907 ) 
1,111 J 
1,127 J 


1,423 


8,156 


O 
N 
D 


12,607 
25,101 


35,642 
33,708 
27,029 


17,783 1 
16,796 [ 
13,461 J 













(1) Monthly data include estimate for non-reporting companies. (2) Bales of 500 pounds gross weight, 
weight. w Quarterly data for the last five columns are monthly averages. 



(3) Invoice 



35 



MANUFACTURING 

Lh 3 . 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Production of Factory Clothing 

Cuar.eny a/erage^. or q-i.^ters 



WOMEN'S AND MISSES' 



Coab 



Suits 



Dtmim 



Skirts 



Wool and Rayon and Cotton, Wool and Rayon and 

wool rayon linen and wool rayon 

mixtures mixtures other fixtures mixtures 

Thousands 



Blouses Slips 

and 

Cotton Rayon and Petti- 
rayon coats ' 
mixtures 

Thousand dozen 



1950 


408.0 


217.1 


90.2 


1,815.0 


1,410.3 


209.0 


228 2 


26.6 


96.9 


170.0 


1950 






















2nd qtr. 


359.1 


197.1 


22.0 


1.844 


1.884.1 


90 3 


132.4 


41.6 


67.8 


172.8 


3rd qtr. 


437.4 


160.7 


218.0 


1.640.7 


885 7 


278.4 


178.9 


16.6 


112.8 


145.5 


4th qtr. 


284.0 


105.1 


99.6 


1,727 8 


1,083.1 


209.8 


210.9 


15.1 


96.1 


185.8 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


527.6 


389.6 


23.3 


2,049.7 


1,523 2 


212.1 


365 7 


35.2 


117.0 


196.1 


2nd qtr. 


292.1 


163.8 


17.8 


1,891.1 


1,682 


105.8 


175.4 


61.8 


61.6 


184.9 


3rd qtr. 


453.3 


169.1 


124.5 


1,517.1 


762.5 


186.4 


242.3 


27 7 


89.8 


133.7 



CHILDREN'S 








BOYS' 








Coats Suits Dresses, 


Suits 


Overcoats 


Trousers 


Overalls, 




Shirts 




All 




and 


and 


Bib and 








Kinds 




Topcoats 


Slacks, 
Fine 


Waist 


Dress, 

Fine, 

Cotton 


Sport, 
Fine 


Work 



Thousands 



Thousand dozen 



1950 

1950 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 



170.6 22 4 



126 9 
180.9 
165.2 



14.0 
17.2 
24.2 



205.1 40.0 
129.0 16.7 
233.8 14.6 



748.3 

715.4 
652.5 
709.4 

1,118.1 
927.2 
652.8 



70.8 15.9 



71 

56 
55 



11 
21.7 
30.8 



89.0 10.0 
60.2 13.6 
33.4 22.0 



364.8 

405.7 
382 3 
313.8 

455.4 
389.0 
369.0 



19.1 

27.6 
13.2 
15.9 

24.2 
28.4 
16.0 



16.5 

20.3 
18.0 
11.6 

15.6 
15.8 
12.9 



8.9 

15.8 
2.7 
5.9 

10.6 
12.4 
13.2 



8.1 



6.4 
5.3 
8.4 



MEN'S AND YOUTHS' 



Dress Clothing 



Work Clothing 



Suits Overcoats Trousers 
and and 

topcoats slacks, 

fine 



Shirts 



Overalls 



Dress or business, Sport, 

fine hne 

Cotton Other'" 



Bib and Combin- 
waist ation 



Work 
pants 



Work 
shirts 







Thousands 










Thousand dozen 








1950 


424.2 


175.8 


731.2 


158.7 






49.9 


61.4 


7.6 


67.8 


87.9 


1950 
























2nd qtr. 


476.8 


117.5 


810.2 


144.1 






90.1 


59 4 


6.5 


69.7 


82.7 


3rd qtr. 


335.9 


201.9 


611.3 


146.7 






27.5 


61.9 


6.3 


70.3 


82.3 


4th qtr. 


437.7 


239 1 


699.0 


169.5 






25.7 


67 


8.2 


70.8 


90.8 


1951 
























1st qtr. 


477.1 


195.2 


814.9 


169.9 


13 


5 


87 .2 


86 5 


10.4 


80.5 


97.8 


2nd qtr. 


456.9 


133.7 


770.1 


148.8 


11 


4 


89.4 


81.1 


12.5 


82.5 


96.2 


3rd qtr. 


320.6 


249.9 


528.6 


130.8 


9 


4 


49.5 


53.2 


8.2 


67.3 


91.3 



36 New series: preliminary, subject to revision. 
Includes children's. '"Includes boys'. 
Source: Quarterly Production of Factory Clothing (Selected Garments), D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 32 



MANUFACTURING 



Wood and Paper Products 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



SAWN LUMBER 


Canada 








East of Rocky Mountains 




British 




Total 


Prince 
Edward 
Island 


Nova 
Scotia 


New 
Bruns- 
wick Quebec Ontario 


Mani- 
toba 


■ Columbia 

Saskat- 
chewan Alberta 



Million feet, board measure 



1939 
1950 


331.4 
538.0 


141.7 
250.9 


0.4 
0.9 


12.7 
24.1 


17.6 
24.2 


54.7 
86.8 


40.1 
75.8 


5.1 
4.8 


3.2 
5.6 


8.0 
28.6 


189.7 
287.2 


1950 N 
D 


418.7 
398.6 


94.5 
123.5 


0.7 
0.9 


13.7 
12.5 


4.4 
6.2 


29.4 
20.7 


27.7 
21.5 


0.4 
0.5 


1.8 
4.9 


16.5 
56.3 


324.2 
275.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


431.8 
479.3 
502.6 


151.0 
212.1 
235.4 


0.4 
0.3 
1.1 


17.3 
27.8 
27.2 


10.1 
24.1 
40.6 


37.9 
58.4 
59.3 


17.4 
14.8 
25.7 


1.9 
2.3 
2.5 


12.0 
10.2 
16.2 


54.1 
74.1 
62.8 


280.8 
267.2 
267.2 


A 
M 

J 


400.2 
595.5 
813.3 


128.9 
282.2 
480.8 


2.0 
1.5 
1.9 


18.3 
38.2 
47.3 


22.2 
24.4 
42.9 


49.9 
114.7 
197.9 


24.1 

90.9 

166.9 


2.9 

4.0 

12.0 


5.0 
4.9 
1.9 


4.5 
3.5 
9.9 


271.3 
313.3 
332.5 


J 

A 

S 


747.3 
696.3 
554.3 


454.7 
404.6 
295.0 


1.1 
0.9 
1.5 


42.3 
26.6 
21.8 


34.7 
24.3 
21.0 


190.1 
161.8 
102.4 


164.3 
169.4 
133.6 


7.4 

10.5 

5.9 


3.8 
2.0 
1.3 


10.9 
9.0 
7.7 


292.6 
291.6 
259.3 


O 
N 


479.3 
360.4 


176.7 
72.3 


1.2 
0.5 


15.4 
11.6 


18.2 
4.5 


66.4 
22.8 


66.6 
15.3 


2.6 
0.5 


0.7 
3.1 


5.6 
13.9 


302.6 
288.1 



WOOD PULP<i> 



NEWSPRINT 



Production 



Exports 



Total Mechanical Chemical 



Produc- 
tion 



Shipments 



Total Domestic 



Export 



Stocks 
End of 
Period 



Thousand tons 



1939 
1951 


347.2 
760.1 


228.2 
427.0 


111.9 
322.0 


58.8 
186.9 


243.9 
459.7 


238.4 
458.6 


15.8 
29.9 


222.6 
428.6 


169.5 
101.9 


1950 N 
D 


745.3 
698.2' 


429.0 
404.0 


305.7 
284.4' 


181.5 
172.2 


456.7 
430.6 


477.7 
448.8 


31.4 
32.3 


446.3 
416.5 


107.4 
89.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


737.0 
697.4 
773.0 


422.7 
394.6 
438.3 


303.7 
292.7 
323.4 


175.6 
149.6 
185.4 


453.0 
425.1 
473.0 


423.3 
400.8 
473.5 


28.4 
28.1 
32.0 


394.9 
372.7 
441.5 


118.8 
143.1 
142.5 


A 

M 

J 


740.4 
805.1 
773.3 


412.9 
455.7 
436.5 


316.1 
337.4 
325.3 


176.1 
188.6 
191.2 


447.6 
485.7 
464.3 


443.3 
486.3 
475.0 


27.7 
32.4 
29.2 


415.6 
453.9 
445.8 


146.8 
146.2 
135.5 


J 

A 

S 


746.6 
803.1 
716.4 


424.0 
449.3 
401.3 


311.1 
341.9 
304.5 


201.6 
211.0 
186.1 


452.5 
484.6 
431.1 


443.0 
480.6 
427.7 


29.1 
29.9 
28.5 


413.9 
450.7 
399.3 


145.0 
149.0 
152.3 


O 

N 
D 


809.4 

779.5' 

719.4 


452.8 
435.9 
400.2 


344.7 

333.0' 

309.7 


202.6 
187.6 
187.8 


492.5 
471.7 
435.3 


497.4 
491.0 
461.5 


33.0 
30.6 
30.9 


464.4 
460.4 
430.5 


147.4 
128.1 
101.9 



Note: Newfoundland is included as of April, 1949, in data for wood pulp and newsprint. 

(1) Total pulp production covers "screenings" which are already included in exports. "Screenings" are excluded 
throughout from mechanical and chemical pulp. 

Source: Production, Shipments and Stocks on Hand of Sawmills, D.B.S. 

Bulletins of Canadian Pulp and Paper Association and Newsprint Association of Canada. 



37 



MANUFACTURING FEBRUARY, 1952 

Shipments of Primary Iron and Steel Shapes to Consuming Industries 

(Carbon and Alloy) 
TABLE 33 Monthly averages or calendar months 



Agricultural 

Implements 

Automotive and Other 



Industries 



Farm 



Building 
Construction Containers 



Machinery Merchant Mining 

and Trade and National 

Tools Products Lumbering Defence 



Thousand tons 



Public Railway Whole- 
Works Cars and salers and 

and Railway Loco- Ship- Ware- 
Utilities Operating motives building houses 



Net Total Producers' Export 
Miscel- Domestic Inter- Ship- 

laneous Shipments change ments 



Pressing, 
Forming 

and 
Stamping 



1949 
1950 


12.5 
16.7 


10.1 
10.9 


30.2 
29.8 


17.1 
21.8 


9 7 
9.7 


29 3 
29.8 


7.5 
11.0 


0.2 

0.3 


12.2 
15.6 


1950 O 
N 
D 


18.1 
21.2 
19.6 


11.9 
11.3 
12.9 


34.8 
30 8 
30.8 


24.7 
24.6 
20.2 


10.1 
11.2 
10.2 


31.0 
33.3 
30.9 


8.6 

9.2 

11.8 


0.4 
0.3 
0.3 


17.0 
16.3 
13 


1951 J 
F 
M 


18 .5 
21.0 
21.6 


12.2 
12.5 
13.9 


35 8 
30.1 
34.8 


26 6 
24.1 
23.6 


13.3 
11.4 
12 8 


38.5 
28.1 
35.7 


13.5 

9 

10.6 


0.9 
8 
2.0 


13.7 
15.0 
17.1 


A 
M 
J 


24.9 
29.2 
21.4 


11.9 
10.6 
13.4 


28.5 
36.4 
34.4 


24.8 
28.3 
26.2 


16.0 
14.1 

12.1 


35.1 
35.3 
34.0 


9.0 
10.8 
11.1 


4.0 

4.4 
4.4 


15.6 
16.8 
16.1 


J 

A 

S 


23.6 
16.1 

17.5 


12.5 
9.5 
9.2 


32.0 
27.1 
28.8 


25.3 
26.7 
24.2 


13.7 
13.4 
13.0 


30.5 
34.9 
33.0 


10.9 
14.4 
10 7 


3.6 
5 
6.3 


15.2 
14.3 

11.6 


O 

N 


20.4 
20.1 


14.1 
15.6 


36.6 
31 6 


24.3 
21.7 


14.2 

17.3 


38.1 
34.9 


11.9 
12.1 


6 7 
6 8 


14.8 
16.9 



Total 













Thousand tons 










1949 
1950 


1.6 
1.1 


31.5 
35.8 


13.0 

5.9 


1.7 
1.9 


29.6 
26 2 


1.2 
1.2 


207.4 
217.8 


79.5 
116 7 


18.3 
18.2 


305.2 
352.8 


1950 O 
N 
D 


1.9 
1.0 
1.1 


30.0 
24.0 
28.3 


9.6 
12.9 
12.1 


0.9 
0.7 
1.4 


31 9 
30.1 
28 


1.1 
1.7 
1.2 


231.9 

228.6 
221.8 


123.5 
125.5 
107.2 


25.9 
27.0 
28.5 


381.3 
381.1 

357.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


0.7 
8 
1.2 


37.5 
37.4 
38.5 


18.0 

16.1 
17.3 


1.2 
4.3 

3.6 


29 3 
28.4 
30.1 


1.4 
2.1 
3.5 


261.1 
241.1 
266.1 


143.4 
122.1 
150.1 


6 6 
4.2 
2.0 


411.2 

367.4 
418.2 


A 

M 
J 


1.9 
5.2 
4.5 


41.2 
39 9 
35.1 


15 9 
15.7 
14.8 


4 
3.5 
2.6 


30.1 

30 6 
28.4 


17 
1.5 
1.9 


264.7 
282.2 
260.4 


145.5 
161.6 
135.5 


2.1 
3.1 
3.4 


412.3 
446.9 
399.3 


J 

A 

S 


2.2 
1.6 
3.2 


31 9 
28.3 

28.1 


12.7 
13 6 
13 6 


2.6 
4.2 
3.8 


21.7 
24 .5 
21.4 


1.5 
1.2 
1.0 


239.8 
234.9 
225.5 


131.7 
146.2 
138.2 


2.8 
10.5 
10.4 


374.3 
391.6 
374.2 


O 

N 


2.7 
17 


29 .3 
36.1 


15.5 
20.1 


3 5 
4.3 


26.8 
32 2 


1.7 

1.5 


260.5 
272.7 


136.2 
132.6 


9.0 
10 2 


405.8 
415.5 



38 



Source: Monthly Report on Primary Iron and Steel, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 33 - concluded 



MANUFACTURING 



Primary Iron and Steel 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Pig (1 > 
Iron 



PRODUCTION 



Steel 



PRIMARY IRON AND STEEL SHAPES 
Shipments 



Ferro- 
Alloys 



Total 



Ingots 



Castings Total < 



Export (3) Domestic Imports 



(J) 











Thousand net tons 








1939 
1951 


70.5 
212.7 


7.1 
20.9 


129.3 
297.3 


124.2 
287.2 


5.1 
10.1 


260 . 1 


21.4 
5.9 


254.2 


39.9 
139.5 


1950 N 
D 


208.3 
198.2 


16.9 
15.3 


289.5 
290.7 


279.8 
281.5 


9.7 
9.2 


255.6 
250.3 


27.0 
28.5 


228.6 
221.8 


130.1 
85.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


201.1 
193.2 
220.6 


19.1 
14.9 
19.5 


309.7 
281.4 
314.8 


299.4 
271.2 
304.3 


10.2 
10.2 
10.5 


267.7 
245.3 
268.1 


6.6 
4.2 
2.0 


261.1 
241.1 
266.1 


108.4 

85.1 

117.6 


A 
M 

J 


211.1 
219.0 
213.2 


19.6 
23.5 
19.8 


312.0 
313.3 
293.5 


301.8 
302.9 
283.7 


10.2 

10.4 

9.9 


266.8 
285.3 
263.8 


2.1 
3.1 
3.4 


264.7 
282.2 
260.4 


147.7 
153.8 
143.1 


J 
A 

S 


210.3 
203.2 
212.5 


17.6 
25.3 
23.0 


274.6 

286.8 
268.2 


266.6 
277.9 
257.9 


8.0 

8.9 

10.4 


242.6 
245.4 
236.0 


2.8 
10.5 
10.4 


239.8 
234.9 
225.5 


145.7 
154.2 
150.8 


o 

N 
D 


224.5 
223.5 
220.5 


25.8' 
22. 3 r 
20.7 


309.4 
307.1 
296.5 


298.2 
295.5 
286.8 


11.3 

11.6 

9.8 


269.5 
282.9 
247.6 


9.0 

10.2 

6.1 


260.5 
272.7 
241 5 


180.1 
166.5 
121.5 



(1) As of January, 1950 includes some silvery pig iron formerly included with ferro-alloys. "'Excluding producers' 
interchange. <3) Prior to 1946, exports include pigs, ingots, blooms, billets and rolling mill products. (4) Prior to 
1946, imports include castings and forgings and rolling mill products. Since 1946, they include, in addition to all other 
shapes, wire and wire rope. 

Source: Primary Iron and Steel, D.B.S. 



Motor Vehicles: Production and Sales 



TABLE 34 




Monthly 


averages or 


calendar months 










Total 

Motor 

Vehicles 


Commercial 

Including 

Military 






PASSENGER CARS 








Production* 1 ' 


Imports 

less 

Re-exports 


Total 
Supply 




Sales"' 




Domestic 

Sales 
Financed 




Production (1) 


Total 


Export 


Domestic 










Thousands 










Number 


1939 
1950 


12.95 

32.57 


3.92 
8.84 


9.03 
23.73 


1.37 
6.81 


10.40 
30.54 


10.72 
29.08 


3.21 
2.01 


7.50 
27.08 


8,088 


1950 N 
D 


30.32 
30.74 


6.90 
7.21 


23.42 
23.53 


8.25 
4.24 


31.67 
27.77 


27.91 
24.64 


3.08 
1.99 


24.83 
22.65 


7,476 
6,637 


1951 J 
F 
M 


39.20 
40.59 

47.78 


11.00 
11.35 
12.90 


28.21 
29.24 
34.88 


4.45 
4.46 
5.40 


32.65 
33.70 
40.28 


26.65 
33.83 
40.32 


0.52 
0.63 
2.44 


26.13 
33.20 
37.89 


6,133 
6,463 
9,811 


A 
M 
J 


41.06 
42.91 
36.23 


12.38 
12.62 
10.38 


28.68 
30.30 
25.85 


8.45 
8.26 
5.88 


37.13 
38 55 
31.72 


39.11 

28.50 
24.74 


4.18 
2.66 
1.72 


34.93 
25.84 
23.03 


8,451 
6,890 
7,216 


J 

A 

S 


30.29 
21.83 
29.86 


9.27 

7.99 

10.67 


21.02 
13.84 
19.19 


3.11 
1.00 
0.49 


24.13 
14.84 
19.68 


24.40 

17.28 
23.03 


3.71 
2.82 
4.42 


20.69 
14.46 
18.61 


7,526 
7,044 
5,681 


O 
N 
D 


32.46 
29.46 
22.09 


11.99 
10.80 
11.17 


20.47 
18.66 
10.92 


-0.15 
-0.87 
-0.70 


20.32 
17.79 
10.22 


18.93 
19.23 
16.17 


5.39 
5.46 
3.23 


13.54 
13.77 
12.93 


5,763 
5,775 
4,763 



D.B.S 



("Monthly data are shipments subsequent to 1946. (2) As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 

Source: Motor Vehicle Shipments, Sales of New Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Financing, and Trade of Canada, 



39 



MANUFACTURING FEBRUARY, 1952 

Refrigerators and Washing Machines 

TABLE 35 Monthly averages or calendar months 



ELECTRIC REFRIGERATORS ' 



DOMESTIC WASHING MACHINES'*' 



Domestic Types 



All Types 



Factory Produc- Ship- Factory 

Production Shipments stocks-- Imports Exports tion •" merits J stocks (: '' Imports Exports 

Thousands 



1939 
1950 


4.29 
28.88 


28 '86 


3.01 


1.11 
0.92 


0.78 
0.20 


8.66 
23.46 


23^93 


10.41 


1.71 
0.15 


1.68 
1.05 


1950 N 
D 


35.43 
31.34 


36.19 
32.70 


4 80 
3.01 


2.45 
1 16 


0.70 
0.54 


28.08 
25.24 


27.75 
25.22 


10.21 
10.41 


0.28 
0.31 


1.28 
0.68 


1951 J 
F 
M 


34.69 
31.45 
35.40 


33.19 
31.25 
33.60 


4.35 
4.54 
6.34 


8 82 

9.06 

10.02 


17 
0.08 
18 


30.71 
27.02 
29.90 


29.75 
25.56 
29.53 


11.36 
12.82 
13.20 


0.68 
0.45 
0.60 


0.50 
1.17 
1.12 


A 

M 

J 


34.22 
32.95 
26.93 


33.68 
30.13 
19.58 


6.88 

9.70 

17.04 


16.65 
18.60 
15.06 


0.13 
0.68 
0.61 


29.94 
27.24 
19.22 


28.30 
22.01 
14.52 


14.84 
20.07 
24.77 


0.23 
0.49 
0.37 


1.93 
1.74 
2.67 


J 

A 

S 


16.55 
17.32 
14.26 


10.74 
9.93 
8.61 


22.85 
30.25 
35.89 


11.43 
9.27 
3.61 


0.43 
0.37 
0.22 


13.32 
13.31 
12.25 


11.86 

9.86 

10.59 


26.22 
29.67 
31.34 


0.23 
0.15 
0.27 


1.59 
2.38 
2.21 


O 
N 
D 


13.44 
12.82 


7.46 
9.46 


41.87 
45.22 


4.11 
2.07 
0.92 


0.03 
0.05 
0.30 


13.12 
12.23 


14.26 
12.86 


30.19 
29.56 


0.44 
0.18 
0.23 


1.08 
1.27 
2.16 



Radio and Television Receiving Sets ] 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Estimated 
Production' 5 ' 


Domestic 
Shipments 


Factory Stocks 
End of Period 


Imports 
(«) 


Exports 


Radios Tele- 


Radios Tele- 


Radios Tele- 
vision 
sets 




sets 


sets 
Total Table 





Value of 
Factory Shipments 



Radios 



Television 
sets 



Average 
Price per 

Set 17 ' 













Thousands 








Thousand dollars 


Dollars 


1939 
1950 


29.0 
68.4 


2.7 


30.9 
63.2 


21.1 
38.8 


2.5 


60.9 
145.2 


2.7 


4.9 
3.9 


0.1 

3.1 


1,667 
4,930 


1,079 


32 
34 


1950 N 
D 


71.1 
66.2 


6.0 
5.2 


91.0 

84.5 


65.4 
58.1 


4.9 

5.5 


165.3 
145.2 


3.1 
2.7 


42 
3.2 


2.1 
4.6 


7,425 
7,248 


2,352 
2,706 


35 
31 


1951 J 
F 
M 


64.9 
69.3 
48 9 


4.0 
4.3 
5.8 


50.7 
56.8 
66.0 


29.8 
33.0 
38.2 


3.8 

4.5 
5.4 


158.5 
168.5 
145.9 


2.9 

2.7 
3.1 


3.4 

2.0 
5.4 


2.4 
1.5 

2.8 


4,405 
4,853 
5.351 


1,956 
2,387 
3,251 


32 
35 
33 


A 
M 

J 


72 4 
68.1 
66.4 


5.0 
5.7 
3 5 


57.5 
38.8 
32.9 


31.6 
16.5 
11.1 


4.4 
1.1 
0.5 


158.6 
184.7 
217.3 


3.6 

8.2 

11.3 


4 4 
3.3 

3.8 


2.5 
1.4 

2.4 


4.843 
3,529 
2,829 


2,528 
542 
235 


37 
39 
36 


J 

A 

S 


36.2 
42.1 
51.4 


3 1 
2.3 
5.3 


28.8 
36.3 
42 4 


13 1 
17.5 
26.2 


0.3 
9 
3.1 


223.1 
222.3 
221.3 


14 1 
15.5 
17.7 


5.0 
8.4 
6.4 


16 
2.4 
8.8 


2.630 
3,663 
4,038 


159 

488 

1,591 


42 
38 
34 


O 
N 
D 


36 f 
66.5 


4.0 
6 3 


45. 5 r 
59.1 


31. r 
43.3 


4.9 
5.6 


206.9' 
207.9 


16.8 
17.5 


5.7 

4.4 
3.7 


4 3 
3.9 
1.5 


4.498' 
5,287 


2,471 
2,876 


37 
36 



40 ' As of May, 1949, Newfoundland is included. (2) End of period. (3 'Does not include apartment-type machines. 

' Electric and other. Factory shipments adjusted for change in stocks. '"Includes television sets. "'Manu- 

facturers' list prices of Table Model electric standard broadcast radios. 

Source: Monthly Reports, Domestic Type Electric Refrigerators, Domestic Washing Machines, Trade of Canada, 
and Radio Receiving Sets, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 36 



Value of Building Permits 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



CONSTRUCTION 



NOVA 
CANADA SCOTIA 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



Montreal- 
58 Muni- Maison- Sher- Three Fort Port 

cipalities Halifax neuve Quebec brooke Rivers William Hamilton Kitchener London Ottawa Arthur 

Thousand dollars 



1939 
1950 

1950 N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 



5,023 
44,467 

41,828 
33,425 

24,954 
29,957 
38,504 

46,825 
54,676 

36,588 

48,029 
33,439 
27,776 



94 
1,233 

1,498 
246 

372 
236 
260 

590 
663 
636 

710 
251 
438 



771 
9,410 

7,459 
9,475 

3,941 
4,826 
8,208 

7,846 
9,591 
6,355 

5,940 
5,306 
3,865 



208 98 

1,060 470 

666 263 

1,422 254 

183 187 

120 331 

420 488 

790 397 

724 649 

523 630 



84 
501 

193 
193 

34 
45 
80 

346 
816 
413 



44 
166 

20 

158 

52 
49 
42 

132 
494 
192 



920 1,254 

373 

436 



234 



225 84 
246 1,355 
300 64 



189 
1,521 

1,175 
947 

641 
2,193 
1,467 

3,174 
2,848 
1,306 

1,138 
1,351 
1,709 



65 
551 

370 
180 

486 
232 
354 

934 
510 
458 

571 
375 
230 



158 
900 

841 
1,459 

196 
298 
506 

930 

1,160 

861 

1,348 
456 
322 



171 
3,008 

4,777 
3,381 

1,599 
1,564 
7,046 

2,436 
3,695 
1,258 

3,300 
1,362 
3,505 



37 
283 

251 
11 

22 

109 

16 

163 
520 
213 

236 

144 

99 



o 


38 


,251 


852 


5,459 


918 


449 


189 


50 


7 


,137 


299 


299 


3,450 


131 


N 


24 


,731 


219 


5,945 


900 


125 


127 


6 


1 


,150 


325 


582 


551 


85 


D 


26, 


777p 


211 


6,276 


341 


76 


77 


3 




821 


183 


183 


680 


5 



ONTARIO 



MANI- 
TOBA SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



St. York and 

Catha- East York Winni- 

rines Toronto Windsor Townships peg 



Regina 



New 
Saska- Edmon- Leth- West- Van- 

toon Calgary ton bridge minster couver Victoria 















Thousand dollars 














1939 
1950 


50 
286 


859 
4,370 


77 
776 


170 
1,567 


215 
1,621 


50 
539 


21 

564 


89 
2,166 


139 
3,882 


39 

376 


98 
216 


524 
2,912 


67 
472 


1950 N 
D 


197 
339 


4,386 
4,860 


812 
377 


1,229 
477 


1,590 
337 


604 
103 


124 
1,712 


1,635 
867 


1,967 
389 


298 
86 


115 
50 


3,359 
2,739 


267 
280 


1951 J 
F 
M 


198 

1,199 

300 


5,845 
2,496 
2,403 


341 

539 

1,351 


3,134 
1,168 
1,078 


411 
1,026 
2,071 


40 

72 

312 


19 

22 

109 


1,181 
1,873 
1,544 


1,516 
3,471 
1,513 


211 
764 
639 


210 
646 
216 


1,454 
1,943 
2,085 


481 
907 
161 


A 
M 
J 


296 

440 

1,189 


2,430 
3,098 
3,863 


1,071 

4,233 

659 


1,371 
1,894 
1,276 


1,902 
2,461 
1,591 


421 
940 
565 


523 
643 
522 


3,440 
2,448 
1,873° 


6,244 
4,612 
3,777 


674 
288 
279 


198 
215 
193 


2,657 
2,836 
1,542 


231 
287 
229 


J 

A 

S 


386 
141 
231 


9,394 
3,456 
1,972 


382 
498 
233 


1,725 

1,734 

733 


1,780 

824 

1,620 


1,169 
599 
404 


396 
563 
455 


1,742 
2,353 
1,493 


3,967 
2,672 
2,649 


559 
236 
452 


142 

200 

91 


1,851 
2,087 
1,057 


213 
796 
188 


O 
N 
D 


288 

170 

46 


2,842 
2,472 
6,895 


480 
1,270 
1,171 


818 
695 
712 


1,716 
834 
249 


343 
982 
223 


265 

124 

77 


1,770 

1,936 

670 


3,425 
1,110 
1,144 


437 

219 

64 


83 

36 

133 


1,804 
1,032 
3,595 


292 
172 
129 



Generally, the twenty-four municipalities for which data are shown were selected as being leaders in the amount 
of permits issued during the period 1926-1946. Annual statistics for 58 municipalities are available historically in 
the Canada Year Book. Monthly reports on the subject were discontinued in December, 1946. 



41 



CONSTRUCTION 



TABLE 36 - concluded 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Value of Building Permits 

By Provinces ' 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



New- Prince 

found- Edward Nova New Saskat- British 

( i inula land Island Scotia Brunswick Quebec Ontario Manitoba chewan Alberta Columbia 



Thousand dollars 



1949 
1950 


(.2,102 
79,833 


461 


60 
83 


1,102 
2.288 


716 
1,228 


14,141 

19,695 


27,831 
36,148 


2.679 
3,140 


1 .568 
1,900 


6.291 
7,222 


7,715 
7,667 


1950 N 
D 


71,830 
55,158 


350 
293 


29 
20 


1,742 
751 


3,709 
413 


16,155 
16.G54 


34,646 
26,566 


2.984 
984 


1 ,066 
2.126 


4.190 
1,386 


6,960 
5,964 


1951 J 
F 
M 


42,269' 
53,495' 
74,215' 


206 

77 

166 


20 


697 

475 

2,715 


184 

363 

1,370 


7,002' 

8.182' 

13,329' 


25,328 
26,693 
41,563' 


578 
1,402 
3,530 


171 
183 
681 


3.123 
6,361 
3,953 


4,981 
9,738 
6,908 


A 
M 

J 


93,214' 

109,979' 1 

81,125' 


470 
,364 
471 


136 

195 

31 


1,562 
1.258 
1,773 


808 
1,609 
1,305 


19.503' 
22.879' 
15,647' 


44,464' 
55,047' 
40,532' 


3.756 
5,306 
2,936 


1 455 
3.838 
2.154 


11,497 
8,850 
7,856 


9,563 
9,632 
8,421 


J 

A 

S 


88,299' 
69,092' 
65,664' 


359 
370 
311 


19 
33 
70 


1,235 

715 

3,399 


869 
852 
676 


18.150' 
14,509' 
12,773' 


44,169' 
34.003' 
31,355' 


6.186 
2,555 
2,921 


2,230 
1,998 
1,414 


7.382 
6,344 
5.493 


7,699 
7,714 
7.253 


O 
N 
D 


73,738' 
54,473' 
53,089 


486 

394 

95 


38 
111 

201 


1,146 
830' 
420 


863 

1,202 

88 


15,632' 

13,067' 

9,216 


39,139' 
27,783' 
33.884 


2.523 

1.783 

902 


1,055 

1.433 

•692 


6.974 
3,595 
2,296 


5,882 
4.258 
5,294 



By Types (,) 
Monthly averages or calendar months 









RESIDENTIAL 








INDUS- COM- INSTITU- 
- TRIAL MERCIAL TIONAL 


OTHER 








New 






Repair 






Atlantic 
Total Provinces 12 ' Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie British 
Provinces Columbia 
















Thousand dollars 






1949 
1950 


34.328 
40,649 


657 
1,179 


7,923 
10,637 


15,928 
18,593 


5.980 
6,331 


3,841 
3,909 


2,780 
3,615 


3.355 12,486 8,599 
5,305 20,044 9,194 


552 
1,027 


1950 O 
N 
D 


44,069 
28.898 
17,280 


827 
638 
695 


12.577 
7.623 

5,372 


19,414 

14.648 

8.622 


8.195 

3,337 

908 


3,057 
2,652 
1,684 


5,978 
2,915 
1,240 


5,520 20,381 15,530 
5.530 20,559 12,116 
6,361 17,827 12,174 


1,240 

1,812 

276 


1951 J 
F 
M 


17.177' 
22,738' 
37.479' 


464 
375 
593 


3,668' 
4.719' 
6.461' 


9,557 
12.397 
22.414' 


1.359 
1,411 
4,508 


2,130 
3,837 
3,502 


1,542 
1.773 
2.391 


8,301 11,536 3.312 
6,590 13,007 9,138 
7.275 16,448' 10,239 


400 
248 
383 


A 
M 

J 


55.967' 
58.523' 
45.974' 


1.415 
1.445 
1.702 


12.463' 

12.211' 

9.395' 


27.253' 
30.237' 
22,470' 


9,950 
9.775 
7.988 


4,887 
4,853 
4,419 


4.615' 
5.708' 
4.851' 


9.744 11. 222' 11. 057 

13.476 16.077' 15.779 

6. 203' 11, 545' 12. 128 


608 
416 
424 


J 

A 

S 


38.288' 
34.490' 
26.872' 


938 
943 
830 


8.078' 
7.341' 
6.104' 


19.782' 
17.512' 
12.169' 


6.299 
5.273 
4.895 


3.192 
3,420 
2.875 


4,813' 
4.421' 
4.138' 


6,507 18,426 19,928 
8,556 11.203 9,906 
8.619 13,507' 12.018 


335 
517 
510 


O 

N 
D 


29.146' 
22.046' 
13.248 


562 

329' 

295 


7.036' 
5.858' 
2,317 


15.062 

10.899 

7.052 


4.413 
2.851 
1.456 


2.073 

2,109' 

2,128 


3,992' 
2,598' 
1,438 


17.433 11, 118' 11. 145' 

8,823' 9, 035' 11. 646 

12.511 4.968 20.733 


904 
325 
191 



42 ; The coverage was extended to 507 municipalities in 1948, and now stands at 546, minor revision still being 

required in the table, due to the non-receipt of returns from a few small places. No account is taken of the building 
activity outside of registration areas. Actual operations normally follow the granting of permits but a number of projects 
are not undertaken or abandoned. The amount depends upon the statement of the applicant and considerable change 
may develop before the completion of the operation. 

As of January, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 37 



CONSTRUCTION 



Building Materials 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION 



CEMENT PRODUCTS (i) 



Cement 
Concrete Concrete Pipe and 
Brick Blocks* 2 ' TUe 



CLAY PRODUCTS 



ASPHALT PRODUCTS 



Thousands 



Thousand 
tons 



Building Brick (4) 

Producers' 
Production 131 stocks 



Millions 



Vitrified 

Sewer 

Pipe 

Thousand 
feet 



Smooth- Mineral- 
Asphalt surfaced surfaced and 
Shingles Rolls Rolls Sheathings 



RIGID 
INSU- 
LATING 
Felts BOARD 



Thousand squares 



Thousand 
tons 



Million 
sq.ft. 



1939 










13 


75 








43 


82 


30 


2 


.61 


8 


17 


1950 


3,878 


5 227 


10.9" 


29 


48 


22 


.44 


400 


203 


100 


105 


5 


:45 


18 


.94 


1950 N 


5,244 


5,797 


10 


70 


33 


28 


21 


.94 


429 


145 


106 


97 


6 


.74 


24 


30 


D 


2,975 


4,266 


8 


99 


28 


81 


22.44 


381 


62 


84 


38 


5 


.78 


24 


10 


1951 J 


3,706 


4,803 


10.94 


29.43 


23 


58 


316 


141 


79 


66 


5 


60 


23 


35 


F 


3,320 


4,149 


9 


45 


23 


42 


23 


59 


434 


181 


82 


74 


5 


54 


22 


12 


M 


3,423 


5,166 


16.47 


27 


85 


23 


49 


340 


188 


125 


86 


6.89 


25 


64 


A 


4,506 


5,638 


20.63 


28 


71 


25.06 


299 


197 


116 


99 


6 


76 


24 


19 


M 


5,159 


6,625 


23 


39 


35 


91 


25 


09 


304 


253 


92 


113 


6 


36 


25 


48 


J 


5,243 


7,845 


25 


34 


35 


67 


25 


37 


325 


231 


85 


123 


5 


47 


22 


36 


J 


3,546 


6,450 


20 


79 


36 


54 


27.00 


366 


216 


118 


147 


4 


70 


24 


19 


A 


2,877 


6,466 


27 


35 


33 


81 


26.43 


323 


237 


121 


149 


5 


51 


27.03 


S 


3,265 


5,428 


22 


85 


32 


54 r 


28.81' 


316 


187 


126 


157 


4 


72 


24 


34 


o 


3,029 


5,719 


24.98 


34 


29 


28 


55 


324 


189 


129 


137 


4.97 


27 


38 


N 


2,166 


4,778 


19 


11 










302 


106 


106 


65 


4 


90 


24 


72 


D 


1,352 


3,091 


13 


31 












57 


33 


30 


3 


29 


18. 


56 



PRODUCERS' SALES 



PRODUC- 
TION EXPORTS' 6 ' IMPORTS 



PRODUCTION 



FACTORY 
SALES 



Cement 



Thousand 
barrels 



Building Structural 
Brick* 4 ' TileW« 



Drain 

Tile (4 > 



Sawn Lumber 



Window Cast Iron Steel 
Glass Soil Pipe Pipes 
and Tubes and 
Fittings Fittings 



Wire Paints, 
Nails Varnishes, 
Lacquers 

(7) 



Millions 



Thousand 

tons Thousands 



Million board feet 



Thousand 
square feet 



Thousand tons 



Thousand 
dollars 



1939 
1950 


478 
1,394 


13.8 
30.0 


7.2 
14.6 


1,197 
1,503 


331.4 
538.0 


176.1 
297.9 


4,067 
5,711 


1.4 

4.5 


8.4 
19.6 


5.5 
7.1 


2,155 
7,342 


1950 N 
D 


1,434 
791 


35.4 
28.3 


13.8 
13.0 


1,892 
911 


418.7 
398.6 


304.2 
229.2 


9,838 
5,066 


6.1 
6.6 


20.7 
19.5 


7.6 
6.4 


7,361 
6,575 


1951 J 
F 
M 


887 

908 

1,380 


28.3 
23.4 
27.9 


13.8 
11.4 
16.1 


856 
836 
868 


431.8 
479.3 
502.6 


264.1 
241.2 
296.9 


3,524 
3,790 
3,886 


5.1 
4.7 
5.5 


21.6 
22.0 
20.1 


7.8 
6.6 
7.6 


8,345 
7,618 
8,172 


A 
M 
J 


1,533 
1,880 
1,681 


27.2 
35.9 
35.4 


13.7 
17.3 
19.9 


1,371 
1,796 
2,168 


400.2 
595.5 
813.3 


303.7 
286.1 
265.7 


7,922 
6,355 
6,814 


5.5 
5.8 
5.6 


22.9 
22.9 
19.2 


7.1 
8.2 
7.9 


9,749 
10,515 
10,101 


J 
A 

S 


1,589 
1,754 
1,542 


34.9 
34.4 
30.2 


19.1 
17.9 
15.7 


1,996 
2,051 
2,172 


747.3 
696.3 
554.3 


318.6 
315.2 
281.8 


7,465 
7,501 
6,778 


3.1 
4.6 
4.1 


15.2 
23.4 
19.7 


6.5 
6.9 
7.1 


8,696 
8,031 
6,874 


o 

N 
D 


1,649 

1,277 

776 


34.5 


18.5 


2,439 


479.3 
360.4 


318.1 
285.3 
258.8 


5,787 
5,948 
3,685 


3.8 
5.7 


22.1 
22.3 


8.6 
6.3 


7,213 
6,426 



("Figures cover the production of firms which normally account for 85 per cent of the total for Canada. 

<2) Since January, 1949, includes concrete chimney blocks. (3, Prior to 1947 data on producers' sales were used 
to indicate production. Data for 1950 and lt51 are obtained by adjusting producers' sales for changes in inventories. 
<4) Includes Newfoundland as of May, 1949. (6) Hollow blocks including fireproofing and load-bearing tile. (6) Planks and 
boards. (7, Prior to 1946 figures represent gross value of production. Figures from 1946 to the present are factory 
sales of firms which normally account for 96% of total Canadian production. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Concrete Building Blocks and Cement Pipe; Products made from Canadian clays; 
Asphalt Roofing; Rigid Insulating Board; Iron Castings and Cast Iron Pipes and Fittings; Steel Wire and Specified Wire 
Products; Sales of Paints, Varnishes and Lacquers and Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



43 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 39 



Farm Cash Income 

Quarterly averages or qu\rtej.-s 



GRAINS, SEEDS AND HAY 



LIVE 
VEGETABLES AND OTHER HELD CROPS »> STOCK 



Totnl 

( isll 

Income 



Total 



Wheat 
Including 
Participa- 
tion 
Payments 



Oats 
Including 
Participa- 
tion 
Payments 



Other 

Grains, 

Seeds 

and 

Hay^ ! 



Total 



Potatoes 



Vege- 
tables 



Tobacco 



Total 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 

1950 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr 
2nd qtr 
3rd qtr 



179.25 
555.88 

475.97 
600.46 
735.95 

478.29 
763.02 
623.55 



62.90 
140.99 

76.36 
181.58 
252.61 

72.95 
288.24 
148.22 



54.48 
96.99 

61.21 
142.36 
143.49 

35.47 
251.46 
105.21 



2.98 
14.91 

6.68 
10.69 
37.25 

13.95 
17.23 
13.23 



5 44 
29.09 



15 98 

38.46 



8.47 10 61 
28.53 36.82 
71.87 46.76 



23.53 
19.54 
29.77 



56.57 
10.45 
37.32 



4.95 
9 94 

5.68 
12.69 
11.66 

8.33 
4.58 
9.00 



4.75 
10.72 

3.67 
23.38 
11.92 

3.75 

3.96 

27.09 



4.86 
14.35 



50.57 
223.99 



218.04 

220.67 

13.33 271.86 



40.81 



226 41 
267.18 
244.33 



LIVE STOCK 



OTHER FARM PRODUCTS 



Cattle 

and 

Calves 



Hogs 



Sheep 

and 
Lambs 



Poultry 



Dairy 
Products 



Fruits 



Eggs 



Other 
Products (4) 



Forest 
Products 



Fur 
Farming 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


23.60 
121.99 


19.09 
79.23 


1.68 
4.03 


1950 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 


118.13 
130.02 
139.42 


82.82 
69.99 
91.50 


0.93 
5.22 
8.21 


1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 


120.08 
150.09 
135.14 


92.64 
97.63 
82.70 


1.95 
1.15 
5.67 



6.20 28.45 4.32 

18.74 81.94 10.16 

16.17 95.05 6.37 

15.44 101.46 18.13 

32.73 71.36 13.16 

11.75 61.25 3.11 
18.32 106.95 5 50 
20.83 119.26 19.37 



6.86 4.94 
25.87 13.90 



26.81 
23.60 
29.19 

26.39 
33.33 
34 02 



18.09 
13.63 
15.36 

9.66 
23.55 
15.95 



3.78 
18.68 

22.47 

4.01 

33.11 

17.54 

26.46 

4.48 



1.45 
1.91 

2.19 
0.57 
2.54 

4.40 
1.36 
0.59 



Prince 
Edward 

Island 



Nova 
Scotia 



New 
Bruns- 
wick 



Quebec Ontario Manitoba 



Saskat- 
chewan 



Alberta 



British 
Columbia 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 

1950 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 



1.75 
5.53 

6.32 
4.41 
5.90 

5.67 
6.55 
5.49 



3.57 
9.89 

10.07 

8.98 

12.58 

10.07 
11.25 
10.49 



3.40 
11.68 

11.11 

9.83 

15.92 

9.75 
11.65 
10.39 



24.90 
90.41 



52.34 
169.86 



98 43 159.24 

94.78 171.27 

103.55 174.73 



16.20 
48.99 

29.40 
49.90 
93.40 



39.57 
101.90 



30.01 
92.20 



71.72 69.02 
131.59 101.62 
163.72 129.75 



79 83 189.13 38 43 
113 78 200 00 69 96 
110.63 201.31 54.94 



52.34 
196 31 
113.75 



72.49 

132.37 

83 98 



7.51 
25.43 

20.67 
28.09 
36.40 

20 60 
21.16 
32.57 



44 'Does not include Supplementary Government Payments made under Prairie Farm Assistance Act, Praine Farm 

Income Act and Wheat Acreage Reduction Act. "'Includes barley and barley participation payments rye , Uax, 
Oar adjustment payments, corn, clover and grass seed, hay and clover <» Includes in addibon sugar beets and 

fibre flax. (4) Includes wool, honey, maple products and miscellaneous iarm products. 
Source: Farm Cash Income, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Inspected Slaughterings of Live Stock and Cold Storage Holdings of Meat 

and Poultry 

TABLE 41 Monthly averages or calendar months 



INSPECTED SLAUGHTERINGS 



Sheep and 
Cattle Calves Lambs Hogs 



COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS AS OF END OF PERIOD 




Veal 


Mutton 
and Lamb 




Pork 




Beei 


Total 


Cured or 
in cure 


Poultry 







Thousands 








Million pounds 






1939 
1950 


73 

107 


57 
64 


65 
43 


302 
367 


29.6 
22. 2 r 


4.2 

3.4' 


6.3 
3.9 


44.0 
31. 3 r 


23.3 
14. 2 r 


15.4 
19. 7 r 


1950 N 
D 


141 
94 


54 
29 


102 
31 


452 
381 


24.8 
22. 2 r 


4.9 
3.4 r 


4.0 
3.9 


29.8 
31. 3 r 


16.9 
14.2' 


17.9 
19. 7 r 


1951 J 
F 
M 


104 
78 
78 


29 
26 
45 


27 
16 
17 


402 
340 
364 


22.4 
20.5 
17.3 


2.3 
1.7 
1.7 


2.9 
2.0 
2.1 


34.6 
40.4 
42.1 


13.2 
16.4 
13.4 


18.1 
14.5 
11.8 


A 
M 
J 


94 
109 
109 


82 
94 
67 


14 
8 
9 


362 
407 
323 


17.7 
17.5 
14.8 


2.7 
4.0 
4.3 


1.4 
0.9 
0.9 


45.9 
47.9 
41.5 


13.6 
15.3 
14.7 


10.2 
8.2 
7.9 


J 

A 

S 


97 

100 

95 


53 
48 
40 


18 
46 
73 


285 
300 
281 


15.3 
14.0 
16.1 


4.3 
4.3 
4.5 


0.6 
0.8 
1.1 


33.9 
25.2 
19.6 


14.2 
12.6 
11.0 


8 
11.8 
16.1 


O 
N 
D 


116 

107 

63 


45 
35 
20 


102 
83 
25 


460 
529 
436 


18.6 
23.6 
19.4 


5.2 
5.2 
4.1 


2.1 
3.6 
4.1 


26.9 
37.8 
39.8 


13.7 
18.2 
13.1 


22.2 
31. 3 r 
34.5 



Prices and Price Ratios: Live Stock and Live-Stock Feeds 



Price index 
numbers of 

commo- 
dities and 
services 
used by 
farmers 



PRICES 



Index of 

live-stock 

feed 

prices 



Index of 
animal 

product 
prices 



1935-39 = 100 



Hog- 

barley 

ratio 

Winnipeg 

(U 



Ratio of 
price of 

beef cattle 
to price 

of hogs (2) 



Ratio of 
price of 

beef 

cattle to 

price of 

lambs 



Cattle, 






steers Hogs 






good up Bl 


Barley 


Oats 


to 1050 lbs dressed 


No. 1 


No. 2 


Toronto Toronto (3) 


feed< 4 > 


C.W. 



Dollars per hundred 
pounds 



Dollars per bushel 



1939 


99. 


1950 


197. 


1950 N 




D 




1951 J 


203. 


F 




M 




A 


218. 


M 




J 




J 




A 


227. 


S 




o 




N 




D 





7- 



85.4 
249.5 

243.7 
243.9 

250.0 
258.9 
260.4 

256.4 
242.6 
228.1 

216.7 
219.1 
224.9 

235.6 
246.7 
240.8 



101.5 
281.4 

290.5 
298.4 

310.9 
329.6 
347.2 

331.6 
336.1 
353.1 

358.9 
348.3 
339.2 

330.3 
328.5 
329.1 



27.0 
16.7 

16.1 
17.4 

17.0 
17.2 
17.4 

16.4 
20.2 
24.3 

26.1 
25.1 
21.2 

17.0 
15.2 
15.8 



73.4 
115.8 

120.1 
121. 2 r 

121.9 
118.7 
122.1 

136.9 
125.0 
118.2 

114.4 
123.5 
136.1 

149.4 
152.5 
154.0 



71.4 
89.6 

96.0 
94.9 

85.7 
84.6 
79.4 

80.9 
82.4 
82.6 

91.9 

95.7 

102.2 

102.6 
103.8 
105.7 



6.91 
25.84 

26.74 
27.79 

29.25 
31.09 
32.06 

32.94 
32.73 
33.69 

33.91 
33.48 
33.61 

33.77 
33.62 
34.12 



8.83 
29.05 

29.02 
29.92 

31.32 
34.26 
34.33 

31.42 
34.24 
37.35 

38.86 
35.48 
32.25 

29.48 
29.14 
28.88 



0.384 
1.375 

1.396 
1.340 

1.439 
1.531 
1.518 

1.454 
1.244 
1.171 

1.159 
1.170 
1.236 

1.358 
1.432 
1.364 



0.308 
0.968 

0.964 
0.994 

1.051 
1.101 
1.063 

1.048 
0.939 
0.839 

0.805 
0.831 
0.869 

0.951 
1.085 
0.999 



(i 'Includes advance equalization payment on barley until March, 1947, and subsidy on hogs from 1944 to date. 
(2) Based on price for hogs including Dominion premium. A rise in ratio favours production of beef. (3, Prior to 1941, 
prices were quoted on a live weight basis. (4 'Prior to August, 1939, Barley No. 1 feed was designated as Barley No. 3 
v^. w . 

Source: Live-Stock Market Review, Dept. of Agriculture, Canadian Coarse Grains, Quarterly Review, and Cold 
Storage Holdings, D.B.S. 



45 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Exports of Live-Stock Products 

TABLE 41 concluded Monthly averages or calendar months 

EXPORTS 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Beef and 

Veal, Fresh 

Chilled and 

Frozen 



Bacon, 
Hams and 
Shoulders 



Canned 
Meats 



Cheese 



Concentrated 

Millc 

Products 



Eggs 
in the 
Shell 



Dried 
Eggs 



Poultry 









Million pounds 






Million dozen 


Million pounds 


1939 
1951 


0.32 
7.79 


15.65 
0.51 


39 
81 


7.58 
2.55 


2.87 
3 66 


0.11 
55 


— 


0.23 
0.08 


1950 N 
D 


8 17 
6.99 


6 51 
4 55 


1.16 
95 


4 33 
1.04 


3.97 
1.33 


0.23 
2 00 





0.02 
0.02 


1951 J 
F 
M 


4 33 
2.65 
2.65 


2.37 
0.48 
38 


1.24 
0.84 
0.59 


45 
0.69 
0.29 


1.04 
1.25 
1.42 


2.50 
0.80 
0.30 


E 


0.01 
0.01 
02 


A 
M 

J 


6.08 
15.12 

17.73 


0.60 

45 
0.30 


0.36 
0.82 
0.79 


0.18 
0.11 
1.33 


1.92 

3.91 
3.93 


0.13 
0.10 
10 


— 


0.01 
0.09 


J 

A 

S 


15.43 
7.78 
7.13 


0.24 
0.16 
0.11 


0.63 
0.70 
0.92 


2.64 
4.63 
6.21 


4 96 
6.54 
4.00 


0.12 
0.08 
0.14 


— 


06 
0.06 
0.23 


O 
N 
D 


8.95 
4.43 
1.15 


0.20 
0.34 
0.51 


0.78 
1.06 

1.01 


8.10 
5.09 

0.94 


3.38 
5.40 
6.22 


0.19 

0.48 
1.63 


— 


0.21 
0.16 
0.10 



Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



TABLE 42 



Milk and Milk Products: Production, Stocks and Sales 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



FLUID 
PRODUCTION SALES 



PRODUCTION OF DAIRY FACTORIES 



Total 
Milk 1 



Concentrated 
Milk and Creamery Cheddar Milk 

Cream Butter Cheese Products 



Ice 
Cream 



COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS' 1 ' 

Concentrated 
Creamery Factory Milk 

Butter'" Cheese" Products 









Million pounds 






Thousand 
gals. 




Million pound 


i 


1939 
1951 


1.315 


251 


22.30 
21.47 


10.46 
7.11 


13 97 
36.21 


754 
2,122 


41.00 
44.82 


25.73 
34.03 


18.08 
64.02 


1950 D 


941 


352 


9 51' 


3.12' 


16 52' 


1,159' 


39.25 


28.05 


34.74 


1951 J 
F 
M 


894 

816 

1,040 


354 
330 
373 


8.16' 

7.07' 

10.14' 


2.00' 
1.25' 
1.75' 


17.12' 
15 31' 
22.96 


1,126' 
1.115' 
1,496' 


25.64' 

17.25 

9.79 


26.96' 

24.34 

20.04 


26 01 
16.65 
12.52 


A 
M 
J 


1,293 
1,701 
1.999 


348 
362 
356 


16 86' 
28.77' 
39.18' 


3.92' 

9.00' 
14.29' 


34.96' 
53.96' 
66 . 25' 


1,866' 
2.957' 
3,279' 


10.18 
16.30 
32.16 


18.02 
21.00 
27.27 


17.83 
31.21 
62.21 


J 

A 

S 


1,873 
1.765 
1,556 


348 
347 
343 


36.34' 
34 . 53' 
29.01' 


13.55' 
13.38' 
11 50' 


56 97' 
50.11' 
41.54' 


3.939' 
3,456' 
2,170' 


46.10 
55.48 
62.61 


37.06 
40.89 
45.00 


83.94 
92.13 
95.02 


O 
N 
D 


1.399 
1.073 


361 

354 


23 58' 
13.80' 
10 18' 


8.93' 
3 74 r 
1.96' 


34.91' 
22 04' 
18 39' 


1.628' 
1,225' 
1,201' 


66 06 
56 59 
44.82' 


41.95 
36.99 
34.03' 


88.51 
75.14 
64.02 


1951 J 






8.83 


1.13 


17.71 


1,129 


35.71 


31.12 





46 : As at end of period. Last month is preliminary. : Milk equivalents of cottage cheese and factory cheese 

other than cheddar, though not included in the monthly figures, are included in the monthly averages. Includes 

butter and cheese imported and "In Transit". 

Source: Monthly Reports, Dairy Production; Milk Production and Utilization; Cold Storage Holdings of Dairy Pro- 
ducts, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 43 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 
Fish: Landings, Exports and Stocks 
Monthly averages or calendar months 





IANDINGS 


EXPORTS OF FISH PRODUCTS 


STOCKS 




Seafish 


By Countries ' 


Selected Types 


Storage 

Holdings 

End of 

Period* 3 ' 


Total 
value (l) 


Maritimes 

Total and British 

quantity (1> Quebec (1) Columbia '''^ 


United 
Total States Other 


Salmon Lobster 





Thousand 
dollars 








Million pounds 










1939 
1950 


1,436 
5,629 


81.2 
111.0 


46.4 
60.5 


34.8 
50.5 


27.5 
45.9 


14.5 
28.9 


13.0 
17.0 


6.2 
6.7 


1.2 
2.1 


31.5 
47. 3 r 


1950 N 
D 


4,890 
4,470 r 


153.0 
115. 6 r 


31.1 
23.6 


121.9 
92. l r 


63.9 
41.1 


33.2 
20.2 


30.7 
20.9 


20.0 
7.7 


0.3 
2.4 


55.0 
47. 3 r 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3,219 
1,779 
1,614 


127.1 
49.4 
30.1 


19.7 
17.1 
20.9 


107.4 

32.3 

9.2 


55.3 
38.7 
37.3 


30.1 
21.3 
18.6 


25.2 
17.4 
18.7 


5.3 
4.1 
3.8 


2.3 
1.6 
1.3 


39.0 
31.5 
25.3 


A 
M 
J 


2,288 
8,526 
7,337 


62.4 
142.5 
116.5 


56.8 
121.5 
101.5 


5.5 
21.0 
15.0 


34.8 
33.5 
36.8 


18.4 
24.3 
24.0 


16.5 

9.2 

12.8 


2.2 
2.4 
2.3 


2.3 
4.6 
4.2 


25.2 
35.7 
38.0 


J 

A 

S 


10,978 

14,067 

8,629 


122.7 
170.4 
114.0 


83.7 
86.3 
67.7 


39.1 
84.1 
46.2 


41.2 
41.8 
43.9 


27.8 
32 2 
29.8 


13.4 

9.5 

14.1 


2.7 
3.4 
6.8 


3.4 
1.4 
1.3 


43.2 
49.3 
51.0 


o 

N 
D 


5,007 
3,730 
5,374 


80.0 
106.7 
170.5 


53.1 
38.6 
29.1 


26.9 

68.1 

141.4 


65.2 
55.5 
55.3 


44.1 
36.7 
24.0 


21.1 
18.9 
31.3 


12.5 

12.0 

4.8 


0.5 
0.4 
2.4 


57.8 
50.6 
44.1 



"'Monthly totals of 1950 are not equivalent to annual data due to receipt of additional statistics which cannot be 
allocated by months. (2) Does not include bait, offal, meal, livers, tongues or roe. (3, As of April, 1949, Newfound- 



land is included. 

Source: Monthly Review of Canadian Fishery Statistics, D.B.S. 



TABLE 44 



Manufactured Food 

Monthly averages or calendar months; quarterly averages or quarters 



Wheat Flour 



Margarine 



Production 



P.C. of 
capacity 



Million 
barrels 



Exports' 1 ' 



Million 
barrels 



Produc- 

tion (2) 



Stocks 
End of 
Period 



• Oatmeal Cereals 
and Rolled Ready to Macaroni, 
Oats Serve etc. Dry 



Yeast, 
Baking Fresh and Dried 
Powder Dried Eggs' 3 ' 



Production 



Million pounds 



1939 
1950 


63.2 
71.1 


1.40 
1.75 


0.45 
0.84 


7.84 


2.40 


14.82 
8.33 


17.14 
17.11 


12.19 
16.21 


2.64 
2.81 


3.69 
5.76 


0.05 


1950 N 
D 


83.9 
81.3 


2.14 
1.96 


1.26 
0.92 


9.49 
6.58 


2.79 r 
2.40 


10.34\ 

6.37/ 


12.66 


17.59 


3.27 


5.88 




1951 J 
F 
M 


78.6 
85.8 
87.1 


1.97 
1.98 
2.19 


1.27 
1.05 
1.16 


9.79 

9.60 

10.84 


1.98 
2.59 
3.00 


9.08) 

7.06 

6.52J 


16.60 


19.04 


2.02 


5.71 




A 
M 
J 


86.4 
83.7 
81.4 


2.10 
2.11 
2.10 


1.29 
1.48 
1.07 


9.54 
7.73 
7.38 


3.85 
3.85 
3.32 


3.551 

6.42 

7.25J 


21.96 


17.64 


2.26 


6.12 


0.25 


J 

A 

S 


57.4 
64.4 
76.1 


1.41 
1.70 
1.80 


0.93 
0.57 
0.70 r 


6.27 
7.80 
8.33 


2.45 
1.88 
2.37 


6.171 
11.54[ 
13.12] 


19.97 


15.38 


2.47 


6.26 


0.17 


O 
N 
D 


75.9 
77.1 
72.0 


1.93 
1.94 
1.76 


0.87 
0.90 
0.72 


10.15 
9.32 
8.41 


2.80 

2.58 r 

3.17 


12.891 
11.23 

9.37 













("Beginning August, 1945, customs exports are adjusted to reflect actual physical movement of wheat flour from 
Canada. Data shown for the last three months are not so adjusted. (2) Includes Newfoundland. (3) Eggs, dried and 
powdered. 

Source: Canadian Milling Statistics, Margarine Report and Quarterly Report on Processed Foods, D.B.S. 



47 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Manufactured Food: Production 
TABLE 44 concluded Quarterly averages or quarters 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Biscuits 
Soda 



Biscuits 

Plain 

and Fancy 



Million pounds 



Chewing 
Gum 

Million 
boxes 



Cocoa 
Powder 
(for sale) 

Million 
pounds 



Chocolate 
Bars 

Million 
dozen 



Chocolate Sugar 
Confection- Confection- 



ery 1 



ery 



Jams 
and 

Jellies 



Marma- 
lades 



Soups 
Canned 



Million pounds 



1939 


7.03 


20.86 


1 71 


1 55 


5.06 


9 54 


11.61 


10.87 


2.98 


24.16 


1950 


10.65 


41.68 


3.30 


2.76 


16.04 


9.49 


19.52 


19.92 


4.88 


40.77 


1950 






















3rd qtr. 


10.29 


46.85 


3.40 


2.25 


16.05 


7.70 


19.58 


27.90 


4.95 


58.22 


4th qtr. 


10.17 


37.37 


2.82 


2.84 


8.85 


13 27 


26.60 


17.31 


4.48 


45.84 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


13.16 


38.56 


3.11 


3.04 


9.58 


6.92 


14.15 


14.26 


5.60 


31.04 


2nd qtr. 


10.11 


43.95 


3.42 


2 .51 


8 12 


4 85 


14.32 


20.76 


4.42 


30.06 


3rd qtr. 


10.20 


47.60 


2 83 


1.98 


9.79 


6.49 


16.73 


19.56 


3.96 


70.55 



Infants' 

Foods Baked 
Prepared Beans 



Million pounds 



Pickles, 

Relishes 

and Sauces 

Thousand 
gallons 



Process 
Cheese 



Spiced Pork Beef Tea, 

Peanuts, and Spiced Stews and Blended, 

Peanut Salted and Ham, Boiled Packed, 

Butter Roasted Canned Dinners etc. 



Carbo- 
Cofiee nated 
Roasted Beverages 



Million pounds 



Million 
gallons 



1939 


0.90 


19.63 


0.46 


4.58 


3.10 


1.97 






8.94 


9.58 


10.66 


1950 


7.12 


22.91 


1.50 


9.06 


5.50 


3.91 


4.39 


2.76 


11.01 


15.85 


25.21 


1950 
























3rd qtr. 


6.60 


19.02 


1.48 


8 .41 


5.39 


3 38 


4.16 


2.44 


10.39 


18.38 


31.72 


4th qtr. 


11.10 


27.08 


1.58 


10.10 


5.82 


5.30 


5.64 


4.10 


10.06 


15.90 


20.05 


1951 
























1st qtr. 


7.06 


26.64 


1.14 


10.34 


6 21 


4 .11 


4.74 


3.76 


11.78 


18.10 


17.40 


2nd qtr. 


6.52 


21.21 


1.05 


9 31 


5.88 


4 32 


4.70 


2.74 


11.10 


16.63 


25.89 


3rd qtr. 


9.42 


12.60 


1.13 


8.87 


5.69 


3.69 


2 92 


2.53 


9 .19 


16.14 


28.48 



SUGAR: PRODUCTION, SALES AND STOCKS 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



RAW CANE SUGAR 



REFINED SUGAR 



Production 



Domestic Sales 



Receipts 



Stocks end 
of period 



Granulated 



Yellow and 
brown 



Total 



Beet 



Cane 



Total 



Stocks 



End of 
period 



Million pounds 



1939 
1951 


82.1 
89 


74.5 
140.7 


83.6 
98.3 


10 2 
10 .5 


93.8 
108.8 


24 3 


86.9 


94.5 
111 .2 


248.5 
316.0 


1950 N 
D 


148 2 
69 3 


155 4 
162.3 


205.8 
145.2 


13.5 
11 5 


219.3 
156.7 


23.3 
19.6 


74.6 

60.9 


97.9 
80.5 


271.4 
347.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


28.7 

35.6 
49 .0 


131.8 

93 4 
68 5 


55 8 
60.0 

66.9 


6.8 

9.0 

12.1 


62.6 
69.0 
78.9 


27 4 
25.7 
23.8 


72 .5 
65.6 
73.4 


100.0 
91.3 
97 .2 


309.2 
286.2 
267.7 


A 
M 

J 


73.3 
162.4 
137 3 


69 8 
114.2 
132.9 


59 .6 
99.8 

104.4 


7.4 
12.7 
11.9 


67.0 
112.4 
116.3 


22.8 
33.7 
31.6 


72.8 

94.4 
113.2 


95 .6 
128.1 
144.8 


238.8 
222.3 
193.7 


J 

A 

S 


108 9 
145.2 
128.8 


138.3 
168.5 

198.8 


89 4 
104.5 

89 7 


9 1 
9.8 

8 6 


98.4 

114.3 

98.4 


23 7 
17.1 
16.0 


93.7 
102.0 
109.4 


117 5 
119 1 
125.4 


174.6 
169.0 
142.0 


O 
N 
D 


89 4 
55 
53 9 


180.9 
139.8 

140 7 


173.4 

175. 8 r 
100 5 


12 7 
16 5 

9.7 


186.1 
192.3' 

110.1 


24 .1 
27.3 

18.1 


96.4 
86 2 
62.7 


120.5 

113.5 
80 8 


208.2 

287.1' 

316.0 



48 ' Bulk and packages. * 

Source: Quarterly Report on Processed Foods, and The Sugar Situation in Canada, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 45 



DOMESTIC TRADE 



Value of Retail Trade 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 



















Lumber 


















and 




Grocery 










Garages 




Building 


Total 


and Com- 




Country 


Depart- 


Motor 


and 




Materials 


AM 


bination 


Meat 


General 


ment 


Variety Vehicle 


Filling 


Clothing 


Shoe and 


Stores'" 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores Dealers 


Stations 


Stores 2 


Stores Hardware 













Million dollars 












1941 
1950 


286.4 
789.0 


47.3 
120.8 


6.7 
15.2 


17.8 
39.5 


31.5 
72.7 


7.1 
14.2 


30.0 
129.5 


17.1 
41.5 


18.7 
41.1 


3.7 
7.7 


12.7 
45.6 


1950 N 
D 


831.8 
976.4 


121.9 
142.2 


15.9 
18.5 


41.8 
46.8 


98.2 
118.9 


15.0 
31.7' 


129.0 
117.4 


41.0 
39.2 


47.8 
69.3 


8.4 
12.1 


49.3 
46.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


703.8 
694.3 

851.5 


119.1 
118.1 
141.1 


15.1 
14.5 
17.1 


32.2 
32.5 
38.5 


58.3 
58.4 
72.6 


9.6 

9.6 

14.4 


127.2 
145.2 
178.3 


37.3 
33.5 
39.0 


32.2 
27.7 
42.3 


5.5 
4.5 
7.3 


36.0 
31.8 
36.1 


A 
M 

J 


859.2 
931.1 
940.2 


128.0 
139.2 
151.2 


16.0 
17.2 
18.0 


39.5 
49.3 
48.9 


75.2 
76.6 
69.5 


13.1 
15.7 
16.5 


186.9 
183.1 
172.9 


42.7 
49.7 
51.5 


43.0 
46.5 
48.3 


8.2 

9.2 

10.4 


45.8 
57.5 
58.0 


J 

A 

S 


865.8 
897.4 
891.2 


139.7 
144.4 
144.5 


15.4 
17.5 
17.6 


48.4 
49.3 
47.9 


54.5 
61.5 
72.4 


14.9 
14.4 
15.1 


158.1 
148.5 
145.3 


53.8 
51.3 
49.0 


38.0 
36.9 
44.1 


7.7 
7.5 
9.1 


53.0 
54.5 
51.4 


O 
N 
D 


898.7 
906.1' 
1005.7 


140.8 
145.9 
161.2 


18.0 
17.3 
20.5 


49.3 
46.9 
52.6 


81.3 
101.9 
119.8 


16.0 
17.4 
33.4 


139.9 

130.3' 

96.2 


50.9 
44.3 
44.6 


47.1 
51.0 
74.1 


8.1 

9.9' 
12.6 


53.5 
46.6' 
42.3 



BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 



BY ECONOMIC AREAS 



Furniture 
Stores 



Radio and 
Appliance Restau- 
Dealers rants 



Coal and 

Wood 

Dealers 



Drug 
Stores 



Jewellery 
Stores 



Mari- British 

times Quebec Ontario Prairies Columbia 













Million dollars 












1941 
1950 


5.3 
13.3 


3.8 
12.1 


10.6 
28.3 


8.2 
16.2 


8.4 

17.3 


3.2 
6.6 


23.6 
54.5 


68.2 
183.8 


117.3 
303.7 


51.7 
158.6 


25.8 
88.4 


1950 N 
D 


12.9 
16.5 


12.5 
16.2 


29.1 
28.4 


17.9 
19.1 


17.0 
24.3 


6.4 
17.1 


54.8 
71.3 


199.2 
224.4 


316.4 
389.2 


172.9 
183.9 


88.6 
107.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


11.2 
11.2 
13.3 


12.6 
11.7 
12.6 


25.4 
22.5 
26.8 


21.1 
20.0 
16.6 


17.4 
18.2 
19.1 


4.5 
4.2 
5.3 


48.6 
45.6 
59.1 


158.5 
154.9 
204.8 


286.4 
282.2 
343.9 


130.5 
129.4 
146.8 


79.9 
82.2 
97.0 


A 
M 
J 


14.4 
13.3 
13.8 


15.3 
10.7 
10.3 


27.1 
30.9 
30.9 


10.7 
10.6 
11.9 


17.1 
18.2 
18.6 


5.2 
5.3 
6.1 


57.5 
60.9 
63.3 


210.9 
223.6 
222.5 


325.6 
353.5 
362.3 


170.9 
195.9 
192.3 


94.2 
97.2 
99.9 


J 
A 

S 


12.0 
12.5 
13.2 


9.6 
9.4 
9.6 


35.0 
35.9 
33.4 


11.8 
14.1 
16.7 


17.4 
18.6 
18.7 


5.2 
6.1 
5.9 


58.2 
59.3 
57.9 


200.9 
209.1 
211.2 


329.2 
335.6 
337.8 


183.1 
196.1 
188.9 


94.5 
97.3 
95.6 


O 
N 
D 


12.5 

13.8' 

15.9 


10.6 
10. 7' 
12.5 


33.3 

29.6' 

29.0 


20.9 

22.0' 

21.6 


19.6 
18.6 
26.0 


6.0 
6.7' 
16.8 


58.4 
59.6' 
73.8 


212.6 
220.8' 
227.7 


341.7 
341.5' 
393.6 


192.3 
188.1' 
200.3 


93.7 
96.2' 
110.4 



Note: Series revised to account for the effect of changes in the number of stores in 1950. Figures for 1951 are based 
on 1950 final revision. 



49 



(1) Total value of sales by retail outlets, including "Tobacco" and "All Other Trades". 
"Family Clothing" and "Women's Clothing". 
Source: Monthly Report on Retail Trade. 



"'Includes "Men's Clothing", 



DOMESTIC TRADE 



TABLE 46 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Retail Sales and Stocks 

Monthly averages or calendar months U! 



DEPARTMENT STORES 



Total 

All 

Departments 



Ladies' Apparel 

and 

Accessories 



Men's and Boys' 

Clothing, 

Furnishings 

and Shoes 



Food and 
Kindred 
Products 



Piece Goods, 

Linens 

and 

Domestics 



Home Furnishings, 
Furniture, Radio 
and Appliances 



Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales 



Stocks 



Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks 















Million 


dollars 












1950 


72.7 


177.4 


20.9 




9 3 




5 




4 7 




13.0 




1950 O 
N 
D 


83. T 
98.2 
118.9 


207.3 
204.3 
177.4 


26.4 
28.9 
32.1 




12 .2 
15.1 
18.2 




4.9 
6.0 

7.4 




5.5 
5 5 
5.4 




14.8 
14.5 
14.9 




1951 J 
F 
M 


58.3 
58.4 
72.6 


187.1 
213.7 
240.4 


14.0 
14.3 
22.5 


47.7 
57.9 
64.7 


6.0 
6.0 
8.7 


24.2 
29 2 
32.3 


4.7 
5.1 
6.0 


5.1 
5.8 
5.4 


5.9 
4.9 

4.5 


15.5 
18.2 
19.4 


12.5 
12.7 
13.2 


42.9 
45.5 
55.4 


A 
M 
J 


75.2 
76.6 
69.5 


239.0 
235.2 
221.5 


22.9 
23.7 
19.8 


63.9 
58.6 
52.4 


9.0 
9.2 
8.9 


32.3 
33.1 
30.7 


4.7 
4.9 
4.7 


5.1 
5.0 
4.5 


4.3 
4.3 

4.2 


19.6 
19.5 
18.2 


14.8 
13.7 
11.8 


53.4 
54.4 
52.9 


J 

A 

S 


54.5 
61.5 
72.4 


221.6 
232.9 
234.9 


13.6 
17.0 
23.4 


54.7 
62.5 
62.6 


6.0 
6.6 

9.2 


30.7 
34.5 
36.9 


4.5 
4.8 
4.7 


4.5 
4.7 
4.4 


3.7 
4.3 

4.7 


17.7 
18.4 
17.7 


10.2 
11.4 
11 8 


51.6 
49.9 
48.2 


o 

N 
D 


81.3 
101.9 
119.8 


241.5 
225.6 


27.0 
30.6 
33.0 


62.4 
56.4 


12.1 
15.8 
18.7 


37 .6 
34.0 


5.3 
6.6 

7.9 


4.9 
5.0 


5.1 
5.5 
5.2 


17.6 
16.5 


11 9 
13.5 
12.6 


48.2 
44.6 



CHAIN STORES— SIX TRADES 



Food 
Stores 



Women's 
Clothing 



Shoe 



Hardware 



Drug 



Variety 



Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks 



Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks 















Million 


dollars 












1949 
1950 


36.3 
42.2 


32.4 
38.3 


3.0 
3.1 


6.2 

6.0 


2.7 

2.7 


15.0 
14.5 


0.9 
1.0 


3.3 

4.8 


2.3 
2.3 


7.4 
7.8 


11.8 
12.4 


29.7 
32.5 


1950 O 
N 
D 


42.4 
45.0 
52. 3 r 


39.3 

39.5' 

38.3 


3.0 

3 
5.7 


8.0 
9.1 
6.0 


2.6 
3.2 
4.8 r 


16.5 
16. 7 r 
14.5 


1.3 

1.2 
1.4' 


4.7 

4.9 r 
4.8 


2.4 

2.3 
3.5 r 


8.1 

9.2 r 
7.8 


12.1 
13.1 
27.5 


40.3 
45. 5' 
32.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


44.0 
45.1 
55.7 


38.3 
39.7 
41.0 


2.4 
2.2 
3.0 


6.7 
8.0 
8.5 


1.8 
1.6 
2.7 


13.8 
15.2 
16.4 


1.0 
0.9 
0.8 


4.6 
5.3 
4.9 


2.3 
2.4 
2.5 


8.2 
8.0 
8.0 


8.3 

8.4 

12.6 


33.9 
38.2 
42.5 


A 
M 
J 


48.7 
53.5 
55.8 


40.5 
41.0 
40.7 


3.0 
3 6 

3.8 


8.9 
8.9 

8.3 


2.6 
3.4 
3.7 


17.0 
18.5 
17.9 


1.0 
1.2 
1.2 


4.8 
5.1 
4.1 


2.2 

2.3 
2.4 


8.2 
8.1 

8.3 


11.4 
13.7 
14.3 


46.6 
47.5 
46.3 


J 

A 

S 


49 1 
52.7 
53.3 


42.9 
42.1 
43.0 


3.4 
3.0 
3 1 


6.9 

8.6 
8.4 


2.9 
2 8 
3.3 


16.7 
18.2 
18 3 


11 
1.0 
1.2 


4.4 
4.1 
4.2 


2.3 

2 3 
2.4 


8.2 
8 2 
8.5 


12.8 
12.5 
13 


45.0 
46.3 
47.9 


O 

N 
D 


53.4 
57.2 
60 8 


47.7 
47.0 


3.3 
3.6 

6 5 


9 9 
10 2 


2 9 

4.0 
5.4 


19 2 
19 4 


1.4 

1.2 

1.4 


4.2 

4 6 


26 

2 4 

3 6 


8 9 
9.5 


13 9 
14.9 
28 9 


51.3 
53.9 



50 ( " Stocks at end of period at selling value. 

Source: Department Store Sales and Stocks, and Chain Store Sales and Stocks, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 47 



DOMESTIC TRADE 



Retail Consumer Credit 

Quarterly averages or quarters (1) 



COMBINED TRADES 



Sales and Percentage Composition 



Accounts Receivable ' 



Cash 



Credit 



Total 



Instalment 



Total 
Sales 



Charge 



Sales Percent Sales Percent Sales Percent Sales Percent Total 



Instal- 
ment 



Charge 



Million dollars or percentages 



1949 
1950 

1950 3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 



2,107.0 1,548.1 73.5* 558.9 26.5 128.7 6.1 430.2 20.4 467.5 139.8 327.7 

2,271.9 1,654.2 72.8 617.7 27.2 168.6 7.4 449.1 19.8 546.6 169.5 377.1 

2.428.6 1,766.2 72.7 662.4 27.3 182.5 7.5 479.9 19.8 475.8 144.6 331.2 

2.537.7 1,856.6 73.2 681.1 26.8 190.9 7.5 490.2 19.3 546.6 169.5 377.1 

2,161.3 1,528.5 70.7 632.8 29.3 172.4 8.0 460.4 21.3 491.9 143.2 348.7 

2.599.8 1,898.3 73.0 701.5 27.0 185.0 7.1 516.5 19.9 478.3 121.8 356.5 
2,543.3 1,855.9 73.0 687.4 27.0 184.3 7.2 503.1 19.8 460.6 104.3 356.3 



SELECTED TRADES 



Department Stores 



Clothing Stores 



Furniture, Radio and Appli- 
ance Stores 



Motor Vehicle Dealers 



Total 
Sales 



Credit Accounts Total 
Sales receivable' Sales 



Credit Accounts Total 
Sales receivable 111 Sales 



Credit Accounts Total Credit Accounts 
Sales receivable'" Sales Sales receivable <l) 













Million 


dollars 












1949 
1950 


213.9 
218.3 


63.3 
67.7 


83.7 
93.6 


127.5 
121.7 


22.6 
23.0 


27.3 
30.1 


69.9 
73.9 


40.3 
43.4 


56.3 
76.4 


257.6 117.0 
348.1 153.8 


55.8 
72.4 


1950 3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 


194.5 
300.9 


62.3 
91.9 


74.6 
93.6 


111.9 
160.1 


20.1 
30.8 


24.4 
30.1 


76.6 
83.3 


45.5 
48.1 


63.6 
76.4 


392.2 178.9 
339.0 148.8 


68.3 
72.4 


1951 1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 


189.3 
221.3 
188.4 


57.3 
62.6 
53.8 


74.7 
66.3 
59.4 


98.9 
135.4 
117.5 


21.3 
25.3 
21.5 


26.4 
25.9 
25.8 


69.9 
77.4 
63.1 


41.1 
43.4 
36.5 


65.3 
60.2 
55.7 


410.8 189.5 
479.8 205.5 
403.5 193.2 


76.5 
79.7 
66.5 



'"Accounts receivable as at end of period. 
Source: Retail Consumer Credit, D.B.S. 



TABLE 48 



Indexes of Wholesale Sales 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



General 
Index 



Auto Parts 

and 
Equipment 



Drugs Clothing Footwear 



Tobacco 
Dry Fruits and and Con- 

Goods Groceries Vegetables Hardware fectionery 











1935-39 = ] 


00 










1939 
1950 


109.1 
306.7 


112.8 
429.2 


111.0 
312.5 


106.1 
247.3 


111.5 
283.2 


105.8 
246.0 


108.6 
274.7 


107.7 
272.7 


110.6 
404.7 


113.4 
381.3 


1950 N 
D 


326.9 
282.4 


479.5 
374.6 


360.5 
322.8 


304.0 
201.3 


330.1 
244.6 


305.7 
173.6 


277.0 
242.4 


240.5 
267.9 


482.3 
411.9 


390.2 
384.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


308.6 
303.1 
333.6 


493.7 
459.2 
431.5 


341.7 
337.7 
334.8 


238.3 
258.5 
321.8 


235.0 
312.0 
416.6 


239.6 
292.3 
307.4 


283.3 
271.6 
281.1 


218.8 
240.4 
280.9 


424.3 
407.6 
480.2 


387.1 
320.9 
382.9 


A 
M 
J 


340.9 
361.7 
343.7 


565.4 
513.0 
505.3 


340.2 
365.3 
315.9 


249.7 
229.4 
203.3 


324.8 
317.4 
236.5 


276.7 
252.5 
197.6 


281.2 
319.0 
322.7 


290.1 
364.6 
339.7 


502.8 
518.0 
474.2 


436.0 
414.5 
436.3 


J 

A 

S 


328.9 
362.3 
348.0 


474.9 
542.9 
595.4 


330.3 
366.5 
336.7 


159.3 
262.9 
296.7 


203.9 
434.9 
432.1 


154.0 
259.5 
300.8 


322.4 
336.6 
318.8 


315.4 
315.2 
270.8 


420.5 
450.1 
447.5 


436.5 
453.2 
379.8 


O 
N 
D 


375.4 
353. 4 r 
294.8 


580.9 
527. 9 r 
440.8 


406.9 
389.0 
321.5 


300.6 
309. 8 r 
201.7 


414.9 

382.6' 

233.8 


291.5 

275.4' 

147.0 


344.0 

321.0' 

260.1 


270.4 
289.6 
326.6 


490.3 

471.7' 

379.4 


453.8 

414.8' 

425.6 



Source: Monthly Report on Wholesale Sales, D.B.S. 



51 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



TABLE 49 



Merchandise Exports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Index 

of [ndei 

Declared of 

Values Prm- 



Index 

of I otal Fruits 

Physical Domestic and 

Volume Exports Vegetables Wheat 



Wheat 
Flour 



Other 

Grain 

Products 



Cattle 



Beef and 
Veal, Fresh 



Other 
Meats 







1<M8 = 100 










Million 


dollars 








1939 
1951 


30.1 


45.1 


66.7 


77.1 
326.2 


1.7 
2.0 


9.1 
36 8 


1.4 
9 5 


2.5 
13.0 


1.3 
5 3 


4.3 


2.9 
1.8 


1950 N 
D 


114.2 
113.1 


112.7 
112.8 


101.3 
100.3 


292.7 
289.9 


2.4 

2.1 


29 3 

30 1 


9.3 
7.8 


8.6 
14.8 


9 4 
7.5 


3.4 
3.1 


4.1 
2.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


111.3 

91.3 
113.2 


116.4 
118.2 
119.8 


95.6 

77.2 
94.5 


285.1 
233.9 
290.2 


2.2 

19 
1.6 


19.2 

18.1 
23.0 


11 8 

8 7 

10.6 


6 5 
5 
4.9 


5.5 
5.5 
7.6 


2.1 
1.3 
1.4 


2.4 
1.2 

1.0 


A 
M 

J 


115.2 
126.2 
121.9 


121.5 
122.3 
123.7 


94.8 

103.2 

98.5 


295.2 
323.4 
312.5 


1.3 

2.2 
1.6 


20.6 
27.1 
40 6 


12.1 
14.2 

9.4 


4.9 
14.2 
17.2 


6.9 
7.0 
4.9 


3.4 

8.4 

10.2 


1.2 

1.7 
1.8 


J 

A 

S 


146.1 
136.5 
124.9 


124.4 
126.4 
126.0 


117.4 

108.0 

99.1 


374.5 
349.8 
320.1 


1.4 
2.2 
2.3 


51.7 
44.4 
36.6 


11.7 
6.9 
4.8 


18.7 
12.8 
13.6 


3.0 
4.4 

5.7 


8.6 
4.1 
3.8 


1.3 

2.0 
2.0 


O 
N 
D 


144.8 
148.1 
148.0" 


126.5 
126.5 
127. I" 


114.5 
117.1 
116. 4" 


371.0 
379.5 
379.3 


2.5 
2.7 
2.0 


37 9 
58.8 
63.0 


8.3 
8.6 
6.9 


16.9 
20.2 
20.6 


5.5 
4.8 
2.2 


4.8 
2.3 

0.6 


2.7 
2.3 

2.0 



Fish and 
Products 



Dairy 
Products 



Alcoholic 
Beverages 



Rubber 
Products 





Hides, 


Other 






Furs 


Skins 


Animal 


Fibres 


Planks 


and 


and 


and 


and 


and 


oducts 


Leather 


Vegetable 


Textiles 


Boards 



Shingles Pulpwood 



Million dollars 



1939 
1951 


2.4 

9.8 


1.5 
1.8 


0.7 
4.7 


1.3 

2.4 


1.2 
2.5 


10 
1.9 


2.3 

7 9 


1.2 
3.1 


4.0 

26.0 


0.7 
2.3 


1.0 
5.7 


1950 N 
D 


12.6 

9.0 


2.0 
0.7 


6.0 

4.4 


1.4 

1.5 


0.4 
5.4 


2.1 
1.7 


10.2 
10.6 


2.4 
2.5 


27.6 
20.8 


2.7 
2.2 


3.7 
3.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


10.6 

8.8 
8.8 


5 
6 
0.6 


4.2 
3.4 
5.3 


1.6 
1.8 
2.1 


6.5 
4.4 
2.6 


2.9 

2.2 
1.8 


14.4 
9.4 
8.8 


2.7 
2.4 

2.7 


24.0 
21.3 
26.5 


2.4 
2.6 
3.2 


3.8 
3.9 
4.7 


A 
M 
J 


7 5 

8.6 
89 


0.6 
1.3 
1.7 


4.4 
4.3 
3.2 


2.1 
2.3 
2.1 


2.3 
1.9 
1.9 


1.7 
1.8 
2.0 


9.1 

4.8 
4.7 


2.7 
4.0 
3.1 


27 5 
26.6 
24.7 


3.5 
2.7 
1.6 


3.5 
2.7 
5.8 


J 

A 

S 


10 

9.1 

10.1 


2 1 
2.9 

2.8 


4.0 

4.7 
5.6 


3.0 

2.6 
3.1 


1.7 
11 
2.0 


2.4 

1.4 
1.8 


5.5 
5.7 
4.0 


3.4 

3.5 

2 3 


28.7 
28.9 
25.4 


1.8 
1.9 
2.2 


7.7 
8.0 
7.1 


O 

N 
D 


12 8 
10 9 

11.4 


3.7 
3.2 

1.6 


6 

5.8 
5 5 


2.6 
2.2 
3.5 


0.6 

0.6 
4.2 


2.2 

1.6 

1.1 


7.2 

8.7 

12 8 


3.4 

3 
3.7 


29.1 
25.9 
23.6 


2.4 

1.8 
1.2 


8.7 
6.6 
5.4 



52 Note. Commencing with April, 1949, the Trade of Canada includes that of Newfoundland. 

Does not include re-exports. 
Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 49 - concluded 



Merchandise Exports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



News- 
Wood- print 
pulp Paper 



Other 
Wood 

and 
Paper 



Iron 
Ore 



Ferro- 
Alloys 



Primary 
Iron and 
Steel (2 > 



Farm Other 

Machinery Machinery 



Auto- 
mobiles 
and 
Parts 



Other 

Iron and 

Steel 



Aluminum 

and 
Products 



Million Dollars 



1939 
1951 

1950 N 
D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 
D 



2.6 
30.4 

21.9 
21.2 

24.0 
21.6 
27.2 

26.6 
31.5 
32.4 

34.3 
35.7 
31.4 

34.6 
32.5 
33.2 



9.6 
44.7 

40.6 
42.2 

40.7 
35.8 
43.3 

42.3 
47.2 
39.2 

51.3 
51.5 
44.0 

50.1 
49.6 
41.4 



2.3 
7.5 

6.9 
8.3 

6.4 
5.9 
7.1 

6.6 
6.7 
7.3 

7.6 
7.9 
7.1 

8.1 

8.3 

10.8 



1.5 

2.0 
0.3 



0.6 
1.0 
2.4 

2.2 
3.2 
2.4 

3.5 
1.9 
1.3 



0.2 
2.6 

1.8 
1.7 

2.2 
2.0 
2.3 

2.4 
2.3 
2.4 



2.4 

3.5 
3.2 
2.3 



0.6 
2.7 

3.5 
3.7 

2.6 
1.0 
1.4 

3.1 
1.8 
2.3 

2.6 
2.7 
2.9 

4.0 
3.8 
4.4 



0.6 
8.9 

6.0 
5.8 

8.5 

5.8 

13.7 

10.8 
10.7 
10.4 

9.2 
7.6 
6.2 

8.3 

7.5 
7.7 



0.9 
3.4 

2.7 
3.1 

2.7 
2.8 
2.8 

3.4 
3.8 
2.7 

2.5 
2.3 
3.5 

4.3 

4.0 
5.5 



2.1 
6.6 

4.2 
3.7 

1.7 
1.9 
4.0 

6.4 
4.2 
3.5 

5.6 
5.9 
9.2 

12.3 
12.7 
11.9 



0.8 
2.8 

2.0 
2.6 

2.0 
1.9 
2.3 

2.6 
2.6 
2.5 

2.5 
2.4 
2.3 

4.2 
4.3 
4.3 



2.2 
10.4 

3.6 

13.2 

10.3 

7.4 

10.8 

12.7 

12.1 

3.5 

14.5 

16.1 

9.8 

11.2 
9.5 
7.0 



Copper Lead 

and and 

Products Products 



Nickel 



Precious Other 

Metals Zinc Non- Asbestos 

(except and Ferrous and 

gold) Products Products Products 



Other 

Non- 
Metallic 
Products Fertilizers 



Miscel- 
Other laneous 
Chemical Commo- 
Products dities 



Million dollars 



1939 
1951 


4.4 
7.3 


0.8 
3.8 


4.8 
11.4 


1.4 
4.0 


0.8 
7.0 


0.8 
3.6 


1.3 
6.8 


1.1 
4.2 


0.8 
3.0 


1.3 
8.0 


1.4 
5.1 


1950 N 
D 


6.9 
7.4 


4.9 
5.9 


8.8 
8.4 


5.2 
2.3 


7.4 
5.4 


3.4 
2.3 


6.8 
5.8 


4.1 
3.2 


3.1 
3.4 


5.5 
6.1 


3.4 
3.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


6.6 
5.4 
5.5 


3.9 
2.4 
3.9 


11.8 

7.7 

10.7 


4.9 
5.4 
3.3 


7.4 
2.6 
5.4 


2.7 
2.2 
4.3 


6.3 
4.3 
8.5 


3.5 
2.9 
3.5 


3.2 
3.1 
2.1 


6.2 
6.0 
6.5 


4.4 
3.5 
4.2 


A 
M 
J 


9.3 
5.6 
6.6 


3.2 
5.2 
2.2 


11.2 
9.0 
9.1 


2.8 
4.1 
4.2 


5.0 
6.2 
7.6 


3.3 
2.7 
3.1 


7.8 
7.2 
6.7 


3.8 
4.2 
3.7 


2.7 
4.1 
3.7 


7.8 
7.7 
7.3 


5.5 
7.8 
4.3 


J 

A 

S 


7.7 
5.6 
7.4 


3.4 
3.1 
3.9 


12.7 
13.3 
11.4 


5.6 
4.2 
3.1 


9.6 
6.8 
7.5 


4.5 
2.6 
3.2 


6.9 
7.4 
6.7 


4.6 
4.1 
4.8 


2.5 
3.0 
2.9 


9.1 
9.7 
8.3 


5.9 
4.6 
4.7 


O 

N 
D 


7.0 

7.9 

12.6 


3.4 
5.1 
5.8 


13.7 
12.8 
13.4 


3.0 
2.8 
5.0 


8.8 
9.8 
7.7 


4.5 
4.6 
5.2 


7.2 
5.5 
7.5 


5.0 
5.2 
4.5 


2.4 
3.1 
3.0 


8.9 

10.3 

8.1 


5.9 
4.8 
5.3 



(1) Does not include re-exports. <2) Includes pigs, ingots, blooms and billets, castings and forgings and rolling mill products. 53 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



TABLE 50 



Merchandise Imports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Index 

ol 

Declared 
\ nluea 



Index 
Of 

Prins 



Inili\ 
Of 

Physical 

\ ol u mi- 



Tea, 
Fruits, Grains Sugar Coffee, 

Total Nuts and and and Vegetable Cocoa and 

Imports Vegetables Products Products Oils Chocolate 



Rubber 


Furs 


and 


and 


Products 


Products 







1948 = 100 










Million dollars 








1939 
1950 


28.4 
120.4 


47.2 
110.7 


60.2 

108.8 


62.59 
264.52 


2 89 
11.49 


0.74 
3.28 


1.95 

7 25 


0.78 
2.85 


1.42 
7.26 


1.34 
4.06 


0.59 
1.83 


1950 O 
N 
D 


146.0 
149.1 
121.3 


114.2 
113.9 
117.0 


127.8 
130.9 
103.7 


320.57 
327.91 
266.29 


10.59 
11.88 
10.66 


4.30 

4.71 
5.99 


15 05 

11.19 

6.55 


4.03 
3.75 
2.74 


9 14 
7.91 
5.76 


4.58 
6.35 
7.24 


3.06 
1.90 
1.36 


1951 J 
F 
M 


149.0 
124.9 
156.0 


120.4 
123.1 
125.3 


123.8 
101.5 
124.5 


327.19 
274.17 
342.50 


11.80 
10.09 
12.86 


2.31 
1.91 
2.86 


3.83 
1.86 
3 16 


4.15 
3.04 

4.47 


7.66 
6.90 
8.44 


11.85 
7 30 
9.92 


4.66 
3 07 
2.57 


A 
M 

J 


179.0 

184.2 
163.8 


128.6 
129.6 
130.0 


139.2 
142.1 
126.0 


393.04 
405.07 
360.42 


13.48 
14.90 
14.96 


5.28 
6.15 
3.47 


5.88 

10.40 
9.21 


7.43 
6.42 
3.85 


7 91 
6 80 
6.43 


7.65 
9.37 
7.95 


2.37 
1.61 

1.29 


J 

A 

S 


168.7 
162.1 
141.5 


129.9 
127.6 
126.6 


129.9 
127.0 
111.8 


370.64 
357.47 
311.50 


13.69 

11.90 

9.26 


2.31 

2.11 
2.10 


8.43 

14.16 

9.86 


2.67 
1.36 
1.32 


7.89 
5.25 
4.68 


6.60 
7.12 
3.98 


1.38 
71 
0.92 


O 

N 


156.1 
147.9" 


124.2' 
121.4 


125. 7' 
121.8" 


344.15 
325.70 


11.33 

12.64 


4.01 

5.60 


9.58 
5.77 


1.58 
1 15 


6.49 
8.00 


4.71 
3 73 


1.03 
0.76 





Other 


Cotton 




Vegetable 








Hides 


and 


Raw and 


and 


Animal 


unmanu- Manu- 


-eather 


Products 


factured factured 



Wool 

Flax, Synthetic 

Hemp, Raw and Fibres 

Jute and Unmanu- Manu- and 

Products factured factured Products 



Books and Paper 
Other Printed and 

Textiles Matter Products 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


1.01 

2.34 


2.65 
7.26 


1.40 
7.55 


1.65 

5.57 


0.77 
2.13 


0.88 
4.61 


1.30 
4.37 


0.45 
1.77 


1.94 
4.37 


1.26 

3.54 


0.72 
1.95 


1950 O 
N 
D 


3.15 
3.25 

2.79 


9.37 

12.70 
10.11 


9.37 
10.82 
11.99 


6.11 
6.53 
5.51 


2.24 
2.43 

1.74 


5.23 
6.00 
6.04 


5 02 
4.39 
3.88 


2.14 
2.36 
2.04 


5.67 
5.65 
4 30 


4.19 
4.14 
3.36 


2.18 
2.52 
2.22 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3.68 
3.08 
3.50 


10.58 

9.17 

12.13 


10.69 

7.15 

12.42 


9.82 
8.58 
9.56 


2.46 
1.32 
2.24 


6.63 

7.41 
8.55 


6.22 

5.88 
5.77 


3.09 
2.54 
3 49 


6.43 
5.49 
7 24 


4.23 

3.36 
4.10 


2.84 
2.65 
3.08 


A 
M 

J 


3.62 

2.81 
3 07 


9 95 
9.92 

8 52 


11.41 

12.54 

7 07 


11.96 
8.18 
6.21 


2 80 
2.59 
4.04 


13 .19 
9 .71 
9 87 


8.95 
6.63 

5.50 


4 94 
4.02 
3.24 


7 31 
7.43 
5 41 


4 70 
4.21 

3.80 


3 02 
2.85 

2.61 


J 

A 

S 


2 .61 
2.21 
1 93 


9.99 

10.47 
10 91 


3 23 
3.65 
4.33 


6 59 
6 27 

4.64 


4.84 
2.83 
2.16 


14.80 

11.60 

6 58 


6.56 
6.54 
4.98 


3 14 
2 78 
2.18 


5.50 
5.49 
5 62 


4 07 
4.44 
4.53 


2 71 
2.83 
2 64 


O 

N 


1.97 
1 .61 


14.53 
12.42 


5 31 

10.54 


5 36 

5.42 


1.68 
2.98 


2 39 
2.03 


4 39 
3.53 


2.38 
2.01 


5 13 
4 94 


5.03 

4 48 


3 54 
3.38 



54 Note: As of April, 1949, The Trade of Canada includes that of Newfoundland. 

Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 50 - concluded 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



Merchandise Imports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Wood, 










Unmanu- 










factured 






Pipes, 




and 




Primary 


Tubes and 


Engines 


Manu- 


Iron 


Iron and 


and 


and 


factured 


Ore 


Steel"' 


Fittings 


Boilers 



Automobiles Other 
Farm Other and Iron and 

Machinery Machinery Parts Steel 



Precious 
Aluminum Metals 
and (except 

Products gold) 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


0.82 
2.87 


0.35 
1.40 


4.00 
9.00 


0.20 
2.95 


0.63 
4.55 


1.74 
13.41 


3.57 
18.85 


3.42 
20.36 


1.36 
11.10 


0.50 
1.56 


0.29 
2.62 


1950 O 
N 
D 


3.56 
3.38 
2.74 


2.91 
2.24 
0.54 


12.20 

13.79 

9.71 


2.68 
2.69 
2.04 


4.80 
4.32 
4.22 


9.62 
9.37 
8.61 


21.95 
21.92 
18.96 


23.01 
24.57 
18.89 


13.46 
14.03 
11.61 


2.45 
2.60 
1.85 


3.56 
2.75 
2.92 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3.76 
3.88 
4.98 


0.01 
0.01 
0.03 


12.73 
10.66 
14.67 


3.10 
2.14 
3.07 


6.32 
5.56 
7.10 


12.15 
13.46 
16.51 


25.67 
20.77 
25.96 


25.43 
23.61 
27.95 


14.97 
12.08 
15.91 


1.90 
1.27 
2.04 


3.04 
2.04 
2.92 


A 
M 
J 


5.01 
4.96 
5.30 


0.38 
1.32 
3.17 


17.46 
17.47 
16.91 


3.64 
4.93 
3.98 


8.37 
7.58 
6.62 


21.23 
21.48 
17.98 


29.89 
31.77 
29.42 


33.36 
29.92 
25.94 


19.68 
18.69 
15.97 


1.89 
2.70 
2.70 


2.69 
3.58 
3.31 


J 

A 

S 


4.93 
4.30 
3.53 


3.70 
4.13 
3.35 


18.60 
18.16 
18.48 


4.02 
4.12 
2.98 


6.94 
5.67 
7.80 


18.76 
19.63 
14.19 


30.99 
27.74 
26.01 


22.71 
14.69 
16.04 


15.38 
15.65 
14.06 


2.61 
2.84 
3.14 


2.75 
2.43 
1.57 


o 

N 


3.99 
3.68 


3.99 
1.73 


21.55 
19.59 


4.72 
3.63 


8.62 
8.87 


15.57 
12.10 


28.04 
28.21 


16.82 
15.63 


15.78 
15.29 


3.41 
2.49 


2.02 
2.52 



Other 

Non- Clay 

Electrical Ferrous and 

Apparatus Products Products 



Coal 

and Glass and 
Products Glassware 



Other 
Petroleum Non- 

and Metallic 

Products Products 



Other 
Refrige- Miscella- 

Chemicals rators neous 

and Allied and Tourists' Corn- 

Products Parts Purchases modifies 













] 


Million dollars 












1939 
1950 


1.15 
6.88 


1.57 
6.90 


0.66 
2.81 


3.82 
15.86 


0.66 
2.35 


4.66 
25.66 


1.27 
4.30 


3.64 
13.19 


0.10 
1.28 


0.79 
2.76 


3.62 
10.32 


1950 O 
N 
D 


7.96 
8.30 
7.21 


7.85 

10.25 

7.27 


3.44 
3.29 
2.83 


21.24 
19.80 
13.19 


2.68 
3.00 
2.33 


33.14 
31.56 
27.47 


6.29 
6.49 
3.43 


14.84 
16.22 
11.95 


1.73 
1.96 
1.51 


4.25 
3.59 
2.48 


11.55 
13.31 
10.25 


1951 J 
F 
M 


9.46 

7.81 

10.38 


8.13 

8.13 

12.20 


3.59 
2.65 
3.35 


14.02 
13.12 
10.51 


2.79 
2.21 
2.82 


27.20 
20.11 
23.75 


3.62 
3.46 
3.86 


17.60 
13.99 
17.36 


3.15 
2.68 
3.44 


1.98 
1.35 
2.37 


13.65 
12.39 
14.93 


A 
M 
J 


11.44 
11.02 
10.27 


9.76 

10.94 

8.71 


4.34 
4.03 
3.87 


12.73 
16.76 
17.81 


3.41 
3.08 
2.74 


25.16 
34.26 
30.21 


5.46 
6.23 
6.60 


18.83 
18.48 
15.47 


4.72 
4.70 
3.87 


3.97 
2.92 
3.58 


17.75 
21.73 
19.47 


J 

A 

S 


9.90 

11.20 

9.72 


8.82 

10.74 

6.55 


4.16 
4.11 
3.20 


17.00 
18.64 
16.76 


2.90 
2.57 
2.37 


38.61 
34.54 
33.56 


6.74 
6.79 
6.53 


16.89 
15.30 
14.11 


2.60 
2.05 
1.13 


4.17 
6.77 
5.83 


20.46 
23.70 
17.96 


O 

N 


10.91 
9.59 


10.01 
10.80 


3.75 
3.52 


21.19 
18.84 


2.59 
2.48 


31.92 
28.58 


5.46 
5.74 


15.97 
15.78 


1.01 
0.80 


6.14 
4.13 


20.23 
20.73 



(» Includes pigs, ingots, blooms and billets, castings and forgings, ferro-alloys and rolling mill products. 



55 



EXTtRNAL TRADE 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 51 



Merchandise Exports" and Imports by Areas 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Al 1 COl N TRIES 




COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES 






Total 


United Kingdom Australia 


India - 


F.xports Imports 


Exports Imports 


Exports Imports Exports Imports 


Exports Imports 


Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


77.08 
259.87 


62.5') 
264.52 


35.90 
54.59 


15.74 
53.80 


27.34 
39.16 


9 50 
33.68 


2.67 
2.95 


0.94 
2.73 


0.43 
2.63 


0.82 
3.11 


1950 N 
D 


292.70 
289.91 


327. Ml 
266 . 29 


53.89 
56.60 


70.13 
51.59 


38.58 
39.56 


40.15 
32.03 


3.24 
4.10 


6.44 
2.24 


2.67 
5.65 


3.08 
2.81 


1951 J 
F 
M 


285.13 
233.91 
290.16 


327.19 
274.17 
342.50 


56.05 
47.67 
60.00 


55.93 
42.62 
55.44 


40.05 
33.59 
39.65 


33.92 
27.81 
30.41 


2 46 
1.39 

4.60 


1.44 
0.78 
1.85 


4.99 
4.89 
6.29 


4.29 
1.67 
4.16 


A 
M 

J 


295.18 
323.36 
312.50 


393.04 
405.07 
360.42 


61.32 
67.63 
66.12 


71.15 
75.65 
70.62 


41.72 
47.24 
51.27 


48.94 
43.60 
39.93 


4.27 
5.27 
1.43 


2.71 
6.19 
5.62 


3.65 
0.96 
1.48 


3 53 
3 53 
6.55 


J 

A 

S 


374.47 
349.76 
320.09 


370.64 
357.47 
311.50 


100.65 
86.10 
68.55 


82.01 
79.96 
55.57 


73.93 
66.40 
52.51 


43.30 
39.05 
28.56 


5.42 
4.74 
2.38 


7 52 
7.39 
6.57 


1.94 
1.50 
57 


5.31 
2 29 
1.97 


O 

N 
D 


371.03 
379.54 
379.33 


344.15 
325.70 


90.99 
81.93 
85.40 


53.98 
51.28 


63.96 
57.99 
63.14 


32.73 
33.33 


6.15 
5.40 
5.57 


3.21 
2.18 


3.70 

2.80 
2.96 


1.92 
3.67 



COMMONWEALTH 
COUNTRIES 

Union of u > 
South Africa 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



Total 



United States 



Latin America 



Europe 



Exports 



Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 













Million dollars 










1939 
1950 


1.50 
3.53 


0.33 
0.41 


41.18 
205 . 27 


46.85 
210.72 


31.70 
168.42 


41.41 
177.54 


1.68 
11.95 


1.33 
17.80 


4.49 
16.98 


3.08 
8.61 


1950 N 
D 


2.84 
2.40 


0.82 
0.21 


238.81 
233.31 


257 . 78 
214.71 


191.96 
191.51 


214.77 
182.28 


13.78 
12.96 


20.27 
15.91 


25.26 
23.21 


15.12 
9.31 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2.72 
2.54 
3.67 


0.22 

41 
0.52 


229 08 
186.24 
230.17 


271.26 
231.55 
287.06 


186.95 
152.43 

190.21 


233.31 
199.03 
245.71 


14.04 
10.67 
11.99 


22 03 
17.03 
22.45 


16.43 
13.49 
17.14 


9 49 

9.61 

11.13 


A 
M 

J 


4.31 
5 60 
4.34 


0.53 
0.81 

0.57 


233.86 
255 . 73 
246.38 


321.89 
329 . 42 
289.80 


183.18 

208.68 
188.40 


278.41 
273.17 
241.47 


14.32 
17.53 
11.21 


22.15 
27.12 
23.02 


19.54 
15.81 
32.20 


14.71 
18.64 
16.14 


J 

A 

S 


8 .16 
4.10 
4.05 


0.55 
0.45 

0.29 


273.81 
263 . 66 
251.54 


288 63 
277.51 
255 93 


201 93 
192 84 
186 73 


234 . 74 
229 46 
211.60 


16.35 
17.69 
18.21 


23.52 
23.63 
21.48 


41.42 
41.93 
36.88 


18.48 
17.05 
15.07 


O 
N 
D 


5 47 
4.01 
3.75 


0.41 
37 


280.04 
297 . 61 
293.93 


290.16 
274 42 


207.13 

209 26 
189 94 


238 27 
224.68 


21.01 
26.63 
28.38 


26.50 
24.08 


38.55 
39.49 
54.04 


18.99 
18.26 



56 Note: Prior to January, 1950, Ireland is included with Commonwealth countries but has since been shown with 

European and Foreign countries. 

Does not include re-exports. "'Includes Pakistan prior to 1948. Prior to 1947 includes "other British 

South Africa" and Northern Rhodesia. 
Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 52 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



Factors in the Balance of Payments 

Monthly averages or calendar months (1) 





Balance of Merchandise Trade' 2 '* 


Net 
Exports 
of Non- 
Monetary 
Gold 


Foreign 

Tourist 

Auto 

Entries' 3 ' 


Returning 
Canadian 
Tourist 
Automo- 
biles 


Security Sales Between Canada official 
and Other Countries* Holdinas 
All United United of Gold 
countries Kingdom States an ^ 




All 
countries 


United 
Kingdom 


United 
States 




Net sales(+) Net purchases(- 


) Dollars'" 






Million dollars 




Thousand cars 


] 


Million dollars 


Million 
U.S. dollars 


1939 
1950 


16.1 
0.8 


18.8 
5.8 


-10.7 
- 3.9 


15.3 
13.6 


105.8 
171.7 


33^2 


6.0 
19.9 


-0.5 
-1.9 


4.8 
21.3 


404.2 
1,741.7 


1950 N 
D 


-31.5 
27.2 


- 1.4 
7.9 


-19.7 
12.0 


12.3 
11.3 


80.1 
58.1 


25.6 
21.2 


3.4 
-1.6 


-1.3 
-0.5 


3.5 


1,787.4 
1,741.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


-38.4 
-37.3 
-48.5 


6.2 
5.9 
9.3 


-43.0 
-44.1 
-52.4 


17.3 

11.7 

8.4 


40.9 
38.9 
62.7 


12.6 
11.5 
28.4 


13.2 

18.0 

8.9 


-1.8 
-1.6 
-0.6 


11.0 

15.2 

6.7 


1,743.6 
1,741.9 
1,653.4 


A 
M 
J 


-92.9 
-78.1 
-44.6 


-7.1 

3.8 

11.5 


-92.3 
-61.7 
-50.6 


16.2 
13.0 
13.8 


86.3 
148.3 
290.5 


28.5 
34.5 
43.9 


2.7 

-2.9 

2.7 


-0.5 
-1.6 
-1.3 


0.9 

-3.2 

1.4 


1,664.3 
1,681.6 
1,683.0 


J 

A 

S 


7.9 

-3.9 

12.0 


30.8 
27.6 
24.2 


-29.8 
-33.7 
-22.1 


13.4 
11.0 
10.8 


489.1 
504.1 
281.2 


97.8 

103.7 

70.5 


1.1 

2.8 

-3.0 


-0.2 

0.6 

-1.0 


0.2 

0.4 

-5.0 


1,668-7 
1,561.8 
1,610.1 


O 
N 
D 


31.5 
58.8 


31.5 
25.7 


-27.4 
-11.9 


8.2 
7.7 


147.6 
76.0 
54.1 


54.2 
30.1 


-30.2 
-23.5 


-0.7 - 


-31.4 
-24.7 


1,678.1 
1,748.9 
1,778.6 



"'Official holdings of Gold and U.S. dollars are given as of end of year and month in Statistical Summary of the 
Bank of Canada and Annual Report of Foreign Exchange Control Board. "'Annual results are from the Canadian 
Balance of International Payments and monthly totals as given in Trade of Canada. < 3) As of January, 1950, New- 
foundland is included. 

*For explanatory notes see April issue, pages 96 and 97. 



TRANSPORTATION 



TABLE 53 



Shipping and Aviation 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



MERCHANT SHIPPING AT SIX MAJOR PORTS"' 



CANALS CIVIL AVIATION' 3 ' 



Freight 
Loaded 



Freight 
Unloaded 



Net Registered Tonnage of Vessels Cleared' 4 ' 



Foreign 



Thousand short tons 



Total Foreign Coasting 



Quebec, 
Montreal, 
Toronto' 2 ' 



Vancouver, 

Saint John, 

Halifax 



Total' 2 ' Revenue Revenue 
Cargo Passenger Ton 
Traffic Miles Miles 



Thousand tons 



Millions Thousands 



1939 
1950 


671 
643 


690 
1,193 


2,852 
3,173 


1,445 
1,590 


1,407 
1,582 


1,845 
1,770 


1,469 
1,845 


2,599 
3,049 


1.8 
39.5 


535 


1950 N 
D 


899 
538 


1,817 
729 


3,605 
2,259 


2,002 
1,272 


1,603 
987 


1,902 
360 


1,703 
1,898 


3,280 
814 


36.7 
38.2 


504 
597 


1951 J 
F 
M 


636 
585 
614 


473 
420 
494 


2,057 
1,841 
2,182 


1,137 
1,000 
1,203 


919 
840 
979 


17 


2,057 
1,841 
2,165 


— 


36.9 
33.3 
42.0 


542 
524 
634 


A 
M 

J 


641 

881 

1,144 


1,008 
1,434 
1,457 


2,685 
3,645 
3,995 


1,438 
2,000 
2,053 


1,247 
1,646 
1,942 


765 
1,727 
2,092 


1,920 
1,918 
1,903 


1,981 
3,698 
3,822 


42.6 
49.6 
58.7 


633 
690 
680 


J 

A 

S 


1,192 
887 
735 


1,677 
1,347 
1,437 


4,747 
4,463 
3,874 


2,239 
2,036 
1,863 


2,508 
2,427 
2,011 


2,468 
2,329 
1,987 


2,279 
2,134 
1,887 


3,842 
3,946 
3,842 






O 

N 
D 


1,194 

1,310 

705 


1,193 

1,313 

586 


3,824 
3,879 
2,444 


2,068 
2,239 
1,356 


1,756 
1,640 
1,088 


1,911 

1,913 

365 


1,913 
1,966 
2,079 


3,981 
3,345 







"'Prior to 1941 
u Excludes Canada- 



statistics are for shipping year ended March 31. "'Annual data are averages of nine months. 
United Kingdom Route. "'Annual data include tugs. 



57 



TRANSPORTATION FEBRUARY, ?95? 

•* ?» Mrenue Freight on C^mdian T ; .!ways 

ABU ' Is. .-.. ily weragea 



TOTAL 



FARM PRODUCTS AMD -OODS 



FOREST PRODUCTS 



METALS 



enue Grain nd 
Grain 
: oaded Products 



Fresh 
Fruits 
and 
Vege- 
»«b'e* 



„ f i 

■ iuJ 
321 J 
bfl 

r'oduc— 



All 

Dthu 



Woodpulp Luuioer, 

i Lath and 

•>od Pap« Shingles 



Ores, con- 
centrates 
All and 

Other Refaned 



i'housuncl on 



1949 
1951 



$25. 5 

348.6 



1950 D 414.2 
195. 



A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 

N 
D 



1952 J 



Mi. 6' 

294.3 

336.2 



337.1 
380.4 
370.0 

350.2 
363.0 
349.7 

389.8 
366.9 
314.6 

332.7 



49.4 

42 . 6 

39.6 
29.1 
32 6 

45.9 
58.2 
52.3 

51.1 

54.5 
49 

63.8 
64.1 
52.3 

17 n 



J.l 

4.5 

4.6 

5.7 
4.5 
4 4 

4.9 
3 6 
2.5 

x 3 
2 8 
5.2 

7.5 
6.3 

4.2 

4.3 



8.0 
B.E 

7.8 

6.5 

7.7 

8.1 

6 Q 
7.8 



11.2 

10.0 

6.5 

G.6 



6.9 
6.6 

6.6 
5.6 
6 i 

5.0 

5 3 
5.2 



11. 

10. 



5 2 



I . 'J 

o,. 4 

15.4 
^4.3 

28.2 

2e o 

20.5 

]7.6 
14 5 
18.7 

OO.O 



17.0 

. 

21.0 

21.0 
19 7 

13.5 

19 g 

:h v 

20.7 
20.4 
21.1 

22.1 



14.9 

i4 a 

15.8 

.9 J 

17.4 

i9.7 
22.1 

20 9 
19.5 

1 J . 3 

19.2 
17 4 
13.3 

12 



5.6 
6.8 

7 2 

5.6 
5.0 
6.3 

6.3 
7.6 
7.6 

6.3 
6.0 
6 2 

7.3 
9.6 
7.2 

5.7 



1.5.8 
17.6 

1J.9 

13.0 

10.8 
12.6 

15.3 
20.1 
21.8 

21.7 

24.4 
21.0 

21.0 
16.8 
12.4 

11.9 



i ON-METALLIC MINERALS 



7> STEEL 



)THER 



Coal and 
Coke 



Petroleum 

and 
Gasoline 



Building 
Materials 



All 
Other 



Autos, 
Machinery, 
Primary Implements 
Products and Parts Fertilizers 



O'her 

Manuiac 

hiring and Merchan- 
Miscel- dise 

laneous L.C.L. 



Cars 

Received 
from 

Connec- 
tions 













Thousand 


cars 










1949 
1951 


28.6 
28.4 


21.4 
21.6 


18.0 
19.7 


62 
7.7 


7.3 
9.0 


7.8 
9.2 


3.0 
3 1 


22.6 
25.1 


77.0 
70.1 


132.9 
149.1 


1950 D 


35.1 


20 4 


12.5 


6 1 


8.0 


8.0 


3.0 


22.9 


68.0 


143.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


32.2 
27.4 
25.2 


22.2 
?9.7 
19.7 


12.1 
11.7 
15.5 


7 
6.3 
7.8 


9? 

8.2 

10.4 


9.1 

8.7 

11.8 


I 3 
\ 2 
J. 5 


2J.7 
21.6 
25.9 


69.5 
64.3 
74.5 


155.0 

144.5 
171.7 


A 
M 
J 


23 .3 
24.6 
26.2 


17.1 
23.0 
22.5 


19.2 
24.1 
23. 7 


7.5 

8.6 
9.2 


9.3 
9.6 
9.5 


12.2 

11.2 

9 9 


* 8 
5 3 
2.1 


27.1 
28.0 
27.5 


77.6 
77.9 
70.3 


150.1 
157.4 
145.6 


J 
A 

S 


23.5 
25 3 
30.3 


23.2 
25.3 

21.5 


23.5 
25.6 
24.0 


7.5 

7.8 
8.1 


8.3 

8.1 
8.7 


9.0 
7.5 
8 1 


1.7 
2 4 

2 3 


25.4 
25.3 
25.1 


66.7 
69.5 
67.3 


138.1 
148.0 
138.7 


o 

N 
D 


35 .2 
35 7 
31.7 


22.3 

21 2 
21 3 


24.4 
19 
13.2 


8.8 
7.7 

6.0 


9.4 
9.0 

8.1 


7.9 
7.8 
6.6 


2.5 

2.8 
3.5 


26.3 
24.1 
21.4 


73.4 
69.7 
60.9 


154.6 
144.8 
140 3 


1952 J 


34.5 


25 .1 


11.5 


6.0 


9.5 


9.3 


3.5 


22.0 


69.3 


154 2 



58 Note: Based on weekly carloadings reported by major lines only. 

Source: Weekly Report, Carloadings, D.B.S. 



FEBRUARY. 



ABLE 55 



1S52 TRANSPORTATION 

Operating Statistics of Canadian Railways 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Op< rating : i ivenues 



fotal 



Freight Passenger 



Operating Operating 
Expenses Income'" 



Revenue 



Tons 
carried 



Tons 

carried 

one mile 



Passengers Passengers 
Carried Carried 
One Mile 



Million dollars 



Millions 



1950 


30.6 

79 9 


23 8 

r 1 


3.0 
6.5 


25.4 
69.5 


4.0 
6.7 


7.9 
13.7 


2,622 
4,608 


1.7 
2.6 


146 
235 


1930 2 


90.8 


73.4 


7.4 


71.1 


12.7 


14.2 


5,235 


2.3 


266 


O 

N 
D 


92 5 
39.9 
84.3 


77! 
72.2 
64.8 


6.0 

5.7 
7 5 


72.4 
72.6 
72.8 


15.8 
13.5 

7.7 


16.1 
15.0 
13.6 


5,542 
5,222 
5,191 


2.2 
2.1 
2.6 


212 r 

203 

261 


.'951 J 
F 
M 


81.6 
76 5 
88.1 


67.3 

63.7 
72.3 


6.0 
5.4 
6.8 


73.3 
72 . 1 
79.0 


3.3 
0.3 

6 . i 


14.0 
12.8 
14.0 


4,968 
4,582 
5,122 


2.4 
2.2 
2.8 


209 
187 
239 


A 
M 
J 


88.1 
92.4 
91.6 


73.1 
75.4 
72.5 


5.8 
6.7 
8.4 


80.0 
B3.5 
81.8 


4.0 
5.1 
5.9 


14.2 

15.1 
15.5 


5 . 190 
5,629 
3,450 


2.3 
2.1 
2.3 


200 
231 
?98 


J 

A 

S 


91.8 
93.8 
91.4 


71.3 
73.2 
72.2 


9.6 

9 5 
7.8 


82.3 
86.1 

8C.2 


4.7 

4.0 
5.4 


15 
15 4 
14.4 


5,337 
5,405 
5,320 


2 6 
2.6 
2.2 


340 
335 
268 


O 


99.0 


81.1 


7.0 


84.2 


11 2 


16.6 


5,744 


2.2 


244 



CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 



CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY 
CANADIA, LINES 



Operating Revenues 



Total 



Freight Passenger 



Operating Operating' 2 ' 
— Expenses I^ome 



Operat«na Revenues Operarn.g Operating u) 

— — — ■ — Expenses Incomo 

Total freight Pa.rengei 













Million 


dollars 










1939 
1950 


12.7 
31.5 


9.9 
25.5 


1.3 
2.9 


9.9 
27.0 


2.4 
3.2 


14.4 
39.9 


11.1 

31.6 


1.4 
3.1 


13.1 
36.3 


0.9 
2.7 


1950S 


36 7 


29.9 


3.4 


27.0 


4.9 


413 . 3 


36.5 


3.5 


38 4 


6.4 


O 
N 
D 


36 7 
35.1 
33.8 


30 8 
29.0 
26.9 


2.7 
2.5 
3.2 


28.1 
28. C 
27.4 


6.6 
6.0 
4.9 


47.0 
46.0 
43. ~ 


79. 
36.1 
32.1 


2.8 
2.7 
3.8 


38.6 
38.8 
39.8 


7.6 
6.1 
2.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


32.7 
31.0 

34.5 


27.7 
26.1 
28.3 


2.6 
2.4 
3.0 


28.9 
27.4 
31.2 


1.4 
1.7 
2.9 


40.4 
37.6 
43.0 


32.8 
30.5 
36.4 


2.9 
2.5 

3.4 


38.9 
39.3 
42.0 


0.7 

Dr2.5 

2.2 


A 
M 
J 


34.9 
37.4 
36.4 


29.5 
31.2 
29.2 


2.5 
2.9 
3.7 


30.8 
34.9 
33.2 


2.6 
1.0 
1.9 


44.2 
46.2 
46.5 


35 8 
36.8 
36.0 


2.9 
3.4 
4.2 


43.0 
42.3 
42.4 


0.3 
3.0 
2.9 


J 

A 

S 


35.8 
36.3 
36.0 


28.2 
28.7 
28.8 


4.0 
4.0 
3.3 


32.5 
34.7 
30.3 


1.1 
0.3 
1.9 


47.5 
48.8 
46.7 


36.2 
37.5 
36.3 


4.9 
4.8 
3.9 


43.8 
45.2 
43.8 


2.6 
2.6 
2.2 


O 


40.4 


33.9 


3.0 


33.1 


4.6 


49.7 


39.9 


3.4 


44.9 


5.4 



Beginning with April, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 

(1> In the upper section of this table, the annual statistics embrace all steam railways, while monthly data refer to 
railways with annual operating revenues of $500,000 or over. (2, Operating income equals operating revenues less 

operating expenses adjusted for tax accruals and rent of equipment and joint facilities. 

Source: Operating Revenues, Expenses and Statistics, Railways in Canada, D.B.S. 



59 



FINANCE 



TABLE 56 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Bank of Canada 

As of end of period 



LIABILITIES 



Chartered Bank Cash 



Notes in 
tills 



Gold 



Deposits 

at Bank of 

Canada 



Total 



Govern- Foreign'" Notes in Total 

ment Other Currency Hands of All Other Liabilities 

Deposits Deposits Liabilities Public Accounts or Assets 



Million dollars 



1939 
1951 


70.6 
273.1 


217.0 
619.0 


287.6 
892.1 


46.3 
94.9 


17.9 
66.1 


155.6 


162 
1,191 


13.3 
44.4 


527 
2,444 


1950 D 


231.3 


578.6 


809.9 


24.7 


207.1 


133.6 


1,136 


39.0 


2,350 


1951 J 
F 
M 


219.6 
202.8 
185.1 


537.6 
550.5 
552.9 


757.3 
753.3 
738.1 


68.3 
69.5 
70.5 


204.4 

204.6 
206.7 


136.0 

128.9 

88.5 


1,075 
1,093 
1,134 


53.3 
39.8 
28.7 


2,294 
2,289 
2,267 


A 
M 
J 


203.1 
214.8 
177.1 


556.1 
530.1 
590.7 


759.2 
744.9 
767.8 


56.9 
76.2 
75.3 


215.1 
221.5 
220.1 


137.7 
129.9 
132.8 


1,120 
1,123 
1,174 


58.9 
38.8 
32.2 


2,348 
2,334 
2,402 


J 

A 

S 


226.0 
189.7 
195.2 


558.2 
580.4 
579.4 


784.2 
770.1 
774.6 


91.1 
115.0 
105.6 


212.6 
185.7 
140.0 


146.7 
143.0 
116.3 


1,145 
1,181 
1,193 


56.2 
62.8 
38.5 


2,435 
2,458 
2,368 


O 
N 
D 


232 2 
195.1 
273.1 


588.3 
633.8 
619.0 


820.6 
828.9 
892.1 


210.3 
66.0 
94.9 


83.3 
92.5 
66.1 


102.1 
135.1 
155 .6 


1,174 
1,212 
1,191 


62.9 
54.4 
44.4 


2,453 
2,389 
2,444 


1952 J 




629.2 




92.8 


54.9 


99.5 




53.9 


2,306 



ASSETS 



Reserve 



Securities 



All Other 
Accounts 



Federal-Provincial 



Silver 



Foreign' 1 ' 

currencies 



TotaJO) 
reserve 



Under 
two years 



Ind. Dev. 
Bank 



Over Bank Other 

two years Cap. Stock Securities 



Total 











Million dollars 










1939 
1951 


225.7 


64.3 
117.9 


290.0 
117.9 


182 
1,142 


1 


50 
,049 


25.0 


89.0 


232 
2,305 


5.5 
21.0 


1950 D 


— 


111.7 


111.7 


1,229 




712 


25.0 


247.9 


2,215 


24.0 


1951 J 
F 
M 





118.1 

117.5 

80.2 


118.1 

117.5 

80.2 


1,171 

1,165 
1,342 




731 
757 
674 


25.0 
25.0 
25.0 


200 3 
168.7 
114.4 


2,128 
2,116 
2,155 


48.2 
55.1 
31.6 


A 
M 

J 





129.0 
125.4 
117.0 


129.0 
125.4 
117.0 


1,328 
1,314 
1,335 




722 
777 
846 


25.0 
25.0 
25.0 


70.6 
45.3 
58.8 


2,146 
2,161 
2,265 


73.0 
47.4 
20.1 


J 
A 

S 


— 


117.0 

100.1 

87.1 


117.0 

100 1 

87.1 


1,327 
1,350 
1,298 




872 
888 
896 


25.0 
25.0 
25.0 


51.4 
44.1 
31.2 


2,276 
2,307 
2,250 


41.9 
50.6 
30.8 


O 
N 
D 




96.6 
128.9 
117.9 


96.6 
128.9 
117 9 


1,317 
1,138 
1,142 


1 
1 


956 
,043 
,049 


25.2 
25.0 
25 


8 2 

18.8 
89.0 


2,307 
2,225 
2,305 


49.7 
35.4 
21.0 


1952 J 


— 


85.4 


85 4 


1,095 


1 


,043 


25 


24.3 


2,187 


33.3 



60 '"Includes foreign exchange items for account of foreign clients and also the Government of Canada and the Foreign 

Exchange Control Board since March 31, 1949. Liabilities payable in pounds sterling, United States dollars and other 
foreign currencies. 

Source: Statistical Summary of Bank of Canada. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 57 



FINANCE 



Canadian Chartered Banks 

Averages of month-end figures or end of month 



ASSETS 



Securities 



Canadian 
Cash 



Federal-Provincial 



Canadian 



Reserve 11 ' Under2yrs Over2yrs municipal 



Foreign 
govern- 
ment 



Other 



Gold, Coin 

and 
Total Foreign 
securities Currency 



Notes oi 

and 
Cheques Balances 
on Other at Other 
Banks Banks 













Million dollars 










1939 
1950 


268 
754 


516 
925 


718 
2,638 


101 
176 


78 
226 


126 
398 


1,540 
4,363 


43 
86 


120 
379 


219 
243 


1950 N 
D 


783 
810 


930 
939 


2,567 
2,555 


190 
194 


205 
193 


389 
405 


4,280 
4,286 


59 
56 


476 
450 


269 
259 


1951 J 
F 
M 


757 
753 
738 


937 
788 
755 


2,517 
2,497 
2,420 


192 
192 
192 


188 
190 
210 


413 
426 
409 


4,248 
4,093 
3,986 


61 
61 
56 


402 
448 
376 


243 
243 
263 


A 
M 
J 


759 
745 
768 


743 
732 
721 


2,366 
2,358 
2,325 


190 
186 
183 


208 
190 
192 


416 
420 
415 


3,924 

3,886 
3,838 


55 
58 
53 


499 
467 
395 


248 
263 
267 


J 

A 

S 


784 
770 
775 


735 
717 
769 


2,317 
2,317 
2,318 


180 
179 
175 


195 
210 
208 


413 
409 
406 


3,840 
3,832 
3,876 


59 
58 
56 


468 
497 
387 


267 
310 
259 


o 

N 
D 


821 
829 
892 


779 
833 
835 


2,288 
2,268 
2,274 


174 
170 
167 


226 
214 
200 


408 
407 
399 


3,876 
3,894 
3,876 


57 
53 
58 


544 
552 
627 


267 
253 
249 



Call 



ASSETS 



Loans 



Canada 



Abroad 



Current Provincial- 
public municipal 



Call 



Current 



Letters 

of 
Credit 



All Other 
Assets 



Total 

Assets 



LIABILITIES 



Notes in 
Circulation 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 


55 
111 


855 
2,330 


133 
115 


48 
93 


145 
222 


54 
201 


113 
118 


3,592 
9,015 


94 


1950 N 
D 


164 
134 


2,611 
2,651 


126 
125 


96 
100 


234 
247 


232 
258 


119 
120 


9,450 
9,496 





1951 J 
F 
M 


118 

109 

94 


2,671 
2,736 
2,856 


124 
136 
152 


113 

114 

96 


252 
256 
252 


269 
281 
289 


123 
124 
126 


9,379 
9,354 
9,284 


— 


A 
M 
J 


87 
92 
82 


2,886 
2,896 
2,898 


161 
170 
164 


97 

99 

110 


271 
281 
281 


290 
282 
269 


128 
131 
132 


9,403 
9,370 
9,256 


— 


J 
A 

S 


84 

90 

107 


2,890 
2,912 
2,901 


153 
161 
144 


112 
119 
131 


285 
262 
273 


246 
230 
228 


135 
136 
139 


9,323 
9,378 
9,276 


— 


o 

N 
D 


111 

96 

107 


2,893 
2,975 
2,901 


141 
149 
127 


82 

90 

131 


290 
285 
278 


222 
232 
225 


138 
137 
138 


9,440 
9,544 
9,610 


— 



Note: Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949. 

'"Since 1935, includes notes of, and deposits with, the Bank of Canada. 

Source: Department of Finance. 



61 



FINANCE 



TABLE 57 - concluded 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Canadian Chartered Banks 

Averages oi month-end figures or end of month 













LIABILITI 


















Den^nd 


Deposit* 

External and 
in cuxrenci. 
oi other 
Nchce countries 


Other 
banks 


Total 


Canadian 

depc-'V' 


Total 
Liabil- 
ities 


Daily 
Average 

Casn to 
Deposits' 3 ' 




Federal Provincial 
Government Government 












Million dollars 










1939 


92 


53 


742 


1,699 


474 


83 


3,144 


2,630 


3,578 


10.4 


1950 


193 


107 


2,563 


4,548 


731 


228 


8,449 


7,597 


8,997 


10.1 


1950 N 


288 


164 


2,324 


4.543 


716 


309 


8,845 


7,995 


9,432 


9.9 


D 


339 


161 


2.770 


4,558 


735 


304 


8 S67 


7,997 


9,478 


10.1 


1951 J 


358 


175 


2,638 


4.577 


724 


267 


8,739 


7,885 


9,361 


10.2 


F 


271 


175 


2,61?. 


4.618 


734 


294 


8,702 


7,841 


9,336 


9.4 


M 


318 


205 


2.487 


4,614 


719 


283 


8,625 


7,753 


9,266 


9.8 


A 


180 


180 


2,725 


4,598 


749 


309 


8,742 


7,856 


9,385 


10.0 


M 


231 


174 


2,692 


4,589 


747 


285 


8,718 


7,829 


9,352 


9 8 


J 


266 


189 


2,578 


4,559 


763 


264 


8,618 


7,697 


9,238 


10.0 


J 


235 


168 


2.675 


4,580 


753 


294 


8,705 


7,809 


9,306 


10.4 


A 


269 


141 


2,675 


4,583 


808 


300 


8,775 


7,799 


9,360 


10.3 


S 


227 


164 


2,651 


4,595 


769 


268 


8,674 


7,724 


9,258 


10 5 


O 


126 


144 


2,907 


4,575 


784 


298 


8,833 


7,913 


9,423 


10.4 


N 


134 


142 


2,936 


4.616 


784 


314 


8,927 


8,015 


9,527 


11.0 


D 


135 


187 


2,963 


4,612 


795 


312 


9,003 


8,089 


9,592 


10.9 



(^Deposits payable in Canadian cur-en^v. 
deposits. 



''Includes all other liabilities. 



Ratio of cash in Canada to Canadian 



TABLE 58 



Currency and Active Bank Deposits 

End of period 



CURRENCY OUTSIDE BANKS 



ACTIVE BANK DEPOSITS 



Chartered Banks 



Notes (I > Coin'" Total 



Demand 



Active 
notice <3) 



Other 

(«) (S) 



Deduct 
floats 



Net 
total 



Bank of 
Canada 

"Other" 
deposits 



Total 



Total 

Currency 

and 

Active 

Bank 

Deposits 



Million dollars 



1939 


247 


34 


281 


853 


197 


157 


136 


1,071 


18 


1,089 


1,370 


1951 


1.191 


84 


1.275 


2,963 


717 


449 


627 


3,502 


66 


3,568 


4,843 


1950 N 


1,119 


77 


1,196 


2,824 


694 


419 


476 


3,461 


221 


3,682 


4,878 


D 


1,136 


78 


1,214 


2.770 


697 


413 


450 


3,430 


207 


3,637 


4,851 


1951 J 


1,075 


76 


1,151 


2,638 


702 


395 


402 


3,333 


204 


3,537 


4,688 


F 


1,093 


76 


1,169 


2,612 


709 


415 


448 


3,288 


205 


3,493 


4,662 


M 


1,134 


78 


1,212 


2.487 


711 


428 


376 


3,250 


207 


3,457 


4,669 


A 


1,120 


78 


1,198 


2,725 


709 


429 


499 


3,364 


215 


3,579 


4,777 


M 


1.123 


79 


1,202 


2,692 


707 


398 


467 


3,330 


222 


3,552 


4,754 


J 


1,174 


81 


1,255 


2,578 


707 


385 


395 


3,275 


220 


3,495 


4,750 


J 


1,145 


80 


1.225 


2,675 


709 


396 


468 


3,312 


213 


3,525 


4,750 


A 


1,181 


81 


1,262 


2,675 


712 


381 


497 


3,271 


186 


3,457 


4,719 


S 


1,193 


82 


1,275 


2,651 


715 


371 


387 


3,350 


140 


3,490 


4,765 


O 


1,174 


82 


1.256 


2.907 


713 


380 


544 


3,456 


83 


3.539 


4,795 


N 


1.212 


84 


1.296 


2.936 


712 


398 


552 


3,494 


92 


3.586 


4,882 


D 


1.191 


84 


1.275 


2.963 


717 


449 


627 


3,502 


66 


3,568 


4,843 



62 Note: Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949. 

'"Note Circulation of Bank of Canada and chartered banks, excluding notes held by chartered banks. '"Sub- 
sidiary coin issued by the Mint less coin held by Bank of Canada and chartered banks in Canada. (3) Chartered banks' 
public notice deposits in Canada other than estimated aggregate quarterly minimum balances in personal savings 
accounts and non-personal notice deposits. ' ' Chartered banks' Canadian dollar deposits of provincial governments, 
Canadian, United Kingdom, and foreign banks. Excluding Government of Canada. Cheques en banks as 
shown in chartered bank month-end returns to the Minister of Finance. 

Source: Statistical Summary of Bank of Canada. 



FEBRUARY, 195" 

Federal Government Revenues and Expenditures 

TABLE 59 



FINANCE 



1^51 



1950 



November 



951 1950 1951-52 1950-51 

December April 1 to December 31 



Million dollars 



REVENUES 

Ordinary Revenue 

Customs Import Duties 

Excise Duties , 

Excise Taxes 

Income and Excess Profits Taxes 

Postal Revenue , 

Sundry , 

Total Ordinary Revenue , 

Special Receipts 

Total Revenues 



EXPENDITURES 

Expenditure (by Departments) 

Agriculture 

Citizenship & Immigration 

Defence Production 

External Affairs 

Finance — 

Administration and General 

Grants to Municipalities (Lieu of Taxes) . . . 

Interest and Other Debt Charges 

Payments to Province; (Subsidies, Tax 
Rental Payments, etc.) 

Flood and Other Emergency Assistance . . 

Implementation of Guarantees 

Fisheries 

Justice 

Labour 

Legislation 

Mines & Technical Surveys 

National Defence 

Administration and General 

Naval Service 

Army Service 

Air Force Service 

Defence Research Board 

Defence Appropriation Act, Sec. 3, 1950 . . 
National Health & Welfare 

Administration & General 

Family Allowances 

Old Age Pensions and Pensions to the Blind 

General Health Grants to Provinces 

National Research Council 

National Revenue 

Post Office 

Public Archives 



27.4 


27.2 


23.0 


22.8 


257.3 


197.8 


22.1 


21.7 


19.1 


20.0 


166.4 


174.2 


74.1 


66.9 


82.8 


62.8 


658.6 


456.9 


166.9 


119.7 


160.8 


131.9 


1,531.3 


1,028.8 


8.8 


7.5 


14.0 


11.0 


76.8 


64.6 


7.4 


7.6 


35.0 


11.3 


98.9 


73.9 


306.7 


250.6 


334.7 


259.8 


2,789.4 


1,996.3 


1.4 


1.4 


1.5 


2.8 


14.9 


53.4 


308.1 


251.9 


336.3 


262.6 


2,804.3 


2,049.6 



6.1 


5.3 


5.6 


5.1 


46.9 


49.3 


2.8 


2.8 


2.7 


2.1 


22 3 


19.4 


1.9 


— 


2.0 


— 


19.6 


_ 


0.7 


0.9 


1.1 


0.8 


9.6 


11.9 


1.5 


1.4 


1.4 


1.5 


12.7 


12.8 


0.3 


0.3 


1.1 


0.8 


1.7 


1.1 


63.4 


65.8 


29.1 


29.1 


279.0 


282.5 


— 





9.7 


15.1 


84.8 


83.0 


0.3 


0.2 


— 


5.4 


0.9 
1.3 
6.3 


13.6 


0.8 


0.7 


0.7 


0.7 


6.5 


1.2 


1.1 


1.2 


0.9 


10.3 


8.9 


6.2 


4.3 


4.9 


5.0 


43.5 


40.9 


0.5 


0.1 


1.7 


0.8 


4.7 


3.5 


2.5 


1.6 


1.7 


1.0 


18.3 


12.0 


1.4 


0.7 


1.2 


0.8 


8.8 


7.4 


16.0 


9.5 


14.8 


7.1 


104.2 


55.8 


31.1 


12.5 


33.7 


16.7 


247.3 


118.9 


56.8 


19.7 


28.7 


16.6 


366.6 


121.0 


2.8 


1.5 


1.7 


1.6 


18.3 


12.8 


■ — 


— 


22.7 


56.8 


24.6 


56.8 


0.8 


0.6 


0.7 


0.5 


6.2 


4.9 


26.8 


25.9 


26.9 


26.0 


239.3 


231.1 


— 


— 


— 


0.9 


53.4 


50.7 


1.7 


2.6 


1.2 


1.9 


10.5 


7.9 


2.5 


1.5 


1.9 


1.4 


16.0 


11.5 


3.7 


3.7 


3.6 


3.5 


33.5 


33.9 


7.6 


9.0 


9.0 


6.8 


65.9 


58.6 


— 


— 


— 


— 


0.2 


0.2 



Note: This statement does not include any receipts other than revenues nor any disbursements other than regular 
budgetary expenditures. Excluded, for example, are all receipts arising from repayments of loans and advances, or from 
accumulations on annuity, pension and insurance funds. Similarly excluded on the expenditure side, for example, are all 
Govt, outlays arising from increases in loans, advances and investments. 

Source: Canada Gazette. 



63 



FINANCE FEBRUARY, 1952 

Federal Government Revenues and Expenditures 

TABLE 59— concluded 



1951 



1950 



November 



1951 



1950 



December 



Million dollars 



195152 1950 51 
April 1 to December 31 



EXPENDITURES (concluded) 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Resources and Development 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary oi State 

Trade and Commerce 

Transport 

Veterans Affairs 

Administration and General 

Treatment Services 

Disability Pensions and Veterans 

Allowances 

Discharge Benefits and Credits 

Soldier Settlement and Veterans' Land Act 

Other Departments 

Total Expenditures 

Excess of Revenues over Expenditures 



LOANS, ADVANCES AND INVESTMENTS*" 
Net Increase or Decrease (— ) 

Loans to, and Investments in, Crown Agencies 

Railway and Steamship Companies 

Miscellaneous 

Total Loans to, and Investments in Crown 
Agencies 

Other Loans and Investments 

United Kingdom and Other Governments 
United Kingdom Financial Agreement Act 

1946 

United Kingdom Loan under The War 

Appropriation Act, 1942 

Other Governments 

Total Loans to United Kingdom and Other 

Governments 

Soldier Settlement and Veterans' Land Act . 

Miscellaneous 

Total Other Loans and Investments 

Total Working Capital Advances 

Net Total of Changes in Loans, Advances 
and Investments 



0.1 


1 


0.1 


— 


6 


0.4 


7.7 


6 4 


7.0 


6.2 


56 7 


50.5 


1.7 


2.0 


2 5 


1.7 


16 


15.8 


2.1 


1.9 


2.0 


1.6 


17.8 


13.1 


0.2 


1 


2 


0.2 


1.4 


13 


2 1 


2.1 


1 6 


1.8 


17.3 


15 8 


7.0 


6 5 


8 5 


8.2 


59 9 


55.0 


1 4 


1.4 


1.8 


1.4 


11 9 


11.8 


3.6 


3.1 


3.5 


3.0 


28.4 


25.5 


10.5 


10.1 


10.4 


9 8 


92 6 


89.0 


15 


2.7 


1.6 


3.4 


11.7 


20 4 


5 


5 


0.4 


0.5 


4.2 


4.6 


0.7 


3 


0.7 


0.6 


7.7 


8.6 


278.0 


209.2 


249.4 


247.3 


2,082.7 


1,628.4 


30.0 


42.8 


86.9 


15.3 


721.6 


421.3 



5.0 


15.4 


5.6 


15.9 


107.7 
52 6 


-2.8 
92.3 


5.0 


15.4 


5.6 


15 9 


160.3 


89.5 



-3 3 



-3 


-0 
-3 



10 



11.7 



-3.4 

-3.4 
1.8 

-1.5 
2.7 



16.5 



-14.0 
-7.2 



■21.2 
2.2 

0.3 

18 7 

7.0 



6.1 



-16.1 



-16.1 

0.6 

-0.2 

-15.8 

-3 1 



2.9 



-14.0 

-28 8 
-11.4 

-54.2 

10.0 

-1.6 

-45.8 
71 2 



185.7 



20.0 

-35.6 

-14.7 

-30 3 

13.2 

-3.6 

-20.8 

2.7 



71.5 



64 ' Does not include advances to Foreign Exchange Control Board which are equivalent in substance to cash 

balances either in Canada or abroad, nor temporary investment of surplus cash in the Government's own securities. 
Note: Credit items are due tc repayments and transfers between departments and classes of expenditure. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 

Cheques Cashed in Clearing House Centres 

TABLE 60 Monthly averages or calendar months 



FINANCE 



CANADA<» 



BY REGIONS 



SELECTED CITIES 



Atlantic Prairie British Van- 

Provinces' 1 ' Quebec Ontario Provinces Columbia Montreal Toronto Ottawa Winnipeg couver 













Million dollars 












1939 
1951 


2,625 
9,349 


57 
241 


818 
2,727 


1,135 
3,921 


457 
1,631 


168 
829 


730 
2,432 


848 
2,689 


106 
372 


287 
864 


132 
684 


1950 N 
D 


11,008 
9,315 


256 
247 


3,354 
2,839 


4,775 
3,835 


1,768 
1,587 


855 
806 


3,082 
2,567 


3,431 
2,701 


519 
281 


960 
873 


706 
670 


1951 J 
F 
M 


9,002 

7,984 
8,830 


226 
200 
253 


2,843 
2,343 
2,779 


3,745 
3,527 
3,766 


1,397 
1,181 
1,250 


791 
733 
782 


2,562 
2,116 
2,441 


2,534 
2,391 
2,631 


335 
386 
275 


712 
584 
598 


643 
618 
657 


A 
M 
J 


9,017 
9,484 
9,500 


227 
247 
239 


2,492 
2,688 
2,647 


3,969 
3,925 
3,987 


1,525 
1,785 
1,744 


804 
839 
882 


2,181 
2,417 
2,369 


2,633 
2,692 
2,767 


463 
352 
321 


846 

1,012 

948 


655 
702 
724 


J 

A 

S 


9,032 
9,072 

8,775 


261 
224 
224 


2,607 
2,620 
2,647 


3,751 
3,754 
3,508 


1,589 
1,633 
1,603 


824 
839 
793 


2,302 
2,348 
2,361 


2,517 
2,485 
2,407 


344 
421 
313 


845 
844 
826 


676 
695 
628 


o 

N 
D 


10,619 
10,737 
10,134 


277 
259 
253 


2,965 
3,212 
2,884 


4,423 
4,499 
4,193 


2,066 
1,930 
1,871 


888 
837 
933 


2,646 
2,858 
2,582 


3,097 
3,101 
3,016 


420 
501 
327 


1,153 
1,004 
1,003 


740 
690 
785 



d) Commencing with April 
Source: Cheques Cashed 



, 1949, Newfoundland is included, 
in Clearing Centres, D.B.S. 



Life Insurance Sales 



TABLE 61 




Monthly averages or 


calendar months 












Canada 


New- 
foundland 


Prince 

Edward 

Island 


Nova 
Scotia 


New 
Bruns- 
wick 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Mani- 
toba 


Saskat- 
chewan 


Alberta 


British 
Columbia 












Million dollars 












1939 
1951 


39.7 
126.2 


0.34 
0.90 


0.17 
0.36 


1.67 
3.84 


0.97 
3.02 


11.45 
33.67 


16.76 
54.19 


2.45 
6.53 


1.20 
3.68 


1.73 
8.67 


2.99 
11.33 


1950 N 
D 


135.8 
119.4 


0.83 
0.84 


0.48 
0.52 


-4.35 
3.58 


2.85 
2.58 


36.23 
31.73 


59.47 
50.74 


6.27 
6.00 


4.40 
3.41 


8.72 
8.74 


12.25 
11.29 


1951 J 
F 
M 


120.5 
118.7 
122.0 


0.63 
1.15 
0.97 


0.31 
0.32 
0.24 


3.49 
3.85 
3.51 


2.84 
2.83 
3.10 


32.91 
30.53 
35.16 


50.90 
51.44 
51.87 


6.26 
6.24 
6.03 


3.24 
3.10 
3.13 


9.58 
8.08 
8.13 


10.33 

11.14 

9.88 


A 
M 
J 


133.0 
130.5 
136.4 


0.79 
0.97 
0.97 


0.31 
0.30 
0.35 


3.90 
3.79 
4.12 


2.81 
3.32 
3.29 


36.53 
34.30 
36.41 


58.56 
56.62 
58.72 


7.22 
7.47 
7.33 


3.01 
3.39 
4.42 


8.28 
8.69 
9.26 


11.61 
11.65 
11.52 


J 

A 

S 


133.7 
106.6 
103.9 


0.92 
0.85 
0.79 


0.31 
0.44 
0.41 


4.80 
3.26 
3.48 


3.33 
2.70 
2.40 


33.48 
28.90 
27.80 


59.01 
43.40 
43.25 


7.05 
5.43 
5.38 


4.78 
3.54 
3.29 


9.06 
7.44 
6.87 


10.98 
10.68 
10.24 


O 

N 
D 


132.1 
143.4 
133.4 


1.04 
0.90 
0.84 


0.36 
0.43 
0.48 


4.13 
3.87 
3.85 


3.13 
3.32 
3.25 


35.04 
37.93 
35.07 


57.77 
61.93 
56.73 


6.24 
7.39 
6.36 


3.87 
4.26 
4.06 


8.99 

10.10 

9 59 


11.53 
13.27 
13.13 



Note — This series gives total new settled-for ordinary insurance sales in Canada, exclusive of revivals, increases, 
dividend additions, reinsurance acquired and pension bonds without insurance. Totals are estimates projected from 
the sales reported by 28 companies operating in Canada representing 91 per cent of new ordinary insurance sales. 

Source: Monthly Survey of Life Insurance Sales in Canada, Life Insurance Agency Management Association, 
Hartford, Conn. 



65 



FINANCE 



TABLE 61 



FEBRUARY, 1952 
Benefit Payments of Life Insurance Companies 

concluded Monthly averages or calendar months 



Death and Disability 

Accidental Matured Benefits 

Death Endow- Income Annuity 

Claims ments Payments Payments 



Surrender 
Values 



Dividends 
to 
Policy- 
holders 



Total Payments 



All 
policies Ordinary Industrial Group 



Million dollars 



1950 


7.11 


2.84 


0.31 


62 


4.98 


3 38 


19.23 


14.36 


2.94 


1.94 


1950 O 
N 
D 


7.26 
7.82 
6.48 


2.91 
3.23 
2.00 


0.27 
0.34 
22 


0.82 
0.71 
0.50 


4.87 
5.15 
4.49 


2.37 
3.21 
4.84 


18.50 
20.46 

18.52 


15.16 
15.73 
12.69 


1.26 
2.82 
3.74 


2.07 
1.91 
2.09 


1951 J 
F 
M 


8 67 
7.00 
8.28 


2.98 
2.74 
3.33 


0.37 
0.25 
29 


0.80 
0.60 
0.65 


5.10 
4.58 
4.75 


3.61 
3.44 
4.03 


21.53 

18.62 
21.33 


15.95 
13.77 
16.10 


3.06 
2.75 
3.16 


2.53 
2.10 
2.07 


A 
M 
J 


7.51 
7.70 
7.33 


2.86 
2.84 
2.71 


0.29 
0.32 
0.29 


0.72 
0.68 
0.72 


5.49 
5.91 
5.29 


3.46 
3.45 
3.82 


20.33 
20.90 
20.15 


15.20 
15.57 
14.97 


2.94 
3.13 
3.13 


2.19 
2.20 
2.06 


J 

A 

S 


7.61 
7.34 
7.19 


3.19 
2.22 
2.34 


0.29 
0.30 
0.27 


0.83 
0.55 
0.67 


5.00 
5.32 
4.66 


3.12 
3.35 
3.47 


20.04 
19.10 
18.59 


15.15 
14.22 
13.90 


2.71 
2.58 
2.72 


2.18 
2.30 
1.97 


o 

N 


7.42 
9.02 


2.96 
3.00 


0.31 
0.29 


70 
0.67 


5.72 
6.36 


3.62 
3.29 


20.74 
22.63 


15.91 
17.23 


2.58 
3.14 


2.24 
2.27 



PAYMENTS TO BENEFICIARIES ON DEATH CLAIMS' 1 ' 
Quarterly averages or quarters 



Canada 



Nfld. P.E.I. 



N.S. 



N.B. Quebec Ontario Manitoba Sask. Alberta B.C. 















Million dollars 










1950 


21.32 






0.07 


0.71 


0.49 


6.17 


9.76 


1.13 


0.53 


0.87 


1.59 


19503rd 
4th 


19.93 
21.55 






09 
0.08 


0.76 
0.53 


0.50 
57 


6.37 
6.06 


8.26 
10.27 


1.15 
1.25 


0.55 
0.48 


0.89 
0.83 


1.35 
1.49 


1951 1st 
2nd 
3rd 


23.94 
22.54 
22.15 







18 
12 
14 


0.10 
0.04 
0.06 


0.67 
0.61 
0.49 


0.52 
0.40 
0.34 


6.74 
6.77 
6.62 


11.57 
10.64 
10.72 


1.05 
1.00 

96 


0.49 
0.42 
0.39 


0.84 
1.03 
1.01 


1.81 
1j2 
1.42 



"Ordinary, Industrial and Group. 

Source: The Canadian Life Insurance Officers Association. 



TABLE 62 



Bond Issues and Retirements 

Years and Quarters 



FEDERAL"' 



PROVINCIAL") 



CORPORATIONS 



New 

Issues 



Retire- 
ments 



New 
Issues 



Retire- 
ments 



New Issues 



New Refunding 



Retire- 
ments 



Net New 
Issues (+) 
or Retire- 
ments(— ) 



TOTAL' 2 ' GOVERN- 
MENT OF 
CANADA 
SHORT 
TERM 
DEBT' 5 ' 



Net New 
Is8ues(+) 
or Retlre- 
ments( — ) 











Par values in 


million Canadian dollars 












1939 


211 


233 


154 


74 


36 


201 


271 





33 


+ 


25 




470 


1950 


2,192 


2,283 


409 


253 


432' 


56' 


143' 


+345 r 


+410' 


1 


,500 


1950 3rd 


68 


97 


77 


15 


44' 


19 


31' 


+ 


32' 


+ 


64' 


1 


,500 


4th 


973 


933 


37 


37 


137' 


16' 


44 r 


+ 108' 


+ 148' 


1 


,500 


1951 1st 


20 


117 


29 


62 


83 


1 


22 


+ 


62 


— 


68 


1 


,400 


2nd 


4 


76 


159 


35 


53 


6 


22 


+ 


37 


+ 


89 


1 


,400 


3rd 


2 


114 


101 


35 


109 


— 


23 


+ 


86 


+ 


40 


1 


,400 


4th 


565 


615 


109 


66 


102 


4 


34 


+ 


72 


+ 


65 


1 


,400 



66 : Direct and Guaranteed. '"Federal, Provincial and Corporation. '"Outstanding, end of period: 

Treasury Bills, Deposit Certificates and Short Term Issues sold directly to Bank of Canada and the Chartered Banks. 
Source: Statistical Summary of Bank of Canada. 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



TABLE 63 



FINANCE 



Index Numbers of Security Prices 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



COMMON STOCKS 



Investors' Index 



Industrials 



Total 

105 

stocks 



Total, Machinery 

82 and equip- Pulp and 

stocks ment paper 



Milling 



Oils 



Textiles Food and 

and allied Building 

clothing products Beverages materials 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1951 


91.6 
168.3 


91.2 
172.0 


100.9 
420.7 


81.7 
561.2 


100.6 
112.8 


83.6 
140.6 


95.0 
358.0 


109.6 
118.9 


98.1 
434.1 


98.3 
272.5 


1950 D 


146.3 


144.4 


373.5 


443.8 


94.9 


100.5 


311.9 


124.9 


428.8 


215.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


153.8 
166.5 
162.9 


154.8 
168.0 
165.0 


401.9 
422.2 
411.1 


481.6 
531.6 
513.3 


104.7 
110.5 
107.1 


110.1 
126.9 
133.6 


359.3 
399.6 
383.0 


125.6 
127.8 
124.4 


442.4 
463.4 
441.2 


244.8 
259.7 
251.6 


A 
M 
J 


165.6 
164.2 
160.7 


169.1 
168.3 
164.4 


415.8 
406.4 
396.4 


568.3 
579.2 
562.2 


106.1 
104.7 
104.1 


138.2 
138.9 
134.1 


369.0 
363.0 
359.8 


123.4 
121.0 
117.9 


445.4 
436.3 
425.6 


260.9 
264.2 
257.6 


J 

A 

S 


162.0 
169.7 
179.8 


165.8 
174.5 
185.4 


405.0 
419.2 
445.4 


568.1 
588.5 
609.8 


111.3 
117.7 
124.0 


135.1 
145.3 
156.6 


355.5 
366.6 
371.6 


115.2 
118.4 
119.7 


421.8 
419.9 
436.5 


264.6 
277.8 
308.8 


o 

N 
D 


183.3 
174.0 
177.3 


189.5 
178.8 
180.6 


462.5 
431.7 
430.4 


595.5 
562.3 
573.6 


122.6 
121.9 
119.3 


162.6 
150.8 
154.7 


346.3 
314.1 
308.2 


114.2 
110.9 
108.5 


445.9 
425.2 
405.9 


305.8 
284.7 
290.0 


1952 J 


181.7 


186.7 


452.0 


582.8 


118.5 


161.0 


301.2 


111.8 


396.5 


295.3 



COMMON STOCKS 



PREFERRED 
STOCKS 



Investors' Index 



Mining Index 



Industrials 

Industrial 
mines 



Utilities 



Total Telephone Power 

15 Trans- and and 

stocks portation telegraph traction 



Banks 

8 
stocks 



Total 

30 
stocks 



Gold 



Base 
metals 



Total 

37 
stocks 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1951 


98.9 
126.0 


86.1 
162.3 


56.0 
325.6 


109.3 
101.4 


88.9 
142.5 


102.5 
144.6 


104.5 
99.2 


95.6 
69.8 


121.7 
166.4 


101.6 
164.5 


1950 D 


112.1 


141.2 


248.6 


101.3 


127.6 


152.6 


88.2 


59.8 


146.0 


160.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


118.1 
125.6 
117.1 


148.6 
163.2 
158.9 


266.5 
315.2 
301 8 


102.5 
104.6 
104.0 


135.8 
146.0 
142.4 


155.6 
158.5 
150.0 


97.6 
104.7 
100.3 


68.8 
74.3 
71.2 


163.5 
174.5 
166.7 


166.0 
169.3 
166.0 


A 
M 
J 


118.3 
117.2 
117.0 


159 7 
156.0 
153.0 


304 7 
296 4 
290.7 


102.9 
102 C 
101.2 


143 9 
139 8 
136 


144.1 
141 7 
141 1 


96.7 
92.5 
90.6 


66.8 
63.7 
63 7 


165 3 
158.6 
152.3 


165.2 
164.3 
162.2 


J 
A 

S 


118.1 
127.1 
135.4 


155.4 
162.6 
172.3 


299 6 
328.8 
368.8 


101.2 
100.5 
100.8 


137 7 
142.1 
147 6 


140 
137.2 
140.2 


92.7 

97.7 
104.0 


65 5 
69.7 
73.7 


35 

161 . 7 
173.6 


m.i 

155 ? 
16<> 


o 

N 
D 


141.0 
136.6 
140.2 


174.0 
167.2 
177.0 


378.4 
354.4 
402.1 


99.2 
99.2 
99.0 


149.1 
143.4 
146.0 


141.5 
141.0 
144.2 


107.5 
102.4 
103.4 


75.3 
71.9 
73.2 


181.2 
172.3 
172.4 


164,2 
162.8 
159.5 


1952 J 


148.1 


175.0 


388.0 


98.6 


147.9 


146.5 


104.2 


72.0 


177.7 





Note: The number of stocks has varied over the period, the totals shown representing the current coverage. 
Source: Prices and Price Indexes, D.B.S. 



67 



FINANCE 

;able 64 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



Commercial Failures* 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



FAILURES •• 



LIABILITIES INVOLVED -" 



Total 



Trade 



Manu- 
factures 



Other 



Total 



Atlantic 
Provinces 



Quebec Ontario 



Prairie 
Provinces 



British 
Columbia 









Number 










Thousand Dollars 






1939 


116 


55 


18 


43 


1 


,257 


78 




556 


409 


135 


80 


1950 


109 


42 


21 


45 


2 


,073 


101 


1 


,339 


392 


94 


147 


1950 A 


85 


23 


19 


43 


1 


956\ 
,813/ 


110 


1 


,317 


412 


28 


66 


S 


86 


38 


11 


37 


1 














O 


111 


36 


24 


51 


2 


,171, 














N 


137 


52 


25 


60 


2 


,504 


37 


1 


,512 


520 


84 


57 


D 


86 


37 


15 


34 


1 


,957J 














1951 J 


137 


61 


33 


43 


2 


,282) 














F 


134 


55 


21 


58 


2 


,025 


24 


1 


,456 


498 


59 


104 


M 


129 


52 


25 


52 


2 


,112J 














A 


124 


56 


20 


48 


2 


374) 














M 


<>7 


42 


22 


33 


1 


787 


49 


1 


,224 


521 


32 


118 


J 


97 


37 


16 


44 


1 


674J 














J 


105 


50 


16 


39 


2 


401] 

293 \ 














A 


119 


53 


22 


44 


2 


106 


1 


,460 


379 


72 


97 


S 


88 


29 


18 


41 


1 


647J 















"Assignments made under the Bankruptcy and Winding Up Acts. 

" Quarterly data for the last five columns are monthly averages. 

(: Tn the Bankruptcy Act of 1949, provision is made for proposals from insolvent persons. Since July, 1950, agreementa 
made under this method are not included with the statistics of bankruptcies. Liabilities of insolvent persons making proposals 
are not available. 

Source: Commercial Failures Under the Provisions of the Bankruptcy and Winding Up Acts, D.B.S. 



'lABLE 65 



Miscellaneous Financial Statistics 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Government 
of Canada 
Theoretical 

15-year 
Bond Yield 



Three- 
Month 
Treasury 
Bill 
Yield 



Montreal Stock Exchange and Curb Market 



Toronto Stock Exchange 



Dividend 
Payments ' 



Brokers' 
loans 



Ratio to 
value of 

stocks 



Industrial 
shares 
traded 



Value of 
listings 



Borrow- Ratio to' 3) 
ings on quoted 
collateral values Sales 



Quoted 
market 
values " 









Million dollars 




Thousand 
shares 


Billion 
dollars 


Million 
dollars 




Million 
shares 


Billion 
dollars 


1939 
1950 


3.16 
2.78 


707 
0.552 


25.43 
41 82 


11.34 
20.63 


0.23 
23 


707 
1.748 


7 01 

8.97 


16.8 

36 3 


36 
0.41 


10 1 
42.2 


4.77 
8 88 


1950 N 
D 


2 88 
2.99 


624 
626 


11.15 
117 92 


23 43 
26 88 


23 
25 


2.089 
1.531 


9 36 
9 95 


41.0 
38 5 


43 
37 


48 8 
26.9 


9.50 
10.19 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3.02 
3 02 
3.25 


0.626 
0.728 
755 


59.57 
31.26 
56.26 


22.46 
26.23 
25.68 


19 
23 
22 


3.442 
2,639 
1,275 


10 99 
11.02 
10.89 


37 6 
37.8 
33.1 


33 
34 
0.30 


70.6 
49.3 
29.5 


11.23 
11.22 
11.10 


A 
M 

J 


3 24 
3.24 
3.25 


0.755 
0.755 
0.754 


36.79 
11.63 
72.39 


25 87 
25.49 
24.45 


22 
23 
23 


1,954 
1,753 
1,078 


11.19 
10.94 
10 63 


36 2 
37.9 
35 8 


0.31 
0.34 
33 


27 2 
28.7 
21 9 


11.58 
11.30 
10.91 


J 

A 

S 


3 23 
3 24 
3.24 


0.771 
0.786 
0.880 


50.01 
25.14 
53 98 


24.82 
27.49 
30 55 


22 
23 
25 


1.071 
1.581 
1.667 


11.39 

11 99 r 

12 29 


36 8 
38.1 

52.7 


32 
31 
32 


29 2 
42 
70.7 


11.66 
12.39 
12.66 


O 
N 
D 


3 26 
3 38 
3.50 


927 
916 
894 


35 92 

13 06 

107 04 


34 86 
31 40 
32.31 


29 
26 
26 


1,624 

1,087 

940 


12.11 

11.88 

12 17 


44 

44 4 

45 4 


35 
36 
36 


99 8 
47. T 
44.8 


12.46 
12.33 
12.70 


1952 J 


3.54 


890 


62 94 






1,452 








65.1 


13.07 



68 " Aj reported by Financial Post. ,; As of December 31. Annual data obtained by averaging monthly ratios. (4) As 

of end of month. Annual data are end of month averages. 

Souce: Statistical Summary, Bank of Canada; Financial Post; Monthly Review, Montreal Stock Exchange; Monthly Review, 
Toronto Stock Exchange. 



LIST OF STATISTICAL TABLES 



INTRODUCTION Page 

1 Selected Economic Indicators: Canada 1 

2 Significant Statistics of United Kingdom 2 

3 Significant Statistics of United States 3 

4 Population, Births, Marriages and Deaths. ... 4 

5 National Accounts: Income and Expenditure. 6 

6 Industrial Production: Volume Indexes 6 

LABOUR 

7 Canadian Labour Force 10 

8 Canadian Labour Income 10 

9 Employment and Earnings: By Industries 11 

10 Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 14 

11 Employment and Earnings: By Cities 16 

12 Average Hourly Earnings 17 

13 Average Hours Worked per Week 19 

14 Percentage of Women in Reporting Establish- 

ments: By Industries 20 

15 Unemployment Insurance 20 

16 Time Lost in Labour Disputes 21 

PRICES 

17 Living Costs in Canada 22 

18 Wholesale Price Indexes: Component Material 

Classification 22 

19 Wholesale Price Indexes: Other Classifications 25 

FUEL AND POWER 

20 Electric Power: Production, Exports and Con- 

sumption 26 

: Consumption by Provinces. . . 26 

21 Coal and Coke 27 

22 Petroleum and Gas 27 

23 Refined Petroleum Products 28 

MINING 

24 Metals 29 

25 Non-Metallic Minerals 30 

MANUFACTURING 

26 Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and 

Shipments 30 

27 Tobacco and Beverages 33 

28 Rubber 33 

29 Leather: Stocks and Wettings of Hides and 

Skins 34 

: Production of Finished Leather 34 

: Production of Boots and Shoes 35 

30 Primary Textiles 35 

31 Production of Factory Clothing 36 

32 Wood and Paper Products 37 

33 Primary Iron and Steel Shapes: Shipments to 

Industries 38 

Primary Iron and Steel 39 

34 Motor Vehicles: Production and Sales 39 

35 Refrigerators and Washing Machines 40 

Radio and Television Receiving Sets 40 



CONSTRUCTION Page 

36 Value of Building Permits: 

By Municipalities 41 

By Provinces and Types 42 

37 Building Materials: Production, Imports and 

Sales 43 

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

38 Production and Acreage of Principal Field 

Crops. See April issue, page 82. 

39 Farm Cash Income 44 

40 Grain Supply and Disposition— See April issue, 

page 85. 

41 Inspected Slaughterings of Live Stock and 

Cold Storage Holdings of Meat and Poultry 45 

Prices and Price Ratios: Live Stock and Live- 
stock Feeds 45 

Exports of Live-Stock Products 46 

42 Milk and Milk Products: Production, Stocks 

and Sales 46 

43 Fish: Landings, Exports and Stocks 47 

44 Manufactured Food: Production 47 

: Sugar: Production, Sales 
and Stocks 48 

DOMESTIC TRADE 

45 Value of Retail Trade 49 

46 Retail Sales and Stocks 50 

47 Retail Consumer Credit 51 

48 Indexes of Wholesale Sales 51 

EXTERNAL TRADE 

49 Merchandise Exports: By Commodities 52 

50 Merchandise Imports: by Commodities 54 

51 Merchandise Exports and Imports: By Areas 56 

52 Factors in the Balance of Payments 57 

TRANSPORTATION 

53 Shipping and Aviation 57 

54 Carloadings of Revenue Freight on Canadian 

Railways 58 

55 Operating Statistics of Canadian Railways — 59 

FINANCE 

56 Bank of Canada: Assets and Liabilities 60 

57 Canadian Chartered Banks: Assets and Liabi- 

lities 61 

58 Currency and Active Bank Deposits 62 

59 Federal Government Revenues and Expend- 

itures 63 

60 Cheques Cashed in Clearing House Centres . . 65 

61 Life Insurance: Sales 65 

: Benefit Payments 66 

62 Bond Issues and Retirements 66 

63 Index Numbers of Security Prices 67 

64 Commercial Failures 68 

65 Miscellaneous Financial Statistics 68 



Note: Symbols used: Throughout the Review (. .) means "not available"; (- 
of digits used"; (•>) signifies "preliminary" and (') indicates "revised' 
provisional. 



-) means "nil" or "less than can be shown with number 
In some cases the annual data for 1949 and 1950 are 



I - M.G.. O.A..D.S.P.. Queen'a Printer and Controller of Stationery. Ottawa, 1901 







CANADIAN 



STATISTICAL 



REVIEW 






MARCH 1952 



*N 






^OTYOOf 



"' I «MMW 



VOLUME XXVII NUMBER 3 






DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS, OTTAWA, CANADA 



CANADIAN 

STATISTICAL 

REVIEW MARCH 1952 

(FORMKRLY MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS) 

Contents: 

Current Economic Conditions Page i 

Statistical Tables Page 1 

List of Statistical Tables Inside Back Cover 



Published by Authority 

of the Rt. Hon. C. D. HOWE 

Minister of Trade & Commerce 



Annual subscription: $3.00 
Single copies: 35^ each 



Subscription orders should be sent to the Queen's Printer, Ottawa, 

Ontario, and remittances made payable to the 

Receiver General of Canada. 



Current Economic 
Conditions 

The present level of business activity is 
being well maintained in sectors related to pri- 
mary resource development and defence, but 
shows declines in particular areas related to 
consumer demands. The investment forecast for 
1952 indicates that new investment projects for 
the year will total $5.0 billion. This consists 
of anticipated outlays by business, institutions 
and governments, and includes housing. The 
programme exceeds that of the previous year by 
9 per cent in value and, after allowance for 
price changes, by about 4 per cent in volume. 
The largest increases are indicated for Federal 
government defence projects and capital assist- 
ance to industry. On the other hand, certain sec- 
tors such as housing, trade and consumer goods 
manufacturing show declines. 

Manufacturing production (seasonally ad- 
justed) in January was 5.6 per cent below the 

1951 average. The decline occurred largely in 
the durable and semi-durable consumer goods 
industries. Total wages, salaries and supple- 
mentary labour income has shown a generally 
upward trend during the past six months, large- 
ly a result of increases in average earnings. 
Retail sales, which increased at a distinctly 
lower rate after the early rush in 1951, in January 
were 3 per cent above the high January figure 
of a year ago. Nevertheless, retail sales in- 
creases have not kept up to increases in labour 
income. Additions to inventories, which were 
particularly large in the second and third quar- 
ters of 1951, were very small toward the end of 
the year. 

The 1952 Investment Forecast 

The recent survey of anticipated outlays for 
new construction, machinery and equipment in 

1952 indicates a continued high level of invest- 
ment amounting to $5.0 billion. The most note- 
worthy feature of the 1952 capital expenditure 
programme is the increased emphasis which it 
places on those industries contributing di- 
rectly to the defence effort and those engaged 
in developing the strategic natural resources of 
the nation. An examination of investment by the 



CURRENT DEMAND INDICATORS 

(BILLIONS OF DOLLARS) 

NEW CAPITAL EXPENDITURE 

35 i- 

I 



3.0 



2.5 



2.0 



1.5 



1.0 



.5 - 




1950 



1951 



1952 



FEDERAL DEFENCE EXPENDITURE 

2.5 



2.0 



1.5 



1.0 



.5 - 





1950 



I 951 



1952-3' 



I 5 



FISCAL YEAR APPROPRIATION 

PERSONAL DISPOSABLE INCOME 

AND 

EXPENDITURE 



I 4 



I 3 



I I 



EXPENDITURE 



DISPOSABLE 
INCOME 



UlbKUbABLt 77/ 

income yy. 

m 



1949 



950 




NEW INVESTMENT IN SELECTED SECTORS 



BILLIONS 
1.2 



i.i 
IX) 
.9 
.8 
.7 
.6 
,5 
.4 
.3 
2 
■ I 



OF DOLLARS 



^ ■ 




UTILITIES 
( Inc Transport) 



MANUFACTURING 
HOUSING 



GOVERNMENT 
DEPARTMENTS' 



AGRICULTURE 
8 FISHING 



1950 




TRADE 



MINING 8 
OIL WELLS 



1952 



Includes defence projects and capital assistance to industries with defence contracts 



various sectors reveals substantial increases in 
reining, certain types of rranufacturing and in 
utilities. These increases are offset to some 
extent by significant declines in housing, trade, 
finance and commercial services and in manu- 
facturing industries catering to consumer needs. 
This increased emphasis on investment in large- 
scale resource development projects became 
apparent after 1948. The demands generated by 
Western re-armament after Korea have provided 
increased incentive forthistype of development. 
Qn the other hand, capital expenditures in in- 
dustries serving more directly the needs of con- 
sumers are being restricted. 



Included in those sectors showing important 
gains over last year are new developments in 
iron ore mining, asbestos mining, and oil well 
drilling, which account for most of the mining 
increase. In manufacturing, the largest increases 
are in iron and steel, chemicals, oil refineries, 
non-ferrous metals, rubber and products. In the 
utilities group, the largest single increase is in 
oil and gas pipe lines. Steam railways, tele- 



phones, central electric stations, waterworks, 
and water transport also show important gains. 
In the government department sector, almost all 
of the increase shown is for Federal government 
defence projects and for capital assistance to 
industries filling defence contracts. It is to be 
noted here that the capital assistance outlays 
made by government are included with govern- 
ment departments and are not shown with the 
industrial sectors in which the outlay is actually 
made. 

A lessening of activity in groups which are 
largely non-defence in nature, is also worthy of 
note. Present indications are that outlays for 
new housing construction will decline by about 
10 per cent in value terms from the 1951 level. 
This represents a volume decline of the order 
of 15 per cent from 1951. While the nation's 
requirements for housing are still large and 
materials should be generally adequate, the 
smaller carry-over of uncompleted houses into 
1952, together with high building costs and 
problems of financing, are expected to keep 
housing activity at lower levels in the current 
year. 



Labour Income, Retail Trade 
and Cost-of-Living 

Labour income of $837 million in December 
was over 13 per cent above December of a year 
ago. The December figure is seasonally low 
each year because it depends to a large extent 
on payrolls during the last pay period of the 
month which contains several non-working days. 
With this exception the continuous upward trend 
of labour income is shown in the accompanying 
chart. In view of current interest in wage rates 
and employment, some of the factors in the labour 
income series may be reviewed briefly. The em- 
ployment index for the industrial composite in- 
creased 3 per cent between the pay periods 
ending nearest to January 1, 1951 and those of 
January 1 952. Average weekly earnings increased 
by 12 per cent, to $50.46, between the same 
dates. The payrolls index increased by 15 per 
cent. Average hourly earnings in manufacturing 
increased by 16 per cent to $1.27, accompanied 
by a decline in the average number of hours of 
work per week. 



Seasonal variations in retail trade are very 
large but they do not obscure the fact that the 
upward trend of retail trade values fell con- 
siderably behind that of labour income during 
the last half of 1951. In December and January, 
retail trade values were 3 per cent above the 
same months of a year ago. 

The cost-of-living index in December and 
January was between 11 and 12 per cent above 
the same months of a year ago, and the mer- 
chandise components of the index were slightly 
higher than this. Thus, the volume of retail 
trade was less than a year ago. 



Prices 

Of the numerous different kinds of price in- 
dexes, retail prices as represented in the cost- 
of-living index have been the most recent to 
decline. The February figure of 190.8 was 0.7 
below the January figure of 191.5. It will be 
recalled that a fractional decline occurred also 



LABOUR INCOME, RETAIL TRADE AND COST OF LIVING 

( INDEXED ON 1950 BASE FOR PURPOSES OF COMPARISON ) 



I 30 



l 20 



l I 



100 




LABOUR INCOME 



COST OF LIVING 



RETAIL TRADE 



DEC FEB. 



til 



PHYSICAL VOLUME OF PRODUCTION 

1935- 39 = 100 




DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 



NON DURABLE MANUFACTURES 
MINING 



1950 



951 



952 



in the month of November. Other price series 
have been declining for longer periods of time. 
The general wholesale price index decreased in 
each successive month after the July, 1951 
figure of 244.2, reaching 236.8 in January, 1952. 
Canadian farm products prices, both field and 
animal products, also showed declines over the 
above period. The weekly index of industrial 
material prices has shown a generally downward 
trend since May, 1951. In January, 1952, it 
averaged 281.4 and by February 22 it was down 
to 269.6. The weekly index of Canadian farm 
products prices also declined in the most recent 
comparison, from 256.5 in January to 247.0 in 
the week of February 22. Residential building 
material prices have been more or less steady 
at 290, despite the evidence of slackened demand 
in this field. Export prices have been well main- 



tained, standing at about the same level in 
January, 1952 as in July, 1951. They declined 
by abouv 1 per cent in January from December. 
Cn the other hand, import prices have declined 
more or less continuously since June, 1951, 
standing in January at 8 per cent below the 
June, 1951 high. 

Production 

The index of physical volume of industrial 
production reached a peak of 223.4 in May, 1951 
and has shown declines in the majority of the 
succeeding months, to reach 203.8 in January, 
1952. These declinesare attributable to consumer 
goods producing industries, especially tobacco, 
rubber, leather, textiles, clothing, radios, elec- 
trical appliances and to motor vehicle output. 



IV 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 1 



INTRODUCTION 



Selected Economic Indicators 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION 



EMPLOYMENT IN 
MANUFACTURING 



Steel Power by 
Index of Ingots Central Non- 
Industrial and News- Electric 1 " Automo- Total Durable durable in Manu 
Production Gold (1) Copper Castings print (1) Stations biles' 2 ' Index Goods Goods iactures 



Average 

Hourly 

Earnings 





1935-39 
= 100 


Thousand 
tine ounces 


Million 
pounds 


Thousand tons 


Million 
kwh. 


Thou- 
sands 




1939 = 100 


Cents 
per hour 


1939 


109.3 


425 


50.7 


129 


244 


2,362 


13.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


42.7 


1951 




364 


44.9 


297 


460 


4,783 


34.5 


190.0 


236.3 


159.9 


116.8 


1950 D 


209.2 


382 


45.5 


291 


431 


4,674 


30.7 


185.3 


223.1 


160.7 


107.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


210.0 
214.0 
217.1 


374 
347 
372 


45.6 
40.6 
48.6 


310 
281 
315 


453 
425 
473 


4,784 
4,376 
4,910 


39.2 
40.6 
47.8 


182.4 
184.5 
186.3 


223.3 
226.9 
229.9 


155.8 
156.9 
157.9 


109.0 
110.4 
111.4 


A 
M 
J 


218.2 
223.4 
218.8 


363 
369 
363 


47.7 
47.0 
45.2 


312 
313 
294 


448 
486 
464 


4,895 
5,130 
4,707 


41.1 
42.9 
36.2 


188.8 
189.9 
192.0 


234.8 
237.0 
240.9 


158.8 
159.2 
160.2 


112.8 
114.1 
115.9 


J 

A 

S 


208.0 
205.4 
208.2 


344 
345 
359 


45.0 
45.3 
43.5 


275 
287 
268 


452 
485 
431 


4,629 
4,596 
4,404 


30.3 
21.8 
29.9 


193.9 
194.0 
194.1 


242.9 
242.0 
242.1 


162.1 
162.8 
162.9 


118.4 
119.1 
120.6 


O 

N 
D 


212.6 
207. 8 r 
200. 3 r 


378 
372 
376 


41.8 
44.2 
44.1 


309 
307 
297 


492 
472 
435 


4,920 
4,936 
5,111 


32.5 
29.5 
22.1 


194.2 
190.8 
189. l r 


240.2 
238.4 
237.5 


164.4 
160.0 
157. 6 r 


121.9 
123.5 
124.5 


1952 J 


203.8" 




45.0 


317 


470 


5,268 


34.2 


184.0 


234.4 


151.4 


126.8 



Civil- 
ian 
Labour 

Force< 3 '< 7 ' 



Thou- 
sands 



Percentage of 

Paid ° rdillar y 
Civilian t A t, „„„ Claimants 
t ,u_... Workers T . 
Labour i TT on Live 

Force and , Un ', Unem- 
employ e d ployment 

Seeking Work<« < 7 ' Register' 5 ' 



Value of Retail 
Trade 



Percentage 



Thou- 
sands 







New 










Railway 


Dwelling 


Building 




Index of 


Total 


Revenue 


Units 


Permits: 


Depart- 


Whole- 


Labour 


Freight 


Com- 


58 Muni- 


ment 


sale 


Income 


Loadings 
Thou- 


pleted < 6 ' 


cipalities 
Thou- 


Total stores 


Sales 








Million 


sand 




sand 




1935-39 


dollars 


tons 


Number 


dollars 


Million dollars 


= 100 



1939 
1951 

1950 D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 

N 
D 

1952 J 



4,598 11 
5,332 1 



5,172 

5,332 
5,421 

5,2io 



215 



138.8 

183.3 

220.5 
208.0 
184.5 

136.8 
88.9 
86.5 

83.9 
80.9 
83.1 

99.8 
153.7 
239,0 

287.8 



5,233 
10,164 



4,308 



5,023 
35,876 



738 9,032 11,290 33,425 



730 
733 
745 

763 
792 
821 

827 
833 
848 

855 
857 



9,338 
8,280 
9,144 

9,413 
10,738 
10,902 

10,678 
10,913 
10,016 

12,048 r 

ll,105 r 

9,387 

9,903" 



6,950 
6,712 
5,859 

5,688 
6,876 
6,609 

4,926 
7,183 
7,002 

8,164 
8,842 



24,954 
29,957 
38,504 

46,825 
54,676 
36,588 

48,029 
33,439 
27,776 

38,251 
24,731 
26,778 r 



870.4 75.2 

976.4 118.9 

703.8 58.3 
694.2' 58. 3 r 
851. 6 r 72.6 

859.2 75.2 

931.1 76.6 

940.2 69.5 

865.8 54. 4 r 
897.4 61.5 
891.2 72.4 

898. 6 r 81. 2 r 
906.1 101.9 
1005.7 119.8 



109.1 
347.1 

295. 6 r 

317. 6 r 
307.9' 
338. 9 r 

352.4' 
372.6' 
357. 3' 

338.7' 
367.7' 
357.0' 

383.7' 
364. 4' 
307.2' 



13,738 722.6 55.2 306.3 



("For newsprint, gold and power, Newfoundland data aie included as of April, 1949, May, 1949 and lanuary, 1950 
respectively. (2) Monthly data are producers shipments. (3) Data exclude persons in certain remote parts of 
several provinces and Indians on reservations. Newfoundland included as of March, 1950. ("Includes only those 
not at work and seeking work. (6 'Newfoundland included as of April, 1949. '"Conversions are included with 

annual data only. (7) As of June 1. 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 1 - concluded 



MARCH, 1952 



Selected Economic Indicators 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Cost of 
Living 
Index 



Price 
Index 
of Resi- 
dential 
Building 
Materials 



Wholesale Price Index 

Cana- 
dian 
farm 
General products 



Exports 

of 

Domestic 



Imports 
of 



Federal 
Government 



Commod- Merchan- 



ities 12 ' 



dise 



Total 
expend- 
itures 



Total 
revenues 



Cheques 
Cashed 

in 
Clearing 
Centres 

CI) 



Index 

of 

Common 

Stock 

Prices 



Index 

of 
Long- 
Term 
Bond 
Yields 







1935-39 = 100 






Mill 


ion dollars 






1935-39 


= 100 


1939 
1951 


101.5 
184.5 


102.3 


99.2 


92.6 


77 
326 


63 
340 


46 
242 


42 
259 


2,635 
9,349 


91.6 

168.3 


101.8 
104.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


172.5 
175.2 
179.7 


269.6 
274.9 
282 .6 


232.3 
238.5 
241.8 


251.0 
262.5 
273.0 


285 
234 
290 


327 
274 
343 


203 
168 


332 
269 


9.002 
7,984 
8,830 


153.8 
166.5 
162.9 


97.9 

97.7 

104.6 


A 
M 

J 


181.8 
182.0 
184.1 


287.2 
289.5 
289.2 


242.2 
241.9 
242.7 


265.4 
265.3 
272 6 


295 
323 
313 


393 
405 
360 


97 
199 
234 


218 
353 
295 


9,017 
9,484 
9,500 


165.6 
164.2 
160.7 


104.9 
104.9 
105.3 


J 

A 

S 


187.6 
188.9 
189.8 


289 8 
290.4 
290.9 


244.2 
241.5 
240.1 


277.1 
256.4 
253.9 


374 
350 
320 


371 
357 
312 


264 
221 
277 


336 
314 
288 


9,032 
9,072 
8,775 


162.0 
169.7 
179.8 


104.7 
104.9 
105.0 


O 
N 
D 


190.4 
191.2 
191.1 


290.8 
289.3 
289.1 


239.6 
239.1 
237.6 


252.6 
258.4 
260.2 


371 
380 
379 


344 
326 
273 


263 
278 
249 


355 
308 
336 


10,619 
10.737 
10,134 


183.3 
174.0 
177.3 


105.7 
107.8 
112.0 


1952 J 
F 


191.5 
190.8 


291.6 


236 8 


256.5 


324 


307 






9,734 


181.7 
179.5 


113.4 
113.9 



'"Annual totals are for fiscal years ended March 31 of period shown. (2) As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 



Significant Statistics of United Kingdom 



TABLE 2 



UNEM- 
PRODUCTION CONSUMPTION PLOYED l ' 


IMPORTS ' 
RETAINED EXPORTS" 1 PRICES 


WAGE 
RATES 


Steel Ingots Insured 
and Raw Raw (4) Workers. 
Index of Coal" Castings Cotton Wool Registered 


Interim 
Retail 
Wholesale Prices 


Weekly 


Production Weekly average 


Including Munitions 





1946 = 100 



Thousand tons 



Million 
pounds 



Thousands 



Index of volume 
1947 = 100 



June 17, June 30, 
1938 = 100 1947 = 100 1947 = 100 



1939 
1950 


140 


4,437 
4,160 


254 
313 


11.29 
8.72 


43.2 


1,251 
297 




114 


162 


101.4 
258.7 


il4 


iii 


1950 O 
N 
D 


152 
153 
140 


4,347 
4,404 
4,143* 


328 

336* 

296 


9.52 

9.28* 

8.02 


44.7 
43.6 
36.7 


327 
326 
331 


1 


111 


175 


( 275.6 

285.0 

{ 288.3 


115 
116 
116 


in 

113 
114 


1951 J 
F 
M 


140 
151 
141 


4,211 
4,517 
4,243* 


306* 

326 

318 


8 69* 

9.12 

8.25 


43.2 
37.4 
36.0 


367 
335 
305 


] 
) 


120 


160 


f 295.8 

301.4 

[ 309.2 


117 
118 
119 


115 
116 
117 


A 
M 
J 


151 
144 
149 


4,605 
4,199 
4,301* 


323 

305* 

308 


9.55 

8.79* 

8.82 


37.2 
36.4 
34.4 


281 
241 
215 


1 
I 


134 


173 


f 314.3 
] 315.3 
L 316.4 


121 

124 
125 


118 
118 
119 


J 

A 

S 


140 
127 
146 


3,940 
3,462 
4,437* 


256 

266* 

303 


8.38 

8.30* 

8.61 


33.0 
29.1 
28.8 


210 
228 
241 


1 


140 


165 


( 315.4 

319.0 

[ 320.6 


126 
127 
128 


120 
120 
121 


O 

N 


151" 


4,507 
4,557 


301* 
316 


9 47* 


30.1 


290 
323 






175" 
179" 


324 .2 
321.8 


129 
129 


122 
125 



*Average of five weeks. Annual data as of middle of July. Monthly data for dates varying from 8th to 17th 

of month. - Average quarterly statistics are given in the monthly section, except the recent data for exports which 

are monthly estimates. (1) Great Britain. '''Monthly average or calendar months. 

Source: Monthly Digest of Statistics and Statistical Abstract for the United Kingdom. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 3 



Significant Statistics of United States 

Monthly averages or calendar months'" 



INTRODUCTION 



INDEX OF 
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 

Manufactured Goods 



LABOUR FORCE 



CONSTRUC- 
TION CON- PASSENGER 

TRACTS AUTO- 

AWARDED MOBILES 



Total Total 



Dur- 
able 



Non- 
durable 



Em- Un- 

ployed employed 



Factory 
Sales 



MANUFACTURING 



Inventories 
New End of 

Orders Sales Period 



1935-39 = 100 

seasonally adjusted 



Million persons 



Billion 
Million dollars Billion dollars 

dollars Thousands unadjusted seasonally adjusted 



1939 
1951 


109 
219 


109 
229 


109 
273 


109 
194 


45.8 
61.0 


9.5 
1.9 


296 
1,313 


238.9 
444.8 


24 '.0 


5.1 
22.1 


11.5 
42.0 


1950 D 


218 


229 


268 


197 


60.3 


2.2 


1,168 


521.4 


22.9 


21.0 


33.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


221 
221 
222 


231 
232 
234 


268 
271 
277 


201 
201 
199 


59.0 
58.9 
60.2 


2.5 
2.4 
2.1 


1,043 
1,141 
1,267 


478.6 
505.9 
617.4 


28.2 
25.8 
28.5 


22.6 
22.3 
22.6 


34.1 
34.7 
35.6 


A 
M 
J 


223 
222 
221 


234 
233 
231 


279 
276 
274 


198 
198 
197 


60.0 
61.2 
61.8 


1.7 
1.6 
2.0 


1,375 
2,573 
1,409 


503.0 
511.9 
482.0 


23.8 
23.6 
24.1 


22.5 
23.4 
22.1 


36.9 
38.1 
39:0 


J 
A 

S 


212 
217 
219 


222 
226 
228 


265 
267 
271 r 


187 
193 
193 r 


62.5 
62.6 
61.6 


1.9 
1.6 
1.6 


1,380 
1,263 
1,083 


381.4 
426.9 
365.9 


21.6 
23.0 
21.2 


21.3 
21. 7 r 
20. 6 r 


39.9 
40.6 
41.1 


o 

N 
D 


218 
219 
218 


226 
228 • 
228 r 


273 r 

277 

281 r 


188 
188 
185 


61.8 
61.3 
61.0 


1.6 

1.8 
1.7 


1,051 

932 

1,234 


414.5 
356.8 
293.3 


24.0 
22. 7 r 
21.0 


22. 5 r 
22. 3 r 
21.3 


41.4 
41. 7 r 
42.0 


1952 J 


219p 


229" 


280" 


187? 


59.7 


2.1 


902 




22.3 


22.9 


41.9 



Average 
Hourly 



Merchandise Consumer 

Credit OuS 

Wholesale Consumers Earnings Exports standing, 

Personal Commodity Price Manufac- including End of 

Income (1 > Prices Index turing re-exports* 2 ' Imports Period. (3) 



Department Stores* 



Sales 



Stocks 



Common 

Stock 

Prices< 4) 

402-416 





Billion 
dollars 


1926=100 


1935-39 = 
100 


Dollars 


Million dollars 


Billion 
dollars 


1947-1949 = 100 
seasonally adjusted 


1935-39 = 
100 


1939 
1951 


72.6 
251.1 


77.1 
180.4 


99.4 
185.6 


0.633 
1.594 


265 


193 


7.0 


34 
109 


119 


94.2 
176.5 


1950 D 


244.4 


175.3 


178.8 


1.543 


1,065 


857 r 


20. l r 


110 


122 


158.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


243.6 
243.3 
245.5 


180.1 
183.6 
184.0 


181.5 
183.8 
184.5 


1.555 
1.561 
1.571 


974 
1,076 
1,284 


1,018' 
909 
1 , 100 r 


19.9 
19.5 
19.4 


125 
115 
105 


127 
129 
133 


168.6 
174.7 
170.3 


A 
M 
J 


249.0 
249.8 
251.0 


183.6 
182.9 
181.7 


184.6 
185.4 
185.2 


1.578 
1.586 
1.599 


1,372 
1,355 
1,292 


l,033 r 
1,018 
929 r 


19.1 
19.2 
19.3 


104 
104 
105 


138 
136 
136 


172.3 
173.9 
171.7 


J 
A 

S 


252.4 
253.7 
253.6 


179.4 
178.0 
177.6 


185.5 
185.5 
186.6 


1.598 r 

1.596 

1.613 r 


l,189 r 

1,267 

1,232 


894 r 
880 r 
718 


19.1 
19.3 
19.4 


105 
109 
107 


138 
134 
128 


172.8 
181.5 
187.3 


O 

N 
D 


257.5 
256.5 
257.1 


178.1 
178.3 
177.8 


187.4 
188.6 
189.1 


1.615 
1.625 
1.635 


1,155 

l,388 r 

l,435 r 


872 r 
827 r 
801 


19.6 
20.0 
20. 6^ 


108 
112 
109 


121 
117 
119 


185.0 
177.7 
182.5 


1952 J 






189.1 


1.641? 








108 


118? 


187.1 



(1) Personal income is given on an annual basis for months as well as for years. <2) Includes army civilian supply 
exports from February 1947. (3) Annual totals are averages of end-of-month figures. (4) Standard and Poor's 

Corporation. *Revised series. Data prior to Nov. 1950 will be shown later. 

Source: Survey of Current Business U.S. Department of Commerce. 



INTRODUCTION 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 4 



Population, Births, Marriages and Deaths 

Monthly averages or calendar months (5) 



CANADA l > 



NEWFOUNDLAND 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages 





Thousands 




Number 






Thousands Number Thousands 




Number 


1939 


11 


267 


19 


,122 


8 


,638 


9 


,079 




94 


177 


53 


1951 


14 


009 


30 


,539 


10 


,492 


10 


,263 


361 


98 


223 


49 


1950 N 






28 


,261 


12 


,334 


9 


,820 






218 


55 


D 






29 


,634 


8 


,516 


10 


,546 






162 


50 


1951 J 






27 


118 


5 


928 


10 


297 






280 


23 


F 






26 


498 


5 


220 


10 


889 






186 


21 


M 






30 


,475 


5 


,205 


12 


,275 






205 


22 


A 






30 


,880 


7 


,475 


11 


,207 






224 


26 


M 






32 


,371 


9 


,847 


10 


,284 






316 


35 


J 


14 


009 


33 


,991 


14 


,152 


9 


,080 


361 


98 


220 


77 


J 






31 


134 


16 


,559 


8 


,847 






219 


68 


A 






32 


746 


13 


791 


9 


,926 






212 


72 


S 






29, 


059 


14 


179 


8 


585 






219 


75 


O 






33, 


532 


13, 


971 


10, 


015 






255 


76 


N 






29, 


348 


10, 


738 


10, 


487 






202 


64 


D 






29, 


318 


8, 


842 


11, 


262 






142 


32 



P.E.I. 



NOVA SCOTIA 



NEW BRUNSWICK 



QUEBEC 



Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births 





Number 


Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 


Number 


1939 
1951 


94 
74 


561 
643 


985 
1.421 


419 
433 


527 
480 


447 
516 


940 
1,359 


311 
362 


424 
414 


3 

4 


,230 
056 


6,635 
9,761 


1950 N 
D 


72 
71 




1,580 
1,253 


533 
328 


552 
492 




1,438 
1,180 


478 
247 


511 
353 






8,886 
11,446 


1951 J 
F 
M 


93 
95 
91 




1,544 
1,292 
1,319 


371 
332 
249 


488 
507 
661 




1,269 
1,193 
1,417 


241 
198 
178 


400 
419 
630 






6,563 

8,220 

10,536 


A 
M 

J 


97 
59 
74 


643 


1,269 
1,513 
1,408 


194 
411 
861 


610 
397 
327 


516 


1,346 
1,733 
1,297 


241 
372 
435 


474 
449 
331 


4 


.056 


9,499 
10,924 
10,804 


J 

A 

S 


45 
95 
66 




1,439 
1,383 
1,441 


594 
363 
572 


407 
437 
483 




1.305 
1,666 
1.288 


486 
569 
519 


288 
413 
396 






10,917 
9,890 
9.745 


O 
N 
D 


63 
60 
44 




1,519 
1,627 
1,297 


219 
690 
337 


333 
567 
537 




1,288 
1,507 
1,003 


432 
448 
225 


377 
468 
328 






9,910 

8,649 

11,469 



Note. — Until the end of 1949, annual and monthly data for births, deaths and marriages are based on tabulated 
figures by month of occurrence on the basis of residence. Figures for 1950 and 1951 are provisional and represent 
registrations hied in Provincial Vital Statistics offices during the month under review, regardless of the month of 
occurrence. 

Estimates are given by years as of June 1, and in Canada as a whole, as of the first day of the last month of each 

?uarter. : Exclusive of stillbirths. Not applicable to figures on population. (4, Yukon, North- West 

erritories and Newfoundland not included in figures for births, marriages and deaths. 
Source: Monthly Report of Births, Marriages and Deaths, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



INTRODUCTION 



Population, o) Births, (2) Marriages and Deaths 

TABLE 4 - concluded Monthly averages or calendar months (S) 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



MANITOBA 



SASK. 



Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population 





Number 


Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 


Number 




Thousands 


1939 
1951 


2,409 
2,936 


2,782 
2,887 


3,708 
4,598 


5,344 
9,683 


2,888 
3,792 


3,128 
3,748 


726 
777 


1,132 
1,664 


640 
622 


513 
563 


906 
832 


1950 N 
D 


3,771 
2,483 


3,096 
3,064 




8,559 
8,567 


3,376 
2,699 


3,283 
3,783 




1,477 
1,595 


806 
626 


529 
545 




1951 J 
F 
M 


908 

939 

1,104 


2,475 
3,019 
3,462 




9,139 
8,843 
9,159 


2,148 
2,163 
2,103 


3,880 
4,174 
4,282 




1,585 
1,353 
1,634 


501 
320 
290 


677 
554 
663 




A 
M 
J 


1,476 
2,467 
4,154 


3,147 
2,770 
2,417 


4,598 


10,234 

9,119 

11,644 


3,259 
3,678 
5,065 


4,111 
3,789 
3,531 


777 


1,720 
1,669 
1,910 


383 
471 
800 


627 
586 
569 


832 


J 

A 

S 


5,335 
4,796 
4,496 


2,559 
2,986 
2,283 




9,625 

10,124 

9,083 


6,103 
3,996 
5,495 


3,268 
3,276 
3,022 




1,729 
1,760 
1,663 


858 
797 
678 


459 
498 
457 




O 
N 
D 


3,995 
2,913 
2,652 


3,044 
2,611 
3,871 




11,065 

10,072 

8,086 


4,995 
3,496 
2,997 


3,536 
4,067 
4,034 




1,757 
1,523 
1,670 


919 
908 
537 


561 
552 
551 





SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths 







Number 




Thousands 


Number 




Thousands 




Number 




1939 
1951 


1,505 
1,832 


610 
570 


503 
538 


786 
940 


1,373 
2,269 


653 
788 


482 
593 


792 
1,165 


1,031 
2,327 


655 
941 


626 
968 


1950 N 
D 


1,367 
1,872 


955 
610 


407 
568 




2,187 
1,729 


1,386 
613 


320 
803 




2,549 
1,830 


974 
860 


1,050 
867 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1,660 
1,608 
2,031 


307 
245 
259 


589 
561 
608 




2,628 
1,853 
1,900 


735 
428 
311 


610 
671 
628 




2,450 
1,950 
2,274 


694 
574 
689 


1,085 

889 

1,250 


A 
M 
J 


1,914 
1,904 
2,023 


403 
738 
711 


510 
563 
445 


940 


2,505 
2,572 
2,322 


720 
714 
977 


673 
659 
488 


1,165 


2,169 
2,621 
2,363 


773 

961 

1,072 


958 

1,012 

898 


J 

A 

S 


1,688 
1,964 
2,064 


808 
853 
452 


593 
449 
439 




2,026 
2,979 
1,263 


1,091 

1,066 

775 


359 
815 
613 




2,186 
2,768 
2,293 


1,216 
1,279 
1,117 


869 
957 
826 


O 
N 
D 


1,874 
1,306 
1,945 


1,416 
350 
300 


570 
503 
620 




3,221 
2,273 
1,689 


875 

1,005 

755 


507 
697 
393 




2,643 
2,189 
2,017 


1,044 

864 

1,007 


1,024 
962 
884 



«>As of June 1. 



(2) Exclusive of stillbirths. 



"'Not applicable to figures on population. 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 5 



National Accounts: Income and Expenditure 



MARCH, 1952 



NET NATIONAL INCOME AT FACTOR COST AND GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT AT MARKET PRICES 



Salaries, 
wages and 
supplemen- 
tary labour 
income 



Net Income of 
Unincorporated Business 



Military 

pay and Investment Farm 
allowances income operators " 





Not 




Depreciation 




( .1 tisS 


Other 


national 




allowances 




national 


unin- 


ln< ome ;ii 


Indirect 


and similar 


Residual 


product 


corporated 


factor 


taxes less 


business 


enor of 


;ll in. it 1(61 


business 


cost 


subsidies 


COS! 


estimate 


price*. 



Million dollars 



1939 


2,575 


32 


917 


385 


464 


4,37.* 


733 


610 


- 9 


5,707 


1949 


7,761 


115 


2,445 


1,504 


1,369 


13,194 


1.830 


1.437 


+ 1 


16,402 


1950 


8,271 


137 


2,921 


1,579 


1,498 


14,406 


1,986 


1,614 


+23 


18,029 


1951" 


9,660 


201 


3,494 


2,102 


1,640 


17,097 


2.386 


1,760 


-26 


21,217 



GROSS NATIONAL EXPENDITURE AT MARKET PRICES 



Gross Domestic Investment' 3 ' 



Personal Government 
expenditure expenditure 
on consumer on goods 
goods and and 



New Construction 


New 
machinery 

and 
equipment 


Change 

in 

inventories 


Exports 
of goods 

and 
services 


Imports of 

goods and 

services 


Residual 
error of 
estimate 


dross 
national 
expend- 
iture at 
market 

price! 


Non 
Residential residential 













Million dollars 










1939 


3,904 


735 


185 


166 


254 


331 


1,451 


-1,328 


+ 9 


5,707 


1949 


10,963 


2,128 


742 


903 


1,323 


231 


4.011 


-3,837 


- 2 


16,462 


1950 


11,862 


2,314 


801 


1,010 


1,378 


995 


4.173 


-4,482 


-22 


18,029 


1951' 


13,062 


3,112 


796 


1,240 


1,845 


1,707 


5,060 


-5,632 


+27 


21,217 



Note: Newfoundland is included as of 1949. 

(1) Accrued net mcome from farm production. (2) Includes outlay on new durable assets such as building and highway 

construction by governments, other than government business enterprises. Also includes the chanye in inventories of government 
commodity agencies and of the Defence Production Revolving Fund. Excludes shipments, under NATO, of previously produced 
military equipment but includes replacements of new equipment. ^Includes capital expenditures by pavate and government 

business enterprises, private non-commercial institutions and outlays on new residential construction by individuals and busiuuss 
investors. 

Source: National Accounts, Income and Expenditure 1926-1950 and "Preliminary 1951", D.B.S. 



TABLE 6 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 ' 



END! STR1 .i 
PRODUCTION 



MINING 



MANU- 
FACT1 RJ s 



Metals 



Fuels 





Total 


Total 


Total 


Gold 


Copper 


Nickel 


Total 


Coal 


Non-Metals 


Total 


1939 


109.3 


118.4 


119.1 


122.4 


120 .0 


117.3 


117.3 


104.7 


113.9 


107.8 


1950 


198.3 


147.5 


110.2 


106.0 


102 .3 


127.2 


213.3 


126.0 


272.7 


207.6 


1950 D 


209.2 


154.6 


112.4 


111.7 


103.2 


124.8 


228.0 


136.1 


283.7 


219.6 


1951 J 


210.0 


158.3 


111.7 


105 .2 


103 8 


132.5 


238.8 


127.6 


336.6 


218.9 


F 


214.0 


157.6 


110.5 


105.6 


102 5 


129.5 


230.2 


117.4 


355.8 


224 . 3 


M 


217.1 


156.5 


112.9 


104.6 


110 .6 


140.7 


210.4 


109.6 


332.9 


227.9 


A 


218.2 


153.8 


111 3 


106.1 


112 3 


132.0 


215.9 


122.6 


287.6 


228 . 5 


M 


223.4 


167.6 


111.6 


99.9 


107.0 


150.9 


278.0 


119 3 


304.8 


231.9 


J 


218.8 


174.0 


114.5 


101.9 


106.4 


148.1 


299.9 


122.5 


310.8 


225.9 


J 


208.0 


165.9 


109.8 


100.6 


102.4 


142.5 


290.1 


111.1 


280.5 


213.5 


A 


205.4 


168.1 


109.2 


93.3 


103.2 


148.3 


309.6 


115.2 


296.6 


210.5 


S 


208.2 


174.4 


115.6 


109.2 


102.5 


145 5 


311.6 


126.3 


294.7 


214.1 


O 


212.6 


172.5 


112.8 


106.3 


95 3 


141 7 


316.3 


137.7 


294.9 


219.4 


N 


207.8' 


169.8' 


114.6' 


104.6 


104.0 


144.1 


288.4 


140.0 


285.0' 


213.9' 


D 


200.3' 


163.0 


115 


109.8 


100.5 


137.0 


270.4 


121.9 


246 6' 


204.9' 


1952 J 


203.8" 


167.0" 


111.0" 




103.0 


143.0 




130.5 


316.4 


207.2" 



Only aeries with definite seasonal patterns are adjusted. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 6 -continued 



INTRODUCTION 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 



100 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



Total 



Foods and Beverages 



Total 



Foods 



Total 



Meat products 



Dairy products 



Flour and 
feed 











Total 


Cattle 
slaughterings 


Hog slaught 
erings 


Total 


Butter and 
cheese 


Concen- 
trated milk 


Total 


1939 
1950 


108.0 
187.9 


111.7 
192.6 


110.2 
173.3 


105.1 
136.4 


101.4 
146.1 


108.2 
138.8 


111.4 
124.9 


109.6 
102.2 


124.2 
268.0 


118.7 
142.1 


1950 D 


194.2 


193.5 


178.5 


110.5 


99.5 


122.8 


148.6 


123.9 


284.5 


169.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


189.3 
193.9 
197.4 


180.4 
184.5 
194.5 


166.1 
165.8 
169.3 


125.7 
117.3 
126.9 


134.2 
131.0 
143.9 


126.7 
116.0 
127.7 


129.1 
120.5 
117.9 


103.6 
91.2 
89.3 


286.0 
280.2 
223.4 


150.5 
163.2 
172.6 


A 
M 
J 


199.3 
202.5 
196.4 


197.0 
202.6 
203.1 


170.1 
182.5 
181.3 


135.7 
162.3 
158.9 


184.3 
220.1 
206.4 


118.6 
141.5 
145.3 


107.9 
119.8 
120.5 


85.8 
90.2 
91.9 


268.2 
315.6 
322.0 


160.1 
156.4 
162.8 


J 

A 

S 


191.6 
191.4 

189.8 


204.7 
212.1 
203.8 


179.1 
187.9 
184.5 


134.9 
148.0 
142.5 


142.7 
122.8 
122.7 


144.1 
177.3 
166.2 


114.6 
121.5 
124.9 


87.0 

94.9 

100.7 


321.6 
319.8 
292.2 


130.6 
143.8 
153.4 


o 

N 
D 


196.4 
189.1 
183.0' 


209.0 
200.1 
195. 9 r 


188.4 
179.2 
178. 8 r 


140.0 
114.4 
109.5 


121.6 
85.1 
75.3 


162.3 
138.7 
139.0 


130.1 
132.3 
147.6 


106.8 
103.4 
117.5 


290.4 
328.7 
330.8 


152.6 
156.6 
156.2 


1952 J 


179. 6> 


186.5 


172.0 


137.6 


119.3 


159.4 


124.8 


98.2 


295.1 


149.9 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



Foods and Beverages 



Tobacco Products 



Foods 



Beverages 



Flour and 



Rubber 
Products 





feed: 
Wheat flour 


Sugar 


Total 


Liquors 


Beer 


Total 


Cigars 


Cigarettes 


Cut 
tobacco 




1939 
1950 


114.9 
143.7 


108.1 
159.2 


117.8 
267.3 


125.3 
234.9 


104.6 
294.2 


111.7 
216.1 


106.2 
153.5 


112.9 
273.5 


113.6 
124.2 


108.7 
278.8 


1950 D 


178.7 


134.8 


251.9 


281.7 


246.6 


197.5 


155.7 


240.0 


132.6 


335.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


155.2 
174.8 
179.0 


85.8 
113.1 
142.8 


235.6 
257.0 
292.2 


261.0 
298.4 
343.1 


222.7 
242.9 
294.5 


219.9 
235.6 
255.7 


167.0 
135.7 
140.2 


270.4 
305.5 
327.5 


141.5 
128.2 
150.5 


319.4 
340.2 
336.7 


A 

M 

J 


174.3 
165.6 
167.3 


147.9 
186.1 
172.4 


301.5 
280.6 
287.7 


286.2 
222.5 
209.4 


346.2 
341.7 
348.7 


230.9 
230.5 
216.9 


151.6 
171.2 
138.5 


305.3 
281.1 
264.5 


108.5 
154.9 
151.1 


357.2 
299.6 
246.3 


J 
A 

S 


121.2 
138.8 
146.8 


142.6 
144.7 
107.6 


303.9 
305.7 
278.7 


201.2 
273.7 
300.5 


396.6 
367.8 
311.8 


187.8 
147.2 
108.7 


100.6 
89.4 
56.2 


238.1 
173.8 
131.1 


116.8 

118.5 

84.8 


262.2 
222.6 
288.9 


o 

N 
D 


146.9 
155.3 
158.8 


182.8 

149.0 

94.8 


289.3 
281.3 
262.2 


374.9 
361.8 
280.4 


289.8 
275.8 
273.8 


226.4 
203.8 
157.0 


129.9 
142.5 
135.7 


290.9 
244.0 
175.3 


129.7 
149.0 
136.7 


281.6 
263.3 
279.8 


1952 J 


145.1 


85.8 


242.4 


276.4 


234.8 


197.6 


130.1 


231.7 


159.4 


279.7 



INTRODUCTION 

Industrial Production 

TABLE 6 - continued Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 



MARCH, 1952 









NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 












Leather Products 






Textiles ex 


Clothing 


Silk 

and 

rayon 


Clothing 


Paper P 
Total 


roducts 




Total 


Tanneries 


Boots 

and 

shoes 


Total 


Cotton 
con- 
sumption 


Wool, yarn 
and cloth 


Pulp and 
paper : 
Total 


1939 
1950 


109.3 

127.7 


108.4 
113.6 


109.9 
137.5 


106 3 
172.4 


110.8 
145.2 


101.6 
196.8 


99.9 
242.3 


106.9 
138.2 


99.5 

195.7 


96.7 
183.4 


1950 D 


133.6 


128.8 


136 9 


183.4 


151.6 


209.5 


260.6 


145.6 


201.5 


191.7 


1951 J 
F 

M 


143.5 
145.9 
138.0 


134.9 
133.8 
112.9 


149 5 
154.4 
155.7 


184.1 
186.5 
190.8 


153.1 
158.1 
175.2 


208.2 
209.9 
209.5 


263.6 
262.9 
253.1 


140.4 
146.4 
148.5 


202.9 
207.5 
207.1 


192.1 
197.4 
197.6 


A 
M 
J 


135.3 
125.0 
104.9 


107.9 
99.4 

73.7 


154.5 
143.0 
126.9 


192.9 
193.1 
179.6 


173.7 
173.3 
161.2 


212.6 
212.6 
192.0 


261.7 
262.6 
249.7 


149.8 
148.5 
138.1 


212.3 
214.6 
213.3 


202.5 
204.0 
204.6 


J 

A 

S 


85.5 
112.0 
101.8 


52.4 
63.4 
63.5 


108.8 
146.2 
128.7 


156.9 
151.3 
153.4 


114.4 
110.9 
130.8 


185.3 
172.5 
170.7 


238.9 
237.2 
234 9 


129.0 
127.0 
130.4 


211.3 
213.5 
212.5 


201.1 
204.4 
202.7 


O 
N 
D 


106.8 

100.8 

89.7 


78 
70 
67.4 


127.0 
122.4 
105.3 


161.2 
154.8 
143. 2 r 


139.9 
131.8 
106.2 


174.2 
168.8 
167. 9' 


227.2 
218.4 
211.1* 


130.1 
123.4 
121. 4 r 


214.9 
210.7 
203.5 


205.7 
204.8 
199.1 


1952 J 








146.3 


121.1 


158.7 


211.5 


111.8 


205.8 


202.9 










NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 










Paper Products 
Pulp and paper 

Pulp Paper 


Printing 

and 

Publishing 




Petroleum and Coal Products 




Chemica 
Total 


1 Products 




Total 


Coke and 

gas 
products 


Petroleum refining 






Total 


Gasoline 


Heavy 
fuel oils 


Paints and 
varnishes 


1939 
1950 


97 6 
195.4 


95.1 
162.8 


104.1 
176.0 


106.7 
225.8 


99.2 
170.7 


115.5 
289.8 


266.5 


196.4 


112.7 
190.3 


111.1 

377.6 


1950 D 


203.7 


171.2 


185.3 


225.0 


182.2 


274.9 


254.8 


215.1 


189.9 


336.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


208.0 
215.4 
211.9 


165.0 
166.7 
173.2 


173.1 
178.8 
176.4 


225.7 
223.3 
219 8 


177.1 
185.5 
167.8 


282.2 
267.3 
280 5 


251.7 
236.5 
240.8 


204.9 
169.3 
192.0 


196.7 
199.3 
197.6 


392.4 
387.7 
384.2 


A 
M 
J 


221.1 
220.5 
220.7 


170.8 
175.8 
177.2 


167.0 
177.1 
170.5 


210.4 
274.4 
283.7 


177.3 
173.8 
169.3 


249 6 
391.6 
416.8 


211.9 
337.0 
352.4 


185.5 
245.0 
245.8 


212.5 
216.2 
216.2 


455.9 
455.1 
454.3 


J 

A 

S 


220.6 
221.9 

222.5 


168.1 
174 7 
169.0 


170.2 
173.2 
168.4 


275 2 
285 3 
263.2 


170 4 
163.4 
164 4 


397.1 
427.2 
378 2 


346.5 
370.7 
335.0 


237.7 
260.3 
246.3 


207.0 
198.0 
199.9 


406.6 
347.6 
334.6 


O 
N 
D 


223.6 
222.1 

215.9 


175 2 
175 3 
170.6 


180.5 
177 3 
174.0 


268 3 
257 7 
247.8 


175 5 
172 1 
180 


376 3 
357.4 
326.7 


351.2 
335.4 
293.3 


255 6 

269.6 
245.5 


197.9 
194.7 
186. 5 r 


324.4 
289.0 
245.8 


1952 J 


222 1 


170 2 


167.1 












185.5" 





MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 6 -concluded 



INTRODUCTION 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 



DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



TOTAL 



Wood 
Products 



Iron and Steel Products 



Transportation 
Equipment 



Primary iron and steel 



Total 



Total Pig iron 



Steel 



Iron 
castings 



Wire and 

wire 
products 



Total 



Motor 
vehicles 



1939 
1950 

1950 D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

o 

N 
D 

1952 J 



107.5 
241.2 

263.1 

269.8 
276.4 
280.3 



107.8 
171.5 



108.7 
226.1 



110.3 
268.0 



104.4 
281.7 



115.1 
222.3 



99.1 
302.1 



114.7 
158.5 



94.5 
269.8 



278 
282 
276 



251.0 
243.3 
255.6 



258, 
256, 
242. 



197.6 
202.0 
197.8 

151.0 
184.4 
207.2 

176.6 
176.4 
166.4 

168.0 
177.7 
183. 6 r 



252.6 
249.4 
252.6 

263.5 
261.7 
254.2 

237.3 
238.9 
249.3 

258.7 
254. 3 r 
243. r 



300.4 
308.1 
316.1 

321.5 
321.5 
306.7 

286.3 
286.1 
305.3 

317.1 
326.6 
302.0 



288.5 
307.3 
316.6 

313.1 
314.2 
316.2 



301 

291. 

315 

322. 
331. 
316.5 



256.5 
265.2 
261.8 

266.6 
259.7 
252.4 

219.3 
233.1 
240.8 

263.7 
273.8 
245.5 



372.7 
354.8 
369.3 

394.9 
359.3 
348.2 

264.4 
306.5 
336.8 

351.4 
329. 9 r 
259.0 



170.9 
158.8 
166.3 

183.4 
175.1 
170.0 

145.5 
138.8 
172.7 

182.4 
163. 4 r 
166.9 



309.6 
340.0 
358.0 

340.4 
339.5 
317.7 

300.9 
257.1 
319.9 

321.4 
313.5 
290. 9 r 



254. 7e 



249.3" 322. Op 301.4 269.7 



93.4 
251.6 



216.5 242.5 269.4 284.7 242.5 350.9 151.9 275.2 243.4 



299 
336 



365.8 

323.7 
314.1 
273.3 

241.0 
161.3 
244.6 

243.2 
220.0 
176. 2 r 



184.9 343.2 263.9 



DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



Non-Ferrous Metals 
and Products 



Electric 
Power 



Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 



Non-Metallic Mineral Products 



Total 



Smelting 

and 
refining 



Total 



Radios 



Electric 
refrig- 
erators 



Total 



Lime and 
gypsum Clay 
Cement products products 



1939 
1950 


119.5 
237.2 


121.0 
150.6 


102.0 
369.6 


310^3 


787^4 


106.1 
237.8 


109.5 
326.4 


118.7 
278.5 


119.3 
237.0 


108.4 
194.4 


1950 D 


266.0 


156.1 


395.1 


345.6 


873.0 


246.8 


363.3 


285.5 


234.9 


201.0 


1951 J 
F 
M 


265.8 
266.0 
268.0 


157.1 
157.2 
150.8 


399.5 
406.8 
400.2 


300.1 
341.9 
234.8 


936 1 
914.0 
999.5 


250 8 
262.1 
269.6 


321.2 
394.0 
378.6 


293.7 
293.3 
300.3 


282.5 
266.8 
271.1 


211.3 
210.3 
216.0 


A 
M 
J 


285.8 
293.3 
292.8 


169.0 
166.0 
168.8 


418.6 
392.2 
362.3 


345.4 
305.1 
300.4 


955.2 
851.4 
723.0 


273.4 
276.8 
267.3 


362.1 
368.5 
294.8 


303.8 
297.6 
300.0 


262.9 
258.9 
244.1 


229.2 
236.2 

226.8 


J 

A 

S 


270.8 
266.1 
253.7 


158.8 
164.0 
152.6 


283.1 
284.1 
312.3 


175.2 
183.8 
263.4 


461.9 
447.6 
414.3 


255.2 
260.4 
256.4 


319.1 
309.5 
316.3 


268.5 
329.1 
322.4 


230.6 
246.8 
229.7 


227.5 
219.5 
209.3 


o 

N 
D 


262.6 
258.0 
253. 8 r 


147.5 
137.6 
137.6 


291.7 
294. 7 r 
229.7 


192.6 
237. 9 r 
135.4 


360.8 
344.1 
184.2 


254.4 
247. 5 r 
235. 3 r 


311.9 
320.6 
341.8 


307.1 
283.4 
250.8 


239.0 
232.4 
220.3 


215.3 
213.1 
220.4 


1952 J 


255.5 


143.0 










344.5 






233.3 



LABOUR 



TABLE 7 



MARCH, 1952 



The Canadian Labour Force 



1948 1949 1950'" 1951 1950 



1951 



CLASSIFICATION 



Survey Averages 



Nov. 4 March 3 June 2 Aug. 18 Nov. 3 



Thousands of persons 14 years of age and over 



Non-institutional Civilian Popula 
tion 



Civilian Labour Force. 

Agricultural 

Non-agricultural 



With jobs 

At work — 35 hours or more . 

At work— 15 to 34 hours 

At work — 1 to 14 hours 

Not at work but with jobs 



Paid workers 

Agricultural .... 
Non-agricultural. 



Without jobs and seeking work 
Persons not in the Labour Force . . 



9,132 9,324 9,709 9,833 9,751 9,800 9,854 9,887 9,790 



4,982 5,090 5,216 5,284 5,201 5,172 

1,100 1,094 1.038 960 974 854 

3,882 3,996 4,178 4.324 4,227 4,318 

4,879 4,957 5,046 5,175 5,084 5,000 

4,301 4,377 4,422 4,512 4,513 4,245 

337 348 373 384 378 433 

109 97 100 98 94 111 

132 135 151 181 99 211 

3,372 3,469 3,571 3,779 3,683 3,665 

134 144 112 102 102 69 

3,238 3,325 3,459 3,677 3,581 3,596 

103 133 170 109 117 172 

4,150 4,234 4,493 4,549 4,550 4,628 



5,210 

880 
4,330 

5,110 
4,458 

451 
82 

119 

3,800 
90 
3,688 3,716 3,710 

85 78 100 

4,522 4,466 4,580 



5,332 
1,017 
4,315 

5,247 

4,699 

339 

117 

92 



5,421 

1,090 
4,331 

5,343 
4,646 

312 
81 

304 



3,802 3,849 
114 133 



Note.— These estimates are derived from a sample survey and are subject to sampling error. In general the smaller 
the estimate the larger is the relative sampling error. 

(l 'Newfoundland included in estimates from March, 1950. 
Source: Labour Force Bulletin, D.B.S. 



Canadian Labour Income 



TABLE I 


1 


Mc 


mthly averages or 


calendar re 


Lontns 










SALARIES AND WAGES 






SUPPLEMEN- 
TARY 
LABOUR 
INCOME 


TOTAL 




Agriculture, 

Logging, 

Fishing, 

Trapping, 

Mining 


Manufacturing 


Construction 


Public Utilities, 

Transportation, 

Communications, 

Storage 

Trade 


Finance, 

Services 

(including 

government) 












Milli 


on dollars 






„ 


1939 
1950 


23 
53 


62 
229 


8 
50 




58 
178 


59 
156 


5 
23 


215 

689 


1950 A 
S 


57 
59 


232 
241 


58 
58 




171 
186 


157 
159 


24 
25 


699 

728 


O 
N 
D 


61 
62 
60 


244 
247 
250 


58 
56 
51 




188 
193 
190 


160 
161 
162 


25 
25 
25 


736 
744 

738 


1951 J 
F 
M 


59 
59 
55 


252 
254 
260 


47 
46 
46 




187 
188 
191 


160 
162 
168 


25 
24 
25 


730 
733 

745 


A 
M 

J 


55 
61 
67 


266 
269 
276 


53 
59 
64 




196 
202 
208 


166 
174 
179 


27 
27 
27 


763 
792 
821 


J 

A 

S 


66 
68 
70 


276 
279 
284 


68 
71 
74 




209 
211 
214 


178 
176 
178 


30 
28 
28 


827 
833 

848 


O 
N 


74 
76 


283 
283 


73 
71 




216 
219 


180 
179 


29 
29 


855 
857 



10 Note: As of January, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 

Source: Monthly Estimates of Canadian Labour Income, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 9 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



INDUSTRIAL COMPOSITE 

Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
merit payrolls earnings* 



FORESTRY 



MINING 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
180.2 


100.0 

381.3 


23.44 
49.61 


100.0 
220.3 


100.0 
616.8 


17.37 
48.40 


100.0 
117.7 


100.0 
245.4 


28.69 
59.82 


1950 D 


179.2 


356.3 


46.63 


260.5 


647.5 


43.04 


116.8 


230.5 


56.60 


1951 J 
F 
M 


175.3 
172.3 
172.3 


338.2 
351.5 
353.8 


45.27 

47.87 
48.19 


256.0 
248.3 
244.1 


632.1 
609.0 
633.7 


42.58 
42.45 
44.94 


115.1 
114.9 
114.7 


217.0 
233.1 
235.2 


54.08 
58.22 
58.85 


A 
M 
J 


173.3 
175.6 
180.3 


357.8 
367.9 
379.0 


48.43 
49.17 
49.34 


208.0 
167.9 
188.6 


549.8 
472.8 
539.8 


45.76 
48.74 
49.54 


114.7 
115.0 
116.4 


230.1 
237.4 
238.3 


57.56 
59.20 
58.74 


J 

A 

S 


183.6 
184.3 
185.4 


392.5 
394.0 
400.2 


50.17 
50.16 
50.66 


197.6 
180.5 
181.8 


589.7 
495.2 
505.5 


51.66 
47.49 
48.15 


119.0 
120.0 
119.5 


250.2 
254.2 
252.3 


60.32 
60.77 
60.77 


o 

N 
D 


186.5 
186.4 
186. 6 r 


410.0 
413.4 
416.7' 


51.59 
52.05 
52.41 r 


214.6 
262.3 
293. 4 r 


630.2 
820.3 
923.3' 


50.83 
54.14 
54.47 r 


120.1 
121.4 
121. 6 r 


263.0 
264.7 
268. 7 r 


63.01 
62.74 
63.60 r 



1952 J 



180.9 389.0 50.46 283.8 



845.9 



51.59 



119.7 251.7 



60.54 



MANUFACTURING 







Total 




Durable Goods 


u 


Non-durable Goods (2) 




Employ- 
ment 

1939 


Aggregate 
payrolls 

= 100 


Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 


Employ- 
ment 

1939 


Aggregate 
payrolls 

= 100 


Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 


Employ- 
ment 

1939 


Aggregate 
payrolls 

= 100 


Weekly 
earnings* 




Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
190.0 


100.0 
427.6 


22.79 
51.25 


100.0 
236.3 


100.0 
536.6 


24.28 
54.89 


100.0 
159.9 


100.0 
348.8 


21.82 
47.74 


1950 D 


185.3 


394.6 


48.51 


223.1 


478.5 


52.07 


160.7 


333.7 


45.28 


1951 J 
F 
M 


182.4 
184.5 
186.3 


373.1 
402.1 
405.3 


46.60 
49.64 
49.56 


223.3 
226.9 
229.9 


457.1 
497.4 
501.3 


49.72 
53.23 
52.94 


155.8 
156.9 
157.9 


312.1 
332.9 
335.6 


43.68 
46.27 
46.35 


A 
M 
J 


188.8 
189.9 
192.0 


414.6 
423.7 
429.0 


50.03 
50.84 
50.90 


234.8 
237.0 
240.9 


542.5 
530.8 
537.6 


53.47 
54.39 
54.20 


158.8 
159.2 
160.2 


329.0 
345.9 
350.1 


46.72 
47.39 
47.67 


J 
A 

S 


193.9 
194.0 
194.1 


440.0 
440.1 
446.1 


51.70 

51.68 
52.37 


242 9 
242.0 
242.1 


552.0 
550.2 
559.8 


55.24 
55.25 
56.17 


162.1 
162.8 
162.9 


358.8 
355.5 
363.9 


48.25 
48.22 
48.71 


O 
N 
D 


194.2 
190.8 
189. l r 


454.4 
451.4 
451.8 


53.31 
53.89 
54.44 r 


240.2 
238.4 
237.5 


567.5 
569.5 
573. 8 r 


57.40 
58.04 
58.68' 


164.4 
160.0 
157. 6 r 


372.6 
366.0 
363.7' 


49.42 
49.87 
50.30' 



1952 J 



184.0 418.7 51.83 234.4 



533.7 



55.33 



151.4 



335.5 48.31 



Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. Statistics throughout Tables 9 to 11 are compiled 
from data which relate to the last pay period of the preceding month. 

'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

C1) lncludes wood products, iron and steel products, transportation equipment, non-ferrous metal products, 
electrical apparatus and supplies, and non-metallic mineral products. (2, Includes foods and beverages, tobacco 

and tobacco products, rubber products, leather products, textile products except clothing, clothing, paper products, 
printing, publishing and allied industries, products of petroleum and coal, chemical products, and miscellaneous 
manufacturing industries. 

Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



11 



LABOUR 

Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
TABLE 9 - continued Monthly averages or first of month 



MARCH, 1952 



MANUFACTURING 


Textile Products except Clothing 


Clothing 




Wood Products 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate Weekly 
payrolls earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
154.9 


100.0 
369.1 


18.00 
42.88 


100.0 

142 4 


100.0 
297.9 


17.15 
35.88 


100.0 
178.7 


100.0 
423.9 


19.32 

45.79 


1950 D 


157.3 


372.1 


42.57 


145.0 


294.8 


34.86 


175.9 


398.6 


43.75 


1951 J 
F 
M 


157.6 
159.4 
160.0 


346.6 
384.4 
381.5 


39.57 
43.40 
42.91 


140.8 
147.1 
150.4 


262.9 
311.1 

319.5 


32.02 
36.28 
36.43 


170.7 
172.8 
175.0 


359.7 
393.3 
399.6 


40.70 
43.96 
44.09 


A 
M 
J 


161.3 
160.8 
158.5 


390.4 
393.5 
378.7 


43.56 
44.04 
43.00 


152.0 
150.2 
146.2 


323.1 

320.1 
301.5 


36.48 
36.54 
35.35 


177.2 
177.9 
184.2 


406.4 
422.1 
428.6 


44.29 
45.81 
44.93 


J 

A 

S 


156.1 
152.8 
150.9 


370.3 
352.6 
355.0 


42.68 
41.52 
42.35 


140.8 
137.1 
138.5 


287.5 
284.5 
293.8 


35.02 

35.57 
36.37 


187.1 
188.3 
187.3 


448.6 
449.6 
454.9 


46.30 
46.09 
46.88 


O 
N 

D 


149.5 
147.7 
144.3' 


362.9 
357.3 
355. 6' 


43.68 
43.53 
44.37' 


137.2 
135.4 
133.0' 


296.9 
289.5 
284 . 7' 


37.10 
36.67 
36.70' 


181.2 
175.5 
167. 1' 


454.6 
443.0 
426.1' 


48.43 
48.77 
49.26 


1952 J 


139.7 


318.4 


41.06 


124.4 


240.3 


33.12 


161.1 


363.5 


43.57 



MANUFACTURING 



Paper Products 



Iron and Steel Products 



Transportation Equipment 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
183.8 


100.0 
426.8 


26.87 
62.21 


100.0 
242.2 


100.0 
544.8 


25.14 
56.74 


100.0 
252.6 


100.0 
549.4 


26.73 
57.89 


1950 D 


176.4 


381.2 


58.07 


229.2 


488.7 


53.59 


225.6 


472.9 


56.02 


1951 J 
F 
M 


172.5 
172.2 

172.9 


359.8 
376.9 
377.0 


56.05 
58.78 
58.57 


230.8 
234.0 
236.1 


468.5 
500.5 
505.3 


51.03 

53.93 
53.95 


229.4 
235.0 
240.4 


462.6 
519.1 
520.6 


53.90 
58.85 
57.69 


A 

M 
J 


175.4 
177.7 
184.5 


379.2 
390.1 
423.9 


58.07 
58.99 
61.74 


240.6 
243.2 
245.6 


525.4 
545.1 
548.4 


55.05 
56.55 
56.34 


248.4 
250.8 
255.8 


531.8 
534.4 
547.4 


57.04 
56.75 
57.00 


J 

A 

S 


192.4 
193.6 
194.9 


464.0 
470.1 
475.4 


64.78 
65.21 
65.52 


246.7 
244.6 
245.3 


559.4 
558.3 
563.9 


57.34 
57.71 
58.13 


258.7 
259.8 
261.7 


561.3 
553.8 
578.6 


57.81 
56.80 
58.85 


O 
N 
D 


192.9 
189.8 
186. 8' 


475.0 
466.2 
463.4' 


66.16 
65.98 
66.66' 


247.0 
245.4 
247.1' 


581.4 
584.1 
597 0' 


59.54 
60.23 
61.12' 


261.0 
263.3 
266.9' 


586.1 
595.7 
601.3' 


59.78 
60.21 
59.96 


1952 J 


183.5 


435.2 


63.71 


244.3 


549.4 


56.90 


267 1 


583.0 


58.11 



12 



* Average weekly wages and salaries. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 9 -continued 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



MANUFACTURING 



CONSTRUCTION 



Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 

Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
merit payrolls earnings* 



Chemical Products 



Total 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 


=100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
323.0 


100.0 
730.0 


24.38 
55.25 


100.0 
230.2 


100.0 
455.2 


28.14 
55.58 


100.0 
177.6 


100.0 
460.6 


18.83 
48.36 


1950 D 


314.4 


668.2 


51.97 


220.9 


406.7 


51.81 


180.4 


427.0 


44.53 


1951 J 
F 
M 


316.0 
318.1 
320.2 


628.2 
686.7 
691.4 


48.62 
52.79 
52.79 


217.7 
221.0 
222.6 


403.2 
420.3 
424.2 


52.12 
53.51 
53.63 


158.1 
145.1 
139.7 


343.8 
359.8 
353.8 


40.82 
46.56 
47.56 


A 
M 
J 


326.2 
328.7 
331.6 


720.3 
735.3 
749.1 


53.99 
54.69 
55.22 


225.2 
229.5 
232.3 


436.7 
449.9 
454.6 


54.57 
55.16 
55.08 


141.9 
163.4 
182.7 


352.0 
408.9 
459.3 


46.59 
46.99 
47.15 


J 
A 

S 


333.1 
325.8 
323.5 


759.7 
748.9 
749.5 


55.74 
56.18 
56.62 


234.4 
234.6 
236.6 


465.7 
469.4 
477.7 


55.92 
56.30 
56.82 


190.4 
199.5 
206.7 


495.7 
526.3 
556.0 


48.81 
49.48 
50.44 


o 

N 
D 


322.5 
317.6 
312. 9 r 


758.4 
762.2 
770. 8 r 


57.48 
58.65 
60.21' 


235.3 
237.0 
236. 6 r 


481.3 
489.4 
489. 4 r 


57.57 
58.11 
58.22 


206.1 
203.1 
194.3' 


570.8 
559.0 
542.3 


51.95 
51.60 
52.34' 


1952 J 


309.1 


717.0 


56.70 


235.4 


486.1 


58.12 


166.9 


413.3 


46.46 



CONSTRUCTION 


AND COMMUNICATION 


PUBLIC UTILITY OPERATION 


Buildings and Structures 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 




Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
395.3 


100.0 
851.3 


24.29 
51.68 


100.0 
177.6 


100.0 
333.7 


28.68 
53.76 


100.0 
187.5 


100.0 
355.5 


29.53 
55.93' 


1950 D 


391.6 


781.2 


48.32 


173.1 


309.8 


51.34 


183.3 


329.6 


53.11 


1951 J 
F 
M 


347.8 
338.0 
334.6 


614.2 
687.5 
688.2 


42.73 
49.22 
49.77 


168.1 
165.0 
165.7 


299.6 
302.7 
303.8 


51.07 
52.55 
52.53 


179.8 
180.1 
178.3 


321.2 
326.1 
331.1 


52.76 
53.48 
54.85 


A 
M 
J 


339.7 
363.0 
398.2 


681.0 
763.8 
827.8 


48.51 
50.92 
50.23 


166.7 
171.5 
176.5 


308.8 
317.6 
331.2 


53.05 
53.03 
53.72 


179.4 
183.2 
190.9 


331.5 
343.3 
359.2 


54.57 
55.36 
55.57 


J 

A 

S 


415.4 
427.5 
449.2 1 


899.7 

941.9 

,011.3 


52.32 
53.22 
54.39 


183.2 
186.4 
189.0 


346.2 
352.9 
361.3 


54.12 
54.20 
54.74 


193.8 
195.8 
195.3 


369.3 
373.7 
371.0 


56.22 
56.32 
56.03 


O 
N 
D 


449.7 1 
448.1 1 
432. 9 r l 


,047.8 
,033.4 
,018.9' 


56.29 
55.72 
56.85' 


186.7 
186.4 
185. 4' 


359.2 
360.5 
361.0' 


55.06 
55.35 
55.71' 


191.8 
190.7 
190.5' 


375.8 
377.9 
385.7' 


57.79 
58.47 
59.73 


1952 J 


369.3 


727.4 


47.59 


180.8 


352.4 


55.77 


187.6 


379.7 


59.71 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



13 



LABOUR 

Employment and Earnings: By Industries 

TABLE 9 - concluded Monthly averages or first oi month 



MARCH, 1952 



TRADE 



Employ- Aggregate 
merit payrolls 

1939 = 100 



Weekly 

earnings* 

Dollars 



1939 
1951 


100.0 
174.0 


100.0 
340.0 


21.83 
42.71 


1950 D 


181.8 


328.1 


39.40 


1951 J 
F 
M 


184.4 
169.5 
168.1 


333.9 
317.4 
319.5 


39.55 
40.91 
41.58 


A 
M 

J 


170.9 
171.0 
172.8 


325.6 
332.9 
338.4 


41 60 
42.51 
42.77 


J 

A 

S 


173.3 
170.8 
171.0 


345.5 
342.9 
342.4 


43.53 
43.85 
43.74 


O 

N 
D 


175.5 
176.7 
183. 6 r 


354.4 
358.1 
368. 6 r 


44.17 
44.34 
43.91 r 


1952 J 


185.4 


375.0 


44.24 



FINANCE, INSURANCE 
AND REAL ESTATE 



SERVICE 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


100.0 
169.8 


100.0 
270.4 


29.59 
46.26 


100.0 
181.3 


100 

349.4 


16.33 
31.61 


159.6 


245 9 


44.72 


173 4 


324 1 


30.50 


159 8 
160.8 
161.7 


246.5 
251 2 
252.1 


44.78 
45.35 
45.28 


172.9 
173.3 
172.5 


318.7 
327.1 
330.8 


30 23 
30.97 
31.45 


167.5 
170.8 
171.0 


264.6 
271.3 
272.0 


45.91 
46.16 
46.23 


172 9 
175.9 
180.9 


332.0 
340.9 
350.4 


31.50 
31.79 
31.77 


172.0 
172.6 
173.0 


273.6 
274.7 
276.1 


46.23 
46.27 
46.40 


188.8 
193.4 
193.7 


363.7 
368.0 
369.3 


31.60 
31.21 
31.28 


173.3 
176.4 
178. 4' 


280.9 
289.6 
292 4 r 


47.11 
47.72 
47 . 65 r 


187.9 
183.2 
180. T 


367.0 
363.7 
361 5 r 


32.07 
32 59 
32.84 r 


178.5 


291.6 


47.47 


176 7 


350 5 


32.56 



TABLE 10 



Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 
Monthly averages or first of month 



1939 
1951 

1950 D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 
D 

1952 J 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939 = 100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



100.0 
176.8 



100.0 
333 5 



19.79 
37.52 



184.2 
165.3 
160.1 

152.0 
161.8 
178.1 



186 
188 



192.4 

188 6 
182.6 
181. r 



318.5 
298.6 
298.2 

289.9 
304.4 
338.9 

353.5 
363.4 
365.9 



34.42 
35.96 
37.06 

37.95 
37.43 
37.87 

37.63 
38.32 



362 
356 
351 



175.2 327.9 



38 29 
38 82 
38.60 r 

37.25 



NOVA SCOTIA 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939=100 



100.0 
149.4 



195.9 343.6 34.90 152.6 



149 
142 
135 

140 
140 



149.4 



100.0 
296.4 

283.0 

264.1 
271.6 
265.9 

279.4 
280.9 
293.7 



149 
155 



37.85 157.8 



158 
158 
156 



303 
314 
313 

323 
324 
321 



148.2 



286.8 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



14 'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. 
Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



NEW BRUNSWICK 



21.42 
42.51 

39.80 

37.99 
40.97 
42.02 

42.70 
42.93 
42.15 

43.52 
43.44 
42.56 

43.67 
43.95 
44.19 r 

41.50 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939 = 100 



100.0 
180 5 

184.1 

187.5 
179.3 
179 

177.1 
171.7 
171.6 

174.9 
179.9 
182 3 



183 
186 
192 



100.0 
383.6 

364.8 

362.4 
368.5 
371.3 

372.6 
357.2 
357.2 

377.1 
387.3 
394.2 

407 3 
422.6 
426. r 



189 7 416 9 



Weekly 
earnings' 

Dollars 



20.21 
43.02 

40.07 

39.08 
41.56 
41.94 

42.53 
42.06 
42.09 

43.60 
43.63 
43.85 

44.97 
46 02 
44.91 r 

44.55 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 10 - concluded 



Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 
Monthly averages or first of month 



LABOUR 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



MANITOBA 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
168.5 


100.0 
375.7 


21.26 
47.37 


100.0 
191.0 


100.0 
403.4 


24.45 
51.69 


100.0 
173.2 


100.0 
326.0 


25.69 
48.37 


1950 D 


167.0 


348.8 


44.45 


189.1 


376.4 


48.74 


177.9 


313.6 


45.35 


1951 J 
F 
M 


162.3 
159.9 
161.0 


327.8 
343.1 
349.6 


42.99 
45.67 
46.21 


186.9 
185.6 
185.7 


361.4 
379.5 
378.6 


47.34 
50.07 
49.92 


171.2 
165.5 
164.3 


296.8 
298.1 
302.6 


44.61 
46.35 
47.41 


A 
M 
J 


160.3 
163.3 
167.9 


348.2 
359.8 
372.0 


46.23 
46.90 
47.16 


187.3 
188.5 
191.9 


386.6 
395.0 
402.3 


50.53 
51.31 
51.34 


165.2 
167.5 
172.6 


302.6 
309.2 
324.7 


47.13 
47.51 
48.42 


J 

A 

S 


171.0 
171.6 
173.2 


381.8 
387.0 
396.1 


47.52 
47.99 
48.66 


194.7 
193.5 
194.1 


416.4 
413.6 
417.8 


52.38 
52.34 
52.72 


177.6 
179.7 
180.4 


339.2 
344.3 
348.7 


49.15 
49.31 
49.69 


O 

N 
D 


175.3 
178.0 
178.6 


406.5 
414.4 
421. 7 r 


49.33 
49.54 
50.23' 


195.4 
193.9 
194. 7' 


428.5 
428.8 
432.2' 


53.73 
54.18 
54.39' 


178.6 
178.4 
177.5' 


348.5 
349.0 
347.8' 


50.17 
50.30 
50.38' 


1952 J 


171.6 


389.7 


48.33 


190.2 


406.6 


52.40 


172.9 


334.0 


49.67 



SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
148.1 


100.0 
285.6 


24.18 
46.68 


100.0 
202.6 


100.0 
402.1 


25.39 
50.37 


100.0 
190.3 


100.0 
388.0 


26.01 
52.86 


1950 D 


150.9 


272.8 


43.82 


197 7 


368.9 


47.45 


189.6 


362.8 


49.76 


1951 J 
F 
M 


144.4 
134.9 
133.3 


262.8 
249.9 
250.8 


44.13 
44.89 
45.60 


193.7 
186.5 
186.7 


355.8 
356.9 
362.3 


46.73 
48.69 
49.37 


180.4 
177.0 
176.9 


331.3 
342.6 
347.6 


47.78 
50.36 
51.10 


A 
M 
J 


135.3 
137.9 
149.8 


256.8 
258.5 
288.1 


46.01 
45.43 
46.62 


187.0 
192.9 
202.5 


356.1 
373.0 
395.9 


48.44 
49.19 
49.74 


181.0 
187.2 
192.3 


353.2 
378.1 
390.9 


50.74 
52.49 
52.82 


J 

A 

S 


154.6 
157.5 
157.8 


298.0 
307.9 
310.0 


46.71 
47.37 
47.61 


208.9 
218.0 
219.0 


418.3 
434.3 
441.3 


50.93 
50.68 
51.28 


197.4 
198.1 
198.9 


408.2 
400.3 
412.1 


53.76 
52.52 
53.86 


O 

N 
D 


156.9 
157.7 
156.5' 


312.8 
315.5 
315.8' 


48.32 
48.48 
48.94' 


214.0 
211.3 
210.9' 


446.2 
441.6 
443.1' 


52.77 
53.16 
53.46' 


201.0 
197.9 
195.1' 


426.1 
433.6 
432.5' 


55.12 
56.97 
57.64' 


1952 J 


152.3 


305.9 


48.70 


206.1 


422.3 


52.14 


186.7 


387.4 


53.95 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



15 



LABOUR 

TABLE 11 



MARCH, 1952 



Employment and Earnings: By Cities 

Monthly averages or first of month 



HALIFAX 



MONTREAL 



Employ- Aggregate 
ment payrolls 





1939 = 


= 100 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
203.8 


100.0 
344.9 


1950 D 


195.1 


301.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


199.2 
192.5 
192.6 


303.4 
308.9 
316.6 


A 
M 

J 


209.1 
195.7 
198.6 


349.9 
328.6 
329.6 


J 

A 

S 


202.5 
200.0 
211.8 


346.0 
348.6 
366.4 


O 
N 
D 


212.3 
214.8 
216. 0' 


376.5 
381.1 
383.1 r 


1952 J 


212.1 


371.9 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly^ 
earnings* 



1939 = 100 



Dollars 



23.42 
39.61 

36.29 

35.71 
37.64 
38.50 

39.20 
39.33 
38.87 

40.02 
40.84 
40.52 

41.54 
41.55 
41.54 r 



100.0 
173.9 



100.0 
363.3 



22.82 
47.69 



172.7 342.3 



168.8 
167.5 
168.2 

170.9 
173.6 
174.6 

176.3 
174.8 
175.8 

178.0 
178.6 
179. 9 r 



320.1 
336.9 
343.1 

346.8 
361.1 
361.5 

367.6 
366.7 
277.1 

386.5 
392.3 
399.7' 



41.06 175.0 369.2 



43.33 
45.97 
46.60 

46.36 
47.55 
47.31 

47.65 
47.93 
49.00 

49.60 
50.18 
50 . 75 r 

48.18 



TORONTO 



OTTAWA-HULL 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939=100 



Weekly^ 
earnings* 

Dollars 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939 = 100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



1939 
1951 

1950 D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 
D 

1952 J 

16 



100.0 
195.3 



100.0 
402.2 



25.05 
51.68 



100.0 
189.3 



194.5 375.6 48.46 187.6 



194.0 
191.0 
191.1 

194.1 
195.4 
196.2 

197.9 
194.4 
195.5 

197.3 
197.4 
198.9' 



362.0 
377.4 
376.9 

390.0 
401.1 
401.8 



412 
407 
413 



425.7 
426.8 
431 



46.81 
49.58 
49.48 

50.40 
51.49 
51.37 

52.27 
52.57 
53.20 

54.21 
54.35 
54 . 47' 



188.7 
183.6 
181.7 

183.5 
186.6 
190.4 

192.8 
192.5 
192.1 

192 4 
194.6 
193.1' 



100.0 
368.1 

340.5 

335.0 
339.3 
338.3 

343.5 
356.2 
372.6 

382.5 
387.0 
387.2 

390 7 
394.5 
390. 9' 



196.3 407.9 52.23 192.1 375.5 



23.17 
45.01 

42.04 

41.12 
42.80 
43.13 

43.36 
44.22 
45.32 

45.93 
46.57 
46.73 

47.09 
47.02 
46.85' 

45.26 



QUEBEC CITY 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



1939=100 



Weekly 
earnings* 

Dollars 



100.0 
151.9 



45.28 153.2 



146.2 
142.6 
142.7 

144.6 
148.1 
152.0 

155.4 
159.1 
159.3 

158.6 
158.2 
156.0' 



100.0 
331.0 

320.9 

295.1 
301.0 
299.9 

301.4 
317.6 
333.0 

339.5 
351.8 
355.7 

361.2 
357.6 
358. 2' 



149.5 324.3 



18.62 
40.48 

38.95 

37.14 
39.29 
39.13 

38.80 
39.88 
40.77 

40.70 
41.18 
41.59 

42.41 
42.11 
42.78' 

40.42 



HAMILTON 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



1939 = 100 



Dollars 



100.0 
203.7 



100.0 
455.4 



198.2 416.9 



197.4 
196.2 
196.7 

199.5 
205.9 
208.6 

211.8 
210.5 
206.8 

206 9 
201.5 
202.9' 

199.5 



403.8 
421.3 
420.8 

434 3 
459.8 
468.8 



483 
482 



470.4 

477.0 
463.9 
479.8' 

448.4 



24.19 
54.11 

50.88 

49.49 
51.96 
51.84 

52.74 
54.09 
54.45 

55.26 
55.47 
55.11 

55.89 
55.80 
57.23' 

54.39 



Reported by farms customarily employing 15 persons or more. 'Average weekly wages and salaries. 
Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 11 - concluded 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Cities 
Monthly averages or first of month 



WINDSOR 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- Aggregate 
ment payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939: 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
228.7 


100.0 
477.5 


27.79 
58.22 


100.0 
172.2 


100.0 
320.2 


24.29 
45.27 


100.0 
203.3 


100.0 
406.8 


25.07 
50.12 


1950 D 


223.5 


470.9 


58.59 


179.2 


312.1 


42.35 


206.4 


388.0 


47.18 


1951 J 
F 
M 


231.2 
234.6 
237.9 


457.7 
524.5 
530.9 


55.15 
62.28 
62.25 


173.3 
168.1 
166.8 


295.1 
298.3 
302.8 


41.41 
43.15 
44.17 


199.4 
195.9 
197.2 


361.2 
375.2 
378.8 


45.47 
48.07 
48.31 


A 
M 

J 


240.2 
235.8 
237.3 


509.2 
480.7 
493.1 


59.14 
56.84 
57.97 


167.9 
168.7 
172.5 


304.4 
308.8 
319.4 


44.09 
44.52 
45.18 


201.0 
203.7 
204.8 


384.7 
402.3 
403.9 


47.97 
49.48 
49.41 


J 

A 

S 


235.7 
231.9 
223.7 


477.5 
452.0 
460.5 


56.51 
54.37 
57.38 


175.3 
174.5 
175.1 


332.5 
331.3 
333.8 


46.29 
46.32 
46.49 


208.4 
207.4 
207.8 


423.4 
424.1 
430.8 


50.90 
51.23 
51.94 


O 
N 
D 


211.8 
211.4 
212.3 


439.9 
449.0 
454. 4 r 


57.91 
59.22 
59.67' 


173.9 
174.8 
175. 8 r 


335.2 
339.4 
341. r 


46.97 
47.33 
47.29 


207.3 
203.9 
203.1' 


435.2 
432.4 
429.0' 


52.59 
53.13 
52.92 


1952 J 


209.3 


439.6 


58.56 


171.7 


329.5 


46.77 


197.7 


405.7 


51.43 



TABLE 12 



Average Hourly Earnings 

Monthly averages or first of month 



MINING 



MANUFACTURING 



Total Metal Coal Total 
Mining Mining 



Durable Non- 
Goods durable 
Goods 



Foods and 
Beverages 



Total 



Meat 
products 



Tobacco 

and 
Tobacco 
Products 



Rubber Leather 
Products Products 













Cents per 


iour 










1949 
1951 


117.2 
133.4 


115.9 
134.8 


128.3 
136.7 


98.6 
116.8 


106.5 
125.8 


90.6 
107.2 


86.0 
99.3 


105.9 
126.7 


85.7 
109.2 


104.5 
124.5 


74.9 
85.5 


1950 D 


124.8 


125.2 


130.5 


107.8 


116.4 


99.0 


93.6 


117.7 


100.0 


111.9 


81.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


127.1 
127.7 
130.1 


127.9 
128.1 
130.0 


131.0 
131.8 
135.5 


109.0 
110.4 
111.4 


117.1 
119.0 
119.9 


100.5 
101.2 
102.3 


95.1 
95.5 
96.6 


117.9 
118.9 
120.7 


96.6 
94.3 
93.7 


114.6 
118.8 
120.9 


82.1 
82.4 
82.9 


A 
M 

J 


130.5 
131.5 
131.6 


130.2 
131.6 
132.0 


136.3 
137.6 
137.3 


112.8 
114.1 
115.9 


121.6 
122.9 
123.8 


103.4 
104.6 
107.2 


98.5 

98.6 

100.4 


121.3 
120.7 
128.0 


100.8 
110.9 
110.5 


122.6 
123.6 
123.5 


83.9 
84.8 
86.2 


J 

A 

S 


133.3 
136.1 
137.1 


134.3 
139.3 
140.4 


139.0 
137.4 
138.7 


118.4 
119.1 
120.6 


127.0 
128.2 
130.0 


109.1 
109.4 
110.6 


100.1 

99.2 

100.8 


127.8 
126.9 
132.9 


114.6 
112.1 
112.2 


122.7 
125.2 
127.7 


86.4 
85.9 
86.3 


O 

N 
D 


138.2 
138.3 
139.3 


141.2 
140.4 
141.8' 


138.5 
138.7 
138.7 


121.9 
123.5 
124.5 


132.1 
133.3 
134.6 


111.2 
113.0 
113.5' 


99.7 
102.8 
103.9' 


133.6 
135.7 
136.1 


122.4 
125.9 
116.0' 


129.7 
131.9 
133.2 


87.5 
88.7 
89. r 


1952 J 


142.8 


145.5 


140.2 


126.8 


136.1 


116.6 


108.5 


137.2 


118.4 


132.6 


89.2 



Data are for hourly rated wage earners of firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. Statistics throughout 
Tables 12 and 13 are compiled from data which relate to the last pay period of the preceding month. 
Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 



17 



LABOUR 



TABLE 12 -concluded 



MARCH, 1952 



Average Hourly Earnings 

Monthly averages or first of month 



MANUFACTURING 



Textile Products 
except Clothing 


Clothing 


Wood Products 

Tola' Saw and Furniture 

planing 

nulls 


Paper Products Printing Iron and Steel Products 


and Allied 
Total Pulp and Industries Total Primary 
paper iron and 
mills steel 


Total Cotton 
goods 



Cents per hour 



1949 
1951 


83.0 
96.6 


85.1 
99 8 


76.4 
86 


90.2 
106.0 


95.3 
113.6 


86.0 
96.6 


106 3 
128.7 


113.7 
137.3 


112.8 
132.2 


108.4 
130.1 


117.5 
141.3 


1950 D 


91.1 


95 8 


80.5 


99.7 


106.2 


92.3 


116.8 


125.4 


125.7 


119.9 


131.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


91.3 
92.9 
94 


95.7 
97.9 
99.4 


80.6 
82.9 
84.2 


99.8 

99.7 
101.1 


107.1 
106.8 
108.5 


91.7 
92.7 
93.4 


118.4 
119.9 
120.5 


126.5 
128.2 
128.2 


125.7 
126.0 
129.5 


119.9 
122.0 
123.6 


131.3 
134.2 
134.9 


A 
M 
J 


94.6 
95.4 
96.3 


99.7 
100.3 
100.8 


85.1 
85.4 
85.8 


103.9 
105.5 
105.0 


112.7 
113.6 
112.0 


93.9 
96.2 
96.8 


119.7 
120.8 
128.2 


127.2 
128.4 
136.7 


131.7 
132.9 
132.9 


125.3 
127.4 
128.8 


135.4 
136.8 
137.7 


J 

A 

S 


97.3 
97.5 
99.0 


99.9 

99.8 

101.3 


86.7 
86.9 
87.7 


105.9 
105.5 
108.8 


112.6 
111.8 

116.5 


97.2 
97.4 
98.3 


133.6 
135.0 
135.0 


142.9 
143.9 
143.8 


133.1 
131.8 
133.9 


131.1 
133.1 
134.8 


138.6 
143.9 
147.1 


O 
N 
D 


100.0 
100.4 
100. 4' 


101.4 
101.2 
100. 5' 


88.6 
89.3 
89.1 


110. 6' 

112.4 

113.2' 


118.4 
120.9 
122.5' 


99.7 
100.9 
101.3' 


136.9 
137.7 
139.1 


146.3 
147.1 
148.8 


135.2 
136.4 
137.4 


137.0 
138.1 
139.6' 


150.2 
151.8 
153.3 


1952 J 


101.1 


100.1 


90.1 


113.7 


123.9 


101.3 


140 8 


150.0 


139.2 


139.9 


154.7 



MANUFACTURING 



CONSTRUCTION 



Iron and Steel 
Products 

Agricultural 
implements 



Transportation Equipment 

Total Railroad and Motor 
rolling stock vehicles 
equipment 



Non-ferrous Electrical Non- Products of Chemical Total Buildings 

Metal Apparatus Metallic Petroleum Products and 

Products and Mineral and Coal Structures 

Supplies Products 



Cents per hour 



1949 
1951 


114.5 
144.5 


116 
133.8 


114.0 
129.7 


130.7 
148.2 


106.9 

127.6 


109.1 
127.5 


96.2 
115.8 


122.6 
151 .2 


98.6 
118.2 


101.2 
117.6 


107.9 
127.1 


1950 D 


131.5 


125.8 


116.7 


145.3 


115.1 


117.6 


106.9 


138.0 


107.5 


109.5 


117.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


130.8 
132.0 
133.0 


125.5 
128.7 
129.0 


118.4 
118.2 
119.5 


141.8 
148.5 
149.1 


118.8 
119.9 
119.9 


117.5 
120.4 
120.9 


108.0 
108.3 
109.5 


141.8 
140.1 
142.0 


110.4 
112.0 
113.1 


109.7 
113.5 
114.1 


118.7 
121.2 
122.1 


A 

M 

J 


140.3 
140.3 
146.5 


129.5 
129.6 
130.0 


119.2 
122.5 
121 9 


150.5 
146.3 
146 9 


121.5 

121 9 

122 3 


123.0 
125.3 
128 2 


111.3 
112.7 
114.7 


141.9 
148.4 
152.0 


114.2 
116.1 
116.9 


115.0 
115.4 
116.2 


122.5 
124.0 
125.9 


J 

A 

S 


149 5 
150.5 
150.4 


136.6 
137.1 
137.7 


138.9 
139.1 
137 4 


147.0 
148.9 
148.1 


127.6 
132.9 
134.0 


130.0 
130.1 
131.7 


117.1 
117.9 
120.1 


149.6 
151.0 
159.7 


118 9 
120 8 
122 3 


117.5 
117.7 
120.3 


127.7 
127.9 
131.0 


O 
N 
D 


153.9 
151 5 
155.7 


140.5 
140.1 
141. 0' 


141 3 
139.2 
140.2 


151.3 
149.8 
149.6 


135.7 
137.8 
138.5' 


132.7 
134.6 
135 6' 


121.5 
123 3 
124.7 


163 4 
163.0 
161.4 


123.6 
124.7 
124.9' 


122.4 
123.9 
125.3 


133.8 
134.9 
135.7' 


1952 J 


155 8 


142 5 


140 8 


154.0 


142.1 


135 5 


126.3 


164.1 


127.9 


122.1 


135.9 



18 



MARCH, 1952 


















LABOUR 








Average Hours Worked per Week 








TABLE 13 


























MINING 










MANUFACTURING 








Total 


Metal 
mining 


Coal 
mining 


Total 


Durable 
goods 


Non- ] 
durable 
goods 


■bods and 
aeverages 


Rubber 
products 


Leather 
products 


Textile 
products 

except 
clothing 


Clothing 


1949 


42.6 


45.3 


37.4 


42.3 


42.5 


42.0 


42.4 


40.9 


40.1 


42.7 


38.2 


1951 


43.1 


44.1 


39.5 


41.8 


42.0 


41.7 


42.2 


41.1 


38.8 


41.5 


37.4 


1950 D 


43.9 


45.2 


40.2 


43.1 


43.1 


43.1 


43.0 


42.7 


40.6 


44.3 


39.8 


1951 J 


40.5 


42.6 


34.9 


40.1 


40.2 


39.9 


40.4 


38.4 


37.0 


40.4 


35.0 


F 


44.1 


45.4 


40.6 


42.9 


43.1 


42.6 


42.3 


43.0 


41.6 


44.0 


39.3 


M 


43.7 


44.9 


39.5 


42.3 


42.5 


42.2 


42.0 


42.7 


41.4 


43.0 


39.0 


A 


42.5 


44.4 


36.4 


42.2 


42.3 


42.1 


41.8 


41.7 


39.8 


43.6 


38.7 


M 


43.4 


44.6 


39.5 


42.5 


42.6 


42.5 


42.2 


42.8 


40.4 


43.7 


38.9 


J 


43.0 


44.3 


38.0 


41.9 


42.1 


41.6 


42.3 


41.4 


37.7 


41.8 


37.1 


J 


43.3 


43.9 


40.5 


41.7 


42.0 


41.4 


42.5 


40.8 


37.1 


41.1 


35.8 


A 


43.0 


43.3 


41.2 


41.4 


41.4 


41.3 


42.3 


39.8 


38.4 


39.2 


36.4 


S 


42.2 


42.5 


39.1 


41.5 


41.7 


41.4 


41.8 


40.6 


38.2 


39.5 


37.3 


O 


43.9 


44.2 


41.2 


41.9 


42.0 


41. 8 r 


43. r 


40.7 


38.4 


40.5 


37.8 


N 


43.5 


43.7 


41.2 


41.8 


42.1 


41.5 


42.7 


41.6 


37.1 


40.0 


36.8 


D 


44.2 


44.8 


41.6 


41.9 


42.2 


41.6 


42.6 


40.0 


38. 5 r 


41. r 


36. 8 r 


1952 J 


40.3 


42.6 


32.7 


38.2 


38.4 


38.0 


39.2 


35.9 


34.9 


36.7 


31.2 










MANUFACTURING 








CONSTRUCTION 


Wood 
products 


Paper 
products 


Printing 
publishing 
and allied 
industries 


Iron and 

steel 
products 


Transporta- 
tion 
equipment 


Non-ferrous Electrical Non- 
metal apparatus metallic 
products and mineral 
supplies products 


Chemical Total 
products 


Buildings 

and 
structures 


1949 


41.3 


46.4 


40.6 


42.9 


42.2 


43.2 


41.1 


44.9 


43.5 


39.7 


40.1 


1951 


41.6 


46.7 


40.2 


42.2 


41.9 


42.6 


41.0 


44.7 


42.9 


40.3 


39.5 


1950 D 


42.3 


47.8 


40.9 


43.2 


42.8 


43.8 


41.9 


45.8 


43.5 


40.1 


40.1 


1951 J 


38.3 


44.9 


39.4 


40.3 


41.2 


41.7 


38.0 


43.1 


42.3 


35.0 


33.7 


F 


42.4 


46.8 


40.2 


42.5 


44.5 


43.6 


41.6 


45.4 


43.4 


40.1 


39.2 


M 


41.9 


46.7 


39.7 


42.0 


43.3 


43.1 


41.3 


44.8 


42.7 


40.6 


39.4 


A 


40.9 


46.2 


40.2 


42.4 


42.6 


43.3 


41.4 


44.6 


43.4 


39.0 


37.9 


M 


41.9 


47.0 


40.3 


43.0 


42.2 


43.8 


41.4 


45.6 


43.5 


39.8 


39.7 


J 


41.0 


46.7 


40.2 


42.2 


42.4 


42.7 


40.8 


44.9 


43.0 


39.6 


38.7 


J 


42.1 


47.2 


40.3 


42.5 


40.9 


42.6 


40.8 


44.7 


42.6 


40.7 


40.0 


A 


42.1 


47.3 


40.3 


41.9 


39.8 


42.1 


40.9 


44.5 


42.6 


41.5 


40.7 


S 


41.3 


47.3 


40.1 


41.8 


41.5 


42.1 


40.8 


44.1 


42.6 


41.7 


40.9 


O 


42.3 


47.2 


40.6 


42.2 


41.4 


42.3 


41.2 


44.8 


42.7 


42.4 


41.6 


N 


42.2 


46.7 


40.4 


42.4 


41.7 


41.7 


41.5 


44.9 


42.8 


41.5 


40.7 


D 


42.2 


46.7 


40.4 


42.6 


41.2 


41.7 


42.5' 


45.0 


42.7 


41.5' 


41. 3' 


1952 J 


35.7 


43.5 


38.1 


38.7 


38.9 


39.9 


37.9 


40.9 


41.2 


36.3 


32.8 


Datar 


efer to hourly 


r rated wage earners of firms customarily employing 15 persons or more as reported at the first of the month. 19 


Sourc 


a: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, 


D.B.S. 

















LABOUR MARCH, 1952 

Percentage of Women in Reporting Establishments : By Industries 
TABLE 14 First of month 







MANUFACTURING 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 
STORAGE AND 
COMMUNI- 
CATION 


TRADE 


FINANCE 
INSURANCE 
AND REAL 

ESTATE 


SERVICE 


INDUS- 
TRIAL 
COMPOSITE 




Total 


Non- 
Durable Durable 
Goods Goods 


Textiles 

(except 

Clothing) 


Clothing 
(Textile 
and Fur) 












1944 O 


29.1 


19 4 


40.2 


48.0 


68.6 


12.2 


49.3 


53.9 


58.2 


27.1 


1950 D 


23.8 


11.5 


34.9 


37 1 


65.7 


14.0 


39 4 


48 3 


50.8 


22.6 


1951 J 


23.0 


11.4 


33.9 


36. 7 r 


64. 9 r 


14 5 


39 2 


49.7 


50.4 


22.6 


F 


23.3 


11.4 


34.4 


36.9 


65.7 


14.5 


37.0 


49.6 


50.2 


22.5 


M 


23.3 


11.5 


34.6 


36.8 


65.8 


14 4 


36.3 


49.6 


50.1 


22.5 


A 


23.2 


11.4 


34.6 


36.5 


66.2 


14.6 


37.1 


49.1 


50.2 


22.7 


M 


23.0 


11.4 


34.3 


36.6 


66.5 


14 4 


36.9 


49.1 


50.1 


22.4 


J 


22.7 


11.3 


34.0 


36.6 


66.5 


14.3 


37.1 


48.9 


50.2 


22.1 


J 


22.4 


11.0 


33.5 


36.2 


65.9 


14 


37.3 


48 9 


50.4 


21.8 


A 


22.2 


10.9 


33.2 


35.5 


64.8 


14 .0 


36.6 


48.9 


50.6 


21.6 


S 


22.3 


10.8 


33.5 


35.6 


65.0 


13 8 


36.2 


49.1 


50.8 


21.5 


O 


22.7 


10.7 


34.0 


35.8 


65.3 


13.8 


37.6 


48 9 


50.6 


21.7 


N 


22 3 


10 .6 


33.6 


35.9 


65.3 


13.8 


37.8 


49 4 


50.2 


21.5 


D 


22.2 


10.5 


33.5 


35.4 


65.6 


14.0 


39.0 


49.4 


50.2 


21.6 


1952 J 


21.5 


10 6 


32.4 


34.8 


64.7 


14.1 


39.0 


49.4 


50.0 


21.7 



Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



TABLE 15 



Unemployment Insurance 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Ordinary 
claimants 
on live 
unem- 
ployment 
register'" 



Number of 

persons 

receiving 

benefit s 



Number of 
persons 

commenc- 
ing the 

receipt of 
benefit 



Number of 

days' 

benefit 

paid 



Employer 
and 
Amount of employee 
benefit contxibu- 
paid <3) tions 



Employment Offices' 1 



Total 



Balance in 

fund at 

end of 

period " 



Live 




applications 




for 


Unfilled 


employment 


vacancies 







Thousands 




Thousand 
days 




Million dollars 




Thousands 


1949 
1951 


135.6 
138.8 


130.3 
100.1 


54.99 
58.06 


2,574 
2.441 


5.78 
6.06 


8.83 
12 66 


11.76 
16.86 


552.2 
707.8 


197 
202 


35 
52 


1950 D 


183.3 


101.9 


69.87 


2.193 


5 31 


12.58 


16.45 


647.8 


227 


35 


1951 J 
F 
M 


220.5 
208.0 
184.5 


149.8 
158.0 
147.2 


104.67 
79.42 
68.45 


3.788 
3,853 
4,193 


9.37 

9.59 

10.47 


12.27 
12.22 
11.44 


16.09 
16.04 
17.11 


654.1 
659.4 
664.6 


301 
298 
291 


37 
40 
45 


A 
M 
J 


136.8 
88.9 
86.5 


109.4 
75.9 
57.1 


54.74 
41.29 
31.28 


3,088 
2,323 
1,481 


7.68 
5.66 
3.51 


12.77 
12.81 
11.68 


16.72 
16.85 
15.46 


672.8 
683.9 
695.9 


218 
152 
140 


58 
71 
63 


J 

A 

S 


83.9 

80.9 
83 1 


57.5 
60.1 

64.3 


39.13 
37.88 
38.18 


1,417 
1,487 
1,378 


3.43 

3.67 
3.46 


12.16 
16. 25" 
12.57 


16.23 

20.95 (,) 

16.64 


708.7 

726.0' 

739.1 


131 

128 
133 


55 
61 
70 


o 

N 
D 


99.8 
153.7 
239.0 


72.3 

97 5 
152.3 


46.10 
67.86 
87.74 


1,567 
2,033 
2,681 


3.90 
5 .11 
6.92 


12.21 
13 65 
11.84 


16.26 
18.02 
15.97 


751.5 
764.4 
773.5 


157 
210 
269 


57 
42 
30 


1952 J 


287.8 


216.9 


154.29 


5,037 


13.43 


12.44 


16.67 


776 1 


364 


25 



20 Note: Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949. In the first five columns "unemployment assistance" for 

that province is disregarded. 

"'Monthly data as of end of month while annual section is based on averages of month-end statistics. "'As of 
January 1950, the number of benefit payments (equivalent to the number of beneficiaries) in the week which includes 
the last day of the month has been substituted for the number of payments in the week which includes the third Friday 
of the month. '"Supplementary benefit payments are excluded. ' Includes prepayment of $4,000,000 by Post 

Office. 

Source: Unemployment Insurance Commission and Monthly Report of Unemployment Insurance Branch, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 16 



LABOUR 



Time Lost in Labour Disputes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Total all 
industries 



MANUFACTURING 



Aircraft, 
Printing Logging, Automo- ship- 
Fur and Textiles Pulp and and lumber biles building 
leather and paper publish- and its and and farm 

products clothing products ing products parts implements 



Food, 

animal and 

vegetable 

products 



Tobacco 

and 

beverages 



Rubber 













Thousand 


man-working days 










1939 
1950 


18.7 
115.8 


0.2 


— 


3.5 
0.3 


1.1 


2.3 

4.6 


0.3 


— 


0.1 
1.3 


1.4 


0.1 
0.9 


1950 D 


8.5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1.5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1951 J 
F 
M 


16.8 
18.9 
15.1 


0.7 
1.3 




0.3 
1.6 
0.4 


0.2 
1.7 
0.3 


0.4 
0.3 
1.1 


— 


0.1 
0.4 


0.2 
2.8 


0.3 


0.4 


A 
M 
J 


9.7 
34.9 

128.2 


0.6 
0.9 


0.6 


4.4 
35.4 


— 


0.1 
5.0 
7.1 


0.2 


— 


2.6 
3.5 
2.2 


0.2 
0.4 
3.3 


2.8 


J 
A 

S 


119.4 
219.5 
105.2 


0.1 


48.1 
55.0 


0.7 


0.6 


0.8 
0.5 
0.3 


0.7 
0.8 
5.3 


0.8 
0.2 


2.1 
3.9 
1.6 


0.6 
0.1 


2.1 
1.5 


O 
N 
D 


49.3 

38.3 

117.0 


1.7 
2.2 


2.5 
9.7 
2.0 


— 


5.2 
0.4 
0.3 


0.4 


6.0 
7.4 
0.6 


— 


6.8 
2.9 
0.6 


3.9 
5.0 r 


6.7 
0.7 
0.9 


1952 J 


75.2 


2.2 


— 


— 


0.3 


— 


— 


— 


0.9 


— 


— 



MANUFACTURING 



Other iron Electrical 
and steel apparatus 



Other 
Non- 
ferrous 



Non- 
metallics, 
chemicals 
and 
miscel- 
laneous 



Con- 
struction 



Fishing 

and 
Trapping 



Mining 



Transport Trade, 
and Public Finance 
Utilities and 

Service 



Coal 



Other 



Thousand man-working days 



1939 
1950 


0.5 
7.1 


0.5 


2.4 


0.2 
0.3 


0.1 9.3 
2.4 0.1 1.2 


0.9 
2.7 


84.0 


1.6 
4.8 


1950 D 


4.5 


— 


— 


0.2 


0.1 


2.0 


— 


— 


0.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1.1 

12.7 

2.3 


— 


5.9 
0.2 


0.2 
1.1 
0.1 


0.2 
0.9 
0.2 


7.2 
0.2 
0.5 


— 


— 


0.2 
0.1 
5.2 


A 
M 
J 


1.5 
11.5 
59.9 


1.6 


0.6 
2.8 
5.3 


0.2 
0.6 


3.7 
8.3 


1.8 
0.8 
0.7 


0.1 


0.2 
0.1 


1.6 
1.0 
1.3 


J 

A 

S 


48.6 

55.1 

5.8 


— 


2.4 

6.8 

21.4 


3.1 
0.9 
0.7 


25.0 

18.0 

7.4 


— 25.5 


32.0 

58.0 

4.4 


0.8 
0.2 
0.1 


0.4 
0.9 
0.9 


O 
N 
D 


9.7 
0.8' 
105.4 


0.1 
0.9 r 


5.6 
0.3 


0.4 


0.5 


0.4 
0.2 
2.9 


1.0 
8.2 
1.0 


0.1 


0.7 
0.5 
0.4 


1952 J 


6.8 


— 


0.5 


— 


4.2 


— — 


— 


60.3 


— 



The distribution of monthly data for metal products in the last two months is on a preliminary basis. 
Source: Labour Gazette, Department of Labour. 



21 



PRICES 














MARCH, 1952 








Living Costs in Canada 








TABLE 


17 




Monthly averages or first of month 














COST-OF-LIVING 


INDEX 






Index of 
Retail 

Prices; 
Commod- 
ities Only 


Index oi 
Farm 
Living 
Costs 




Total 


Food 


Rent 


Fuel and 
Lighting 

6 


Clothing 
12 


Home 

Furnishings 

and 

Services 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Base period jQO 
weight 


31 


19 


9 


23 














1935-39 = 


100 








1939 


101.5 


100.6 


103.8 


101.2 


100.7 


101.4 


101.4 


101 


99.5 


1951 


184.5 


241.1 


140.0 


147.1 


203.1 


194.4 


141.3 


214 5 


198.6 


1951 J 


172.5 


220.2 


136.4 


141.5 


187.1 


179 8 


135.8 


197.3 


184.1 


F 


175.2 


224.4 


136.4 


141.7 


192.4 


185.1 


137.0 


201.4 




M 


179.7 


233.9 


137.6 


146.5 


196.3 


188.6 


137.8 


207.9 




A 


181.8 


238.4 


137.6 


146.7 


198.8 


190.7 


138.8 


211.2 


197.1 


M 


182.0 


235.4 


137.6 


146.2 


201.5 


194.9 


140.7 


211.3 




J 


184.1 


239.8 


139.8 


146.2 


202.5 


197.1 


141.0 


214.0 




J 


187.6 


249.7 


139.8 


147.2 


202.9 


197.4 


142.2 


219.6 




A 


188.9 


251.4 


139.8 


148.2 


204.6 


199.0 


143.7 


221.1 


214.7 


S 


189.8 


251.1 


142.7 


149.5 


206.9 


199.1 


144.0 


221.6 




O 


190.4 


249.7 


142.7 


150.2 


213.8 


200.1 


144.3 


222.4 




N 


191.2 


250.2 


144.8 


150.8 


214.6 


199.9 


144.9 


223.0 




D 


191.1 


249.3 


144.8 


150.8 


215.5 


200.6 


144.9 


222.7 




1952 J 


191.5 


250.0 


144.8 


151.2 


215.3 


201.1 


145.7 


223.1 




F 


190.8 


248.1 


144.8 


151.3 


213.0 


200.1 


146.5 


221.6 





The Index of Farm Living Costs is available for January, April and August only. 

Source: Prices and Price Indexes: Price Index Numbers of Commodities and Services Used by Farmers, D.B.S 



TABLE 18 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



GENERAL 
INDEX 



VEGETABLE PRODUCTS 



Total 



Fresh 
fruits 



Milled Rubber Sugar Tea, coffee 

cereal Bakery and its and its and 

foods products products products cocoa 



Potatoes 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


99.2 
211.2 


89.1 
202.0 


93.8 

178.3 


70.5 
219.4 


81.4 
188.6 


97.2 
155.2 


102.3 
178.1 


107.7 
185.9 


101.2 
326.8 


121.2 
143.5 


1950 D 


225.2 


209.5 


183.2 


209.3 


197.6 


161.7 


228.7 


202.9 


343.9 


113.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


232.3 
238.5 
241.8 


214.1 
219.0 
220.6 


172.9 
183.6 
186.5 


213.0 
217.1 
219.0 


199.2 
200.8 
200.5 


161.7 
171.2 
171.7 


238.0 
241.8 
245.0 


203.1 
203.1 
203.8 


359.5 
374.0 
377.7 


123.2 
134.6 
140.0 


A 

M 
J 


242.2 
241.9 
242.7 


221.7 
220.0 
217.6 


176.6 
172.7 
154.4 


220.8 
215.1 
211.1 


200.5 
199.2 
200.2 


171.7 
171.7 
171.7 


248.8 
244.0 
240.1 


205.8 
220.9 
234.2 


374.5 
372.0 
371.3 


139.6 
134.5 
144.2 


J 

A 

S 


244.2 
241.5 
240.1 


216.1 
215.9 
217.1 


150.4 
167.6 
174.3 


213.3 
215.1 
217.6 


199.3 
201.3 
202.0 


174.8 
174.8 
174.8 


230.1 
230.1 
232.2 


230.6 
214.5 
211.6 


353.2 
357.8 
353.0 


187.7 
175.8 
192.0 


O 

N 
D 


239.6 
239 . 1 
237.6 


218.9 
220.9 
221.0 


171.3 
167.1 
171.6 


220.6 
223.2 
219.7 


202.9 
203.7 
202.9 


176.4 
176.4 
176.4 


231.9 
230.3 
228.0 


211.3 
204.8 
203.7 


347.8 
337.2 
346.0 


234.3 
348.6 
374.3 


1952 J 


236.8 


220.2 


176.9 


216.7 


199.8 


177.0 


226.5 


203.7 


346.1 


407.7 



22 The data for 1951 and 1952 are subject to revision. 

Source: Prices and Price Indexes, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 18 - continued 



PRICES 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



ANIMALS AND THEIR PRODUCTS 




Fishery 
products 


Leather Milk 
Hides and unmanu- Boots and Live and its 
skins factured shoes stock products 


Eggs 


Meats 


Total 


Fresh Cured 


1935-39 = 100 



1939 
1950 

1950 D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 
D 

1952 J 



100.6 
251.3 



102.2 
260.7 



103.8 
258.2 



102.8 
235.1 



101.8 
178.8 



104.1 
334.1 



97.6 
214.2 



94.8 
168.9 



107.8 
337.7 



268.7 279.6 337.6 279.8 195.3 352.2 227.1 200.2 355.1 



281.2 
294.5 
302.4 

296.7 
299.1 
309.1 

312.7 
305.4 
300.9 

294.8 
289.4 
285.8 

282.2 



288.1 
287.1 
288.6 

288.4 
275.1 
267.1 

286.6 
281.4 
281.9 

280.9 
284.4 
290.4 



380.3 
400.8 
403.1 

368.2 
351.4 
346.0 

312.7 
256.5 
257.2 

274.6 
208.2 
201.7 



309.5 
327.9 
327.9 

324.4 
324.4 
318.1 

312.6 
298.8 
274.3 

274.3 
245.0 
234.1 



200.4 
204.1 
211.4 

219.1 
224.8 
223.4 

223.4 
223.7 
222.8 

218.8 
216.3 
209.3 



375.4 
402.2 
409.0 

402.6 
410.1 
434.4 

438.6 
422.6 
410.3 

397.5 
393.8 
397.5 



228.6 
229.3 
247.9 

230.7 
231.6 
233.5 

235.6 
235.7 
234.5 

235.3 
240.9 
244.8 



163.2 
173.6 
195.6 

204.4 
219.7 
236.3 

255.4 
253.7 
253.5 

243.2 
229.1 
176.2 



383.5 
410.0 
414.8 

417.9 
418.9 
449.2 

453.4 
438.8 
435.4 

421.9 
413.2 
420.2 



301.4 191.1 230.7 209.6 383.1 247.1 153.2 416.4 



100.0 
205.8 

196.8 

208.5 
216.7 
216.2 

209.5 
219.5 
227.7 

234.0 
239.7 
249.7 

238.5 
226.7 
190.9 

194.2 



FIBRES, TEXTILES AND THEIR PRODUCTS 



Total 



Cotton 
fabrics 



Miscel- 
laneous 
fibres 
and 
products 



Rayon «> 
fabrics 



Rayon < 2 > 
yarns 



Wool 

raw, 

domestic 



Hosiery 

and knit 

goods, 

chiefly 

wool 



Wool 
cloth 



WOOD, WOOD 

PRODUCTS AND 

PAPER 



Total Newsprint 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


98.9 
246.7 


95.2 
241.0 


99.1 
276.5 


112.8 
191.9 


97.3 
154.0 


95.6 
328.6 


103.0 
208.9 


98.6 
293.6 


107.5 

258.3 


116.3 
248.7 


1950 D 


285.0 


267.3 


303.6 


199.4 


168.5 


468.2 


219.1 


369.8 


273.8 


255.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


298.8 
314.6 
327.1 


267.3 
277.3 
278.1 


312.1 
313.5 
341.4 


200.5 
200.5 
203.7 


168.5 
168.5 
187.3 


561.4 
644.9 
753.3 


219.1 
268.0 
283.3 


408.4 
434.3 
452.9 


284.5 
286.5 
289.0 


255.6 
254.9 
253.9 


A 
M 
J 


324.7 
316.5 
306.6 


278.1 
278.1 
278.1 


375.0 
375.0 
375.0 


203.7 
203.7 
203.7 


195.8 
195.8 
195.8 


649.2 
591.1 
532.2 


288.5 
286.6 
286.6 


463.3 
425.1 
387.8 


293.6 
294.3 
293.3 


255.1 
256.4 
258.0 


J 

A 

S 


294.1 
283.0 
270.2 


278.1 
278.1 
268.6 


368.0 
356.4 
373.4 


203.7 
199.4 
199.4 


195.8 
195.8 
195.8 


470.0 
390.2 
310.0 


286.6 
286.6 
286.6 


337.1 
328.0 
292.2 


303.7 
302.9 
302.4 


283.8 
282.3 
280.7 


O 
N 
D 


269.0 
270.6 
268.8 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


373.4 
372.5 
372.5 


199.4 
210.1 
210.1 


195.8 
195.8 
195.8 


310.0 
313.2 
304.5 


286.0 
286.0 
271.3 


280.0 
283.7 
283.5 


301.7 
299.0 
295.2 


279.9 
277.8 
272.6 


1952 J 


266.4 


257.2 


368.1 


210.1 


195.8 


295.2 


271.2 


285.4 


294.6 


268.8 



U) Changed from silk fabrics to rayon fabrics in January, 1942. 
silk hosiery. 



c « From 1926 to 1941 rayon yarns and artificial 23 




PRICES 



TABLE 18 continued 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



MARCH, 1952 



WOOD, WOOD 

PRODUCTS AND 

PAPER 



IRON AND ITS PRODUCTS 



NON-FERROUS 
METALS 



Lumber 

and 

timber 



Pulp 



Total 



Rolling 

mill 

Pig iron products Hardware 



Wire 



Scrap iron 
and steel 



Total 



Copper 
and its 
products 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


106.4 
388.2 


93.4 
195.1 


104.8 

183.6 


101.5 
218.1 


104.2 
170.6 


101.1 
180.4 


102.2 
205.1 


109.1 

244.4 


100.0 
159.5 


101.9 
222.0 


1950 D 


414.9 


213.1 


192.5 


233.8 


177.2 


193.9 


216.5 


269.8 


173.1 


243.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


445.4 
455.2 
468.2 


233.7 
233.0 
232.2 


196.4 
201.4 
201.5 


233.8 
233.8 
233.8 


178.0 
185.8 
185.8 


196.0 
203.0 
203.0 


216.5 
222.6 
222.6 


272.6 
276.0 
278.3 


174.7 

175.5 
174.4 


243.4 
243.8 
243.5 


A 
M 
J 


469.8 
469.7 
459.6 


256.4 
257.6 
259.1 


204.5 
206.4 
206.8 


233.8 
233.8 
239.3 


187.6 
187.6 
187.6 


207.1 
207.1 
207.1 


225.6 
225.6 
225.6 


281.7 
322.3 
322.3 


175.9 
176.3 
185.1 


246.6 
247.5 
275.6 


J 

A 

S 


458.1 
456.4 
457.4 


257.3 
255.7 
255.6 


210.8 
212.0 
214.5 


255.6 
255.6 
255.6 


194.5 
197.3 
198.2 


208.7 
209.6 
215.0 


225.6 
225.6 
234.9 


314.3 
314.3 
317.0 


184.2 

183.4 
183.6 


275.5 
274.5 
274.7 


O 
N 
D 


456.1 
449.5 
445.4 


255.0 
253.2 
248.2 


215.7 
216.8 
216.8 


255.6 
255.6 
255.6 


200.4 
202.2 
202.2 


217.2 
217.2 
217.2 


234.9 
234.9 
234.9 


317.0 
317.0 
317.0 


184.8 
185.3 
183.4 


273.7 
271.9 
268.1 


1952 J 


451.1 


244.0 


218.6 


255.6 


202.2 


217.9 


234.9 


317.0 


180.9 


263.2 



NON-FERROUS 
METALS 

Lead Zinc 

and its and its 

products products 



NON-METALLIC MINERALS 



Total 



Clay and 

allied 
products 



Window Petroleum 
Coal Coke glass products 



Salt 



Cement 



1935 39 = 100 



1939 
1950 


93 
299.6 


94.6 
334.9 


99.7 
164.8 


97.9 
172.6 


101.6 
167.9 


109.0 
204.1 


95.4 
172.5 


96.4 
167.7 


127.1 
252.4 


93.5 
128.2 


1950 D 


372.8 


412.0 


165.8 


180.6 


171.1 


211.4 


173.5 


163.6 


252.4 


134.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


372.2 
372.0 
372.0 


417.0 
417.6 
416.1 


167.3 
168.3 
169.3 


182.1 
184.9 
185.1 


171.4 
173.9 
173.9 


211.4 
213.5 
224.1 


182.7 
182.7 
182.7 


163.6 
162.7 
162.7 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


134.3 
134.9 
139.5 


A 
M 

J 


374.5 
377.1 
379.8 


421.5 
423.7 
426.6 


169.0 
169.6 
169.3 


186.8 
191.6 
189.6 


173.2 
172.5 
171.0 


224.1 
224.1 
224.1 


195.1 
197.8 
197.8 


162.7 
164.2 
164.3 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


139.8 
139.8 
139.8 


J 

A 

S 


376.7 
374.2 
374.2 


423.5 
421.2 
421.7 


169.5 
170.7 
170.9 


189.6 
195.3 
195.3 


172.1 
172.3 
172.7 


224.1 
224.1 
224.1 


197.8 
197.8 
197.8 


164.2 
166.2 
166.3 


257 2 
257.2 
257.2 


139.8 
145.8 
146.6 


O 

N 
D 


392.6 

406.2 
406.5 


443.0 
459.7 
459.7 


170.8 
170.7 
171.3 


195.3 
195.3 
195.3 


172.7 
172.7 
173.6 


224.1 
224.1 
224.1 


197.8 
197.8 
197.8 


166.3 
166.2 
166.2 


282. 4 r 
282.4' 

282 4 r 


146.8 
146.8 
146.8 


1952 J 


406.5 


459.7 


173.8 


195.3 


175 2 


224.1 


197.8 


166.2 


282.4 


151.5 



24 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 18 -concluded 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRICES 



NON- 
METALLICS 



CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS 



Asbestos Total 



Inorganic Organic Coal tar 
chemicals chemicals products 



Drugs and 
Dyeing Paints, pharma- Fertilizer 

materials Explosives prepared ceuticals materials 



1935-39 = 100 



1939 

1950 

1950 D 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 
D 

1952 J 



102.6 
211.3 



232.5 
232.5 
233.9 

233.9 
233.9 
233.9 

233.9 
233.9 
233.9 

233.9 
233.9 
234.5 



100.3 
157.7 



99.4 
116.9 



95.0 
182.2 



100.3 
158.8 



101.6 
185.8 



97.5 
120.5 



97.8 
163.4 



179.7 
183.1 

184.8 

187.5 
188.0 
189.1 

190.2 
189.6 
189.3 

190.3 

187.7 
188.0 



123.4 
126.1 
128.0 

129.6 
129.6 
130.0 

130.1 
131.3 
134.1 

134.4 
134.3 
134.3 



259.8 
259.8 
260.6 

260.6 
260.6 
267.9 

267.9 
267.9 
267.9 

264.8 
264.8 
261.9 



177.9 
177.9 
177.9 

177.9 
177.9 
177.9 

187.5 
187.5 
187.5 

187.5 
187.5 
187.5 



202.1 
202.1 
202.1 

202.1 
202.1 
202.1 

202.1 
202.1 
202.1 

202.1 
202.1 
202.1 



134.5 
134.5 
134.5 

134.5 
134.5 
134.5 

134.5 
134.5 
134.5 

134.5 
134.5 
134.5 



176.1 
176.1 
176.1 

184.2 
184.2 
184.2 

184.2 
184.2 
184.2 

184.2 
184.2 
184.2 



100.7 
145.6 



213.6 173.0 121.5 227.0 173.0 202.1 127.4 168.1 173.9 



181.4 
181.9 
192.2 

200.9 
206.2 
206.2 

206.2 
207.9 
207.9 

207.9 
207.9 
207.2 



267.0 188.8 136.0 261.9 187.5 202.1 134.5 184.2 207.2 



107.5 
150.4 

151.6 

155.3 
158.5 
158.1 

158.1 
158.1 
158.1 

164.2 
168.4 
168.4 

168.4 
168.4 
173.7 

178.5 



TABLE 19 



CLASSIFICATION BY PURPOSE OR USE 



Canadian Farm Products 



Raw and Fully and 

partly man- chiefly man- General 

ufactured ufactured Industrial building 

goods goods materials materials 



Iron and 
Residential non-ferrous 
building metals and 
materials products 



Total 



Field 



Animal 



Farm prices 
of agricul- 
tural 
products (1) 













1935-39 = 


100 










1939 
1950 


94.9 
212.8 


101.9 
211.0 


99.0 
244.6 


102.0 
249.9 


102.3 
242.7 


102.0 
190.8 


92.6 
236.7 


83.7 
191.9 


101.5 
281.4 


91.8 
260. 5 r 


1950 D 


225.1 


225.7 


280.9 


268.1 


263.3 


207.3 


243.3 


188.2 


298.4 


268. 8 r 


1951 J 
F 
M 


231.1 
237.1 
238.8 


233.6 
240.0 
244.1 


294.0 
303.4 
305.3 


279.7 
287.4 
291.5 


269.6 
274.9 
282.6 


210.9 
214.3 
213.7 


251.0 
262.5 
273.0 


191.1 
195.5 
198.8 


310.9 
329.6 
347.2 


273. 9 r 
284. 7 r 
293.7' 


A 
M 
J 


238.6 
238.9 
242.9 


244.9 
244.4 
243.7 


305.4 
305.4 
303.9 


293.9 
294.2 
290.2 


287.2 
289.5 
289.2 


216.2 
217.4 
224.1 


265.4 
265.3 
272.6 


199.2 
194.6 
192.0 


331.6 
336.1 
353.1 


291.6 
292.4 
300. 3 r 


J 

A 

S 


242.5 
237.1 
235.8 


246.6 
245.1 
243.7 


297.0 
287.4 
285.8 


289.8 
290.4 
291.2 


289.8 
290.4 
290.9 


226.0 
226.2 
227.9 


277.1 
256.4 
253.9 


195.4 
164.6 
168.5 


358.9 
348.3 
339.2 


307.2 
284. 9 r 
284. r 


O 
N 
D 


236.3 
237.0 
235.9 


242.7 
241.4 
239.7 


289.4 
287.5 
284.6 


291.4 
289.5 
289.5 


290.8 
289.3 
289.1 


229.7 
230.9 
230.1 


252.6 
258.4 
260.2 


175.0 
188.2 
191.3 


330.3 
328.5 
329.1 


278.9 
278. 4 r 
276.0 


1952 J 


233.3 


239.7 


281.4 


290.8 


291.6 


230.0 


256.5 


194.8 


318.2 





(1) Excluding Newfoundland. From August, 1950, to July, 1951, prairie farm prices for wheat, oats and barley are 
final prices. Since August, 1951, prairie grain prices are initial prices only. 

Source: Prices and Price Indexes, and Index Numbers of Farm Prices of Agricultural Products, D.B.S. 



25 



FUEL AND POWER 



TABLE 20 



MARCH, 1952 



Electric Power 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION 



EXPORTS'" 



CONSUMPTION 



Hydraulic Thermal 



Total 



Primary Secondary 



Total 



Primary Secondary 











Million 


kilowatt 


lours 








1939 
1951 


2,320 
4,631 


41 
152 


2,362 
4,783 


1,735 
4,459 


627 
325 


159 

197 


2,202 
4,586 


1,616 
4,325 


586 
261 


1950 D 


4.511 r 


163 


4,674 


4.369 r 


306 


178 


4,497 


4,241 


255 


1951 J 
F 
M 


4,619 
4.231 
4,751 


165 
145 
159 


4,784 
4,376 
4,910 


4,500 
4,105 
4,535 


284 
270 
376 


172 
165 
221 


4,612 
4,211 
4,690 


4,368 
3,982 
4,395 


244 
229 
295 


A 
M 
J 


4,745 
4,987 
4.574 


150 
144 
133 


4,895 
5,130 
4,707 


4,356 
4,541 
4,376 


539 
589 
331 


208 
231 
224 


4.687 
4,899 
4,483 


4,227 
4,407 
4,242 


460 
492 
241 


J 

A 

S 


4,496 
4,450 
4.260 


133 
146 
145 


4,629 
4,596 
4,404 


4,345 
4,446 
4.271 


284 
150 
133 


238 
160 
129 


4,391 
4,436 
4,276 


4,205 
4,315 
4,148 


186 
121 
128 


O 

N 
D 


4.750 
4,775 
4.931 


169 
161 
180 


4,920 
4,936 
5,111 


4,654 
4,609 
4,765 


265 
327 
346 


203 
204 
214 


4,717 
4,733 
4,896 


4,511 
4,471 
4,624 


206 
262 
272 


1952 J 


5.083 


185 


5,268 


4,926 


343 


210 


5,058 


4,784 


274 



CONSUMPTION 



Canada 



Prince 
New- Edward 
foundland Island 



Nova New Mani- Saskat- 

Scotia Brunswick Quebec Ontario toba chewan 



British 
Alberta Columbia 













Million kilowatt he 


>urs 










1939 
1951 


2,202 

4,586 


10.47 


0.65 
1.95 


36 

73 


37 
60 


991 
2,010 


788 
1,714 


148 
244 


14 
38 


21 
85 


166 
349 


1950 D 


4,497 


10.90 


2.15 


73 


58 


1,905 


1,679 


273 


41 


90 


365 


1951 J 
F 
M 


4,612 
4,211 
4,690 


10.76 

9.61 

10.12 


2.08 
1.83 
1.94 


76 
68 
74 


63 
56 
63 


1,954 
1,793 
2,006 


1,716 
1,574 
1.775 


283 

257 
275 


41 
36 
38 


91 
78 
84 


375 
337 
363 


A 
M 

J 


4,687 
4,899 
4,483 


9.36 
9.32 
8.96 


1.81 
1.81 
1.73 


69 
72 
69 


52 
60 
59 


2,142 
2.320 
2,033 


1,716 
1.737 
1,664 


247 
239 
219 


35 
35 
34 


78 
80 
77 


337 
346 
318 


J 

A 

S 


4,391 
4,436 
4,276 


9.39 

9 22 

10.87 


1.88 
1.99 
1.88 


68 
69 
70 


57 
63 
55 


1,984 
1,994 
1,851 


1,627 
1,624 
1,633 


203 
214 
211 


34 
36 
36 


78 
83 
82 


328 
342 
325 


O 

N 
D 


4,717 
4,733 
4,896 


12.29 
12.55 
13.15 


2 04 
2.11 
2.30 


80 
80 
81 


58 
64 
66 


2,002 
1,992 
2,054 


1.822 
1.824 
1,860 


244 
256 
281 


41 
43 
48 


91 

96 

104 


364 
363 
389 


1952 J 


5,058 


15 49 


2 22 


85 


67 


2,130 


1,898 


302 


49 


108 


400 



26 Note: As of January, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 

1 Less imports. 
Source: Monthly Report, Central Electric Stations, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 21 



FUEL AND POWER 



Coal and Coke 

Monthly averages or calendar months 









COAL 


COKE< l > 






Production 


Imports' 1 ' 


Exports , Coal( , 2 ' Production 


Bitu- 
minous 


Sub-bitu- 
minous 


Lignite Total 


Nova British 
Scotia Alberta Columbia 


for 
Consumption 


Thousand tons 



1939 
1951 


1,051 
1,113 


176 
250 


80 
185 


1,308 
1,548 


588 
526 


460 
638 


141 
145 


1,250 
2,209 


31 
36 


2,456 
3,721 


201 
325 


1950 D 


1,134 


460 


334 


1,927 


498 


897 


145 


1,411 


18 


3,320 


343 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1,273 
1 , 109 r 
l,117 r 


377 

280 r 

181 r 


284 r 

228 

195 


l,934 r 
l,618 r 
l,492 r 


612 

529 r 

570 r 


816 r 
672 r 
538 r 


164 
141 
147 


1,212 

911 

1,039 


19 
13 
20 


3,127 r 
2,516 r 
2,511 r 


342 
312 
335 


A 
M 
J 


1 , 148' 
1 , 165 r 
l,102 r 


139 
123 
140 


106 
61 
62 


l,394 r 
l,349 r 
1,303 


571 
592 
519 


517 
479 
512 


155 

159 r 

153 


2,358 
3,040 
2,978 


33 
32 
21 


3,719 r 

4,357 r 
4,259 


322 
328 
318 


J 
A 

S 


955 

978 

1,059 


91 
174 
249 


38 

95 

203 r 


1,084 
1,247 
l,512 r 


443 
335 
508 


448 
603 
616 


100 
153 
128 


2,510 
3,161 
2,669 


27 
26 
62 


3,568 r 
4,383 r 
4,119 r 


314 
322 
306 


o 

N 
D 


l,188 r 

1,241 

1,026 


370 
475 
400 


319 
328 
300 


1,877 
2,044 
1,725 


583 
589 
457 


755 
919 
785 


154 
153 
131 


2,804 
2,574 
1,249 


46 
69 
67 


4,635 
4,548 
2,908 


336 
334 
335 


1952 J 


1,190 


452 


335 


1,977 


559 


879 


145 


1,010 


52 


2,934 


342 



(1) As of April, 1949, Newfoundland data are included. (2) Annual computation to 1950 entails considerable 

adjustments in production and external trade as described on page 19 of the Coal Report for 1950. 
Source: Monthly Report, Coal and Coke Statistics, D.B.S. 



TABLE 22 



Petroleum and Gas 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



CRUDE PETROLEUM 



NATURAL GAS 



Sales 



Imports 



Producers' 
Shipments 



Shipments Total 



Domestic 



Industrial 

and 

commercial 



MANUFACTURED GAS 
Sales 



Total Domestic' 1 * Industrial 





Thousand barrels' 2 ' 








Million cu. ft. 








1939 
1951 


3,090 
6,940 


652 
4,010 


2,932 
6,540 


5,421 


2,370 


3,040 


1,245 
2,345 


1,421 


338 


1950 D 


6,917 


2,603 


7,800 


7,296 


3,517 


3,768 


2,625 


1,587 


366 


1951 J 
F 
M 


7,099 
5,153 
5,840 


2,996 
2,801 
2,494 


9,038 
7,773 
8,014 


7,894 
8,094 
7,602 


3,870 
4,179 
3,744 


4,011 
3,898 
3,844 


2,655 
2,594 
2,462 


1,716 
1,691 
1,579 


378 
347 
346 


A 
M 
J 


6,909 
7,420 
6,697 


2,449 
4,474 
4,757 


6,004 
5,089 
4,846 


5,893 
4,174 
3,289 


2,817 
1,783 
1,238 


3,066 
2,382 
2,047 


2,490 
2,404 
2,263 


1,520 
1,426 
1,323 


347 
338 
341 


J 
A 

S 


8,510 
7,836 
7,658 


4,936 
5,324 
4,925 


4,305 
4,682 
5,399 


2,774 
2,803 
3,378 


867 

744 

1,044 


1,904 
2,055 
2,331 


2,083 
1,956 
2,039 


1,164 
1,056 
1,145 


337 
332 
314 


o 

N 
D 


7,100 
6,544 
6,518 


4,882 
4,106 
3,980 


6,947 
7,437 
8,950 


4,877 
6,779 
7,500 


1,719 
3,029 
3,408 


3,152 
3,738 
4,046 


2,281 
2,288 
2,625 


1,358 
1,445 
1,626 


321 
325 
327 


1952 J 


6,579 



















(1) Includes gas used for house heating. (2) Barrels of 35 Imperial gallons. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Petroleum and Natural Gas Production; Imports entered for Consumption; Trade of Canada, 
D.B.S. 



27 



FUEL AND POWER 



TABLE 23 



Refined Petroleum Products 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



MARCH, 1952 



CRUDE PETROLEUM 



NET PRODUCTION OF SALEABLE PRODUCTS 
Fuels 



Motor Heavy Light 

Received Consumed Total Total gasoline fuel oils iuel oils 



DOMESTIC 
CONSUMPTION 

Fuels 

Motor 
Total gasoline 



Thousand barrels 



1940 
1951 


4,255 
10,860 


4,163 
10,603 


3,882 
9,961 


3,635 
9,198 


1,947 
4,423 


1,067 
2,134 


462 
1,808 


3,927 
10,512 


2,071 
4,576 


1950 N 
D 


10,346 
9,723 


9.871 
9,146 


8,967 
8,528 


8,440 
8,096 


4,165 
3,757 


1,873 
2,030 


1,586 
1,665 


10,056 
10,771 


3,956 
3,461 


1951 J 
F 
M 


8.353 
7,919 
7,771 


9,541 
8,301 
8,690 


8,671 
7,199 
8,145 


8,126 
6,721 
7,589 


3,659 
3,168 
3,560 


1,936 
1,443 
1,814 


1,568 
1,283 
1,355 


9,879 
9,388 
9,322 


3,016 
2,931 
3,161 


A 
M 
J 


9,740 
11,960 
12,165 


7,585 
11,624 
11,550 


6,956 
11,039 
11,207 


6,417 
10,239 
10,182 


3,009 
4,967 
5,028 


1,696 
2,315 
2,247 


1,208 
2,078 
2,039 


8,897 
11,126 
10,161 


3,853 
6,030 
5,316 


J 

A 

S 


13,482 
12,986 
12,657 


11,763 
12,599 
11,795 


11,277 
12,163 
10,677 


10,262 

11,012 

9,720 


5,122 
5,489 
4,753 


2,246 
2,459 
2,251 


2,195 
2,247 
1,837 


10,486 

11,078 

9,704 


5,831 
6,167 
5,063 


o 

N 
D 


12,504 

11,106 

9,685 


11,867 
11,282 
10,643 


11,552 
10,648 
10,005 


10,672 

10,026 

9,404 


5,215 
4,759 
4,343 


2,415 
2,464 
2,319 


2,229 
1,845 
1,807 


12,000 
12,410 
11,690 


5,623 
4,297 
3,621 



28 



DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION 



STOCKS AT END OF PERIOD 



At Refinery 



In Market Channels 



Fuels 



Refined Products 



Heavy 
fuel oils 



Light 
fuel oils 



Crude oil 



Unfinished 
products 



Total 



Motor 
gasoline 



Total 
fuel 



Motor 
gasoline 











Thousand barrels 








1940 
1951 


1,214 
2,669 


476 
2,194 


5,561 
8,154 


1,954 
3,521 


6,331 
15,252 


2,708 
5,130 


6,442 
14,214 


3,788 
5,900 


1950 N 
D 


2,680 
2,825 


2,275 
3,149 


4,593 
5,097 


3,274 
3,130 


12,547 
11,656 


3,751 
4,259 


13,067 
12,571 


5,453 
5,377 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2,486 
2,144 
2,330 


2,842 
2,989 
2,615 


3,908 
3,526 
2,607 


3,304 
3,725 
3,616 


12,615 
13,067 
14,327 


5,663 
6,815 
8,127 


11,398 
9,471 
7,757 


4,933 
4,088 
3,480 


A 
M 
J 


2,201 
2,642 
2,674 


2,005 
1,639 
1,517 


4,761 
5,097 
5,713 


3,736 
3,631 
3,435 


13,426 
13,530 
14,408 


7,300 
6,079 
5,808 


7,891 

9,086 

10,442 


4,015 
4,383 
4,631 


J 

A 

S 


2,894 
2,733 
2,437 


1,191 
1,521 
1,346 


7,431 
7,818 
8,681 


3,495 
3,328 
3,855 


15,329 
15,925 
16,312 


5,386 
4,573 
3,825 


11,818 
13,012 
14,361 


4,630 
5,088 
5,872 


o 

N 
D 


3,088 
3,528 
2,873 


2.057 
3,049 
3,560 


9,317 
9,142 
8,154 


3,613 
3,707 
3,521 


16,346 
15,233 
15,252 


3,753 
3,937 
5,130 


14,456 
14,990 
14,214 


5,770 
6,211 
5,900 



Source: Monthly Report on Refined Petroleum Products, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 24 



MINING 



Metals 

Monthly averages or calendar months 






COPPER 


NICKEL LEAD 


Production Exports Production Exports 
Total metal content Refined copper 


Production Exports Production* 1 ' Exports Production Exports 
Total metal content Refined lead 













Million pounds 










1939 
1951 


50.7 
44.9 


45.2 
25.3 


38.6 
41.0 


27.6 
17.0 


18.8 
22.8 


19.6 
21.9 


32.4 
26.3 


30.8 
20.9 


31.8 
27.1 


30.1 
17.6 


1950 D 


45.5 


26.6 


39.7 


17.5 


20.6 


17.8 


23 3 


35.6 


36.4 


25.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


45.6 
40.6 
48.6 


25.6 
20.4 
21.0 


41.8 
36.8 
41.2 


16.2 
13.2 
14.8 


21.8 
19.3 
23.2 


24.4 
15.8 
22.4 


32.2 
24.0 
25.3 


23.7 
13.9 
22.6 


30.3 
27.4 
29.9 


20.2 
13.1 
21.7 


A 
M 
J 


47.7 
47.0 
45.2 


35.9 
21.2 
24.0 


40.8 
45.6 
42.7 


24.7 
13.9 
16.2 


21.1 
24.9 
23.6 


23.3 
18.7 
17.8 


20.1 
22.3 
27.6 


17.9 
30.1 
12.3 


28.3 
28.9 
28.2 


17.1 
29.6 
11.5 


J 
A 

S 


45.0 
45.3 
43.5 


27.5 
18.8 
23.6 


40.4 
43.6 
37.3 


18.3 
13.0 
16. r 


23.5 
24.5 
23.2 


24.5 
22.5 
20.7 


22.0 
27.6 
23.8 


18.5 
16.4 
20.8 


12.9 
29.7 
28.0 


11.6 

9.8 

13.9 


o 

N 
D 


41.8 
44.2 
44.1 


21.4 
24.9 
39.5 


42.6 
38.5 
40.8 


13.9 
16.8 
26.7 


23.4 
23.0 
22.6 


24.8 
23.3 
24.3 


30.1 
29.6 
31.1 


18.1 
26.7 
29.8 


27.1 
26.8 
28.0 


17.3 
25.9 
19.9 


1952 J 


45.0 


24.8 


40.7 


18.5 


23.5 


20.1 


29.7 


21.5 


26.9 


16.3 



ZINC 



ALUMI- 
NUM 



IRON ORE 



GOLD 



SILVER 



Production Exports Production Exports Imports of Producers' Production Mint Production Exports 

Bauxite Shipments Receipts 

Refined zinc Ore 



Total metal content 







Million pounds 






Thousand 
short tons 




Thousand fine ounce! 


i 


1939 
1951 


32.9 

54.7 


29.4 
50.1 


29.3 
36.5 


26.0 
24.4 


85.1 
401.4 


10.3 
388.2 


425 
364 


404 
331 


1,930 
1,892 


1,753 
1,483 


1950 D 


54.3 


39.8 


36.4 


23.9 


135.2 


175.1 


382 


365 


1,936 


1,200 


1951 J 
F 
M 


51.4 
50.4 
52.0 


56.5 
21.2 
38.8 


36.5 
33.4 
36.3 


26.6 

9.2 

24.4 


80.3 
48.8 
41.6 


44.4 
31.3 
36.5 


374 
347 
372 


363 
342 
322 


2,015 
1,589 
1,755 


1,398 
1,316 
2,142 


A 
M 
J 


51.2 
51.7 
54.2 


37.5 
44.6 
55.3 


35.0 
36.2 
36.4 


22.0 
27.6 
28.7 


120.4 
377.0 
454.2 


158.1 
521.8 
649.7 


363 
369 
363 


419 
376 
364 


1,468 
1,854 
2,405 


964 
1,474 
1,377 


J 

A 

S 


55.4 
60.3 
56. 2 r 


72.5 
50.6 
58.1 


36.5 
36.7 
35.9 


27.2 
23.3 
20.9 


582.3 
750.9 
707.5 


715.4 

691.0' 

594.3 


344 
345 
359 


324 
357 
313 


1,794 
2,006 
1,896 


1,518 
1,777 
1,538 


O 

N 
D 


57. 8 r 
57. 7 r 
58.3 


56.2 
63.6 
46.5 


37.6 
37.4 
40.5 


32.7 
24.7 
25.0 


880.7 
622.0 
151.3 


612.6 
347.7 
255.9 


378 
372 
376 


314 
245 
234 


1,983 
1,977 
1,968 


889 
1,709 
1,692 


1952 J 


59.5 


53.1 


38.6 


18.4 


63.4 


163.9 




265 




1,637 



Note: Iron ore shipments and silver and gold production include Newfoundland as of April and as of May, 1949 
respectively. "'Includes Newfoundland as of May, 1949. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Silver, Lead and Zinc; Gold; Copper and Nickel; Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



29 



MINING 



IABLE 25 



MARCH, 1952 



Non Metallic Minerals: Production, Shipments and Exports 
Monthly averages or calendar months 





ASBESTOS 


GYPSUM 


FELDSPAR 


CEMENT 


LIME 


SALT 




Producers' 
Shipments 


Exports 


Producers' 
Shipments 


Producers' 
Shipments 


Exports 


Production 


Producers' 
Shipments 




Commer- 
cial 


For Use in 
Chemicals 


















Producers' shipments 








Thousand tons 




Thousand barrels 




Thousand tons 


1939 
1951 


30.4 
81 


28.8 
78 5 


118 

301 


10 
3 1 


0.6 

17 


477 
1,427 


478 
1,405 


46 
103 1 


19.7 
39.0 


15.7 
41.9 


1950 D 


76 .2 


73.5 


213 


3.4 


1.5 


1,352 


791 


99.5 


32.4 


44 8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


74.1 
71.5 
94 9 


77.5 
53.5 
99.8 


193 
178 
178 


2.6 
2.9 
2.5 


1.4 
1.4 
1.1 


1,262 
1,241 
1,409 


887 

908 

1,380 


98 .0 

91.1 

103.6 


33.6 
32.2 
28.2 


44.1 
42.3 
47 


A 
M 

J 


86.8 
93 2 
83 


89.0 
83.2 
77.9 


222 
264 
342 


1.6 
3.1 
5.5 


0.1 

1.7 

2.6 


1,492 
1,525 
1,429 


1,533 
1,880 
1,681 


103.8 
110.5 
103.7 


32.2 

37.1 
40.7 


39.4 
43.2 
40.1 


J 

A 

S 


71.0 
80.4 

82.5 


73.5 
81.1 
80.2 


449 
465 
452 


3.0 

4.4 
3.6 


2.4 

2.8 
2.2 


1,538 
1,513 
1,479 


1.589 
1,754 
1,542 


102.6 
108.8 

100.8 


46.6 

43.1 
39.9 


42.3 

40 8 
40.5 


O 
N 
D 


82 5 
85 6 
66.1 


81.8 
65.6 
79.2 


422 
289 
163 


4.0 
2.3 
2.2 


2.7 
0.8 

0.8 


1,527 
1,441 
1,272 


1,649 

1,277 

776 


114.8 

105.0 

94.3 


46.6 
54.7 
33.2 


40.8 

40.7 
41 2 


1952 J 


76.3 


71.4 


136 


1.3 


0.4 


1,353 


851 




40.1 


43.0 



Source: Monthly Reports: Production of Canada's Leading Minerals, Cement; Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 

MANUFACTURING 

Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and Shipments 

TABLE 26 Monthly averages or calendar months 

OUTSTANDING BINDING ORDERS 1 "— SELECTED INDUSTRY GROUPS 



Flour 
Milling 



Rubber 
Goods 



Textile Clothing 
Industries Industries 







Motor 




Non- 






Vehicle 




Ferrous 


Primary Machinery 


Other 


Parts and 


Railway 


Smelting 


Iron and and Tools 


Iron and 


Acces- 


Rolling 


and 


Steel Industries 


Steel 


sories 


Stock 


Refining 



Electrical 
Apparatus 













January, 1951 = 


100 










1950 
1951 


47.2 
89.9 


94.3 
108.3 


70.3 
81.9 


63.0 
75.7 


54.9 
104.3 


69.5 
139.1 


65.6 
119.1 


67.8 
85.7 


44.1 
120.8 


55.8 


74.7 
124 4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


100.0 
167.3 
128.5 


100.0 
100.7 
117.0 


100.0 

105.9 

97.5 


100.0 
96.7 
93.4 


100.0 

96.1 
95.3 


100.0 
112.5 
123.4 


100.0 
108.8 
107.7 


100.0 

100 9 

99.3 


100.0 
118.6 
124 4 


100.0 
99.8 
98.0 


100.0 

92.6 

109.3 


A 
M 

J 


111.0 
82.6 
46.6 


113.3 
113.3 
120 


99 3 
94.0 
84.0 


84.1 
87.6 
98.4 


103.3 

102.1 
102.9 


131.6 
135.3 
135.8 


119.2 
113.2 
117.5 


92 5 
89.9 
84 8 


117 7 
109.1 
124.5 


90.9 
84.8 
76.0 


112.0 
116.4 
125.7 


J 

A 

S 


43.8 
58 
64 1 


108.9 
100.7 
137.8 


77.3 
66.4 
61.8 


81.6 

73.1 
54.7 


102.4 
100.3 
106 5 


150.0 
140.5 
151.1 


114.5 
128.4 
126.8 


77 3 
74.6 
74 .7 


125 5 
127.0 
139 3 


73 8 
64.4 
65.9 


128.7 
133.7 
135.1 


O 

N 
D 


101.1 
85.9' 
89.5 


119.3 
80.0 
89.0 


62.5 

61.6' 

71.9 


45.6 
47 1 
46.2 


115.9 
111.3 
115.9 


156.5 

163.8' 

168.9 


141.4 

141.6' 

110.5 


76.0 

79.8' 
78.2 


137.3 

128.6 

97.3 


176.5 
172.8 


137.5 

140.4' 

161.6 



30 'Indexes of value of total outstanding binding orders (those for which acceptance when shipped is obligatory under normal 

circumstances) at the end of each month, as reported by co-operating firms and based on the values of the same firms in January, 
1951. 

Source: Monthly Report on Inventories and Shipments by Manufacturing Industries, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 MANUFACTURING 

Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and Shipments 

TABLE 26 — continued Monthly averages or calendar months 











INVENTORIES* 1 ' 


AND SHIPMENTS 










Inventories All Industries by Components 


Inventories and Shipments 


by Economic Use Groupings 




Total 


Raw 
Materials 


Goods in 
Process 


Finished 
Products 


All Industries 




Consumers' Goods 






Total 


Non-durable 




Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 






Million dollars 








1947 average = 100 






1949 
1951 


2,498.2 
3,577.6 


l,855'o 


626.6 


1,096.0 


134.3 
192.2 


125.1 
172.3 


140.4 

191.9 


123.0 
162.3 


156.5 
192.0 


125.4 
167.9 


1950 D 


2,772.4 


1,504.7 


459.3 


805.5 


149.7 


153.5 


159.3 


148.9 


168.6 


148.9 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2,806.6 
2,878.6 
2,956.3 


1,504.5 
1,533.2 
1,552.6 


484.8 
515.0 
540.6 


817.3 
830.4 
863.1 


150.8 
154.7 
158.9 


160.9 
160.1 
175.0 


160.9 

164.5 
168.7 


159.1 
158.1 
169.5 


164.1 
165.3 
167.1 


157.5 
149.6 
155.5 


A 
M 
J 


3,039.8 
3,122.1 
3,294.2 


1,586.9 
1,608.5 
1,690.0 


553.6 
562.9 
588.3 


899.3 

950.7 

1,015.9 


163.3 
167.8 
177.0 


171.4 
186.5 
183.6 


173.9 
177.1 
185.1 


166.4 
174.3 
169.2 


169.2 
168.9 
175.7 


158 2 
177.4 
178.4 


J 
A 

S 


3,389.6 
3,443.8 
3,506.1 


1,770.0 
1,809.2 
1,827.1 


594.5 
627.0 
644.9 


1,025.1 
1,007.6 
1,034.1 


182.1 
185.0 
188.4 


173.1 
174.6 
165.2 


188.5 
189.0 
191.6 


154.4 
159.0 
151.8 


179.5 
179.5 
186.1 


173.0 
172.9 
157.3 


o 

N 
D 


3,561.9 
3,521.5 
3,577.6 


1,854.4 
1,820.9 
1,855.0 


633.5 
643.2 
626.6 


1,074.0 
1,056.3 
1,096.0 


191.4 
189.1 
192.2 


183.9 
175.6 
157.5 


194.2 
190.9 
191.9 


173.8 
165.8 
146.6 


194.7 
191.7 
192.0 


188.4 
186.7 
160.1 


1952 J 










192.6 


166.8 


193.1 


158.3 


194.9 


168.1 










INVENTORIES") 


AND SHIPMENTS 
















Inventories and Shipments 


by Economic Use Groupings 










Consumers' Goods 




Capital Goods 


Producers' Goods 


Constructs 






Semi-durable 


Durable 


an Goods 




Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 












1947 average = 100 










1949 
1951 


122.4 

185.6 


114.3 
137.9 


118.3 
201.9 


128.2 
181.9 


106.2 

176.2 


151.2 
198.7 


130.5 

192.3 


125.0 
174.0 


152.9 

220.4 


117.0 
222.0 


1950 D 


146.9 


134.3 


150.6 


174.8 


113.5 


165.9 


141.7 


163.1 


166.2 


153.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


155.5 
161.9 
168.3 


144.8 
154.5 
167.7 


160.0 
166.6 
175.4 


191.1 
200.8 
232.3 


114.8 
118.9 
125.9 


158.7 
162.8 
190.6 


141.4 
141.1 
141.8 


164.2 
154.9 
175.3 


166.0 
183.7 

191.0 


169.0 
186.8 
202.3 


A 
M 

J 


197.2 
184.2 
195.5 


157.0 
142.7 
135.0 


184.9 
193.2 
198.9 


218.0 
217.2 
190.3 


129.6 

132.9 
139.3 


194.4 
221.3 
197.3 


147.9 
154.6 
165.2 


173.7 
185.0 
181.5 


185.6 

197.5 
220.8 


183.0 
252.5 
291.9 


J 

A 

S 


197.4 
196.6 
193.8 


104.8 
139.5 
133.9 


204.2 
209.2 
207.9 


162.7 
134.4 
160.1 


146.1 
150.0 
158.1 


200.9 
199.1 
188.9 


174.0 
180.4 
187.2 


162.2 
174.7 
170.5 


227.7 
241.1 
230.5 


324.1 
275.7 
235.7 


O 

N 
D 


188.0 
183.7 
185.6 


139.1 
130.3 
105.2 


204.9 
203.3 
201.9 


173.3 
140.2 
162.3 


165.4 
168.5 
176.2 


218.3 
225.1 
227.4 


194.4 
193.1 
192.3 


188.9 
185.9 
171.1 


216.2 
209.5 
220.4 


218.9 
179.9 
144.1 


1952 J 


183.6 


130.6 


206.3 


165.9 


180.2 


231.4 


194.3 


183.2 


210.9 


131.1 



Note: This series has been revised from December, 1950 to allow for final figures, and for re-weighting, from the 1950 year-end 
survey. 

'"As at end of period. 



31 



MANUFACTURING MARCH, 1952 

Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and Shipments 

TABLE 26 concluded Monthly averages or calendar months 



INVENTORIES ' AND SHIPMENTS 


Inventories and Shipments tor Selected Industry Groups 


Foods 


Rubber Pulp and 
goods Textiles Clothing Paper Mills 


Iron and 
Steel 12 ' 


Invt. Ship. 


Invt. Ship. Invt. Ship. Invt. Ship. Invt. Ship. 


Invt. Ship. 













1947 average 


= 100 












1949 
1951 


146.5 
171 .7 


127.6 
154.6 


116.4 
221.1 


97.1 

164.8 


132.3 
215.3 


119 8 
151.8 


118.5 
159.4 


119.1 
122.7 


210.1 
186.9 


98.7 
112.6 


136.3 
142.6 


128.0 
138.8 


1950 D 


165 1 


137 5 


155.8 


143.7 


164 


170.1 


133 7 


109.7 


186.9 


123.4 


142.6 


169.7 


1951 J 
F 

M 


156 .1 
148.1 
150.9 


150.1 
137.7 
144.4 


163.5 
172.2 
186.2 


182.7 
169.6 
179.5 


172 .1 
175.7 
180 


173.7 
180.7 
189.9 


143.0 
151.1 
156.8 


113.7 
133.8 
154.7 


178.4 
181.3 
186.5 


129.2 
124.3 
140.0 


140.0 
141.1 
141.5 


168.4 
157.1 

174.3 


A 
M 

J 


151.2 
157.0 
157.4 


150.4 
164.3 
171.7 


191.5 
209.1 
221.6 


193.3 
168.1 
154.0 


195.2 

193.7 
216.9 


170.0 
163.2 
150.9 


162.8 
169.0 
176.2 


143.0 
121.2 
122.8 


184.4 
191.1 
203.6 


140.6 
153.2 
149.5 


148.6 
157.6 
168.5 


170.7 
183.2 
187.7 


J 

A 

S 


162.4 
157 1 
170 7 


158.6 
149.5 
149.0 


221.4 
223.6 
216.8 


137.1 
136.6 
160.7 


218.6 
220.2 
220.3 


118.5 
147.4 
132.9 


179.8 
177.3 
172.1 


84.4 
127.0 
135.8 


218.1 
229.6 
244.8 


151.0 
165.6 
144.6 


179.1 
182.4 
184.7 


166.7 
178.4 
180.1 


O 

N 
D 


187.4 
170.4 
171.7 


170.0 
175.0 
134.0 


210.3 
204.9 
221.1 


190.8 
165.0 
140.1 


214.9 

213.3 
215.3 


131.8 
137.7 
124.7 


165.1 
157.9 
159.4 


134.1 

118.7 

83.5 


253.4 
252.1 
257.9 


166.7 
167.8 
154.3 


194.8 
190.2 
194.6 


193.4 
187.5 
164.3 


1952 J 


171.1 


149.7 


212.1 


150.5 


219.0 


152.2 


151.7 


110.9 


264.7 


153.6 


190.4 


200.7 



Machinery 



Motor 
Vehicles 



Other 

Transportation 
Equipment ' 



Non-ferrous 
Metals 



Electrical 
Apparatus ' 



Petroleum 
Products 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Invt. 



Ship. 













1947 


average 


= 100 












1949 
1951 


110.6 

205.4 


131.2 
183.8 


126.5 
218.3 


124.1 
198.6 


86.2 
135.4 


185.7 
241.0 


133.5 
199.2 


128.5 
183.5 


100.2 
213.4 


127.4 
179.4 


237.6 
348.1 


151.4 
300.6 


1950 D 


129.2 


176.0 


161.9 


165.0 


74.0 


173.6 


147.8 


170.5 


135.9 


178.3 


285.8 


253.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


142.3 

148.8 
157.4 


168.9 
165.4 
188.0 


170.7 
174.9 
177.9 


202.4 
229.4 
268.9 


71.2 

73.7 
82.4 


138.4 
161.3 
195.0 


156.4 
157.8 
157.2 


165.0 
154.8 
190.5 


137.5 
142.6 
155.2 


190.6 
180.1 
200.8 


272.0 
269.2 
269.3 


269.6 
256.6 
235.5 


A 
M 

J 


161.6 

164.9 

174.4 


198.6 
193.9 
183.7 


190.6 
190.0 
196.2 


243.7 
252.9 
213.0 


84.7 
87 2 
92.4 


186.4 
270.0 
207.7 


158.8 
168.9 
174.2 


178.7 
188.1 
188.1 


161.4 
169.1 
183.6 


209.6 
195.9 
186.1 


277.8 
287.1 
307.6 


241.5 
326.4 
304.2 


J 

A 

S 


177 .6 
187.2 

194.2 


169.9 

158.4 
178 9 


202.1 
206.4 
206.9 


176.2 
135.1 
168.6 


106 3 
106.4 
116.5 


266.7 
278.6 
234.5 


187.4 
191.7 
203.5 


169.4 
189.1 
169.6 


188.7 
199.2 
201.0 


140.6 
155.6 
171.5 


324.3 

337.7 
356.2 


312.5 
323.4 
365.3 


O 
N 
D 


195 4 
205.3 
205.4 


225 8 
191.7 
182 5 


203 1 
208.0 
218.3 


181.9 
118.3 
192 2 


126.7 
130.1 
135.4 


273.1 
299.3 
381.4 


204.7 
202.0 
199.2 


203.4 
209.8 
195.7 


201.1 
200.3 
213.4 


194.4 
174.5 
153.2 


360.9 
352.9 
348.1 


338.8 
330.0 
303.2 


1952 J 


210.3 


171 .5 


208.1 


188.7 


146.7 


369.3 


207.2 


185.7 


213.1 


153 5 


344.6 


297.5 



32 As at end of period. : Includes primary iron and steel, iron castings, sheet metal products and wire and wire products. 

Includes heavy electrical machinery, office, household and store machinery and industrial machinery. (< Includes ship- 

building, railway rolling stock and aircraft. Excludes heavy electrical machinery. 

Source: Monthly Report of Inventories and Shipments by Manufacturing Industries, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 27 



MANUFACTURING 



Tobacco and Beverages 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



TOBACCO 



BEVERAGES 



Releases foi Consumption in Canada'" 



Stocks' 2 ' 



Production 



Cut Plug Unmanu- 

tobacco tobacco Snuff Cigarettes Cigars factured Beer (3) 



New Spirits 
spirits bottled 14 ' 



Stocks' 2 ' 

Distilled 
liquor 





Thousand pounds 




Millions 


Million 
pounds 


Thousand 
barrels 


Million proof gallons 


1939 
1951 


1,977 
2,275 


267 
168 


70 
72 


594 
1,306 


11.1 
14.1 


75,5 
164.9 


209.3 
624.5 


0.96 
2.09 


0.26 
0.96 


85.92 


1950 D 


2,061 


163 


74 


1,244 


17.7 


154.5 


487.9 


2.30 


0.89 


79.66 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2,326 
2,154 
2,362 


190 
163 
188 


89 
78 
85 


1,518 
1,477 
1,578 


17.7 
14.9 
15.9 


193*4 


456.1 
459.6 
603.2 


2.40 
2.42 
2.31 


0.83 
0.90 
1.21 


80.59 
81.60 
81.88 


A 
M 

J 


1,804 
2,733 
2,566 


130 
205 
196 


79 

109 

90 


1,429 
1,487 
1,357 


17.0 
17.8 
13.7 


176.0 


681.9 
727.2 
714.0 


2.12 
2.19 
1.75 


0.94 
0.73 
0.69 


82.64 
83.69 
84.12 


J 
A 

S 


1,857 
2,242 
1,681 


141 
130 
123 


34 

46 

1 


1,013 
932 

754 


9.4 
8.5 
6.3 


156 '8 


781.2 
782.8 
590.0 


1.40 
1.81 
1.78 


0.67 
1.02 
0.99 


84.31 
84.59 
84.65 


o 

N 
D 


2,763 
2,682 
2,125 


205 
205 
134 


99 
81 
78 


1,835 

1,381 

906 


16.4 
16.9 
14.7 


164.9 


593.6 
564.8 
539.4 


2.43 
2.40 
2.07 


1.34 
1.28 
0.92 


84.97 
85.24 
85.92 


1952 J 


2,620 


142 


89 


1,316 


13.8 




478.6 


2.29 


0.91 


86.60 



(1) Releases of domestically manufactured tobacco for consumption in Canada. (2 'End of period. (3 'The 

production of beer is shown in thousand barrels of 25 gallons each. Commencing with April, 1949, Newfoundland 

is included. (4) Includes bottling of imported liquors. 

Source: Department of National Revenue: and Quarterly Report, Stocks and Consumption of Unmanufactured 
Tobacco, D.B.S. 



TABLE 28 



Rubber 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRO- 
IMPORTS DUCTION 



CONSUMPTION 



CONSUMPTION OF NATURAL 
AND SYNTHETIC 



STOCKS 



Natural^' Synthetic Natural Synthetic Reclaim Total 



Wire End of Period 

Tires and Foot- and 

Tubes wear Cable Natural Synthetic 



Million pounds 



1939 
1951 


6.07 
8.96 


11*63 


5.90 
8.28 


4*93 


1.40 
2.95 


13 '22 


8*94 


1.47 


0.41 


9.90 


11.39 


1950 D 


10.21 


11.74 


10.09 


4.86 


3.09 


14.96 


10.16 


1.48 


0.38 


7.66 


6.75 


1951 J 
F 
M 


16.37 

9.16 

13.20 


11.85 
10.59 
11.82 


9.68 

9.72 

10.36 


4.99 
4.98 
5.07 


3.28 
3.33 
3.60 


14.67 
14.70 
15.43 


9.81 

9.86 

10.25 


1.71 
1.68 
1.83 


0.45 
0.38 
0.40 


9.23 

9.30 

11.18 


7.09 
5.99 
6.74 


A 
M 
J 


8.54 

11.21 

8.88 


10.38 

8.46 

10.09 


10.68 

10.17 

7.47 


5.42 
4.80 
4.10 


3.74 
3.67 
2.78 


16.10 
14.96 
11.56 


10.67 

10.11 

7.37 


1.93 
1.75 
1.45 


0.41 
0.42 
0.43 


10.95 
10.26 
12.26 


6.87 
6.83 
7.36 


J 

A 

S 


8.02 

10.29 

4.58 


12.17 
11.28 
12.47 


7.36 
6.34 
7.12 


4.17 
4.35 
5.11 


2.59 
2.45 
2.48 


11.53 
10.70 
12.23 


8.16 
6.40 
8.22 


1.01 
1.70 
1.36 


0.22 
0.46 
0.44 


12.05 
14.56 
14.53 


8.23 
8.15 
9.88 


O 

N 
D 


6.10 
4.69 
6.50 


13.52 
13.16 
13.75 


7.31 
6.61 
6.58 


5.31 
5.35 
5.57 


2.83 
2.41 
2.29 


12.62 
11.95 
12.16 


8.76 
8.59 
9.08 


1.40 
1.03 
0.80 


0.44 
0.48 
0.37 


12.36 
8.26 
9.90 


10.27 

9.86 

11.39 


1952 J 


9.15 


15.25 


6.58 


5.66 


2.52 


12.24 


8.66 


1.17 


0.47 


11.04 


12.41 






("Includes crude rubber, Gutta-percha unmanufactured, Latex and Balata crude. 
Source: Monthly Report on Consumption, Production and Inventories of Rubber, D.B.S. 



33 



MANUFACTURING 



TABLE 29 



Leather 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



MARCH, 1952 



HIDES AND SKINS 



Stocks: End ol Period 



Wettings 



Cattle 

hides 



Call and 
kip skins 



Goat and 
kid skins 



Sheep and 
lamb skins 



Cattle 
hides 



Call and 
kip skins 



Goat and 
kid skins 



Sheep and 
lamb skins 



PRODUCTION OF FINISHED LEATHER 



Horse 
hides 











Thousand 








Thousand 








Thousands 




dozen 




Thousands 




dozen 


Thousands 


1940 


627 


591 


87 


69 


146 


111 


25 


13 


4.7 


1951 


342 


653 


118 


62 


125 


52 


12 


11 


0.1 


1950 O 


337 


531 


36 


48 


161 


110 


12 


16 


0.1 


N 


357 


512 


81 


53 


176 


102 


25 


16 


0.1 


D 


368 


467 


64 


52 


179 


76 


24 


11 


0.2 


1951 J 


345 


432 


44 


47 


185 


92 


25 


16 


0.1 


F 


311 


417 


57 


39 


171 


80 


11 


16 


0.2 


M 


286 


408 


56 


39 


162 


67 


25 


17 


0.1 


A 


294 


441 


40 


37 


152 


67 


31 


16 


2 


M 


312 


479 


80 


38 


139 


72 


22 


11 


0.1 


J 


347 


596 


101 


42 


108 


42 


11 


8 


0.2 


J 


352 


626 


128 


48 


85 


20 


— 


7 


0.1 


A 


337 


676 


128 


47 


113 


22 


2 


9 


— 


S 


335 


687 


139 


55 


96 


25 


1 


10 


— 


o 


313 


689 


122 


64 


103 


57 


17 


10 


0.1 


N 


325 


650 


121 


56 


101 


41 


2 


10 


0.1 


D 


342 


653 


118 


62 


84 


46 


2 


5 


— 



Cattle Leather 



Glove and 
Sole Upper garment 

leather leather leather 



Bag, case 

and strap 

leather 



Harness 
leather 



Call and 
Kip Skin 



Upper 
leather 



Goat and 

Kid 
Leather 



Sheep and Lamb 
Leather 



Glove and 
garment 
leather 



Shoe 
leather 



Horse 
Hide 

Glove and 
garment 
leather 





Thousand 
pounds 


Thousand 


square ieet 


Thousand sides 


Thousand 
square leet 


Thousand 
skins 


Dozer 


skins 


Thousand 
square feet 


1940 
1951 


2,056 
1,232 


2,911 


288 


12 


5 


621 


20 


4.517 


2,937 


323 


1950 O 
N 
D 


1,427 
1,443 
1.938 


3,955 
4,207 
3,872 


516 
488 
434 


14 
13 
11 


4 
7 
5 


1,051 
1.038 
1,104 


14 
16 
14 


6.211 
6.966 
6,279 


3,877 
4,504 
3,469 


207 
211 
186 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1.607 
1.589 
1.596 


4,395 
3.743 
3,781 


435 
338 
361 


15 
15 
18 


8 
6 
5 


1,123 
983 
817 


38 
31 
35 


6.825 
5.643 
7,367 


4,279 
4,190 
4,696 


226 
281 
387 


A 
M 

J 


1,469 
1.451 
1,268 


3,173 
2.941 
2,361 


327 
179 
237 


18 

15 

9 


4 
4 
3 


812 
781 
679 


28 
23 
19 


5.937 
4,293 
3,198 


4,475 
2,990 
2.013 


457 
465 
324 


J 

A 

S 


819 
996 
906 


1,712 
2.393 
2,017 


195 
264 
209 


4 

5 

12 


2 
5 
7 


179 
388 
245 


5 
14 
13 


3,476 
3.551 
3,877 


1.078 
1,981 
1,993 


180 
265 
273 


O 
N 

D 


995 

1.305 

784 


2.911 
2,902 
2.598 


325 
311 
270 


13 

12 

9 


7 
8 
5 


422 
554 
472 


8 

12 

9 


3.099 
4,519 
2,413 


3,047 
2,688 
1.809 


279 
355 
388 



34 



Source: Statistics of Hides, Skins and Leather, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 29 - concluded 



MANUFACTURING 



Leather 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION OF BOOTS AND SHOES 



Men's 



Women's 



Boys' and 
Youths' 



Misses' and Babies' and 
Children's Infants' 



Total 
All Kinds 



Leather or 
Fabric 
Uppers 



AllOther 



Thousand pair 



1939 
1951 


623 
663 


978 
1,295 


104 
119 


268 
443 


93 
224 


2,067 
2,743 


1,779 
2,275 


289 
468 


1950 N 
D 


791 
634 


1,448 
1,165 


136 
133 


560 
391 


291 
214 


3,227 
2,538 


2,364 
2,054 


862 
484 


1951 J 
F 
M 


646 
702 
798 


1,392 
1,455 
1,671 


110 
135 
163 


450 
441 
517 


213 
233 
263 


2,812 
2,967 
3,412 


2,509 
2,677 
2,977 


303 
290 
435 


A 
M 

J 


791 
793 
584 


1,589 
1,556 
1,234 


146 
130 
110 


516 
468 
444 


245 
231 
219 


3,287 
3,179 
2,590 


2,885 
2,714 
2,143 


402 
465 
448 


J 
A 

S 


451 
667 
587 


894 
1,404 
1,255 


91 
125 
106 


303 
456 
424 


163 
243 
214 


1,902 

2,895 
2,586 


1,467 
2,318 
1,995 


435 
577 
591 


o 

N 
D 


702 
689 
540 


1,189 

1,086 

819 


117 

111 

80 


458 
499 
336 


260 
251 
153 


2,726 
2,637 
1,928 


2,094 
1,948 
1,580 


632 
689 
349 



Note: As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 
Source: Production of Leather Footwear, D.B.S. 



TABLE 30 



Primary Textiles: Cotton, Wool and Rayon 
Monthly averages or calendar months'" 



Raw Cotton (1 > 



Broad Woven Woollen and 

Cotton Cotton Worsted Worsted Broad Woven 

Yarn Fabric Yarn Fabrics Rayon Fabric 



Imports 



Bale Openings 



Production 



Shipments Production 





Thousand 
pounds 


Number of 
bales' 2 ' 


Thousand 
pounds' 3 ' 


Thousand 
pounds 


Thousand 
yards 


Thousand 
pounds 


Thousand yards 


1940 
1951 


18,052 
17,121 


37,930 
36,898 


18,950 
18,368 


16,412 
17,158 


25,774 
25,828 


1,306 
1,241 


2,199 
1,758 


4,821 
9,592 


1950 D 


26,413 


39,665 


19,693 






1,393 






1951 J 
F 
M 


23,255 
14,704 
25,753 


39,838 
41,441 
45,473 


19,833 1 
20,447 
22,653 J 


19,646 


29,574 


f 1,578 ] 

1,487 
I 1,492 j 


2,099 


10,599 


A 
M 
J 


23,103 
25,250 
14,140 


44,518 
44,498 
41,257 


22,182 1 
22,208 
20,568 J 


20,192 


30,397 


( 1,469 I 

1,350 
[ 1,277 ] 


1,831 


10,769 


J 

A 

S 


6,490 
7,824 
9,747 


28,106 
27,882 
33,384 


13,995 1 
13,873 
16,613 J 


13,853 


20,854 


[ 907 1 

1,111 
I 1,127 J 


• 1,423 


8,156 


O 

N 
D 


12,607 
25,101 
17,483 


35,642 
33,708 
27,029 


17,783 ] 
16,796 
13,461 J 


14,939 


22,488 


f 1,108 ) 
1,019 

I 970 J 


1,679 


8,844 


1952 J 




31 ,067 


15,477 













(1) Monthly data include estimate for non-reporting companies. (2) Bales of 500 pounds gross weight, 
weight. < 4 > Quarterly data for the last five columns are monthly averages. 



w Invoice 



35 



MANUFACTURING 



TABLE 31 



MARCH, 1952 



Production of Factory Clothing 

Quarterly averages or quarters 



WOMEN'S AND MISSES' 



Coats 



Suits 



Dresses 



Skirts 



Wool and Rayon and Cotton, 

wool rayon linen and 

mixtures mixtures other 



Wool and Rayon and 

wool rayon 

mixtures mixtures 



Thousands 



Blouses Slips 

and 

Cotton Rayon and Petti- 
rayon coats u 
mixtures 

Thousand dozen 



1950 


408.0 


217.1 


90.2 


1,815.0 


1,410.3 


209.0 


228.2 


26.6 


96.9 


170.8 


1950 






















2nd qtr. 


359.1 


197.1 


22.0 


1.844 


1,884.1 


90 3 


132.4 


41.6 


67.8 


172 8 


3rd qtr. 


437.4 


160.7 


218.0 


1.640.7 


885.7 


278.4 


178.9 


16.6 


112.8 


145.5 


4th qtr. 


284.0 


105.1 


99.6 


1,727.8 


1,083.1 


209.8 


210.9 


15.1 


96.1 


185.8 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


527.6 


389 6 


23.3 


2,049.7 


1,523.2 


212.1 


365.7 


35.2 


117.0 


196.1 


2nd qtr. 


292.1 


163.8 


17.8 


1,891.1 


1,682.0 


105.8 


175.4 


61.8 


61.6 


184.9 


3rd qtr. 


453.3 


169.1 


124.5 


1,517.1 


762.5 


186.4 


242 3 


27.7 


89.8 


133 7 



CHILDREN'S 



BOYS' 



Coats 



Suits 



Dresses, 

All 

Kinds 



Suits Overcoats Trousers 
and and 

Topcoats Slacks, 
Fine 



Overalls, 

Bib and 

Waist 



Shirts 



Dress, 

Fine, 

Cotton 



Sport, 
Fine 



Thousands 



Thousand dozen 



Work 



1950 

1950 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 

1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 



170.6 22.4 

126.9 14.0 

180.9 17.2 

165.2 24.2 



748.3 

715.4 
652.5 
709.4 



205.1 40.0 1,118.1 
129.0 16.7 927.2 
233.8 14.6 652.8 



70.8 15.9 

71.1 4.1 
56.7 21.7 
55.5 30.8 

89.0 10.0 

60.2 13.6 
33.4 22.0 



364.8 



19.1 



405 
382 



313.8 

455.4 
389.0 
369.0 



27 
13 
15 

24 
28 



16.0 



16.5 

20.3 
18.0 
11.6 

15.6 
15.8 
12.9 



8.9 

15.8 
2.7 
5.9 

10.6 
12.4 
13.2 



8.1 



MEN'S AND YOUTHS' 



Dress Clothing 



Work Clothing 



Suits 



Overcoats 

and 
topcoats 



Trousers 

and 

slacks, 

fine 



Shirts 



Overalls 



Dress or business, Sport, 

fine tine 

Cotton Other'" 



Bib and 
waist 



Combin- 
ation 



Work 
pants 



Work 
shirts 







Thousands 










Thousand dozen 








1950 


424.2 


175 8 


731.2 


158.7 






49.9 


61.4 


7.6 


67.8 


87.9 


1950 
























2nd qtr. 


476.8 


117.5 


810.2 


144.1 






90.1 


59 4 


6.5 


69.7 


82.7 


3rd qtr. 


335.9 


201.9 


611.3 


146.7 






27.5 


61.9 


6.3 


70.3 


82.3 


4th qtr. 


437.7 


239.1 


699.0 


169.5 






25.7 


67.0 


8.2 


70.8 


90.8 


1951 
























1st qtr. 


477.1 


195 .2 


814.9 


169.9 


13 


5 


87 .2 


86 .5 


10.4 


80.5 


97.8 


2nd qtr. 


456.9 


133.7 


770.1 


148.8 


11 


4 


89 4 


81.1 


12 5 


82.5 


96.2 


3rd qtr. 


320.6 


249.9 


528.6 


130 8 


9 


4 


49 5 


53.2 


8.2 


67.3 


91.3 



36 New series: preliminary, subject to revision. 
("Includes children's. (,) Includes boys'. 
Source: Quarterly Production of Factory Clothing (Selected Garments), D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 
TABLE 32 



MANUFACTURING 



Wood and Paper Products 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



SAWN LUMBER 


Canada 






East of Rocky Mountains 




British 




Total 


Prince 
Edward 
Island 


New 
Nova Bruns- 
Scotia wick Quebec Ontario 


Mani- 
toba 


Uulumbld 

Saskat- 
chewan Alberta 


Million feet, board measure 



331.4 
531.5 



141.7 
249.7 



398.6 123.5 



431.8 
479.3 
502.6 

400.2 
595.5 
813.3 

747.3 
696.3 
554.3 



151.0 
212.1 
235.4 

128.9 
282.2 
480.8 

454.7 
404.6 
295.0 



0.4 
1.1 

0.9 

0.4 
0.3 
1.1 

2.0 
1.5 
1.9 

1.1 

0.9 
1.5 



12.7 
25.1 

12.5 

17.3 
27.8 
27.2 

18.3 
38.2 
47.3 

42.3 
26.6 
21.8 



17.6 
22.8 



54.7 
90.3 



40.1 
75.6 



6.2 20.7 21.5 



10.1 
24.1 
40.6 



22 
24 
42. 

34. 
24. 
21.0 



37.9 
58.4 
59.3 

49.9 
114.7 
197.9 

190.1 
161.8 
102.4 



17.4 
14.8 
25.7 

24.1 

90.9 

166.9 

164.3 
169.4 
133.6 



5.1 
4.4 

0.5 

1.9 

2.3 
2.5 

2.9 

4.0 

12.0 

7.4 

10.5 

5.9 



3.2 

5.5 



8.0 
25.0 



189.7 
281.8 



4.9 56.3 275.1 



12.0 
10.2 
16.2 

5.0 
4.9 
1.9 

3.8 
2.0 
1.3 



54.1 280.8 

74.1 267.2 

62.8 267.2 

4.5 271.3 

3.5 313.3 

9.9 332.5 

10.9 292.6 
9.0 291.6 
7.7 259.3 



o 


479 


.3 


176 


7 


1.2 


15.4 


18.2 


66.4 


66 


6 


2.6 





7 


5 


6 


302 


6 


N 


360 


.4 


72 


3 


0.5 


11.6 


4.5 


22.8 


15 


3 


0.5 


3 


1 


13 


9 


288 


1 


D 


317 


7 


103 


2 


0.8 


7.4 


6.1 


22.2 


17 


6 


0.5 


5. 





43 


6 


214 


6 





WOOD PULP"' 








NEWSPRINT 








Production 


Exports 


Produc- 
tion 




Shipments 




Stocks 
End of 
Period 


Total 


Mechanical Chemical 


Total 


Domestic 


Export 



Thousand tons 



1939 
1951 


347.2 
760.1 


228.2 
427.0 


111.9 
322.0 


58.8 
186.9 


243.9 
459.7 


238.4 
458.6 


15.8 
29.9 


222.6 
428.6 


169.5 
101.9 


1950 D 


698.2 


404.0 


284.4 


172.2 


430.6 


448.8 


32.3 


416.5 


89.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


738. 2 r 
697.4 
773.0 


422.7 
394.6 
438.3 


304. 9 r 
292.7 
323.4 


175.6 
149.6 
185.4 


453.0 
425.1 
473.0 


423.3 
400.8 
473.5 


28.4 
28.1 
32.0 


394.9 
372.7 
441.5 


118.8 
143.1 
142.5 


A 

M 

J 


740.4 
805.1 
773.3 


412.9 
455.7 
436.5 


316.1 
337.4 
325.3 


176.1 
188.6 
191.2 


447.6 

485.7 
464.3 


443.3 
486.3 
475.0 


27.7 
32.4 
29.2 


415.6 
453.9 
445.8 


146.8 
146.2 
135.5 


J 

A 

S 


746.6 
803.1 
716.4 


424.0 
449.3 
401.3 


311.1 
341.9 
304.5 


201.6 
211.0 
186.1 


452.5 
484.6 
431.1 


443.0 
480.6 
427.7 


29.1 
29.9 
28.5 


413.9 

450.7 
399.3 


145.0 
149.0 
152.3 


o 

N 
D 


809.4 
779.5 
719.4 


452.8 
435.9 
400.2 


344.7 
333.0 
309.7 


202.6 
187.6 
187.8 


492.5 
471.7 
435.3 


497.4 
491.0 
461.5 


33.0 
30.6 
30.9 


464.4 
460.4 
430.5 


147.4 
128.1 
101.9 


1952 J 


770.1 


431.6 


328.5 


196.3 


470.5 


445.2 


28.8 


416.4 


127.2 



Note: Newfoundland is included as of April, 1949, in data for wood pulp and newsprint. 

(1) Total pulp production covers "screenings" which are already included in exports. "Screenings" are excluded 
throughout from mechanical and chemical pulp. 

Source: Production, Shipments and Stocks on Hand of Sawmills, D.B.S. 

Bulletins of Canadian Pulp and Paper Association and Newsprint Association of Canada. 



37 



MANUFACTURING MARCH, 1952 

Shipments of Primary Iron and Steel Shapes to Consuming Industries 

(Carbon and Alloy) 
TABLE 33 Monthly averages or calendar months 



Agricultural 

Implements 

Automotive and Other 



Industries 



Farm 



Building 
Construction Containers 



Machinery Merchant 
and Trade 

Tools Products 



Mining 

and 

Lumbering 



National 
Defence 



Thousand tons 



Pressing, 
Forming 

and 
Stamping 



1949 
1951 



12.5 
20.8 



1950 N 
D 


21.2 
19.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


18.5 
21.0 
21.6 


A 

M 
J 


24.9 
29.2 

21.4 


J 

A 

S 


23.6 
16.1 

17.5 


O 
N 
D 


20.4 
20.1 
15 7 



10.1 
12.3 

11 3 
12.9 

12.2 
12.5 
13.9 



11 

10. 

13 

12. 
9. 
9. 

14. 
15. 
12. 



30.2 
32.1 

30.8 
30.8 

35.8 
30.1 
34.8 

28.5 
36.4 
34.4 

32.0 
27.1 
28.8 



17.1 
25.1 



24 
20 

26 
24 
23 



24.8 
28.3 
26.2 



36 
31 



28.7 



25 
26 
24 

24 
21 
25 



9.7 
13.9 

11.2 
10.2 

13.3 

11.4 
12.8 

16.0 
14.1 
12.1 

13.7 
13.4 
13.0 

14.2 
17.3 
15.1 



29.3 
34.4 

33.3 
30.9 

38.5 
28.1 
35.7 



35 
35 



34.0 

30.5 
34.9 
33.0 

38.1 
34.9 
34.2 



7.5 
11.0 

9.2 

11.8 



13 

9 

10 



0.2 

4.4 

0.3 
0.3 

0.9 
8 
2 



9.0 
10.8 
11.1 



10 
14 
10 

11 

12 

8 



6.7 
6.8 
8.4 



12.2 
14.9 

16.3 
13.0 

13.7 
15.0 
17.1 

15.6 
16.8 
16.1 

15.2 
14.3 
11.6 

14.8 
16.9 
11.7 



Public 
Works 

and 
Utilities 



Railway 
Operating 



Railway 
Cars and 

Loco- 
motives 



Ship- 
building 



Whole- 
salers and 
Ware- 
houses 



Net Total Producers' Export 
Miscel- Domestic Inter- Ship- 

laneous Shipments change ments 



Total 













Thousand tons 










1949 
1951 


1.6 
2.3 


31.5 
34.9 


13 
15 9 


1.7 
3.4 


29.6 
27.2 


1.2 
1.6 


207.4 
254.2 


79.5 
140.1 


18.3 
5.9 


305.2 
400.2 


1950 N 
D 


1.0 
1.1 


24 
28.3 


12 9 
12.1 


0.7 
1.4 


30.1 
28 


1.7 
1.2 


228.6 
221.8 


125.5 
107.2 


27.0 
28.5 


381.1 

357.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


0.7 
0.8 

1.2 


37.5 
37.4 
38 5 


18.0 

16.1 
17.3 


1.2 
4.3 
3.6 


29.3 
28 4 
30.1 


1.4 
2.1 
3.5 


261.1 
241.1 
266.1 


143.4 
122.1 
150.1 


6.6 
4.2 

2.0 


411.2 

367.4 
418.2 


A 

M 

J 


1.9 

5.2 
4.5 


41 .2 
39.9 
35 1 


15 9 
15.7 
14.8 


4.0 
3.5 

2.6 


30.1 

30.6 
28 4 


17 
1.5 
1.9 


264.7 

282.2 
260.4 


145.5 
161.6 
135.5 


2.1 
3.1 

3.4 


412.3 
446.9 
399.3 


J 

A 

S 


2.2 
1.6 

3 2 


31 .9 
28 3 
28.1 


12.7 
13 6 
13 6 


2.6 
4.2 
3 8 


21 7 
24 5 
21 4 


15 
1.2 
1.0 


239 . 8 
234.9 

225.5 


131.7 
146.2 
138.2 


2.8 
10 5 

10.4 


374.3 
391.6 
374.2 


O 
N 
D 


2.7 
1.7 
2 1 


29 3 
36 1 
34 .9 


15 5 
20 1 
17.4 


3.5 

4 3 

2.7 


26.8 

32 2 
22 8 


17 
15 
10 


260.5 
272.7 
241.5 


136.2 
132.6 
137.7 


9.0 
10.2 

6.1 


405.8 
415.5 

385.2 



38 



Source: Monthly Report on Primary Iron and Steel, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 33 - concluded 



MANUFACTURING 



Primary Iron and Steel 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Pig<» 
Iron 



PRODUCTION 



Steel 



PRIMARY IRON AND STEEL SHAPES 
Shipments 



Ferro- 
Alloys 



Total 



Ingots 



Castings Total (2 > Export (3) Domestic Imports'") 











Thousand net tons 








1939 
1951 


70.5 
212.7 


7.1 
20.9 


129.3 

297.3 


124.2 
287.2 


5.1 
10.1 


260.1 


21.4 
5.9 


254.2 


39.9 
139.5 


1950 D 


198.2 


15.3 


290.7 


281.5 


9.2 


250.3 


28.5 


221.8 


85.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


201.1 
193.2 
220.6 


19.1 
14.9 
19.5 


309.7 
281.4 
314.8 


299.4 
271.2 
304.3 


10.2 
10.2 
10.5 


267.7 
245.3 
268.1 


6.6 
4.2 
2.0 


261.1 
241.1 
266.1 


108.4 

85.1 

117.6 


A 
M 

J 


211.1 
219.0 
213.2 


19.6 
23.5 
19.8 


312.0 
313.3 
293.5 


301.8 
302.9 
283.7 


10.2 

10.4 

9.9 


266.8 
285.3 
263.8 


2.1 
3.1 
3.4 


264.7 
282.2 
260.4 


147.7 
153.8 
143.1 


J 

A 

S 


210.3 
203.2 
212.5 


17.6 
25.3 
23.0 


274.6 
286.8 
268.2 


266.6 
277.9 
257.9 


8.0 

8.9 

10.4 


242.6 
245.4 
236.0 


2.8 
10.5 
10.4 


239.8 
234.9 
225.5 


145.7 
154.2 
150.8 


o 

N 
D 


224.5 
223.5 
220.5 


25.8 
22.3 
20.7 


309.4 
307.1 
296.5 


298.2 
295.5 
286.8 


11.3 

11.6 

9.8 


269.5 
282.9 
247.6 


9.0 

10.2 

6.1 


260.5 
272.7 
241.5 


180.1 
166.5 
121.5 


1952 J 


209.2 




316.5 


305.7 


10.8 


266.4 


12.0 


254.4 


179.0 



(1) As of January, 1950 includes some silvery pig iron formerly included with ferro-alloys. (2) Excluding producers' 

interchange. (3) Prior to 1946, exports include pigs, ingots, blooms, billets and rolling mill products. (4, Prior to 
1946, imports include castings and forgings and rolling mill products. Since 1946, they include, in addition to all other 
shapes, wire and wire rope. 

Source: Primary Iron and Steel, D.B.S. 



TABLE 34 



Motor Vehicles: Production and Sales 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



Total Commercial 
Motor Including 
Vehicles Military 

Production (1) 



PASSENGER CARS 



Production"' 



Imports 

less 

Re-exports 



Total 
Supply 



Total 



Sales (2) Domestic 

Sales 

Export Domestic Financed 











Thousands 










Number 


1939 
1951 


12.95 
34.48 


3.92 
11.04 


9.03 
23.44 


1.37 
3.31 


10.40 
26.75 


10.72 
26.01 


3.21 
3.10 


7.50 
22.91 


6,799 


1950 D 


30.74 


7.21 


23.53 


4.24 


27.77 


24.64 


1.99 


22.65 


6,637 


1951 J 
F 
M 


39.20 
40.59 

47.78 


11.00 
11.35 
12.90 


28.21 
29.24 
34.88 


4.45 
4.46 
5.40 


32.65 
33.70 
40.28 


26.61' 

33.83 

40.32 


0.52 
0.63 
2.44 


26.09 r 

33.20 

37.89 


6,205 r 

6,463 

9,811 


A 
M 
J 


41.06 
42.91 
36.23 


12.38 
12.62 
10.38 


28.68 
30.30 
25.85 


8.45 
8.26 
5.88 


37.13 
38 55 
31.72 


39.11 

28.50 
24.74 


4.18 
2.66 
1.72 


34.93 
25.84 
23.03 


8,451 
6,890 
7,216 


J 

A 

S 


30.29 
21.83 
29.86 


9.27 

7.99 

10.67 


21.02 
13.84 
19.19 


3.11 
1.00 
0.49 


24.13 
14.84 
19.68 


24.40 
17.28 
23.03 


3.71 
2.82 
4.42 


20.69 
14.46 
18.61 


7,526 
7,044 
5,681 


O 

N 
D 


32.46 
29.46 
22.09 


11.99 
10.80 
11.17 


20.47 
18.66 
10.92 


-0.15 
-0.87 
-0.70 


20.32 
17.79 
10.22 


18.93 
19.23 
16.17 


5.39 
5.46 
3.23 


13.54 
13.77 
12.93 


5,763 
5,775 
4,763 


1952 J 


34.23 


14.87 


19.37 


0.16 


19.52 


22.60 


8.85 


13.75 


5,141 



D.B.S 



"'Monthly data are shipments subsequent to 1946. (2) As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 

Source: Motor Vehicle Shipments, Sales of New Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Financing, and Trade of- Canada, 



39 



MANUFACTURING 



TABLE 35 



MARCH, 1952 



Refrigerators and Washing Machines 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



ELECTRIC REFRIGERATORS" 



DOMESTIC WASHING MACHINES"' 



Domestic Types 



All Types 



Factory Produc- Ship- Factory 

Production Shipments stocks'- 1 Imports Exports uon ■' ments " stocks 1 " 11 ' Imports Exports 

Thousands 



1939 
1951 


4.29 
23.05 


19 52 


45.21 


111 

9 14 


78 
27 


8.66 
20.01 


18 39 


29.93 


1.71 
36 


1.68 
1.65 


1950 D 


30.74' 


32.11' 


3.01 


1 16 


0.54 


25.24 


25.22 


10.41 


0.31 


0.68 


1951 J 
F 
M 


34.69 
31.45 
35.40 


33.19 
31.25 
33.60 


4.35 
4 54 
6.34 


8.82 

9.06 

10.02 


17 
0.08 
.18 


30.71 
27.02 
29.90 


29.75 
25.56 
29.53 


11.36 
12.82 
13.20 


0.68 
45 
0.60 


0.50 
1.17 
1.12 


A 
M 

J 


34.22 
32.95 
26.93 


33.68 
30.13 
19.58 


6.88 

9.70 

17.04 


16.65 
18.60 
15.06 


13 
0.68 
0.61 


29.94 
27.24 
19.22 


28.30 
22.01 

14.52 


14.84 
20.07 
24.77 


0.23 
0.49 
37 


1.93 
1.74 
2.67 


J 

A 

S 


16.55 
17.32 
14.26 


10.74 
9.93 
8.61 


22.85 
30.25 
35.89 


11.43 
9.27 
3.61 


0.43 
0.37 
0.22 


13.32 
13.31 
12.25 


11.86 

9.86 

10.59 


26.22 
29.67 
31.34 


0.23 
15 
0.27 


1.59 
2.38 
2.21 


O 
N 
D 


13.44 

12.82 

6.60 


7.46 
9.46 

6.62 


41.87 
45.22 
45.21 


4.11 
2.07 
0.92 


0.03 
0.05 

0.30 


13.12 
12.23 
11.91 


14.26 
12.86 
11.54 


30.19 
29.56 
29.93 


0.44 
0.18 
0.23 


1.08 
1.27 
2.16 


1952 J 








1.10 


0.08 








0.33 


22 



Radio and Television Receiving Sets 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Estimated 
Production ' 



Domestic 
Shipments 



Factory Stocks Imports 
End oi Period <•> 



Radios 



Tele- 
vision 
sets 



Radios 



Total Table 



Tele- Radios Tele- 
vision vision 
sets sets 



Exports Value of Average 
Factory Shipments Price per 
Set '■> 



Radios 



Television 
sets 













Thou 


sands 








Thousand dollars 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


29.0 
55.2 


4.3 


30.9 
47.9 


21.1 
27.9 


3.3 


60.9 
185.0 


14.7 


4.9 
4.7 


0.1 
3.0 


1.667 
4,288 


1,739 


32 

36 


1950 D 


66.2 


5.2 


84.5 


58.1 


5.5 


145.2 


2.7 


3.2 


4 6 


7,248 


2.706 


31 


1951 J 
F 

M 


64.9 
69.3 
48.9 


4.0 

4.3 
5.8 


50.7 
56.8 
66.0 


29.8 
33.0 
38.2 


3.8 
4.5 
5.4 


158.5 
168.5 
145.9 


2.9 

2.7 
3.1 


3.4 
2.0 
5.4 


2.4 
1.5 

2.8 


4,405 
4,853 
5,351 


1,956 
2,387 
3,251 


32 
35 
33 


A 
M 
J 


72.4 
68 1 
66.4 


5.0 
5.7 
3 5 


57.5 
38.8 
32.9 


31.6 
16.5 
11.1 


4.4 
1.1 
0.5 


158.6 
184.7 
217.3 


3.6 

8.2 
11.3 


4.4 
3.3 

3.8 


2 5 
1.4 
2.4 


4.843 
3,529 
2,829 


2.528 
542 
235 


37 
39 
36 


J 

A 

S 


36.2 
42.1 

51 4 


3 1 
2 3 
5.3 


28.8 
36.3 
42.4 


13.1 
17.5 
26.2 


0.3 
9 

3.1 


223.1 
222.3 
221.3 


14 .1 
15.5 
17.7 


5.0 

8 4 
6 4 


1.6 
2.4 
8.8 


2,630 
3.663 
4.038 


159 

488 

1,591 


42 
38 
34 


O 
N 

D 


36.0 
66.5 
40.6 


4.0 
6.3 

1.8 


45.5 
59.1 
59.3 


31.0 
43.3 
44.0 


4 9 

5 6 
4.6 


206.9 
207.9 
185.0 


16.8 
17.5 
14.7 


5 7 
4.4 
3.7 


4.3 
3.9 

1.5 


4,498 
5,287 
5.526 


2,471 
2,876 
2,380 


37 
36 
36 


1952 J 
















2.9 


2.5 









40 (1) As of May, 1949, Newfoundland is included. : End of period. Does not include apartment-type machines. 

1 Electric and other. Factory shipments adjusted for change in stocks. Includes television sets. Manu- 

facturers' list prices of Table Model electric standard broadcast radios. 

Source: Monthly Reports, Domestic Type Electric Refrigerators, Domestic Washing Machines, Trade of Canada, 
and Radio Receiving Sets, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 36 



CONSTRUCTION 



Value of Building Permits 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



NOVA 
CANADA SCOTIA 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



Montreal- 
58 Muni- Maison- Sher- Three Fort Port 

cipalities Halifax neuve Quebec brooke Rivers William Hamilton Kitchener London Ottawa Arthur 













Thousand dollars 












1939 
1951 


5,023 
35,876 


94 
453 


771 
6,130 


208 
554 


98 
401 


84 
242 


44 
210 


189 
2,078 


65 
413 


158 
595 


171 
2,537 


37 
145 


1950 D 


33,425 


246 


9,475 


1,422 


254 


193 


158 


947 


180 


1,459 


3,381 


11 


1951 J 
F 
M 


24,954 
29,957 
38,504 


372 
236 
260 


3,941 
4,826 
8,208 


183 
120 
420 


187 
331 
488 


34 
45 
80 


52 

49 
42 


641 
2,193 
1,467 


486 
232 
354 


196 
298 
506 


1,599 
1,564 
7,046 


22 

109 

16 


A 
M 
J 


46,825 
54,676 

36,588 


590 
663 
636 


7,846 
9,591 
6,355 


790 
724 
523 


397 
649 
630 


346 
816 
413 


132 
494 
192 


3,174 
2,848 
1,306 


934 
510 
458 


930 

1,160 

861 


2,436 
3,695 
1,258 


163 
520 
213 


J 
A 

S 


48,029 
33,439 
27,776 


710 
251 
438 


5,940 
5,306 
3,865 


920 
373 
436 


1,254 

{234} 


225 
246 
300 


84 

1,355 

64 


1,138 
1,351 
1,709 


571 
375 
230 


1,348 
456 
322 


3,300 
1,362 
3,505 


236 

144 

99 


O 
N 
D 


38,251 
24,731 
26,778' 


852 
219 
211 


5,459 
5,945 
6,276 


918 
900 
341 


449 

125 

76 


189 

127 

77 


50 
6 
3 


7,137 

1,150 

821 


299 
325 
183 


299 
582 
183 


3,450 
551 
680 


131 

85 

5 


1952 J 


13,738" 


66 


1,885 


147 


64 


24 


4 


548 


134 


273 


337 


1 



ONTARIO 



MANI- 
TOBA SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



St. York and 

Catha- East York Winni- 

rines Toronto Windsor Townships peg 



Re gin a 



New 
Saska- Edmon- Leth- West- Van- 

toon Calgary ton bridge minster couver Victoria 



Thousand dollars 



1939 


50 


859 


77 


170 


215 


50 


21 


89 


139 


39 


98 


524 


67 


1951 


407 


3,931 


1,019 


1,362 


1,374 


506 


310 


1,860 


3,008 


402 


197 


1,995 


341 


1950 D 


339 


4,860 


377 


477 


337 


103 


1,712 


867 


389 


86 


50 


2,739 


280 


1951 J 


198 


5,845 


341 


3,134 


411 


40 


19 


1,181 


1,516 


211 


210 


1,454 


481 


F 


1,199 


2,496 


539 


1,168 


1,026 


72 


22 


1,873 


3,471 


764 


646 


1,943 


907 


M 


300 


2,403 


1,351 


1,078 


2,071 


312 


109 


1,544 


1,513 


639 


216 


2,085 


161 


A 


296 


2,430 


1,071 


1,371 


1,902 


421 


523 


3,440 


6,244 


674 


198 


2,657 


231 


M 


440 


3,098 


4,233 


1,894 


2,461 


940 


643 


2,448 


4,612 


288 


215 


2,836 


287 


J 


1,189 


3,863 


659 


1,276 


1,591 


565 


522 


1,873 


3,777 


279 


193 


1,542 


229 


J 


386 


9,394 


382 


1,725 


1,780 


1,169 


396 


1,742 


3,967 


559 


142 


1,851 


213 


A 


141 


3,456 


498 


1,734 


824 


599 


563 


2,353 


2,672 


236 


200 


2,087 


796 


S 


231 


1,972 


233 


733 


1,620 


404 


455 


1,493 


2,649 


452 


91 


1,057 


188 


O 


288 


2,842 


480 


818 


1,716 


343 


265 


1,770 


3,425 


437 


83 


1,804 


292 


N 


170 


2,472 


1,270 


695 


834 


982 


124 


1,936 


1,110 


219 


36 


1,032 


172 


D 


46 


6,895 


1,171 


712 


249 


223 


77 


670 


1,144 


64 


133 


3,595 


129 


1952 J 


41 


3,401 


1,372 


283 


165 


65 


51 


469 


419 


36 


50 


836 


212 


G< 


merally, the twenty-four municipalities for which data are shown were 


selected 


as being leaders 


in the 


amount 


41 


of pen 


aits issued during the period 1926-1946. 


Annual 


statistics 


for 58 municipalities are available historically in 




the Ca 


nada Year Book. Monthly reports on the 


subject were discontinued in December, 1946. 











CONSTRUCTION 



TABLE 36 concluded 



MARCH, 1952 



Value of Building Permits 

By Provinces ' 
Monthly averages or calendar months 





( .mada 


New- 
found- 
land 


Prince 
Edward 
Island 


Nova 
Scotia 


New 

Brunswick 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Manitoba 


Saskat- 
chewan 


Alberta 


British 
Columbia 












Thousand dollars 










1949 
1950 


62,102 
79,833 


461 


60 
83 


1,102 
2,288 


716 
1,228 


14,141 
19,695 


27.831 
36,148 


2,679 
3,140 


1,568 
1,900 


6,291 
7,222 


7,715 
7,667 


1950 D 


55,158 


293 


20 


751 


413 


16,654 


26,566 


984 


2,126 


1,386 


5,964 


1951 J 
F 
M 


42,269 
53,495 
74,215 


206 
77 

166 


20 


697 

475 

2,715 


184 

363 

1,370 


7,002 

8.182 

13,329 


25,328 
26,693 
41,563 


578 
1,402 
3,530 


171 
183 
681 


3,123 
6,361 
3,953 


4,981 
9,738 
6,908 


A 
M 

J 


93,214 

109,979 

81,125 


470 

1,364 

471 


136 

195 

31 


1,562 
1,258 
1,773 


808 
1,609 
1,305 


19.503 
22,879 
15,647 


44,464 
55.047 
40,532 


3,756 
5,306 
2,936 


1,455 
3,838 
2,154 


11,497 
8,850 
7,856 


9,563 
9,632 
8,421 


J 

A 

S 


88,324' 
69,136' 
65,691' 


359 
370 
314' 


19 
33 
70 


1,235 

715 

3,399 


869 
852 
676 


18.150 
14.509 
12,773 


44,194' 
34,040' 
31,376' 


6.186 
2,555 
2,921 


2,230 

2,005' 

1,417' 


7,382 
6,344 
5,493 


7,699 
7,714 
7,253 


O 
N 
D 


73,765' 
54,517' 
53,515' 


486 

396' 

95 


28 
111 
201 


1.146 
830 
420 


863 

1,202 

88 


15,632 

13,067 

9,481' 


39,166' 
27.824' 
33, 901 ' 


2,523 

1,783 

903' 


1 .056' 

1,434' 

693' 


6,974 
3,595 
2,316' 


5,882 
4,275 
5,416' 


1952 J 


27,165 


101 


10 


102 


70 


4,031 


17,840 


313 


183 


1,284 


3,229 



By Types (1) 
Monthly averages or calendar months 









RESIDENTIAL 








INDUS- COM- INSTTTU- 
- TRIAL MERCIAL TIONAL 


OTHER 








New 






Repair 






Atlantic 
Total Provinces 11 


' Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie British 
Provinces Columbia 
















Thousand dollars 






1949 
1950 


34,328 
40,649 


657 
1,179 


7,923 
10,637 


15,928 
18,593 


5,980 
6,331 


3,841 
3,909 


2,780 
3,615 


3,355 12,486 8,599 
5,305 20,044 9,194 


552 
1,027 


1950 N 
D 


28,898 
17,280 


638 
695 


7,623 
5,372 


14.648 
8,622 


3.337 
908 


2,652 
1,684 


2,915 
1,240 


5,530 20,559 12,116 
6,361 17,827 12,174 


1,812 
276 


1951 J 
F 
M 


17,177 
22,738 
37,479 


464 
375 
593 


3,668 
4,719 
6,461 


9,557 
12,397 
22,414 


1,359 
1,411 
4,508 


2,130 
3,837 
3.502 


1,542 
1,773 
2,391 


8,301 11,536 3,312 
6,590 13,007 9,138 
7,275 16,448 10,239 


400 
248 
383 


A 
M 

J 


55,967 
58,523 
45,974 


1,415 
1,445 
1,702 


12,463 

12,211 

9,395 


27,253 
30,237 
22,470 


9.950 
9,775 
7,988 


4.887 
4,853 
4,419 


4.615 
5,708 
4,851 


9,744 11,222 11,057 

13,476 16,077 15,779 

6,203 11,545 12,128 


608 
416 
424 


J 

A 
S 


38,307' 
34,530' 
26,888' 


938 
943 
830 


8,078 
7,341 
6,104 


19,801' 
17,546' 
12,184' 


6.299 

5.279' 

4.895 


3,192 
3,420 
2,875 


4,815' 
4.424' 
4,144 r 


6,507 18,431' 19.928 
8,556 11,203 9.906 
8,619 13,513' 12,018 


335 

518' 

510 


O 
N 
D 


29,170' 
22.085' 
13,332' 


562 
329 
295 


7,036 

5.858' 

2.341' 


15.086' 

10,938' 

7,064' 


4.413 
2,851 
1,472' 


2,073 
2,109 
2,161' 


3.993' 
2,601' 
1,452' 


17,433 11,118 11,145 

8.823 9, 037' 11, 646 

12,624' 5, 088' 20. 828' 


904 
325 
191 


1952 J 


10,719 


131 


1,652 


6.800 


642 


1.494 


1,313 


6,031 4,871 3,536 


695 



42 'The coverage was extended to 507 municipalities in 1948, and as of January, 1952, stands at 822, minor revision 

still being required in the table, due to the non-receipt of returns from a few small places. No account is taken of the 
building activity outside of registration areas. Actual operations normally follow the granting of permits but a number of 
projects are not undertaken or abandoned. The amount depends upon the statement of the applicant and considerable 
change may develop before the completion of the operation. 
(,, As of January, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 37 



CONSTRUCTION 



Building Materials 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION 



CEMENT PRODUCTS 0) 



Cement 
Concrete Concrete Pipe and 
Brick Blocks^ 2 ' Tile 



CLAY PRODUCTS 



ASPHALT PRODUCTS 



Building Brick (4 > 

Producers' 
Production (3) stocks 



Vitrified 

Sewer 

Pipe 



Smooth- Mineral- 
Asphalt surfaced surfaced and 
Shingles Rolls Rolls Sheathings 



RIGID 
INSU- 
LATING 
Felts BOARD 





Thousands 


Thousand 
tons 


Millions 


Thousand 
feet 


Thousand squares 


Thousand 
tons 


Million 
sq. ft 


1939 
1951 


3 ',466 


5,513 


19^35 


13.75 




329 


43 
182 


82 
101 


30 

104 


2.61 
5.39 


8.17 
24.37 


1950 D 


2,975 


4,266 


8.99 


28.81 


22.44 


381 


62 


84 


38 


5.78 


24.10 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3,706 
3,320 
3,423 


4,803 
4,149 
5,166 


10.94 

9.45 

16.47 


29.43 
23.42 
27.85 


23.58 
23.59 
23.49 


316 
434 
340 


141 
181 
188 


79 

82 

125 


66 
74 
86 


5.60 
5.54 
6.89 


23.79 r 
22.65' 
26.03' 


A 
M 
J 


4,506 
5,159 
5,243 


5,638 
6,625 
7,845 


20.63 
23.39 
25.34 


28.71 
35.91 
35.67 


25.06 
25.09 
25.37 


299 
304 
325 


197 
253 
231 


116 
92 
85 


99 
113 
123 


6.76 
6.36 
5.47 


24.53 r 
25.99' 
22.87' 


J 
A 

S 


3,546 
2,877 
3,265 


6,450 
6,466 
5,428 


20.79 
27.35 
22.85 


36.54 

34.30 r 

32.78 r 


27.00 

26.92 r 

29.06 r 


366 
323 
316 


216 
237 
187 


118 
121 
126 


147 
149 
157 


4.70 
5.51 
4.72 


24.51' 

27.03 

24.34 


O 

N 
D 


3,029 
2,166 
1,352 


5,719 
4,778 
3,091 


24.98 
19.11 
13.31 


35.03 r 

28.57 

23.58 


29.30 r 

30.99 

38.13 


324 
302 
294 


191 r 

106 

57 


129 

106 

33 


137 
65 
30 


4.97 
4.90 
3.29 


27.38 
24.72 
18.56 


1952 J 


1,259 


2,755 


14.44 








110 


86 


30 


3.08 


21.30 



PRODUCERS' SALES 



PRODUC- 
TION EXPORTS' 6 ' IMPORTS 



PRODUCTION 



FACTORY 
SALES 



Cement 



Building Structural 
Brick' 4 ' Tile (4 >< 5 > 



Drain 
Tile' 4 ' 



Sawn Lumber 



Window Cast Iron Steel 
Glass Soil Pipe Pipes 
and Tubes and 
Fittings Fittings 



Wire Paints, 
Nails Varnishes, 
Lacquers 

(7) 





Thousand 
barrels 


Millions 


Thousand 
tons 


Thousands 


Million board feet 


Thousand 
square feet 


Thousand tons 




Thousand 
dollars 


1939 
1951 


478 
1,405 


13.8 


7.2 


1,197 


331.4 
531.5 


176.1 
286.3 


4,067 
5,788 


1.4 
4.4 


8.4 
20.6 


5.5 
7.5 


2,155 
8,083 


1950 D 


791 


28.3 


13.0 


911 


398.6 


229.2 


5,066 


6.6 


19.5 


6.4 


6,575 


1951 J 
F 
M 


887 

908 

1,380 


28.3 
23.4 
27.9 


13.8 
11.4 
16.1 


856 
836 
868 


431.8 
479.3 
502.. 6 


264.1 
241.2 
296.9 


3,524 
3,790 
3,886 


5.1 

4.7 
5.5 


21.6 
22.0 
20.1 


7.8 
6.6 
7.6 


8,345 
7,618 
8,172 


A 
M 

J 


1,533 
1,880 
1,681 


27.2 
35.9 
35.4 


13.7 
17.3 
19.9 


1,371 
1,796 
2,168 


400.2 
595.5 
813.3 


303.7 
286.1 
265.7 


7,922 
6,355 
6,814 


5.5 
5.8 
5.6 


22.9 
22.9 
19.2 


7.1 
8.2 
7.9 


9,749 
10,515 
10,101 


J 

A 

S 


1,589 
1,754 
1,542 


34.9 
34.4 
30. 6 r 


19.1 
17.9 
16.0' 


1,996 
2,051 
2,172 


747.3 
696.3 
554.3 


318.6 
315.2 
281.8 


7,465 
7,501 
6,778 


3.1 
4.6 
4.1 


15.2 
23.4 
19.7 


6.5 
6.9 
7.1 


8,696 
8,031 
6,874 


O 
N 
D 


1,649 

1,277 

776 


34.8' 

26.9 

16.4 


18.8' 

15.2 

13.0 


2,439 

1,730 

901 


479.3 
360.4 
317.7 


318.1 
285.3 
258.8 


5,787 
5,948 
3,685 


3.8 
3.5' 
2.2 


22.1 
22.3 
15.3 


8.6 
8.5' 
7.4 


7,213 
6,426 
5,258 


1952 J 


851 










223.9 


3,563 






8.0 





^'Figures cover the production of firms which normally account for 85 per cent of the total for Canada. 

<2) Since January, 1949, includes concrete chimney blocks. (3) Prior to 1947 data on producers' sales were used 
to indicate production. Data for 1950 and 1951 are obtained by adjusting producers' sales for changes in inventories. 
(4 >Includes Newfoundland as of May, 1949. (5) Hollow blocks including fireproofing and load-bearing tile. (6 'Planks and 
boards and flooring. (7, Prior to 1946 figures represent gross value of production. Figures from 1946 to the present 
are factory sales of firms which normally account for 96% of total Canadian production. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Concrete Building Blocks and Cement Pipe; Products made from Canadian clays; 
Asphalt Roofing; Rigid Insulating Board; Iron Castings and Cast Iron Pipes and Fittings; Steel Wire and Specified Wire 
Products; Sales of Paints, Varnishes and Lacquers and Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



43 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 



TABLE 39 



MARCH, 1952 



Farm Cash Income ' 

Quarterly averages or quarters 



GRAINS, SEEDS AND HAY 



VEGETABLES AND OTHER FIELD CROPS' 3 ' 



LIVE 
STOCK 



Total 

Cash 

Income 



Total 



Wheat 


Oats 


Other 


Including 


Including 


Grains, 


Participa- 


Participa- 


Seeds 


tion 


tion 


and 


Payments 


Payments 


Hay • 



Total 



Potatoes 



Vege- 
tables 



Tobacco Total 













viillion dollars 












1939 


179.25 


62.90 


54.48 


2.98 


5.44 


15.98 


4.95 


4 75 


4.86 


50.57 


1950 


555.88 


140.99 


96.99 


14.91 


29.09 


38.46 


9.94 


10.72 


14.35 


223.99 


1950 






















2nd qtr. 


475.97 


76.36 


61.21 


6.68 


8.47 


10.61 


5.68 


3.67 


— 


218.04 


3rd qtr. 


600.46 


181.58 


142.36 


10.69 


28.53 


36.82 


12.69 


23.38 


— 


220 . 67 


4th qtr. 


735.95 


252.61 


143.49 


37.25 


71.87 


46.76 


11.66 


11.92 


13.33 


271.86 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


478.29 


72.95 


35.47 


13.95 


23.53 


56.57 


8.33 


3.75 


40.81 


226.41 


2nd qtr. 


763.02 


288 . 24 


251.46 


17.23 


19.54 


10.45 


4 58 


3.96 


— 


267.18 


3rd qtr. 


623.55 


148.22 


105.21 


13.23 


29.77 


37.32 


9.00 


27.09 


— 


244.33 



LIVE STOCK 



OTHER FARM PRODUCTS 



Cattle 

and 

Calves 



Hogs 



Sheep 

and 
Lambs 



Poultry 



Dairy 
Products 



Fruits 



Eggs 



Other 
Products'" 



Forest 
Products 



Fur 
Farming 













Million dollars 










1939 


23.60 


19.09 


1.68 


6.20 


28.45 


4.32 


6.86 


4.94 


3.78 


1.45 


1950 


121.99 


79.23 


4.03 


18.74 


81.94 


10.16 


25.87 


13.90 


18.68 


1.91 


1950 






















2nd qtr. 


118.13 


82.82 


0.93 


16.17 


95.05 


6.37 


26.81 


18.09 


22.47 


2.19 


3rd qtr. 


130.02 


69.99 


5.22 


15.44 


101.46 


18.13 


23.60 


13.63 


4.01 


0.57 


4th qtr. 


139.42 


91.50 


8.21 


32.73 


71.36 


13.16 


29.19 


15.36 


33.11 


2.54 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


120.08 


92.64 


1.95 


11 75 


61 25 


3.11 


26.39 


9.66 


17.54 


4.40 


2nd qtr. 


150.09 


97.63 


1.15 


18.32 


106.95 


5.50 


33.33 


23.55 


26.46 


1.36 


3rd qtr. 


135.14 


82.70 


5.67 


20.83 


119.26 


19.37 


34.02 


15.95 


4.48 


0.59 



Prince 

Edward 

Island 



Nova 
Scotia 



New 
Bruns- 
wick 



Quebec Ontario Manitoba 



Saskat- 
chewan 



Alberta 



British 
Columbia 



Million dollars 



1939 
1950 

1950 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 

1951 
1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 



1.75 
5.53 

6 32 
4.41 
5.90 

5.67 
6.55 
5 49 



3.57 
9.89 

10.07 
8.98 

12.58 

10.07 
11.25 
10.49 



3.40 
11.68 

11.11 

9.83 

15.92 

9 75 
11.65 
10.39 



24.90 
90.41 



52.34 
169.86 



98.43 159.24 

94 78 171.27 

103.55 174.73 



79.83 
113.78 
110.63 



189.13 
200.00 
201.31 



16.20 
48.99 

29.40 
49.90 
93.40 

38.43 
69.96 
54.94 



39.57 
101.90 

71.72 
131.59 
163.72 

52 34 
196.31 
113.75 



30.01 
92.20 

69.02 
101.62 
129.75 

72.49 

132.37 

83.98 



7.51 
25.43 

20.67 
28.09 
36.40 

20.60 
21.16 

32.57 



44 ' Does not include Supplementary Government Payments made under Prairie Farm Assistance Act, Prairie Farm 

Income Act and Wheat Acreage Reduction Act. - Includes barley and barley participation payments, rye, flax, 

flax adjustment payments, corn, clover and grass seed, hay and clover. l3) Includes in addition sugar beets and 
fibre flax. w Includes wool, honey, maple products and miscellaneous farm products. 
Source: Farm Cash Income, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Inspected Slaughterings of Live Stock and Cold Storage Holdings of Meat 

and Poultry 

TABLE 41 Monthly averages or calendar months 



INSPECTED SLAUGHTERINGS 



Cattle 



Sheep and 
Calves Lambs 



Hogs 



COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS AS OF END OF PERIOD 




Veal 


Mutton 
and Lamb 




Pork 




Beef 


Total 


Cured or 
in cure 


Poultry 







Thousands 








Million pounds 






1939 
1951 


73 
96 


57 
49 


65 
36 


302 
374 


29.6 
19.4 


4.2 
4.1 


6.3 

4.1 


44.0 
38.9 


23.3 
13.1 


15.4 
34.6 


1950 D 


94 


29 


31 


381 


22.2 


3.4 


3.9 


31.3 


14.2 


19.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


104 
78 
78 


29 

26 
45 


27 
16 
17 


402 
340 
364 


22.4 
20.5 
17.3 


2.3 
1.7 
1.7 


2.9 
2.0 
2.1 


34.6 
40.4 
42.1 


13.2 
16.4 
13.4 


18.1 
14.5 
11.8 


A 
M 
J 


94 
109 
109 


82 
94 
67 


14 
8 
9 


362 
407 
323 


17.7 
17.5 
14.8 


2.7 
4.0 
4.3 


1.4 
0.9 
0.9 


45.9 
47.9 
41.5 


13.6 
15.3 
14.7 


10.2 
8.2 
7.9 


J 

A 

S 


97 

100 

95 


53 

48 
40 


18 
46 
73 


285 
300 
281 


15.3 
14.0 
16.1 


4.3 

4.3 
4.5 


0.6 
0.8 
1.1 


33.9 
25.2 
19.6 


14.2 
12.6 
11.0 


8 
11,8 
16.1 


O 

N 
D 


116 

107 

63 


45 
35 
20 


102 
83 
25 


460 
529 
436 


18.6 
23.6 
19.4 


5.2 
5.2 
4.1 


2.1 
3.6 

4.1 


26.9 
37.8 
38. 9 r 


13.7 
18.2 
13.1 


22.2 
31.3 
34. 6 f 


1952 J 


92 


23 


25 


506 


22.5 


3.2 


3.9 


48.8 


14.0 


34.1 



Prices and Price Ratios: Live Stock and Live-Stock Feeds 



Price index 
numbers of 

commo- 
dities and 
services 
used by 
farmers 


Index of 

live-stock 

feed 

prices 


Index of 
animal 

product 
prices 




193539 = 100 





PRICES 







Ratio of 


Hog- 
barley 
ratio 


Ratio of 

price of 

beef cattle 


price of 

beef 
cattle to 


Winnipeg 


to price 
of hogs (2) 


price of 
lambs 



Cattle, 






steers Hogs 






good up Bl 


Barley 


Oats 


to 1050 lbs dressed 


No. 1 


No. 2 


Toronto Toronto (3) 


feed' 4 ' 


C.W. 



Dollars per hundred 
pounds 



Dollars per bushel 



1939 
1951 


99 
216 


4 
6 


85.4 
240.0 


101.5 


27.0 
19.4 


73.4 
131.1 


71.4. 
91.5 


6.91 


8.83 


0.384 


0.308 


1950 D 






243.9 


298.4 


17.4 


121.2 


94.9 


27.79 


29.92 


1.340 


0.994 


1951 J 
F 
M 


203 


7 


250.0 
258.9 
260.4 


310.9 
329.6 
347.2 


17.0 
17.2 
17.4 


122. r 

118.7 

122.1 


85.7 
84.6 
79.4 


29.25 
31.09 
32.06 


31.32 
34.26 
34.33 


1.439 
1.531 
1.518 


1.051 
1.101 
1.063 


A 
M 
J 


218 


3 


256.4 
242.6 
228.1 


331.6 
336.1 
353.1 


16.4 
20.2 
24.3 


136.9 
125.0 
118.2 


80.9 
82.4 
82.6 


32.94 
32.73 
33.69 


31.42 
34.24 
37.35 


1.454 
1.244 
1.171 


1.048 
0.939 
0.839 


J 

A 

S 


227 


7 


216.7 
219.1 
224.9 


358.9 
348.3 
339.2 


26.1 
25.1 
21.2 


114.4 
123.5 
136.1 


91.9 

95.7 

102.2 


33.91 
33.48 
33.61 


38.86 
35.48 
32.25 


1.159 
1.170 
1.236 


0.805 
0.831 
0.869 


o 

N 
D 






235.6 
246.7 
240.8 


330.3 
328.5 
329.1 


17.0 
15.2 
15.8 


149.4 
152.5 
154.0 


102.6 
103.8 
105.7 


33.77 
33.62 
34.12 


29.48 
29.14 
28.88 


1.358 
1.432 
1.364 


0.951 
1.085 
0.999 


1952 J 






238.6 


318.2 


14.6 


154.1 


98.3 


32.86 


27.79 


1.410 


0.960 



^'Includes advance equalization payment on barley until March, 1947, and subsidy on hogs from 1944 to date. 
<2 'Based on price for hogs including Dominion premium. A rise in ratio favours production of beef. (3, Prior to 1941, 
prices were quoted on a live weight basis. (4 'Prior to August, 1939, Barley No. 1 feed was designated as Barley No. 3 

Source: Live-Stock Market Review, Dept. of Agriculture, Canadian Coarse Grains, Quarterly Review, arid Cold 
Storage Holdings, D.B.S. 



45 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Exports of Live-Stock Products 

TABLE 41 - concluded Monthly averages or calendar months 

EXPORTS 



MARCH, 1952 



Beei and 
















Veal, Fresh 


Bacon, 






Concentrated 


Eggs 






Chilled and 


Hams and 


Canned 




Milk 


in the 


Dried 




Frozen 


Shoulders 


Meats 


Cheese 


Products 


Shell 


Eggs 


Poultry 









Million pounds 






Million dozen 


Million pounds 


1939 
1951 


32 
7.79 


15.65 
0.51 


39 
0.81 


7.58 
2.55 


2 87 
3.66 


.11 
0.55 


— 


0.23 

0.08 


1950 D 


6.99 


4.55 


0.95 


1 04 


1.33 


2.00 


— 


0.02 


1951 J 
F 
M 


4.33 

2.65 
2.65 


2.37 
48 
0.38 


1.24 
0.84 
0.59 


45 
0.69 
0.29 


1.04 
1.25 
1.42 


2.50 
80 
0.30 


E 


0.01 
0.01 
0.02 


A 
M 

J 


6 08 
15.12 
17.73 


60 
45 
0.30 


0.36 
0.82 
0.79 


0.18 

0.11 
1.33 


1.92 
3.91 

3.93 


.13 
0.10 
0.10 


— 


01 
0.09 


J 

A 

S 


15.43 
7.78 
7.13 


0.24 
0.16 
0.11 


0.63 
0.70 
0.92 


2.64 
4.63 
6.21 


4.96 
6.54 
4.00 


0.12 
0.08 
0.14 


— 


0.06 
0.06 
0.23 


O 
N 
D 


8.95 
4.43 
1.15 


0.20 
0.34 

0.51 


0.78 
1.06 
1.01 


8.10 
5 09 
0.94 


3.38 
5.40 
6.22 


0.19 

0.48 
1.63 


— 


0.21 
0.16 
0.10 


1952 J 


0.67 


50 


1.48 


0.17 


1.43 


1.01 


— 


0.32 



Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



TABLE 42 



Milk and Milk Products: Production, Stocks and Sales 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



FLUID 
PRODUCTION SALES 



Total 
Milk" 1 



Milk and 
Cream 



PRODUCTION OF DAIRY FACTORIES 

Concentrated 
Creamery Cheddar Milk Ice 

Butter Cheese Products Cream 



COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS'" 

Concentrated 
Creamery Factory Milk 

Butter**' Cheese" Products 









Million pounds 






Thousand 
gals. 




Million pound) 


i 


1939 
1951 


1,315 
1,366 


251 
352 


22.30 
21.47 


10.46 
7.11 


13.97 

36.21 


754 
2,122 


41.00 
44.82 


25.73 
31.88' 


18.08 
64.02 


1951 J 
F 
M 


895' 

815 r 

1 ,038' 


354 

329' 

372' 


8.16 

7.07 

10.14 


2.00 
1.25 

1.75 


17.12 
15.31 

22.96 


1.126 
1,115 

1,496 


25.64 

17.34' 

9.79 


26 96 
24 . 38' 
20.04 


26.01 

16.66' 

12.52 


A 
M 

J 


1.292 r 
1,706' 
1 ,975' 


347' 

362 

356 


16.86 
28.77 
39.18 


3.92 

9.00 

14.29 


34.96 
53.96 
66.25 


1,866 
2,957 
3,279 


10.18 
16.30 
32.16 


18 02 
21.00 
27.27 


17.83 
31.21 
62.21 


J 

A 

S 


1 .862' 
1,768' 
1,552' 


347' 

347 

343 


36.34 
34.53 

29.01 


13.55 
13.38 
11.50 


56.97 
50.11 

41.54 


3,939 
3.456 
2,170 


46.10 
55.48 
62.61 


37.06 
40.89 
45.00 


83.94 
92.13 
95.02 


o 

N 

D 


1 .398' 
1 .066' 
958 


361 

353' 

356 


23 58 
13.80 

10.18 


8.93 
3 74 
1.96 


34.91 
22.04 
18.39 


1,628 
1.225 
1,201 


66.06 
56.59 
44.82 


41.95 

36.99 

31 88' 


88.51 
75.14 
64.02 


1952 J 
F 






8 83 
7.75 


1.13 
1 04 


17.71 
16.92 


1,129 
1,330 


36.05' 
25.85 


31.25' 
29.64 


50.47' 



46 ' As at end of period. Last month is preliminary. : Milk equivalents of cottage cheese and factory cheese 

other than cheddar, though not included in the monthly figures, are included in the monthly averages. Includes 

butter and cheese imported and "In Transit". 

Source: Monthly Reports, Dairy Production; Milk Production and Utilization; Cold Storage Holdings of Dairy Pro- 
ducts, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 43 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 
Fish: Landings, Exports and Stocks 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



LANDINGS 



EXPORTS OF FISH PRODUCTS 



Seafish 



By Countries* 2 ' 



Selected Types 



Total 
value (1) 



Mariumes 
Total and British United 

quantity' 1 * Quebec' 1 ' Columbia' 1 ' Total States 



Other Salmon Lobster 



STOCKS 

Storage 

Holdings 

End of 

Period 13 ' 





Thousand 
dollars 








Million pounds 










1939 
1951 


1,436 
6,055 


81.2 
107.6 


46.4 
58.0 


34.8 
49.6 


27.5 
45.0 


14.5 
27.6 


13.0 
17.3 


6.2 
5.2 


1.2 
2.1 


31.5 
44.5 


1950 D 


4,470 


115.6 


23.6 


92.1 


41.1 


20.2 


20.9 


7.7 


2.4 


47.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3,252 r 

1,779 

1,614 


129. 3 r 
49.4 
30.1 


19.7 
17.1 
20.9 


109. T 
32.3 
9.2 


55.3 
38.7 
37.3 


30.1 
21.3 
18.6 


25.2 
17.4 
18.7 


5.3 
4.1 
3.8 


2.3 

1.6 
1.3 


39. l r 

31.5 

25.3 


A 
M 
J 


2,288 
8,526 
7,337 


62.4 
142.5 
116.5 


56.8 
121.5 
101.5 


5.5 
21.0 
15.0 


34.8 
33.5 
36.8 


18.4 
24.3 
24.0 


16.5 

9.2 

12.8 


2.2 
2.4 
2.3 


2.3 

4.6 
4.2 


25.2 
35.7 
38.0 


J 

A 

S 


10,978 

14,067 

8,629 


122.7 
170.4 
114.0 


83.7 
86.3 
67.7 


39.1 
84.1 
46.2 


41.2 
41.8 
43.9 


27.8 
32.2 
29.8 


13.4 

9.5 

14.1 


2.7 
3.4 
6.8 


3.4 
1.4 
1.3 


43.2 
49.3 
51.0 


O 
N 
D 


5,007 
3,730 
5,374 


80.0 
106.7 
170.5 


53.1 
38.6 
29.1 


26.9 

68.1 

141.4 


65.2 

55.5 
55.3 


44.1 
36.7 
24.0 


21.1 
18.9 
31.3 


12.5 

12.0 

4.8 


0.5 
0.4 
2.4 


57.8 
50.6 
44. 5 r 


1952 J 


3,176 


116.8 


23.5 


93.4 


39.3 


23.6 


15.8 


3.0 


3.0 


34.8 



'"Monthly totals of 1950 are not equivalent to annual data due to receipt of additional statistics which cannot be 
allocated by months. (2, Does not include bait, offal, meal, livers, tongues or roe. (3) As of April, 1949, Newfound- 
land is included. 

Source: Monthly Review of Canadian Fishery Statistics, D.B.S. 



TABLE 44 



Manufactured Food 

Monthly averages or calendar months; quarterly averages or quarters 



Wheat Flour 



Margarine 



Production 



P.C. of 

capacity 



Million 
barrels 



Exports' 1 ' 



Million 
barrels 



Produc- 
tion' 2 ' 



Stocks 
End of 
Period 



• Oatmeal Cereals 
and Rolled Ready to Macaroni, 
Oats Serve etc. Dry 



Yeast, 
Baking Fresh and Dried 
Powder Dried Eggs' 3 ' 



Production 



Million pounds 



1939 
1951 


63.2 
77.2 


1.40 
1.92 


0.45 


8.76 


3.35 


14.82 
8.68 


17.14 
18.35 


12.19 

17.44 


2.64 
2.37 


3.69 
6.13 


0.05 
0.11 


1950 D 


81.3 


1.96 


0.92 


6.58 


2.40 


6.37 












1951 J 
F 
M 


78.6 
85.8 
87.1 


1.97 
1.98 
2.19 


1.27 
1.05 
1.16 


9.79 

9.60 

10.84 


2.01 r 

2.59 

3.00 


9.08) 

7.06 

6.52J 


16.60 


19.04 


2.02 


5.71 




A 
M 
J 


86.4 
83.7 
81.4 


2.10 
2.11 
2.10 


1.29 
1.48 
1.07 


9.54 
7.73 
7.38 


3.85 
3.85 
3.32 


3.551 

6.42 

7.25J 


21.96 


17.64 


2.26 


6.12 


0.25 


J 

A 

S 


57.4 
64.4 
76.1 


1.41 
1.70 
1.80 


0.93 
0.57 
0.70 


6.27 
7.80 
8.33 


2.45 
1.88 
2.37 


6.17) 
11.54[ 
13.12J 


19.97 


15.38 


2.49 r 


6.26 


0.17 


O 
N 
D 


75.9 
77.1 
72.0 


1.93 
1.94 
1.76 


0.86 r 
0.90 
0.72 


10.15 
9.32 
8.41 


2.80 
2.58 
3.35' 


12.89) 
11.23 

9.37J 


14.88 


17.68 


2.70 


6.42 




1952 J 


73.5 


1.84 


0.90 


9.40 


3.17 


8.31 












'"Bee 
Canada, 
powdered 


inning August, 1945, customs exports 
3ata shown for the last three months are 


are adjusted to reflect actual physical movement of wheat flour from 47 
not so adjusted. < 2) Includes Newfoundland. <3 'Eggs, dried and 


Sourc 


e: Canadian Milling Statistics, Margarine Report and Quarterly Report 


on Processed Foods, D.B.S. 







FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Manufactured Food: Production 
TABLE 44 - concluded Quarterly averages or quarters 



MARCH, 1952 



Biscuits 
Soda 



Biscuits 

Plain 

and Fancy 



Chewing 
Gum 



Cocoa 
Powder 
(for sale) 



Chocolate 
Bars 



Chocolate Sugar Jams 

Confection- Confection- and Marma- Soups 

ery 11 ery Jellies lades Canned 









Million 


Million 


Million 














Million 


pounds 


boxes 


pounds 


dozen 




Million pounds 






1939 


7.03 


20.86 


1.71 


1.55 


5 06 


9.54 


11.61 


10.87 


2.98 


24 16 


1951 


10.97 


42.67 


3 02 


2.47 


9.68 


8.32 


17.44 


17.22 


4.52 


46.63 


1950 






















4th qtr. 


10.17 


37.37 


2.82 


2.84 


8.85 


13.27 


26.60 


17.31 


4.48 


45.84 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


13.16 


38.56 


3.11 


3.04 


9.58 


6.92 


14.15 


14.26 


5.60 


31.04 


2nd qtr. 


10.11 


43.95 


3 42 


2.51 


8 12 


4.85 


14.32 


20.76 


4.42 


30.06 


3rd qtr. 


10.20 


47 58 r 


2 83 


1.98 


9.79 


6.47' 


16.76' 


19.56 


3.96 


70.55 


4th qtr. 


10.39 


40.58 


2 .71 


2.35 


11.23 


15.03 


24.53 


14.30 


4.11 


54.86 



Infants' 

Foods Baked 
Prepared Beans 



Million pounds 



Pickles, 

Relishes Process 
and Sauces Cheese 



Spiced Pork Beef Tea, 

Peanuts, and Spiced Stews and Blended, 

Peanut Salted and Ham, Boiled Packed, 

Butter Roasted Canned Dinners etc. 



Carbo- 
Coffee nated 
Roasted Beverages 



Thousand 
gallons 



Million pounds 



Million 
gallons 



1939 


0.90 


19.63 


0.46 


4.58 


3.10 


1.97 






8.94 


9.58 


10.66 


1951 


8.97 


20.76 


1.17 


9.80 


5.91 


4.22 


4.25 


3.15 


10.72 


17.36 


22.92 


1950 
























4th qtr. 


11.10 


27.08 


1.58 


10.10 


5.82 


5.30 


5.64 


4.10 


10.06 


15.90 


20.05 


1951 
























1st qtr. 


7.06 


26.64 


1.14 


10.34 


6.21 


4.11 


4.74 


3.76 


11.78 


18.10 


17.40 


2nd qtr. 


6.52 


21.21 


1.05 


9.31 


5.88 


4.32 


4.70 


2.74 


11.10 


16.54 r 


25.89 


3rd qtr. 


9.42 


12.60 


1.14 1 


8.87 


5.69 


3.69 


2.92 


2.55' 


9.19 


16.05' 


28.48 


4th qtr. 


12.89 


22.61 


1.35 


10.67 


5.84 


4 76 


4.62 


3.54 


10.81 


18.78 


19.92 



SUGAR: PRODUCTION, SALES AND STOCKS 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



RAW CANE SUGAR 



REFINED SUGAR 



Production 



Domestic Sales 



Receipts 



Stocks end 
of period 



Granulated 



Yellow and 
brown 



Total 



Beet 



Cane 



Total 



Stocks 



End of 
period 



Million pounds 



1939 
1951 


82 1 
89.0 


74 5 
140.7 


83.6 
98.3 


10.2 
10.5 


93.8 
108.8 


24.3 


86.9 


94.5 
111 2 


248.5 
316.0 


1950 D 


69.3 


162 3 


145.2 


11.5 


156.7 


19.6 


60.9 


80.5 


347.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


28.7 
35.6 
49 


131.8 
93 4 
68.5 


55.8 
60 
66.9 


6.8 

9 

12.1 


62.6 
69.0 
78.9 


27 4 
25.7 
23.8 


72.5 
65.6 
73.4 


100.0 
91.3 
97 2 


309.2 
286.2 
267.7 


A 
M 

J 


73 3 
162.4 
137.3 


69.8 
114.2 

132.9 


59.6 

99 8 

104 4 


7.4 
12.7 

11.9 


67.0 
112.4 
116.3 


22 8 
33.7 
31.6 


72.8 

94.4 

113.2 


95 6 
128.1 
144.8 


238.8 
222.3 
193.7 


J 

A 

S 


108.9 
145.2 
128.8 


138.3 

168.5 
198.8 


89.4 

104.5 

89.7 


9.1 
9.8 
8 6 


98.4 
114.3 

98.4 


23.7 
17.1 
16.0 


93.7 
102.0 
109.4 


117.5 
119.1 
125.4 


174.6 
169 
142.0 


O 
N 
D 


89 4 
55 
53.9 


180 9 
139.8 

140.7 


173 4 
175.8 
100 5 


12 7 

16.5 

9 7 


186.1 
192.3 
110.1 


24.1 
27.3 
18 1 


96.4 
86.2 
62.7 


120.5 

113.5 

80 8 


208.2 
287.1 
316.0 


1952 J 


25.9 


103 4 


55 .6 


9 8 


65.4 


20 9 


67 2 


88 .1 


290.9 



48 Bulk and packages. 

Source: Quarterly Report on Processed Foods, and The Sugar Situation in Canada, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 45 



DOMESTIC TRADE 



Value of Retail Trade 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 





Grocery 










Garages 


Total 


and Com- 




Country 


Depart- 


Motor 


and 


All 


bination 


Meat 


General 


ment 


Variety Vehicle 


Filling 


Stores"' 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores Dealers 


Stations 



Clothing 
Stores 12 ' 



Lumber 

and 
Building 
Materials 
Shoe and 

Stores Hardware 













Million dollars 












1941 
1951 


286.4 
870.4 


47.3 
139.4 


6.7 
17.0 


17.8 
44.6 


31.5 
75.2 


7.1 
15.8 


30.0 
151.0 


17.1 
45.6 


18.7 
44.3 


3.7 
8.3 


12.7 
47.2 


1950 D 


976.4 


142.2 


18.5 


46.8 


118.9 


31.7 


117.4 


39.2 


69.3 


12.1 


46.3 


1951 J 
F 
M 


703.8 
694.3 
851.5 


119.1 
118.1 
141.1 


15.1 
14.5 
17.1 


32.2 
32.5 
38.5 


58.3 
58.4 
72.6 


9.6 

9.6 

14.4 


127.2 
145.2 
178.3 


37.3 
33.5 
39.0 


32.2 
27.7 
42.3 


5.5 
4.5 
7.3 


36.0 
31.8 
36.1 


A 
M 
J 


859.2 
931.1 
940.2 


128.0 
139.2 
151.2 


16.0 
17.2 
18.0 


39.5 
49.3 
48.9 


75.2 
76.6 
69.5 


13.1 
15.7 
16.5 


186.9 
183.1 
172.9 


42.7 
49.7 
51.5 


43.0 
46.5 
48.3 


8.2 

9.2 

10.4 


45.8 
57.5 
58.0 


J 

A 

S 


865.8 
897.4 
891.2 


139.7 
144.4 
144.5 


15.4 
17.5 
17.6 


48.4 
49.3 
47.9 


54.5 
61.5 
72.4 


14.9 
14.4 
15.1 


158.1 
148.5 
145.3 


53.8 
51.3 
49.0 


38.0 
36.9 
44.1 


7.7 
7.5 
9.1 


53.0 
54.5 
51.4 


o 

N 
D 


898.7 

906.1 

1005.7 


140.8 
145.9 
161.2 


18.0 
17.3 
20.5 


49.3 
46.9 
52.6 


81.3 
101.9 
119.8 


16.0 
17.4 
33.4 


139.9 

130.3 

96.2 


50.9 
44.3 
44.6 


47.1 
51.0 
74.1 


8.1 

9.9 

12.6 


53.5 
46.6 
42.3 


1952 J 


722.6 


139.4 


16.0 


36.0 


55.2 


10.1 


110.7 


40.0 


35.5 


5.8 


33.9 



BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 



BY ECONOMIC AREAS 



Furniture 
Stores 



Radio and 
Appliance Resiau- 
Dealers rants 



Coal and 

Wood 

Dealers 



Drug 
Stores 



Jewellery 
Stores 



Mari- British 

times Quebec Ontario Prairies Columbia 













Million dollars 












1941 
1951 


5.3 
13.1 


3.8 
11.3 


10.6 
30.0 


8.2 
16.5 


8.4 
19.0 


3.2 

6.4 


23.6 
58.5 


68.2 
204.8 


117.3 
336.1 


51.7 
176.2 


25.8 
94.8 


1950 D 


16.5 


16.2 


28.4 


19.1 


24.3 


17.1 


71.3 


224.4 


389.2 


183.9 


107.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


11.2 
11.2 
13.3 


12.6 
11.7 
12.6 


25.4 
22.5 
26.8 


21.1 
20.0 
16.6 


17.4 
18.2 
19.1 


4.5 
4.2 
5.3 


48.6 
45.6 
59.1 


158.5 
154.9 
204.8 


286.4 
282.2 
343.9 


130.5 
129.4 
146.8 


79.9 
82.2 
97.0 


A 
M 
J 


14.4 
13.3 
13.8 


15.3 
10.7 
10.3 


27.1 
30.9 
30.9 


10.7 
10.6 
11.9 


17.1 
18.2 
18.6 


5.2 
5.3 
6.1 


57.5 
60.9 
63.3 


210.9 
223.6 
222.5 


325.6 
353.5 
362.3 


170.9 
195.9 
192.3 


94.2 
97.2 
99.9 


J 

A 

S 


12.0 
12.5 
13.2 


9.6 
9.4 
9.6 


35.0 
35.9 
33.4 


11.8 
14.1 
16.7 


17.4 
18.6 
18.7 


5.2 
6.1 
5.9 


58.2 
59.3 
57.9 


200.9 
209.1 
211.2 


329.2 
335.6 
337.8 


183.1 
196.1 
188.9 


94.5 
97.3 
95.6 


O 
N 
D 


12.5 
13.8 
15.9 


10.6 
10.7 
12.5 


33.3 
29.6 
29.0 


20.9 
22.0 
21.6 


19.6 
18.6 
26.0 


6.0 

6.7 

16.8 


58.4 
59.6 
73.8 


212.6 
220.8 
227.7 


341.7 
341.5 
393.6 


192.3 
188.1 
200.3 


93.7 

96.2 

110.4 


1952 J 


10.7 


10.8 


26.5 


24.3 


19.0 


4.4 


50.3 


167.0 


285.9 


141.9 


77.7 



(1, Total value of sales by retail outlets, including "Tobacco" and "All Other Trades". 
"Family Clothing" and "Women's Clothing". 
Source: Monthly Report on Retail Trade. 



'Includes "Men's Clothing", 49 



DOMESTIC TRADE 



TABLE 46 



MARCH, 1952 



Retail Sales and Stocks 

Monthly averages or calendar months'" 



DEPARTMENT STORES 



Total 

All 

Departments 



Ladies' Apparel 

and 

Accessories 



Men's and Boys' 

Clothing, 

Furnishings 

and Shoes 



Food and 
Kindred 
Products 



Piece Goods, 

Linens 

and 

Domestics 



Home Furnishings, 
Furniture, Radio 
and Appliances 



Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks 















Million 


dollars 












1950 
1951 


72.7 
75.2 


177.4 
182.6 


20.9 
21.8 


42.3 


9 3 
9.7 


24.8 


5.0 

5.3 


4.2 


4.7 
4.7 


15.4 


13.0 
12.5 


43.2 


1950 N 
D 


98.2 
118.9 


204.3 
177.4 


28.9 
32.1 




15.1 
18.2 




6.0 
7.4 




5 5 
5.4 




14.5 
14.9 




1951 J 
F 
M 


58.3 
58.4 
72.6 


187.1 
213.7 
240.4 


14.0 
14.3 
22.5 


47.7 
57.9 
64.7 


6.0 
6.0 
8.7 


24.2 
29.2 
32.3 


4.7 
5.1 
6.0 


5.1 
5.8 
5.4 


5.9 
4.9 
4.5 


15.5 
18.2 
19.4 


12.5 
12.7 
13.2 


42.9 
45.5 
55.4 


A 
M 

J 


75.2 
76.6 
69.5 


239.0 
235.2 
221.5 


22.9 
23.7 
19.8 


63.9 
58.6 
52.4 


9.0 
9.2 
8.9 


32.3 
33.1 
30.7 


4.7 
4.9 
4.7 


5.1 
5.0 
4.5 


4.3 
4.3 
4.2 


19.6 
19.5 
18.2 


14.8 
13.7 
11.8 


53.4 
54.4 
52.9 


J 

A 

S 


54.5 
61.5 
72.4 


221.6 
232.9 
234.9 


13.6 
17.0 
23.4 


54.7 
62.5 
62.6 


6.0 
6.6 

9.2 


30.7 
34.5 
36.9 


4.5 
4.8 
4.7 


4.5 
4.7 
4.4 


3.7 
4.3 
4.7 


17.7 
18.4 
17.7 


10.2 
11.4 
11.8 


51.6 
49.9 
48.2 


O 
N 
D 


81.3 
101.9 
119.8 


241.5 
225.6 
182.6 


27.0 
30.6 
33.0 


62.4 
56.4 
42 3 


12.1 
15.8 
18.7 


37.6 
34 .0 
24.8 


5.3 
6.6 
7.9 


4.9 
5.0 

4.2 


5.1 
5.5 
5.2 


17.6 
16.5 
15.4 


11.9 
13.5 
12.6 


48.2 
44.6 
43.2 


1952 J 


55.2 




14.0 




6.2 




4.9 




6.2 




9.7 





CHAIN STORES-SLX TRADES 



50 



Food 
Stores 



Women's 
Clothing 



Shoe 



Hardware 



Drug 



Variety 



Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks Sales Stocks 















Million 


dollars 












1949 
1951 


36.3 
52.4 


32.4 
44.1 


3.0 

3.4 


6.2 
7.3 


2.7 
3.1 


15.0 
16.7 


0.9 
1.1 


3.3 
4.2 


2.3 

2.5 


7.4 

84 


11.8 
13.7 


29.7 
35.1 


1950 N 
D 


45.0 
52.3 


39.5 
38 8 r 


3.0 
5.7 


9.1 
5.9 r 


3.2 
4.8 


16.7 
15. 3 r 


1.2 
1.4 


4.9 
3.8' 


2.3 
3.5 


9.2 
8.3 r 


13.1 
27.5 


45.5 
32. 9 r 


1951 J 
F 
M 


44.0 
45.1 
55.7 


38.3 
39.7 
41.0 


2.4 
2.2 
3.0 


6.7 
8.0 
8.5 


1.8 
1.6 
2.7 


13.8 
15.2 
16.4 


1.0 
0.9 
0.8 


4.6 
5.3 

4.9 


2.4 r 

2.4 

2.5 


8.2 
8.0 
8.0 


8.3 

8.4 

12.6 


33.9 
38.2 
42.5 


A 
M 

J 


48.7 
53.5 
55.8 


40.5 
41.0 
40.7 


3.0 
3.6 
3.8 


8.9 
8.9 
8.3 


2.6 

3.4 
3.7 


17.0 
18.5 
17.9 


1.0 
1.2 
1.2 


4.8 
5.1 

41 


2.2 
2 3 
2.4 


8.2 
8.1 
8.3 


11.4 
13.7 
14.3 


46.6 
47.5 
46.3 


J 

A 

S 


49.1 
52.7 
53.3 


42.9 
42 1 
43.0 


3 4 
3.0 
3 1 


6.9 
8.6 
8.4 


2.9 
2.8 
3.3 


16 7 
18.2 
18 3 


1.1 
1.0 
1.2 


4.4 
4.1 

4.2 


2.3 
2.3 
2.4 


8.2 
8.2 
8.5 


12.8 
12.5 
13 


45.0 
46.3 
47.9 


O 
N 
D 


53.4 
57.2 
60.8 


47 7 
47 
44.1 


3.3 
3 6 
6 5 


9 9 

10 2 

7 3 


2.9 
4.0 
5.4 


19 2 
19.4 
16.7 


14 
1.2 
1.4 


4.2 
4.6 

4.2 


2.6 

2.4 
3.6 


8.9 
9.5 
8 4 


13 9 
14.9 
28.9 


51.3 
53 9 
35.1 


1952 J 


55.0 




2.7 




19 




0.9 




2.4 




8.8 





1 Stocks at end of period at selling value. 
Source: Department Store Sale! and Stocks, and Chain Store Sales and Stocks, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 

TABLE 47 


1952 




Retail Consumer Credit 

Quarterly averages or quarters (1) 


DOMES 


>TIC 1 


RADE 












COMBINED TRADES 


















Sales 


and Percentage Composition 






Accounts Receivable' 1 ' 




Total 
Sales 


Cash 




Credit 






Total 


Instal- 
ment 






Sales 


Percent 


Total Instalment 


Charge 
t Sales Percent 






Sales 


Percent Sales 


Percen 


Charge 










Million dollars or percentages 












1949 
1951 

1950 4th qtr. 

1951 1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 


2,107.0 1,548.1 

2.611.3 1,883.1 

2,638.6 1,927.4 

2,249.6 1,589.0 
2,730.6 1,989.8 

2.654.4 1,920.5 
2,810.4 2,033.1 


73.5 
72.4 

73.1 

70.6 
72.9 
72.4 
72.3 


558.9 
728.2 

711.2 

660.6 
740.8 
733.9 

777.3 


26.5 128.7 

28.0 194.4 

26.9 203.4 

29.4 183.8 

27.1 200.8 

27.6 197.4 

27.7 195.4 


6.1 
7.5 

7.7 

8.2 
7.3 
7.4 
7.0 


430.2 
533.8 

507.8 

476.8 
540.0 
536.5 
581.9 


20.4 
20.5 

19.2 

21.2 
19.8 
20.2 
20.7 


467.5 
507.4 

546.6 

491.9 
478.3 
456.7 
507.4 


139.8 
105.7 

169.5 

143.2 

121.8 

99.8 

105.7 


327.7 
401.7 

377.1 

348.7 
356.5 
356.9 
401.7 












SELECTED TRADES 












Department Stores 


Clothing Stores 


furniture, Radio and AppL 
ance Stores 


- Motor 


Vehicle Dealers 


Total 
Sales 


Credit Accounts Total 
Sales receivable* 1 ' Sales 


Credit Accounts Total 
Sales receivable 11 ' Sales 


Credit Accounts Total 
Sales receivable' 1 ' Sales 


Credit Accounts 
Sales receivable' 1 ' 










Million dollars 














1949 
1951 

1950 4th qtr. 

L951 1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 


213.9 
225.4 

300.8 

189.1 
221.3 
188.4 
302.9 


63.3 
65.7 

91.8 

57.2 
62.6 
53.5 
89.4 


83.7 
75.7 

93.6 

74.7 
66.3 
58.7 
75.7 


127.5 
128.4 

160.1 

98.9 
135.4 
117.5 
161.9 


22.6 27.3 

24.5 31.0 

31.4 30.1 

22.1 26.4 
22.9 25.9 

21.2 24.9 

31.6 31.0 


69.9 
72.4 

85.9 

72.5 
77.9 
63.3 
76.0 


40.3 
40.8 

49.6 

42.6 
43.6 
37.1 
39.9 


56.3 
52.4 

76.4 

65.3 
60.2 
51.9 
52.4 


257.6 117.0 
453.0 208.2 

380.5 167.0 

450.8 207.9 
543.0 205.5 
451.8 223.6 
366.3 195.7 


55.8 
70.3 

72.4 

76.5 
79.7 
71.1 
70.3 



Note: Series adjusted to agree with revisions in the value of retail trade in 1950 and 1951. 
'•'Accounts receivable as at end of period. 
Source: Retail Consumer Credit, D.B.S. 



TABLE 48 



Indexes of Wholesale Sales 

Monthly averages or calendar months 





General 
Index 


Auto Parts 

and 
Equipment 


Drugs 


Clothing 


Footwear 


Dry 
Goods 


Groceries 


Fruits and 
Vegetables 


Hardware 


Tobacco 
and Con- 
fectionery 








1935-39 = 


100 










1939 
1951 


109.1 
347.1 


112.8 
510.3 


111.0 
347.3 


106.1 
252.6 


111.5 
328.5 


105.8 
249.4 


108.6 
304.1 


107.7 
288.0 


110.6 
455.7 


113.4 
409.4 


1950 D 


295.6 


403.2 


320.4 


200.7 


244.6 


171.6 


243.6 


260.4 


412.0 


398.0 


1951 J 
F 
M 


317.6 
307.9 
338.9 


506.7 
465.2 
441.9 


342.9 
337.3 
334.3 


238.3 
258.5 
321.8 


235.0 
312.0 
416.6 


238.4 
285.1 
316.0 


280.6 
269.6 
281.2 


209.3 
237.3 
271.2 


429.9 
398.7 
473.2 


373.9 
316.2 
381.6 


A 
M 
J 


352.4 
372.6 
357.3 


559.1 
520.0 
504.2 


334.9 
362.6 
312.8 


249.7 
229.4 
203.3 


324.8 
317.4 
236.5 


272.5 
250.6 
195.8 


278.5 
319.5 
321.2 


296.7 
354.5 
339.9 


504.7 
525.2 
481.7 


435.8 
416.0 
432.6 


J 
A 

S 


338.7 
367.7 
357.0 


482.1 
526.7 
574.0 


328.1 
364.4 
338.1 


159.3 
262.9 
296.7 


203.9 
434.9 
432.1 


157.7 
263.0 
299.2 


321.5 
332.6 
317.4 


308.3 
303.3 
269.4 


418.3 
439.1 
458.1 


428.7 
453.8 
374.0 


o 

N 
D 


383.7 
364.4 
307.2 


580.1 
523.4 
440.2 


404.5 
387.9 
320.2 


300.6 
309.8 
200.9 


414.9 
382.6 
231.1 


289.0 
280.8 
145.1 


346.0 
321.6 
259.1 


262.3 
288.6 
315.0 


489.3 
470.6 
379.4 


454.7 
413.5 
431.5 


952 J 


306.3 


448.9 


370.7 


218.5 


166.4 


170.5 


283.0 


248.2 


365.2 


390.2 



Note: Series revised to reflect adjustment in weights. 
Source: Monthly Report on Wholesale Sales, D.B.S. 



51 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



TABLE 49 



Merchandise Exports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



MARCH, 1952 



Index 

of Index 

Declared of 

Values Prices 



Index 

of Total Fruits 

Physical Domestic and 

Volume Exports Vegetables Wheat 



Wheat 
Flour 



Other 

Grain 

Products 



Beef and 
Cattle Veal, Fresh 



Other 
Meats 







1948=100 










Million dollars 








1939 
1951 


30.1 
127.3 


45.1 
122.5 


66.7 
103.9 


77.1 
326.2 


17 
2.0 


9.1 
36 8 


1.4 
9.5 


2.5 
12.9' 


1.3 
5.3 


4.2' 


2.9 
1.8 


1950 D 


113.1 


112. 2 r 


100.8' 


289.9 


2.1 


30.1 


7.8 


14.8 


7.5 


3.1 


2.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


111.3 

91.3 

113.2 


115. 9 r 
117. 8 r 
119. 3 r 


96.0' 

77.5' 
94.9' 


285.1 
233.9 
290.2 


2.2 
1.9 

1.6 


19 2 
18.1 
23.0 


11.8 

8.7 

10 6 


6.5 
5.0 
4.9 


5.5 
5.5 
7.6 


2.1 
1.3 
1.4 


2.4 
1.2 
1.0 


A 
M 

J 


115.2 
126.2 
121.9 


121. 2 r 
121. 9 r 
123.0' 


95.0' 

103.5' 

99.1' 


295.2 
323.4 
312.5 


1.3 
2.2 
1.6 


20.6 
27.1 
40.6 


12.1 

14.2 
9.4 


4.9 
14.2 
17.2 


6.9 
7.0 
4.9 


3.4 

8.4 

10.2 


1.2 
1.7 
1.8 


J 

A 

S 


146.1 
136.5 
124.9 


123.8' 
125.5' 
125. 0' 


118.0' 

108. 8' 
99.9' 


374.5 
349.8 
320.1 


1.4 
2.2 
2.3 


51.7 
44.4 
36.6 


11.7 
6.9 
4.8 


18.7 
12.8 
13.6 


3.0 
4.4 
5.7 


8.6 
4.1 
3.8 


1.3 
2.0 
2.0 


O 
N 
D 


144.8 
148.1 
148.0 


125.5' 
126.0' 

125.8' 


115.4' 
117.5' 
117.6' 


371.0 
379.5 
379.3 


2.5 
2.7 
2.0 


37.9 
58.8 
63.0 


8.3 
8.6 
6.9 


16.9 
20.2 
20.6 


5.5 
4.8 
2.2 


4.8 
2.3 
6 


2.7 
2.3 
2.0 


1952 J 


126.3 


124.7" 


101.3" 


323.7 


2.1 


28.1 


8.2 


8.8 


1.3 


0.4 


2 3 



Fish and Dairy Alcoholic Rubber 
Products Products Beverages Products 



Hides, Other 

Furs Skins Animal Fibres Planks 

and and and and and 

Products Leather Vegetable Textiles Boards 



Shingles Pulpwood 



Million dollars 



1939 
1951 


2.4 

9.8 


1.5 
1.8 


0.7 
4.7 


1.3 
2.4 


1.2 
2.5 


1.0 
1.9 


2.3 
7.9 


1.2 
3.1 


4.0 
26.0 


0.7 
2.3 


1.0 

5.7 


1950 D 


9.0 


0.7 


4.4 


1.5 


5.4 


1.7 


10.6 


2.5 


20.8 


2.2 


3.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


10.6 
8 8 
8.8 


0.5 
0.6 
0.6 


4.2 
3 4 
5.3 


1.6 
1.8 
2.1 


6.5 
4.4 

2.6 


2.9 
2.2 
1.8 


14.4 
9.4 

8.8 


2.7 

2.4 
2.7 


24.0 
21.3 
26.5 


2.4 
2.6 
3.2 


3.8 

3.9 
4.7 


A 
M 

J 


7.5 
8 6 
8.9 


0.6 
1.3 

1.7 


4.4 
4.3 
3.2 


2 1 
2.3 

2.1 


2.3 
1.9 

1.9 


1.7 
18 
2.0 


9.1 
4.8 
4.7 


2.7 

4.0 
3.1 


27.5 
26.6 
24.7 


3.5 
2.7 
1.6 


3.5 
2.7 
5.8 


J 

A 

S 


10 

9.1 

10.1 


2 1 
2.9 
2.8 


4.0 
4.7 
5.6 


3.0 
2.6 
3.1 


1.7 
11 
2.0 


2.4 
1.4 
1.8 


5 5 
5.7 
4.0 


3.4 

3.5 
2.3 


28.7 
28.9 
25.4 


1.8 
1.9 
2.2 


7.7 
8.0 
7.1 


O 
N 
D 


12 8 
10 9 
11.4 


3.7 
3.2 

1.6 


6.0 
5 8 
5.5 


2.6 
2.2 

3 5 


0.6 

6 
4.2 


2.2 
1.6 
1.1 


7 2 

8.7 

12 8 


3.4 
3.0 
3.7 


29.1 

25.9 
23 6 


2.4 
1.8 
1.2 


8.7 
6.6 
5.4 


1952 J 


9 9 


5 


3 9 


2 7 


3.6 


1.3 


10.7 


3.2 


20.2 


1.2 


5.8 



52 Note: Commencing with April, 1949, the Trade of Canada includes that of Newfoundland. 

Does not include re-exports. 
Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



UARCH, 1952 



'ABLE 49 - concluded 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



Merchandise Exports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Other Auto- 
News- Wood Primary mobiles 
Wood- print and Iron Ferro- Iron and Farm Other and 
pulp Paper Paper Ore Alloys Steel (2) Machinery Machinery Parts 



Other Aluminum 
Iron and and 

Steel Products 



Million dollars 



2.6 
30.4 

21.2 

24.0 
21.6 
27.2 

26.6 
31.5 
32.4 

34.3 
35.7 
31.4 

34.6 
32.5 
33.2 

33.5 



9.6 

44.7 

42.2 

40.7 
35.8 
43.3 

42.3 
47.2 
39.2 

51.3 
51.5 
44.0 

50.1 
49.6 
41.4 

47.2 



2.3 

7.5 

8.3 

6.4 
5.9 
7.1 

6.6 

6.7 
7.3 

7.6 
7.9 
7.1 

8.1 

8.3 

10.8 

7.1 



1.5 
0.3 



0.6 
1.0 
2.4 



3.5 
1.9 
1.3 

0.2 



0.2 
2.6 

1.7 

2.2 
2.0 
2.3 

2.4 
2.3 
2.4 

2.9 
3.5 
2.4 

3.5 
3.2 
2.3 

3.2 



0.6 
2.7 

3.7 

2.6 
1.0 
1.4 

3.1 
1.8 
2.3 

2.6 
2.7 
2.9 

4.0 
3.8 
4.4 

5.1 



0.6 
8.9 

5.8 

8.5 

5.8 

13.7 

10.8 
10.7 
10.4 

9.2 
7.6 
6.2 

8.3 

7.5 
7.7 

13.1 



0.9 
3.4 

3.1 

2.7 
2.8 
2.8 

3.4 
3.8 
2.7 

2.5 
2.3 
3.5 

4.3 
4.0 
5.5 

3.5 



2.1 
6.6 

3.7 

1.7 
1.9 
4.0 

6.4 
4.2 
3.5 

5.6 
5.9 
9.2 

12.3 
12.7 
11.9 

18.2 



0.8 
2.8 

2.6 

2.0 
1.9 
2.3 

2.6 
2.6 
2.5 

2.5 
2.4 
2.3 

4.2 
4.3 
4.3 

4.1 



2.2 
10.4 

13.2 

10.3 

7.4 

10.8 

12.7 

12.1 

3.5 

14.5 

16.1 

9.8 

11.2 
9.5 
7.0 

7.1 











Precious 




Other 




Other 






Miscel- 




Copper 


Lead 




Metals 


Zinc 


Non- 


Asbestos 


Non- 




Other 


laneous 




and 


and 




(except 


and 


Ferrous 


and 


Metallic 




Chemical 


Commo- 




Products 


Products 


Nickel 


gold) 


Products 


Products 


Products 


Products 


Fertilizers 


Products 


dities 










Million dollars 










•39 


4.4 


0.8 


4.8 


1.4 


0.8 


0.8 


1.3 


1.1 


0.8 


1.3 


1.4 


151 


7.3 


3.8 


11.4 


4.0 


7.0 


3.6 


6.8 


4.1 r 


3.0 


8.0 


5.1 


)50 D 


7.4 


5.9 


8.4 


2.3 


5.4 


2.3 


5.8 


3.2 


3.4 


6.1 


3.5 


•51 J 


6.6 


3.9 


11.8 


4.9 


7.4 


2.7 


6.3 


3.5 


3.2 


6.2 


4.4 


F 


5.4 


2.4 


7.7 


5.4 


2.6 


2.2 


4.3 


2.9 


3.1 


6.0 


3.5 


M 


5.5 


3.9 


10.7 


3.3 


5.4 


4.3 


8.5 


3.5 


2.1 


6.5 


4.2 


A 


9.3 


3.2 


11.2 


2.8 


5.0 


3.3 


7.8 


3.8 


2.7 


7.8 


5.5 


M 


5.6 


5.2 


9.0 


4.1 


6.2 


2.7 


7.2 


4.2 


4.1 


7.7 


7.8 


J 


6.6 


2.2 


9.1 


4.2 


7.6 


3.1 


6.7 


3.7 


3.7 


7.3 


4.3 


J 


7.7 


3.4 


12.7 


5.6 


9.6 


4.5 


6.9 


4.6 


2.5 


9.1 


5.9 


A 


5.6 


3.1 


13.3 


4.2 


6.8 


2.6 


7.4 


4.1 


3.0 


9.7 


4.6 


s 


7.4 


3.9 


11.4 


3.1 


7.5 


3.2 


6.7 


4.8 


2.9 


8.3 


4.7 


o 


7.0 


3.4 


13.7 


3.0 


8.8 


4.5 


7.2 


5.0 


2.4 


8.9 


5.9 


N 


7.9 


5.1 


12.8 


2.8 


9.8 


4.6 


5.5 


5.2 


3.1 


10.3 


4.8 


D 


12.6 


5.8 


13.4 


5.0 


7.7 


5.2 


7.5 


4.5 


3.0 


8.1 


5.3 


:52j 


8.7 


4.2 


10.8 


4.3 


7.6 


4.4 


5.8 


4.3 


3.2 


7.6 


6.3 


"'Does 


not include 


re-exports. 


(2) Includes pigs, 


ingots, blooms and billets, castings 


and forgings and rolling mill products. 53 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



TABLE 50 



MARCH, 1952 



Merchandise Imports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Index 

of Index 

Declared of 

Values Prices 



Index 

of 

Physical 

Vol u nit- 



Fruits, Grains 

Total Nuts and and 

Imports Vegetables Products 



Tea, 

Sugar Coflee, Rubber Furs 

and Vegetable Cocoa and and and 

Products Oils Chocolate Products Products 







1948=100 










Million dollars 








1939 
1951 


28.4 
154.8 


47.2 
126.0 


60.2 
122.9 


62.59 
340.40 


2.89 
12.41 


0.74 
3.84 


1.95 
7.16 


0.78 
3.25 


1.42 
6.86 


1.34 

7.04 


0.59 
1.80 


1950 N 
D 


149.1 
121.3 


113. 6 r 
116. 7' 


131.3' 
103.9' 


327.91 
266.29 


11.88 
10.66 


4.71 
5.99 


11.19 
6.55 


3.75 
2.74 


7.91 
5.76 


6.35 
7.24 


1.90 
1.36 


1951 J 
F 
M 


149.0 
124.9 
156.0 


119.9' 
122. 3 r 
124.6' 


124.3' 
102.1' 
125.2' 


327.19 
274.17 
342.50 


11.80 
10.09 
12.86 


2 31 
1.91 
2.86 


3.83 
1.86 
3.16 


4 15 
3.04 
4.47 


7.66 
6.90 
8.44 


11.85 
7.30 
9.92 


4.66 
3.07 
2.57 


A 
M 
J 


179.0 
184.2 
163.8 


128.1' 
129.5' 
129.9' 


139. 7' 
142. 2' 
126.1' 


393.04 
405.07 
360.42 


13.48 
14.90 
14.96 


5.28 
6.15 
3.47 


5.88 

10.40 

9.21 


7.43 
6.42 
3.85 


7.91 
6.80 
6.43 


7.65 
9.37 
7.95 


2.37 
1 61 
1.29 


J 

A 

S 


168.7 
162.1 
141.5 


129.6' 
127.2' 
126.2' 


130.2' 
127.4' 
112. V 


370.64 
357.47 
311.50 


13.69 

11.90 

9.26 


2.31 
2.11 
2.10 


8.43 

14.16 

9.86 


2.67 
1.36 
1.32 


7.89 
5.25 
4.68 


6.60 
7.12 
3.98 


1.38 
0.71 
0.92 


o 

N 
D 


156.1 
147.9 
123. 9" 


124.2' 
121. 5' 
121. 6p 


125.7 
121. 7' 
101. 9» 


344.15 
325.70 
273.01 


11.33 
12.64 
11.99 


4.01 
5.60 
7.98 


9.58 
5.77 
3.72 


1.58 
1.15 
1.53 


6.49 
8.00 
5.91 


4.71 
3.73 
4.34 


1.03 
0.76 
1.22 



Other Cotton Wool 

Vegetable Flax, Synthetic 

Hides and Raw and Hemp, Raw and Fibres 

and Animal unmanu- Manu- Jute and Unmanu- Manu- and 

Leather Products factured factured Products factured factured Products 



Books and Paper 
Other Printed and 

Textiles Matter Products 















Million dollars 












1939 
1951 


1.01 
2.60 


2.65 
10.72 


1.40 
8.01 


1.65 
7.25 


0.77 
2.59 


0.88 
7.90 


1.30 
5.64 


0.45 
2.95 


1.94 
5 94 


1.26 
4.24 


0.72 
2.90 


1950 N 
D 


3.25 

2.79 


12.70 
10.11 


10.82 
11.99 


6.53 
5.51 


2.43 
1.74 


6.00 
6.04 


4.39 
3.88 


2.36 
2.04 


5.65 
4.30 


4.14 
3.36 


2.52 
2.22 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3.68 
3.08 
3.50 


10.58 

9.17 

12.13 


10.69 

7.15 

12.42 


9.82 
8.58 
9.56 


2.46 
1.32 
2.24 


6.63 
7.41 
8.55 


6.22 
5.88 
5.77 


3.09 
2 54 
3.49 


6.43 
5.49 
7.24 


4.23 
3.36 
4.10 


2.84 
2.65 
3.08 


A 
M 
J 


3.62 

2.81 
3.07 


9.95 
9.92 
8.52 


11.41 

12.54 

7.07 


11.96 
8.18 
6.21 


2.80 
2.59 

4.04 


13.19 
9.71 
9.87 


8.95 
6.63 
5.50 


4.94 
4.02 

3.24 


7.31 
7.43 
5.41 


4.70 
4 21 
3.80 


3.02 
2.85 
2.61 


J 

A 

S 


2.61 
2.21 
1.93 


9.99 
10.47 
10.91 


3.23 
3.65 
4.33 


6.59 
6.27 
4.64 


4.84 
2.83 
2 16 


14.80 
11.60 

6.58 


6.56 
6.54 
4.98 


3 14 
2.78 
2.18 


5.50 
5.49 
5.62 


4.07 
4.44 
4.53 


2.71 
2.83 
2.64 


o 

N 
D 


1.97 
1.61 

1.16 


14.53 
12.42 
10.10 


5 31 

10.54 

7.79 


5.36 
5 42 
4.40 


1.68 
2.98 
1.15 


2.39 
2.03 

2.05 


4.39 
3.54' 
2.76 


2.38 
2.01 

1.64 


5 .13 

4.92' 

5.33 


5.03 
4.48 
3.95 


3 54 
3.38 
2.70 



54 Note: As of April, 1949, The Trade of Canada includes that of Newfoundland. 

Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 
















EXTERNAL 


TRADE 








Merchandise Imports by Commodities 








TABLE 50 - concluded 




Monthly averages 


or calendar months 










Wood, 
























Unmanu- 
























factured 






Pipes, 














Precious 




and 




Primary 


Tubes and 


Engines 






Automobiles Other 


Aluminum 


Metals 




Manu- 


Iron 


Iron and 


and 


and 


Farm 


Other 


and 


Iron and 


and 


(except 




factured 


Ore 


Steel' 1 ' 


Fittings 


Boilers 


Machinery Machinery 


Parts 


Steel 


Products 


gold) 










Million dollars 










1939 


0.82 


0.35 


4.00 


0.20 


0.63 


1.74 


3.57 


3.42 


1.36 


0.50 


0.29 


[951 


4.28 


1.89 


16.88 


3.60 


7.37 


16.26 


27.40 


22.15 


15.49 


2.34 


2.52 


.950 N 


3.38 


2.24 


13.79 


2.69 


4.32 


9.37 


21.92 


24.57 


14.03 


2.60 


2.75 


D 


2.74 


0.54 


9.71 


2.04 


4.22 


8.61 


18.96 


18.89 


11.61 


1.85 


2.92 


951 J 


3.76 


0.01 


12.73 


3.10 


6.32 


12.15 


25.67 


25.43 


14.97 


1.90 


3.04 


F 


3.88 


0.01 


10.66 


2.14 


5.56 


13.46 


20.77 


23.61 


12.08 


1.27 


2.04 


M 


4.98 


0.03 


14.67 


3.07 


7.10 


16.51 


25.96 


27.95 


15.91 


2.04 


2.92 


A 


5.01 


0.38 


17.46 


3.64 


8.37 


21.23 


29.89 


33.42' 


19.62 r 


1.89 


2.69 


M 


4.96 


1.32 


17.47 


4.93 


7.58 


21.48 


31.77 


29.92 


18.69 


2.70 


3.58 


J 


5.30 


3.17 


16.91 


3.98 


6.62 


17.98 


29.42 


25.98 r 


15.92 r 


2.70 


3.31 


J 


4.93 


3.70 


18.60 


4.02 


6.94 


18.76 


30.99 


22.71 


15.38 


2.61 


2.75 


A 


4.30 


4.13 


18.16 


4.12 


5.67 


19.63 


27.74 


14.69 


15.65 


2.84 


2.43 


S 


3.53 


3.35 


18.48 


2.98 


7.80 


14.19 


26.01 


16.04 


14.06 


3.14 


1.57 


O 


3.98 r 


3.99 


21.55 


4.72 


8.62 


15.57 


28.04 


16.82 


15.78 


3.41 


2.02 


N 


3.68 


1.73 


19.59 


3.63 


8.87 


12.10 


28.21 


15.63 


15.29 


2.49 


2.52 


D 


2.98 


0.85 


16.22 


2.84 


9.00 


12.01 


24.28 


13.61 


12.49 


1.09 


1.35 



Other 

Non- Clay 

Electrical Ferrous and 

Apparatus Products Products 



Other Refrige- 

Coal Petroleum Non- Chemicals rators 

and Glass and and Metallic and Allied and 

Products Glassware Products Products Products Parts 



Other 
Miscella- 
neous 
Tourists' Corn- 
Purchases modifies 



Million dollars 



A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 

N 
D 



1.15 
10.01 

8.30 
7.21 

9.46 

7.81 

10.38 

11.44 
11.02 
10.27 

9.90 

11.20 

9.72 

10.91 
9.59 
8.41 



1.57 
9.37 

10.25 
7.27 

8.13 

8.13 

12.20 

9.76 

10.94 

8.71 

8.82 

10.74 

6.55 

10.01 

10.80 

7.64 



0.66 
3.62 

3.29 
2.83 

3.59 
2.65 
3.35 

4.34 
4.03 
3.87 

4.16 
4.11 
3.20 

3.75 
3.52 
2.83 



3.82 
15.86 

19.80 
13.19 

14.02 
13.12 
10.51 

12.73 
16.76 
17.81 

17.00 
18.64 
16.76 

21.19 

18.84 
12.98 



0.66 
2.65 

3.00 
2.33 

2.79 
2.21 
2.82 

3.41 
3.08 
2.74 

2.90 
2.57 
2.37 

2.59 
2.48 
1.81 



4.66 
29.49 

31.56 

27.47 

27.20 
20.11 
23.75 

25.16 
34.26 
30.21 

38.61 
34.54 
33.56 

31.92 
28.58 
25.99 



1.27 
5.43 

6.49 
3.43 

3.62 
3.46 
3.86 

5.46 
6.23 
6.60 

6.74 
6.79 
6.53 

5.47 r 

5.74 

4.60 



3.64 
15.98 

16.22 
11.95 

17.60 
13.99 
17.36 

18.83 
18.48 
15.47 

16.89 
15.30 
14.11 

15.97 
15.78 
12.03 



010 
2.55 

1.96 
1.51 

3.15 
2.68 
3.44 

4.72 
4.70 
3.87 

2.60 
2.05 
1.13 

1.01 
0.80 
0.47 



0.79 
3.92 

3.59 
2.48 

1.98 
1.35 
2.37 

3.97 
2.92 
3.58 

4.17 
6.77 
5.83 

6.14 
4.13 
3.85 



3.62 
18.25 

13.31 
10.25 

13.65 
12.39 
14.93 

17.75 
21.73 
19.47 

20.46 
23.70 
17.96 

20.23 
20.73 
15.97 



(1) Includes pigs, ingots, blooms and billets, castings and forgings, ferro-alloys and rolling mill products. 



55 



EXTERNAL TRADE 

Merchandise Exports and Imports by Areas 

TABLE 51 Monthly averages or calendar months 



MARCH, 1952 



ALL COl \ 1 RIES 




COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES 






Total 


United Kingdom Australia 


India' 2 ' 


Exports Imports 


Exports Imports 


Exports Imports Exports Imports 


Exports Imports 













Million dollars 










1939 
1951 


77.08 
326.21 


62.59 
340 . 40 


35.90 
72.70 


15.74 
60.59 


27.34 
52.62 


9.50 
35.08 


2.67 
4.09 


0.94 
3.85 


0.43 
2.98 


0.82 
3.35 


1950 D 


289.91 


266.29 


56.60 


51.59 


39 56 


32.03 


4.10 


2.24 


5.65 


2 81 


1951 J 
F 
M 


285.13 
233.91 
290.16 


327.19 
274.17 
342.50 


56.05 
47.67 
60.00 


55.93 
42.62 
55.44 


40.05 

33.59 
39.65 


33.92 
27.81 
30.41 


2.46 
1.39 
4.60 


1.44 
0.78 
1.85 


4.99 
4.89 
6.29 


4.29 
1.67 
4.16 


A 
M 

J 


295.18 
323.36 
312.50 


393.04 
405.07 
360.42 


61.32 
67.63 
66.12 


71.15 
75.65 
70.62 


41.72 
47.24 
51.27 


48.94 
43.60 
39.93 


4.27 
5.27 
1.43 


2.71 
6.19 
5.62 


3.65 
0.96 
1.48 


3.53 
3.53 
6.55 


J 

A 

S 


374.47 
349.76 
320.09 


370.64 
357.47 
311.50 


100.65 
86.10 
68.55 


82.01 
79.96 
55.57 


73.93 

66.40 
52.51 


43.30 
39.05 
28.56 


5.42 
4.74 
2.38 


7.52 
7.39 
6.57 


1.94 
1.50 
0.57 


5.31 

2.29 
1.97 


O 

N 
D 


371.03 
379.54 
379.33 


344.15 
325.70 
273.01 


90.99 
81.93 
85.40 


53.98 
51.28 
32.89 


63.96 
57.99 
63.14 


32.73 
33.33 

19.42 


6.15 

5.40 
5.57 


3.21 
2 18 
0.78 


3.70 
2.80 
2.96 


1.92 
3.67 
1 32 


1952 J 


323.70 




65.26 




43 27 




5.78 




4.05 





COMMONWEALTH 
COUNTRIES 

Union ob 3) 
South Africa 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



Total 



United States 



Latin America 



Europe 



Exports 



Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 













Million dollars 










1939 
1951 


1.50 
4.39 


0.33 

0.45 


41.18 
253.50 


46.85 
279.81 


31.70 
191 47 


41.41 
234.41 


1.68 
18.17 


1.33 

22.81 


4.49 
30.57 


3.08 
14.82 


1950 D 


2 40 


0.21 


233.31 


214.71 


191.51 


182.28 


12.96 


15.91 


23.21 


9.31 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2 72 
2.54 

3 67 


0.22 
0.41 
0.52 


229.08 
186.24 
230.17 


271 26 
231.55 
287.06 


186.95 

152.43 
190.21 


233.31 
199.03 
245 . 71 


14.04 
10.67 
11.99 


22.03 
17.03 
22.45 


16.43 
13.49 

17.14 


9.49 

9.61 

11.13 


A 
M 

J 


4.31 
5 60 
4.34 


0.53 
0.81 

57 


233.86 
255.73 
246.38 


321.89 
329.42 
289 80 


183.18 
208 68 
188.40 


278.41 
273.17 
241.47 


14.32 
17.53 

11.21 


22.17' 

27.12 
23.02 


19.54 
15.81 
32.20 


14.69 r 

18.64 

16.14 


J 

A 

S 


8 16 
4.10 

4 05 


0.55 
0.45 
0.29 


273.81 
263 66 
251.54 


288 63 
277.51 
255.93 


201.93 
192.84 
186.73 


234 74 
229.46 
211.60 


16.35 
17.69 
18.21 


23.52 

23.63 
21.48 


41.42 
41.93 
36.88 


18.48 
17.05 
15.07 


o 

N 
D 


5 47 
4.01 

3 75 


0.41 

37 
25 


280.04 
297.61 
293.93 


290.16 
274 42 
240.12 


207 13 
209 26 
189.94 


238 27 
224 68 
203.06 


21.01 
26.63 
28.38 


26.50 
24.08 
20.68 


38.55 
39.49 
54.04 


18.99 
18.26 
10.34 


1952 J 


4 33 




258 44 




187 87 




28.76 




27.30 





56 Note: Prior to January, 1950, Ireland is included with Commonwealth countries but has since been shown with 

European and Foreign countries. 

"'Does not include re-exports. Includes Pakistan prior to 1948. (3) Prior to 1947 includes "other British 

South Alrica" and Northern Rhodesia. 
Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 52 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



Factors in the Balance of Payments 

Monthly averages or calendar months (1) 



Balance of Merchandise Trade 12 









Net 
Exports 








of Non- 


All 


United 


United 


Monetary 


countries 


Kingdom 


States 


Gold 



Returning 
Foreign Canadian 
Tourist Tourist 
Auto Automo- 
Entries' 3 ' biles 



Security Sales Between Canada official 
and Other Countries* Holdings 

of Gold 
and 
U.S. 
Net sales(+) Net purchases( — ) Dollars ' 



All United 

countries Kingdom 



United 
States 







Million dollars 




Thousand cars 


Million dollars 


Million 
U.S. dollars 


1939 
1951 


16.1 


18.8 


-10.7 


15.3 
12.5 


105.8 
185.0 




6.0 
1.5 


-0.5 
-0.6 


4.8 
-0.5 


404.2 
1,778.6 


1950 D 


27.2 


7.9 


12.0 


11.3 


58.1 


21.2 


-1.6 


-0.5 


— 


1,741.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


-38.4 
-37.3 
-48.5 


6.2 
5.9 
9.3 


-43.0 
-44.1 
-52.4 


17.3 

11.7 

8.4 


40.9 
38.9 
62.7 


12.6 
11.5 
28.4 


18. 2 r 

23. r 

8.9 


-1.8 
-1.6 
-0.6 


16. r 

20. 2 r 

6.7 


1,743.6 
1,741.9 
1,653.4 


A 
M 
J 


-92.9 
-78.1 
-44.6 


-7.1 

3.8 

11.5 


-92.3 
-61.7 
-50.6 


16.2 
13.0 
13.8 


86.3 
148.3 
290.5 


28.5 
34.5 
43.9 


6.2' 
-1.9* 
2.7 


-0.5 
-1.6 
-1.3 


1.9' 

-2.2 r 
1.4 


1,664.3 
1,681.6 
1,683.0 


J 

A 

S 


7.9 

-3.9 

12.0 


30.8 
27.6 
24.2 


-29.8 
-33.7 
-22.1 


13.4 
11.0 
10.8 


489.1 
504.1 
281.2 


97.8 

103.7 

70.5 


1.1 

2.8 

-3.0 


-0.2 

0.6 

-1.0 


0.2 

0.4 

-5.0 


1,668-7 
1,561.8 
1,610.1 


o 

N 
D 


31.5 

58.8 

112.0 


31.5 
25.7 
45.3 


-27.4 

-11.9 

-9.9 


8.2 

7.7 

18.3 


147.6 
76.0 
54.1 


54.2 
30.1 


-30.2 
-22. 2 r 
12.2 


-0.6 r 


-31.4 

-24.7 

10.7 


1,678.1 
1,748.9 
1,778.6 


1952 J 










38.3 













"Official holdings of Gold and U.S. dollars are given as of end of year and month in Statistical Summary of the 
Bank of Canada and Annual Report of Foreign Exchange Control Board. (2) Annual results are from the Canadian 
Balance of International Payments and monthly totals as given in Trade of Canada. (3 'As of January, 1950, New- 
foundland is included. 

'For explanatory notes see April issue, pages 96 and 97. 



TRANSPORTATION 



TABLE 53 



Shipping and Aviation 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



MERCHANT SHIPPING AT SIX MAJOR PORTS' 1 ' 



CANALS CIVIL AVIATION"' 



Freight 
Loaded 



Freight 
Unloaded 



Net Registered Tonnage of Vessels Cleared' 4 ' 



Foreign 



Total Foreign Coasting 



Quebec, 
Montreal, 
Toronto <2) 



Vancouver, 

Saint John, 

Halifax 



Total (2) Revenue Revenue 
Cargo Passenger Ton 
Traffic Miles Miles 



Thousand short tons 



Thousand tons 



Millions Thousands 



1939 
1950 


671 
643 


690 
1,193 


2,852 
3,173 


1,445 
1,590 


1,407 
1,582 


1,845 
1,770 


1,469 
1,845 


2,599 
3,049 


1.8 
39.5 


535 


1950 N 
D 


899 
538 


1,817 
729 


3,605 
2,259 


2,002 
1,272 


1,603 
987 


1,902 
360 


1,703 
1,898 


3,280 
814 


36.7 
38.2 


504 
597 


1951 J 
F 
M 


636 
585 
614 


473 
420 
494 


2,057 
1,841 
2,182 


1,137 
1,000 
1,203 


919 
840 
979 


17 


2,057 
1,841 
2,165 


— 


36.9 
33.3 
42.0 


542 
524 
634 


A 

M 

J 


641 

881 

1,144 


1,008 
1,434 
1,457 


2,685 
3,645 
3,995 


1,438 
2,000 
2,053 


1,247 
1,646 
1,942 


765 
1,727 
2,092 


1,920 
1,918 
1,903 


1,981 
3,698 
3,822 


42.6 
49.6 
58.7 


633 
690 
680 


J 

A 

S 


1,192 
887 
735 


1,677 
1,347 
1,437 


4,747 
4,463 
3,874 


2,239 
2,036 
1,863 


2,508 
2,427 
2,011 


2,468 
2,329 
1,987 


2,279 
2,134 
1,887 


3,842 
3,946 
3,842 


58.0 
60.1 
61.2 


703 
812 
708 


O 
N 
D 


1,194 

1,310 

705 


1,193 

1,313 

586 


3,824 
3,879 
2,444 


2,068 
2,239 
1,356 


1,756 
1,640 
1,088 


1,911 

1,913 

365 


1,913 
1,966 
2,079 


3,981 

3,345 

642 


54.6 
45.4 


815 
756 



"'Prior to 1941 
"'Excludes Canada- 



statistics are for shipping 
United Kingdom Route. 



year ended March 31. "'Annual 
(4 'Annual data include tugs. 



data are averages of nine months. 57 



TRANSPORTATION MARCH, 1952 

Carloadings of Revenue Freight on Canadian Railways 

TABLE 54 Monthly averages or calendar months 



lol'AL 



Revenue 

( ai s 

l oaded 



FARM PRODUCTS AND FOODS 



FOREST PRODUCTS 



Grain and 

Grain 

Products 



Fresh 
Fruits 
and 
Vege- 
tables 



Live Stock, 
Meats and 

Packing- 
house 

Products 



All 
Other 



Woodpulp Lumber, 

and Lath and All 

Pulpwcod Paper Shingles Other 



METALS 

Ores, Con- 
centrates 

and 
Helmed 













Thousand 


uais 










1949 
1951 


325.5 
348.6 


42.6 

49.4 


5.1 
4.5 


10.2 

8.0 


6.9 

6.6 


14.5 

23.1 


17 
20.7 


14.9 
18.3 


6.6 
6.8 


15.8 
17.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


331.5 
294 . 3 
336.2 


39.6 
29.1 
32.6 


5.7 
4.5 
4.4 


7.8 
6.5 
7.1 


6.6 
5.6 
6.1 


26.5 
24.8 

29.4 


22.2 
21.1 
24.2 


15.8 
15.8 
19.2 


5.6 
5.0 
6.3 


13.0 
10.8 
12.6 


A 
M 

J 


337.1 
380.4 
370.0 


45 .9 
58.2 
52.3 


4.9 
3.6 

2.5 


7.7 
8.1 
7.7 


5.0 
5.3 
5.2 


15.4 
24.3 
30.2 


21.0 

21.0 
19.7 


17.4 
19.7 
22.1 


6.3 

7.6 
7 6 


15.3 
20.1 
21.8 


J 

A 

S 


350.2 
363.0 
349. 6 r 


51.1 
54 5 
49.0 


1.8 
2 8 
5.2 


6.9 
7.8 
8.6 


5.5 

5.1 
6.4 


28.7 
26.0 
20.5 


18.5 
19.9 
18.7 


20.9 
19.5 
18.6 


6.3 
6.0 

6.2 


21.7 
24.4 
21.0 


O 
N 
D 


389.8 
366.9 
314.6 


63.8 
64.1 
52.3 


7.5 
6.7 
4.2 


11.2 

10.0 

6.5 


11.4 

10.3 

6.2 


17.6 
14.5 
18.7 


20.7 
20.4 
21.1 


19.2 
17.4 
13.3 


7.3 
9.6 

7.2 


21.0 
16.8 
12.4 


1952 J 
F 


332.7 
316.3 


47.0 
42.3 


4.3 
3.3 


6.6 
5.9 


5.2 
5.0 


33.3 
32.4 


22.1 
22.3 


12.0 
13.7 


5.7 
7.5 


11.9 
12.2 



NON-METALLIC MINERALS 



IRON AND STEEL 



OTHER 



Coal and 
Coke 



Petroleum 

and 
Gasoline 



Building 
Materials 



All 
Other 



Autos, 
Machinery, 
Primary Implements 
Products and Parts Fertilizers 



Other 
Manufac- 
turing and Merchan- 
Miscel- dise 

laneous L.C.L. 



Cars 

Received 

ixom 

Connec- 
tions 













Thousand 


cars 










1949 
1951 


28.6 
28.4 


21.4 
21.6 


18 .0 
19.7 


6.2 

7.7 


7.3 
9.0 


7.8 
9.2 


3.0 
3.1 


22.6 
25.1 


77.0 
70.1 


132.9 
149.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


32.2 
27.4 
25.2 


22.2 
19.7 
19.7 


12.1 
11.7 
15.5 


7.0 

6.3 
7.8 


9.5 
8.2 

10.4 


9 1 

8.7 

11.8 


3.3 

3.2 
3.5 


23.7 
21.6 
25.9 


69.5 
64.3 

74.5 


155.0 
144.5 
171.7 


A 

M 
J 


23.3 
24.6 
26.2 


17.1 
23 
22 5 


19.2 
24.1 

23.7 


7.5 
8.6 
9.2 


9.3 
9.6 
9.5 


12.2 

11.2 

9.9 


4.8 
5.3 
2.1 


27.1 
28.0 
27.5 


77.6 
77.9 
70.3 


150.1 
157.4 
145.6 


J 

A 

S 


23 5 
25.3 
30 3 


23 2 
25.3 
21 5 


23 6 
25.8 
24.0 


7.5 

7 8 
8.1 


8.3 
8 1 
8.7 


9.0 
7.5 
8.1 


1.7 
2.4 
2.3 


25.4 
25.3 
25.1 


66.7 
69 5 
67.3 


138.1 
148.0 
138.7 


O 
N 
D 


35 2 
35.7 
31.7 


22.3 
21 2 
21 3 


24.4 
19 
13 2 


8.9' 
7.7 
6.0 


9.3' 
9 
8 1 


7.9 
7 8 
6.6 


2.5 

2.8 
3.5 


26.3 
24.1 
21.4 


73.4 
69 7 
60.9 


154. 5 r 
144 9 r 
140.3 


1952 J 

F 


34 5 
26 4 


25 1 
22.0 


11.5 
12 .0 


6 
5 9 


9 5 
9.4 


9.3 

9.8 


3.5 
3.2 


22 
20.9 


63. 3 r 
62.3 


154.2 
160.7 



58 Note: Based on weekly carloadings reported by major lines only. 

Source: Weekly Report, Carloadings, D.B.S. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 55 



TRANSPORTATION 
Operating Statistics of Canadian Railways") 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Operating Revenues 



Total 



Freight Passenger 



Operating Operating 
Expenses Income' 21 



Reve 



Tons 
carried 



Tons 

carried 

one mile 



Passengers Passengers 
Carried Carried 

One Mile 









Million dollars 








Millions 




1939 
1950 


30.6 
79.9 


23.8 
64.1 


3.0 
6.5 


25.4 
69.5 


4.0 
6.7 


7.9 
13.7 


2,622 
4,608 


1.7 
2.6 


146 
235 


1950 O 
N 
D 


92.5 

89.9 
84.3 


77.1 
72.2 
64.8 


6.0 

5.7 
7.5 


72.4 
72.6 
72.8 


15.8 
13.5 

7.7 


16.1 
15.0 
13.6 


5,542 
5,222 
5,191 


2.2 
2.1 
2.6 


212 

202' 

261 


1951 J 
F 
M 


81.6 
76.5 
88.1 


67.3 
63.7 
72.3 


6.0 
5.4 
6.8 


73.3 
72.1 
79.0 


3.3 
0.3 
6.4 


14.0 
12.8 
14.0 


4,968 
4,582 
5,122 


2.4 
2.2 
2.8 


209 
187 
239 


A 
M 
J 


88.1 
92.4 
91.6 


73.1 
75.4 
72.5 


5.8 
6.7 
8.4 


80.0 
83.5 
81.8 


4.0 
5.1 
5.9 


14.2 
15.1 
15.5 


5,190 
5,629 
5,456 


2.3 
2.1 
2.3 


200 
231 
298 


J 
A 

S 


91.8 
93.8 
91.4 


71.3 
73.2 
72.2 


9.6 
9.5 
7.8 


82.3 
86.1 

80.2 


4.7 
4.0 
5.4 


15.0 

15.4 
14.4 


5,337 
5,405 
5,320 


2.6 
2.6 
2.2 


340 
335 
268 


o 

N 


99.0 
94.7 


81.1 
76.8 


7.0 
6.7 


84.2 
83.5 


11.2 

7.3 


16.6 
15.9 


5,744 
5,828 


2.2 
2.4 


244 
233 



CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 



CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY 
CANADIAN LINES 



Operating Revenues 



Total 



Freight Passenger 



Operating Operating (2) 
Expenses Income 



Operating Revenues 



Total 



Freight Passenger 



Operating Operating (2) 
Expenses Income 













Million 


dollars 










1939 
1950 


12.7 
31.5 


9.9 
25.5 


1.3 
2.9 


9.9 
27.0 


2.4 

3.2 


14.4 
39.9 


11.1 
31.6 


1.4 
3.1 


13.1 
36.3 


0.9 
2.7 


1950 O 
N 
D 


36.7 
35.1 
33.8 


30.8 
29.0 
26.9 


2.7 
2.5 
3.2 


28.1 
28.0 
27.4 


6.6 
6.0 
4.9 


47.0 
46.0 
43.5 


39.0 
36.1 
32.1 


2.8 
2.7 
3.8 


38.6 
38.8 
39.8 


7.6 
6.1 
2.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


32.7 
31.0 
34.5 


27.7 
26.1 
28.3 


2.6 
2.4 
3.0 


28.9 
27.4 
31.2 


1.4 
1.7 
2.9 


40.4 
37.6 
45.0 


32.8 
30.5 
36.4 


2.9 
2.5 
3.4 


38.9 
39.3 
42.0 


0.7 

Dr2.5 

2.2 


A 
M 
J 


34.9 
37.4 
36.4 


29.5 
31.2 
29.2 


2.5 
2.9 
3.7 


30.8 
34.9 
33.2 


2.6 
1.0 
1.9 


44.2 
46.2 
46.5 


35.8 
36.8 
36.0 


2.9 

3.4 
4.2 


43.0 
42.3 
42.4 


0.3 
3.0 
2.9 


J 

A 

S 


35.8 
36.3 
36.0 


28.2 
28.7 
28.8 


4.0 
4.0 
3.3 


32.5 
34.7 
30.3 


1.1 
0.3 
1.9 


47.5 
48.8 
46.7 


36.2 
37.5 
36.3 


4.9 
4.8 
3.9 


43.8 
45.2 
43.8 


2.6 
2.6 
2.2 


O 

N 


40.4 
37.9 


33.9 
31.4 


3.0 
2.8 


33.1 
32.0 


4.6 
4.1 


49.7 
48.1 


39.9 
38.2 


3.4 
3.3 


44.9 
45.4 


5.4 
2.0 



Beginning with April, 1950, Newioundland is included. 

(1) In the upper section oi this table, the annual statistics embrace all steam railways, while monthly data refer to 
railways with annual operating revenues of $500,000 or over. (3) Operating income equals operating revenues less 

operating expenses adjusted for tax accruals and rent of equipment and joint facilities. 

Source: Operating Revenues, Expenses and Statistics, Railways in Canada, D.B.S. 



59 



FINANCE 



TABLE 56 



MARCH, 1952 



Bank of Canada 

As of end of period 



LIABILITIES 



Chartered Bank Cash 



Notes in 
tills 



Deposits 

at Bank of 

Canada 



Total 



Govern- 




Foreign '' 


Notes in 




Total 


ment 


Other 


Currency 


Hands of 


All Other 


Liabilities 


Deposits 


Deposits 


Liabilities 


Public 


Accounts 


or AMetl 



Million dollars 



1939 
1951 


70.6 
273.1 


217 
619.0 


287.6 
892.1 


46.3 
94.9 


17.9 
66.1 


155.6 


162 
1,191 


13.3 
44.4 


527 
2,444 


1951 J 
F 
M 


219.6 
202.8 
185 1 


537.6 
550.5 
552.9 


757.3 
753.3 
738.1 


68.3 
69.5 
70.5 


204.4 
204.6 
206.7 


136.0 

128.9 

88 .5 


1,075 
1,093 
1,134 


53.3 
39.8 
28.7 


2,294 
2,289 
2,267 


A 
M 
J 


203.1 
214.8 

177.1 


556.1 
530.1 
590.7 


759.2 
744.9 
767.8 


56.9 
76.2 
75.3 


215.1 
221.5 
220.1 


137.7 
129.9 
132.8 


1,120 
1,123 
1,174 


58.9 
38.8 
32.2 


2,348 
2,334 
2,402 


J 

A 

S 


226.0 
189.7 
195.2 


558.2 
580.4 
579.4 


784.2 
770.1 
774.6 


91.1 
115.0 
105.6 


212.6 
185.7 
140.0 


146.7 
143.0 
116.3 


1,145 
1,181 

1,193 


56.2 
62.8 
38.5 


2,435 
2,458 
2,368 


O 
N 
D 


232.2 
195.1 
273.1 


588.3 
633.8 
619.0 


820.6 
828.9 
892.1 


210.3 

66.0 
94.9 


83 3 
92.5 
66.1 


102.1 
135.1 
155.6 


1,174 
1,212 
1,191 


62.9 

54.4 
44.4 


2,453 
2,389 
2,444 


1952 J 
F 


222 4 


629.2 
616.7 


851.6 


92.8 
88.5 


54.9 
52 .1 


99.5 

84.7 


1,153 


53.9 
27.8 


2,306 
2,244 



Gold 



ASSETS 



Reserve 



Securities 



Federal-Provincial 



Silver 



Foreign' 1 ' 
currencies 



Total") 
reserve 



Under 
two years 



Ind. Dev. 
Bank 



Over Bank Other 

two years Cap. Stock Securities 



Total 



All Other 
Accounts 











Million 


dollars 










1939 
1951 


225.7 


64.3 
117.9 


290.0 
117.9 


182 
1,142 


50 

1,049 


25.0 


89.0 


232 
2,305 


5.5 
21.0 


1951 J 
F 
M 


— 


118 .1 

117.5 

80.2 


118.1 

117.5 

80.2 


1,171 
1,165 
1,342 


731 
757 
674 


25.0 
25.0 
25.0 


200.3 
168.7 
114.4 


2,128 
2,116 
2,155 


48.2 
55.1 
31.6 


A 
M 
J 





129.0 
125.4 
117.0 


129.0 
125.4 
117.0 


1,328 
1,314 
1,335 


722 
777 
846 


25.0 
25.0 
25.0 


70.6 
45 3 
58.8 


2,146 
2,161 
2,265 


73.0 
47.4 
20.1 


J 

A 

S 




117.0 

100.1 

87.1 


117.0 

100.1 

87.1 


1,327 
1.350 
1,298 


872 
888 
896 


25.0 
25.0 
25.0 


51.4 
44.1 
31 .2 


2,276 
2,307 
2,250 


41.9 
50.6 
30.8 


O 

N 
D 


— 


96 .6 
128.9 
117.9 


96.6 
128.9 
117.9 


1.317 
1,138 
1,142 


956 
1,043 
1,049 


25 .2 

25.0 
25.0 


8.2 
18 8 
89.0 


2,307 
2,225 
2,305 


49 7 
35.4 
21 


1952 J 
F 


— 


85 4 
70 4 


85.4 
70.4 


1,095 
1,058 


1,043 
1.028 


25.0 
25 .0 


24.3 
27.3 


2,187 
2.138 


33.3 
35.9 



60 I Includes foreign exchange items for account of foreign clients and also the Government of Canada and the Foreign 

Exchange Control Board since March 31, 1949. Liabilities payable in pounds sterling, United States dollars and other 
foreign currencies. 

Source: Statistical Summary of Bank of Canada. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 57 



FINANCE 



Canadian Chartered Banks 

Averages of month-end figures or end of month 



ASSETS 



Securities 



Canadian 
Cash 



Federal-Provincial 



Foreign 
Canadian govern- 



Reserve' 1 ' Under 2 yrs Over 2 yrs municipal ment 



Notes ot 

Gold, Coin and 

and Cheques Balances 

Total Foreign on Other at Other 
Other securities Currency Banks Banks 













Million dollars 










1939 
1951 


268 
783 


516 
779 


718 
2,355 


101 
182 


78 
203 


126 
412 


1,540 
3,931 


43 
57 


120 
472 


219 
261 


1950 D 


810 


939 


2,555 


194 


193 


405 


4,286 


56 


450 


259 


1951 J 
F 
M 


757 
753 
738 


937 
788 
755 


2,517 
2,497 
2,420 


192 
192 
192 


188 
190 
210 


413 
426 
409 


4,248 
4,093 
3,986 


61 
61 

56 


402 
448 
376 


243 
243 
263 


A 
M 

J 


759 
745 
768 


743 
732 
721 


2,366 
2,358 
2,325 


190 
186 
183 


208 
190 
192 


416 
420 
415 


3,924 

3,886 
3,838 


55 
58 
53 


499 
467 
395 


248 
263 
267 


J 

A 

S 


784 
770 
775 


735 
717 
769 


2,317 
2,317 
2,318 


180 
179 
175 


195 
210 
208 


413 
409 
406 


3,840 
3,832 
3,876 


59 
58 
56 


468 
497 
387 


267 
310 
259 


O 

N 
D 


821 
829 
892 


779 
833 
835 


2,288 
2,268 
2,274 


174 
170 
167 


226 
214 
200 


408 
407 
399 


3,876 
3,894 
3,876 


57 
53 
58 


544 
552 
627 


267 
253 
249 


1952 J 


852 


882 


2,276 


165 


214 


391 


3,927 


58 


456 


264 



ASSETS 



Loans 



Canada 



Current Provincial- 
Call public municipal 



Call 



Abroad 

Letters 

of 
Current Credit 



All Other 
Assets 



Total 
Assets 



LIABILITIES 



Notes in 
Circulation 



Million dollars 



1939 
1951 


55 
98 


855 
2,868 


133 

148 


48 
108 


145 
272 


54 
255 


113 
132 


3,592 
9,385 


94 


1950 D 


134 


2,651 


125 


100 


247 


258 


120 


9,496 


— 


1951 J 
F 
M 


118 

109 

94 


2,671 
2,736 
2,856 


124 
136 
152 


113 

114 

96 


252 
256 
252 


269 
281 
289 


123 
124 
126 


9,379 
9,354 
9,284 


— 


A 
M 
J 


87 
92 
82 


2,886 
2,896 
2,898 


161 
170 
164 


97 

99 

110 


271 
281 
281 


290 
282 
269 


128 
131 
132 


9,403 
9,370 
9,256 


— 


J 

A 

S 


84 

90 

107. 


2,890 
2,912 
2,901 


153 
161 
144 


112 
119 
131 


285 
262 
273 


246 
230 
228 


135 
136 
139 


9,323 
9,378 
9,276 


— 


O 

N 
D 


Ill 

96 

107 


2,893 
2,975 
2,901 


141 
149 
127 


82 

90 

131 


290 
285 
278 


222 
232 
225 


138 
137 
138 


9,440 
9,544 
9,610 





1952 J 


107 


2,827 


128 


80 


276 


229 


140 


9,343 


— 



Note: Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949. 

(1) Since 1935, includes notes of, and deposits with, the Bank of Canada. 

Source: Department of Finance. 



61 



FINANCE 



TABLE 57 - concluded 



MARCH, 1952 



Canadian Chartered Banks 

Averaqes of month-end figures or end of month 













LIABILITIES 


















Deposits 








Total 
Liabil- 
ities' 1 ' 


Daily 
Averag* 

Ratio 

Cash to 

Deposits' 31 




Federal Provincial 
Government Government 


Demand 


Notice 


External and 

in currencies 

of other 

countries 


Other 

banks 


Tot:il 


Canadian 
deposits 1 " 












Million doll 


ars 










1939 


92 


53 


742 


1.699 


474 


83 


3,144 


2,630 


3,578 


10.4 


1951 


229 


170 


2.712 


4 . 593 


761 


291 


8,755 


7,851 


9,367 


10.2 


1950 D 


339 


161 


2.770 


4.558 


735 


304 


8,867 


7,997 


9,478 


10.1 


1951 J 


358 


175 


2,638 


4,577 


724 


267 


8,739 


7,885 


9,361 


10.2 


F 


271 


175 


2.612 


4,618 


734 


294 


8,702 


7,841 


9,336 


9 4 


M 


318 


205 


2.487 


4,614 


719 


283 


8,625 


7,753 


9,266 


9.8 


A 


180 


180 


2,725 


4,598 


749 


309 


8,742 


7,856 


9,385 


10.0 


M 


231 


174 


2,692 


4,589 


747 


285 


8,718 


7,829 


9,352 


9 8 


J 


266 


189 


2,578 


4,559 


763 


264 


8,618 


7,697 


9,238 


10.0 


J 


235 


168 


2,675 


4,580 


753 


294 


8,705 


7,809 


9,306 


10.4 


A 


269 


141 


2,675 


4,583 


808 


300 


8,775 


7,799 


9,360 


10.3 


S 


227 


164 


2,651 


4,595 


769 


268 


8,674 


7,724 


9,258 


10.5 


O 


126 


144 


2,907 


4,575 


784 


298 


8,833 


7,913 


9,423 


10.4 


N 


134 


142 


2,936 


4,616 


784 


314 


8,927 


8.015 


9,527 


11.0 


D 


135 


187 


2,963 


4,612 


795 


312 


9,003 


8,089 


9,592 


10.9 


1952 J 


168 


195 


2,703 


4,639 


762 


263 


8,730 


7,846 


9,326 


11.2 



(1 'Deposits payable in Canadian currency, 
deposits. 



(^Includes all other liabilities. 



u 'Ratio of cash in Canada to Canadian 



TABLE 58 



Currency and Active Bank Deposits 

End of period 



CURRENCY OUTSIDE BANKS 



ACTIVE BANK DEPOSITS 



Chartered Banks 



Notes'" Coin' 2 ' Total 



Demand 



Active 
notice' 3 ' 



Other 

(4) (6) 



Deduct 
float <6 ' 



Net 
total 



Bank of 
Canada 

"Other" 
deposits 



Total 



Total 

Currency 

and 

Active 

Bank 

Deposits 



Million dollars 



1939 


247 


34 


281 


853 


197 


157 


136 


1,071 


18 


1.089 


1,370 


1951 


1.191 


84 


1.275 


2,963 


717 


449 


627 


3.502 


66 


3,568 


4,843 


1950 D 


1,136 


78 


1.214 


2,770 


697 


413 


450 


3,430 


207 


3,637 


4,851 


19511 


1,075 


76 


1,151 


2,638 


702 


395 


402 


3.333 


204 


3,537 


4,688 


F 


1.093 


76 


1.169 


2,612 


709 


415 


448 


3,288 


205 


3,493 


4,662 


M 


1,134 


78 


1.212 


2,487 


711 


428 


376 


3.250 


207 


3,457 


4,669 


A 


1,120 


78 


1,198 


2.725 


709 


429 


499 


3.364 


215 


3.579 


4,777 


M 


1,123 


79 


1,202 


2,692 


707 


398 


467 


3,330 


222 


3,552 


4,754 


J 


1.174 


81 


1.255 


2,578 


707 


385 


395 


3,275 


220 


3,495 


4,750 


J 


1,145 


80 


1,225 


2,675 


709 


396 


468 


3.312 


213 


3.525 


4,750 


A 


1,181 


81 


1,262 


2,675 


712 


381 


497 


3.271 


186 


3,457 


4,719 


S 


1.193 


82 


1.275 


2.651 


715 


371 


387 


3,350 


140 


3,490 


4,765 


O 


1,174 


82 


1.256 


2.907 


713 


380 


544 


3.456 


83 


3,539 


4,795 


N 


1,212 


84 


1.296 


2,936 


712 


398 


552 


3.494 


92 


3.586 


4,882 


D 


1,191 


84 


1.275 


2.963 


717 


449 


627 


3,502 


66 


3,568 


4,843 


1952 J 


1,153 


82 


1,235 


2.703 


748 


412 


456 


3.407 


55 


3,462 


4,697 



62 Note: Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949. 

'"Note Circulation of Bank of Canada and chartered banks, excluding notes held by chartered banks. '"Sub- 
sidiary coin issued by the Mint less coin held by Bank of Canada and chartered banks in Canada. '" Chartered banks' 
public notice deposits in Canada other than estimated aggregate quarterly minimum balances in personal savings 
accounts and non-personal notice deposits. 'Chartered banks' Canadian dollar deposits of provincial governments, 
Canadian, United Kingdom, and foreign banks. Kicluding Government of Canada. ' Cheques on banks as 
shown in chartered bank month-end returns to the Minister of Finance. 

Source: Statistical Summary of Bank of Canada. 



MARCH, 1952 FINANCE 

Federal Government Revenues and Expenditures 

TABLE 59 



1951 



1950 



November 



1951 1950 1951-52 1950-51 

December April 1 to December 31 



Million dollars 



REVENUES 

Ordinary Revenue 

Customs Import Duties 

Excise Duties 

Excise Taxes 

Income and Excess Proiits Taxes 

Postal Revenue 

Sundry 

Total Ordinary Revenue 

Special Receipts 

Total Revenues 



EXPENDITURES 

Expenditure (by Departments) 

Agriculture 

Citizenship & Immigration 

Defence Production 

External Affairs 

Finance — 

Administration and General 

Grants to Municipalities (Lieu of Taxes) . . . 

Interest and Other Debt Charges 

Payments to Provinces (Subsidies, Tax 
Rental Payments, etc.) 

Flood and Other Emergency Assistance . . . 

Implementation of Guarantees 

Fisheries 

Justice 

Labour 

Legislation 

Mines & Technical Surveys 

National Defence 

Administration and General 

Naval Service 

Army Service 

Air Force Service 

Defence Research Board 

Defence Appropriation Act, Sec. 3, 1950 . . 
National Health & Welfare 

Administration & General 

Family Allowances 

Old Age Pensions and Pensions to the Blind 

General Health Grants to Provinces 

National Research Council 

National Revenue 

Post Office 

Public Archives 



27.4 


27.2 


23.0 


22.8 


257.3 


197.8 


22.1 


21.7 


19.1 


20.0 


166.4 


174.2 


74.1 


66.9 


82.8 


62.8 


658.6 


456.9 


166.9 


119.7 


160.8 


131.9 


1,531.3 


1,028.8 


8.8 


7.5 


14.0 


11.0 


76.8 


64.6 


7.4 


7.6 


35.0 


11.3 


98.9 


73.9 


306.7 


250.6 


334.7 


259.8 


2,789.4 


1,996.3 


1.4 


1.4 


1.5 


2.8 


14.9 


53.4 


308.1 


251.9 


336.3 


262.6 


2,804.3 


2,049.6 



6.1 


5.3 


5.6 


5.1 


46.9 


49.3 


2.8 


2.8 


2.7 


2.1 


22.3 


19.4 


1.9 


— 


2.0 


— 


19.6 


— 


0.7 


0.9 


1.1 


0.8 


9.6 


11.9 


1.5 


1.4 


1.4 


1.5 


12.7 


12.8 


0.3 


0.3 


1.1 


0.8 


1.7 


1.1 


63.4 


65.8 


29.1 


29.1 


279.0 


282.5 





. . 


9.7 


15.1 


84.8 


83.0 


0.3 


0.2 


— 


5.4 


0.9 
1.3 
6.3 


13.6 


0.8 


0.7 


0.7 


0.7 


6.5 


1.2 


1.1 


1.2 


0.9 


10.3 


8.9 


6.2 


4.3 


4.9 


5.0 


43.5 


40.9 


0.5 


0.1 


1.7 


0.8 


4.7 


3.5 


2.5 


1.6 


1.7 


1.0 


18.3 


12.0 


1.4 


0.7 


1.2 


0.8 


8.8 


7.4 


16.0 


9.5 


14.8 


7.1 


104.2 


55.8 


31.1 


12.5 


33.7 


16.7 


247.3 


118.9 


56.8 


19.7 


28.7 


16.6 


366.6 


121.0 


2.8 


1.5 


1.7 


1.6 


18.3 


12.8 


— 


— 


22.7 


56.8 


24.6 


56.8 


0.8 


0.6 


0.7 


0.5 


6.2 


4.9 


26.8 


25.9 


26.9 


26.0 


239.3 


231.1 


— 


— 


— 


0.9 


53.4 


50.7 


1.7 


2.6 


1.2 


1.9 


10.5 


7.9 


2.5 


1.5 


1.9 


1.4 


16.0 


11.5 


3.7 


3.7 


3.6 


3.5 


33.5 


33.9 


7.6 


9.0 


9.0 


6.8 


65.9 


58.6 


— 


— 


■ — 


— 


0.2 


0.2 



Note: This statement does not include any receipts other than revenues nor any disbursements other than regular 
budgetary expenditures. Excluded, for example, are all receipts arising from repayments of loans and advances, or from 
accumulations on annuity, pension and insurance funds. Similarly excluded on the expenditure side, for example, are all 
Govt, outlays arising from increases in loans, advances and investments. 

Source: Canada Gazette. 



63 



FINANCE MARCH, 1952 

Federal Government Revenues and Expenditures 

TABLE 59 -concluded 



1951 



1950 



1951 



1950 1951-52 1950-51 



November 



December 



April 1 to December 31 



Million dollars 



EXPENDITURES (concluded) 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Resources and Development 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State 

Trade and Commerce 

Transport 

Veterans Afiairs 

Administration and General 

Treatment Services 

Disability Pensions and Veterans 

Allowances 

Discharge Benefits and Credits 

Soldier Settlement and Veterans' Land Act 

Other Departments 

Total Expenditures 

Excess of Revenues over Expenditures 



LOANS, ADVANCES AND INVESTMENTS") 
Net Increase or Decrease ( — ) 

Loans to, and Investments in, Crown Agencies 

Railway and Steamship Companies 

Miscellaneous 

Total Loans to, and Investments in Crown 
Agencies 

Other Loans and Investments 

United Kingdom and Other Governments 
United Kingdom Financial Agreement Act 

1946 

United Kingdom Loan under The War 

Appropriation Act, 1942 

Other Governments 

Total Loans to United Kingdom and Other 

Governments 

Soldier Settlement and Veterans' Land Act. . 

Miscellaneous 

Total Other Loans and Investments 

Total Working Capital Advances 

Net Total of Changes in Loans, Advances 
and Investments 



0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


— 


0.6 


0.4 


7.7 


6.4 


7 


6.2 


56 7 


50.5 


17 


2.0 


2.5 


1.7 


16.0 


15 8 


2 1 


1.9 


2.0 


16 


17 8 


13.1 


0.2 


0.1 


0.2 


0.2 


1.4 


1.3 


2.1 


2.1 


1.6 


18 


17.3 


15 8 


7.0 


6 5 


8.5 


8.2 


59 9 


55.0 


1.4 


14 


18 


14 


11 9 


11 8 


3.6 


3.1 


3 5 


3.0 


28.4 


25.5 


10.5 


10 1 


10.4 


9.8 


92.6 


89 


1.5 


2 7 


1.6 


3.4 


11.7 


20.4 


5 


5 


4 


5 


4.2 


4.6 


0.7 


0.3 


0.7 


0.6 


7.7 


8.6 


278.0 


209.2 


249.4 


247.3 


2,082.7 


1,628.4 


30 


42 8 


86.9 


15.3 


721.6 


421.3 



5.0 
5.0 



11.7 



15.4 
15.4 



5.6 
5.6 



15.9 
15.9 



107.7 
52.6 

160.3 



16.5 



-6.1 



2.9 



185.7 



-2.8 
92.3 

89.5 



— 


— 


-14 


— 


-14.0 


20.0 








-7.2 


-16.1 


-28 8 


-35.6 


-3.3 


-3 4 


— 


— 


-11 4 


-14.7 


-3.3 


-3.4 


-21 2 


-16 1 


-54.2 


-30.3 


0.2 


1.8 


2.2 


6 


10 


13.2 


-0.2 


— 


0.3 


-0 2 


-1.6 


-3.6 


-3.3 


-1.5 


-18.7 


-15 8 


-45 8 


-20.8 


10.0 


2.7 


7 


-3 1 


71.2 


2.7 



71.5 



64 (1, Does not include advances to Foreign Exchange Control Board which are equivalent in substance to cash 

balances either in Canada or abroad, nor temporary investment of surplus cash in the Government's own securities. 
Note: Credit items are due to repayments and transfers between departments and classes of expenditure. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 60 



FINANCE 



Cheques Cashed in Clearing House Centres 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



CANADA") 



BY REGIONS 



SELECTED CITIES 



Atlantic Prairie British Van- 

Provinces' 1 ' Quebec Ontario Provinces Columbia Montreal Toronto Ottawa Winnipeg couver 













Million dollars 












1939 
1951 


2,635 
9,349 


57 
241 


818 
2,727 


1,135 
3,921 


457 
1,631 


168 
829 


730 
2,432 


848 
2,689 


106 
372 


287 
864 


132 
684 


1950 D 


9,315 


247 


2,839 


3,835 


1,587 


806 


2,567 


2,701 


281 


873 


670 


1951 J 
F 
M 


9,002 
7,984 
8,830 


226 
200 
253 


2,843 
2,343 
2,779 


3,745 
3,527 
3,766 


1,397 
1,181 
1,250 


791 
733 
782 


2,562 
2,116 
2,441 


2,534 
2,391 
2,631 


335 
386 
275 


712 
584 
598 


643 
618 
657 


A 
M 
J 


9,017 
9,484 
9,500 


227 
247 
239 


2,492 
2,688 
2,647 


3,969 
3,925 
3,987 


1,525 
1,785 
1,744 


804 
839 
882 


2,181 
2,417 
2,369 


2,633 
2,692 
2,767 


463 
352 
321 


846 

1,012 

948 


655 
702 
724 


J 

A 

S 


9,032 
9,072 
8,775 


261 
224 
224 


2,607 
2,620 
2,647 


3,751 
3,754 
3,508 


1,589 
1,633 
1,603 


824 
839 
793 


2,302 
2,348 
2,361 


2,517 
2,485 
2,407 


344 
421 
313 


845 
844 
826 


676 
695 
628 


O 

N 
D 


10,619 
10,737 
10,134 


277 
259 
253 


2,965 
3,212 
2,884 


4,423 
4,499 
4,193 


2,066 
1,930 
1,871 


888 
837 
933 


2,646 
2,858 
2,582 


3,097 
3,101 
3,016 


420 
501 
327 


1,153 
1,004 
1,003 


740 
690 
785 


1952 J 1 


9,734 


283 


2,696 


4,187 


1,678 


891 


2,399 


2,984 


357 


827 


737 



(1 > Commencing with April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 
Source: Cheques Cashed in Clearing Centres, D.B.S. 



TABLE 61 



Life Insurance Sales 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Prince 
New- Edward 

Canada foundland Island 



New 
Nova Bruns- 

Scotia wick 



Quebec Ontario 



Mani- 
toba 



Saskat- 
chewan 



British 
Alberta Columbia 



Million dollars 



1939 
1951 


39.7 
126.2 


0.34 
0.90 


0.17 
0.36 


1.67 
3.84 


0.97 
3.02 


ir.45 

33.67 


16.76 
54.19 


2.45 
6.53 


1.20 
3.68 


1.73 
8.67 


2.99 
11.33 


1950 D 


119.4 


0.84 


0.52 


3.58 


2.58 


31.73 


50.74 


6.00 


3.41 


8.74 


11.29 


1951 J 
F 
M 


120.5 
118. 7 
122.0 


0.63 
1.15 
0.97 


0.31 
0.32 
0.24 


3.49 
3.85 
3.51 


2.84 
2.83 
3.10 


32.91 
30.53 
35.16 


50.90 
51.44 
51.87 


6.26 
6.24 
6.03 


3.24 
3.10 
3.13 


9.58 
8.08 
8.13 


10.33 

11.14 

9.88 


A 
M 
J 


133.0 
130.5 
136.4 


0.79 
0.97 
0.97 


0.31 
30 
35 


3.90 
3.79 
4.12 


2.81 
3.32 
3.29 


36.53 
34.30 
36.41 


58.56 
56.62 
58.72 


7.22 
7.47 
7.33 


3.01 
3.39 
4.42 


8.28 
8.69 
9.26 


11.61 
11.65 
11.52 


J 

A 

S 


133.7 
106.6 
103.9 


0.92 
0.85 
0.79 


0.31 
0.44 
0.41 


4.80 
3.26 
3.48 


3.33 
2.70 
2.40 


33.48 
28.90 
27.80 


59.01 
43.40 
43.25 


7.05 
5.43 
5.38 


4.78 
3.54 
3.29 


9.06 
7.44 
6.87 


10.98 
10.68 
10.24 


O 

N 
D 


132.1 
143.4 
133.4 


1.04 
0.90 
0.84 


0.36 
0.43 
0.48 


4.13 
3.87 
3.85 


3.13 
3.32 
3.25 


35.04 
37.93 
35.07 


57.77 
61.93 
56.73 


6.24 
7.39 
6.36 


3.87 
4.26 
4.06 


8.99 

10.10 

9.59 


11.53 
13.27 
13.13 


1952 J 


120.2 


0.80 


0.27 


3.30 


2.63 


33.85 


49.77 


6.19 


3.80 


8.99 


10.62 



Note — This series gives total new settled-for ordinary insurance sales in Canada, exclusive of revivals, increases, 
dividend additions, reinsurance acquired and pension bonds without insurance. Totals are estimates projected from 
the sales reported by 28 companies operating in Canada representing 91 per cent of new ordinary insurance sales. 

Source: Monthly Survey of Life Insurance Sales in Canada, Life Insurance Agency Management Association, 
Hartford, Conn. 



65 



FINANCE 

Benefit Payments ol Life Insurance Companies 

TABLE 61 - concluded Monthly averages or calendar months 



MARCH, 1952 



Death and 
Accidental Matured 



Death 
Claims 



Endow- 
ments 



Disability 
Benefits 
Income 

Payments 



Annuity Surrender 
Payments Values 



Dividends 
to 
Policy- 
holders 



Total Payments 



All 
policies Ordinary Industrial Group 



Million dollars 



1950 
1951 


7 11 
7.83 


2 84 
2.83 


31 
30 


0.62 
0.68 


4 98 

5 22 


3.38 
3.71 


19.23 
20.56 


14.36 
15.25 


2.94 
3.01 


1.94 
2.29 


1950 N 
D 


7.82 
6.48 


3.23 
2.00 


0.34 
0.22 


0.71 
0.50 


5.15 
4.49 


3.21 
4.84 


20.46 
18.52 


15.73 
12.69 


2.82 
3.74 


1.91 
2.09 


1951 J 
F 
M 


8.67 
7.00 
8.28 


2.98 
2.74 
3.33 


0.37 
25 
29 


0.80 
0.60 
0.65 


5.10 
4.58 
4.75 


3.61 
3.44 
4.03 


21.53 
18.62 
21.33 


15.95 
13.77 
16.10 


3.06 
2.75 
3.16 


2.53 
2.10 
2.07 


A 
M 
J 


7.51 
7.70 
7.33 


2.86 
2.84 
2.71 


0.29 
0.32 
0.29 


0.72 
0.68 

0.72 


5.49 
5.91 
5.29 


3.46 
3.45 
3.82 


20.33 
20.90 
20.15 


15.20 
15.57 
14.97 


2.94 
3.13 
3.13 


2.19 
2.20 
2.06 


J 

A 

S 


7.61 
7.34 
7.19 


3.19 
2.22 
2.34 


0.29 
0.30 
27 


0.83 
0.55 
0.67 


5.00 
5.32 
4.66 


3.12 
3.35 
3.47 


20.04 
19.10 
18.59 


15.15 

14.22 
13.90 


2.71 
2.58 
2.72 


2.18 
2.30 
1.97 


O 
N 
D 


7.42 
9.02 
8 85 


2.96 
3.00 
2.76 


0.31 

0.29 
0.30 


0.70 
0.67 
0.57 


5.72 
6.36 
4.45 


3.62 
3.29 
5.81 


20.74 
22.63 
22.75 


15.91 
17.23 
15.08 


2.58 
3.14 
4.25 


2.24 
2.27 
3.42 



PAYMENTS TO BENEFICIARIES ON DEATH CLAIMS' lf 

Quarterly averages or quarters 



Canada 



Nfld. P.E.I. 



N.S. 



N.B. Quebec Ontario Manitoba Sask. Alberta B.C. 



Million dollars 



1950 
1951 


21.32 
23.48 


0.18 


0.07 
0.06 


0.71 
0.74 


0.49 
0.44 


6.17 
6.78 


9.76 
10.96 


1.13 
1.02 


0.53 
0.78 


0.87 
0.94 


1.59 
1.59 


1950 4th 


21.55 




0.08 


0.53 


0.57 


6.06 


10.27 


1.25 


0.48 


0.83 


1.49 


1951 1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 


23.94 
22.54 
22.15 

25.29 


0.18 
0.12 
0.14 
0.28 


0.10 
0.04 
0.06 
0.06 


0.67 
0.61 
0.49 
1.18 


0.52 
0.40 
0.34 
0.50 


6.74 
6.77 
6.62 
6.99 


11.57 
10.64 
10.72 
10.90 


1.05 
1.00 
0.96 
1.09 


0.49 
0.42 
0.39 
1.82 


0.84 
1.03 
1.01 
0.88 


1.81 
1.52 
1.42 
1.60 



'"Ordinary, Industrial and Group. 

Source: The Canadian Life Insurance Officers Association. 



Bond Issues and Retirements 



TABLE 62 








Years and Quarters 












FEDERAL' 1 ' 


PROVINCIAL") 




CORPORATIONS 




TOTAL'" 


GOVERN- 
MENT OF 




New 
Issues 


Retire- 
ments 


New 
Issues 


Retire- 
ments - 


New Issues 
New Refunding 


Retire- 
ments 


Net New 
Issues (+) 
or Retire- 
ments( — ) 


Net New 
Issues(+) 
or Retire- 
ments (—) 


CANADA 

SHORT 

TERM 

DEBT (J) 










Par 


values in 


million Canadian dollars 






1939 
1951 

1950 3rd 
4th 

1951 1st 
2nd 
3rd 
4th 


211 
592 

68 
973 

20 

4 

2 

565 


233 
922 

97 
933 

117 

76 

114 

615 


154 

412 

77 
37 

43' 
159 
101 
109 


74 
198 

15 
37 

62 
35 
35 
66 


36 
367 

44 
137 

100' 

55' 

110' 

102 


201 
11 

19 
16 

1 
6 
2' 

4 


271 
102 

31 
44 

22 
22 
23 

34 


- 33 

+ 277 

+ 32 

+ 108 

+ 79' 
+ 38' 
+ 88' 
+ 72 


+ 25 
+ 160 

+ 64 

+ 148 

- 37' 
+ 90' 
+ 42' 

+ 65 


470 
1,400 

1,500 
1,500 

1,400 
1,400 
1,400 
1,400 



66 : Direct and Guaranteed. : Federal, Provincial and Corporation. '"Outstanding, end of period: 

Treasury Bills, Deposit Certificates and Short Term Issues sold directly to Bank of Canada and the Chartered Banks. 
Source: Statistical Summary of Bank of Canada. 



MARCH, 1952 



TABLE 63 



FINANCE 



Index Numbers of Security Prices 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



COMMON STOCKS 



Investors' Index 



Industrials 



Total 

105 

stocks 



Total, Machinery 

82 and equip- Pulp and 

stocks ment paper 



Milling 



Oils 



Textiles Food and 

and allied Building 

clothing products Beverages materials 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1951 


91.6 
168.3 


91.2 
172.0 


100.9 
420.7 


81.7 
561.2 


100.6 
112.8 


83.6 
140.6 


95.0 
358.0 


109.6 
118.9 


98.1 
434.1 


98.3 
272.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


153.8 
166.5 
162.9 


154.8 
168.0 
165.0 


401.9 
422.2 
411.1 


481.6 
531.6 
513.3 


104.7 
110.5 
107.1 


110.1 
126.9 
133.6 


359.3 
399.6 
383.0 


125.6 
127.8 
124.4 


442.4 
463.4 
441.2 


244.8 
259.7 
251.6 


A 
M 
J 


165.6 
164.2 
160.7 


169.1 
168.3 
164.4 


415.8 
406.4 
396.4 


568.3 
579.2 
562.2 


106.1 
104.7 
104.1 


138.2 
138.9 
134.1 


369.0 
363.0 
359.8 


123.4 
121.0 
117.9 


445.4 
436.3 
425.6 


260.9 
264.2 
257.6 


J 

A 

S 


162.0 
169.7 
179.8 


165.8 
174.5 
185.4 


405.0 
419.2 
445.4 


568.1 
588.5 
609.8 


111.3 
117.7 
124.0 


135.1 
145.3 
156.6 


355.5 
366.6 
371.6 


115.2 
118.4 
119.7 


421.8 
419.9 
436.5 


264.6 
277.8 
308.8 


O 

N 
D 


183.3 
174.0 
177.3 


189.5 
178.8 
180.6 


462.5 

•431.7 

430.4 


595.5 
562.3 
573.6 


122.6 
121.9 
119.3 


162.6 
150.8 
154.7 


346.3 
314.1 
308.2 


114.2 
110.9 
108.5 


445.9 
425.2 
405.9 


305.8 
284.7 
290.0 


1952 J 
F 


181.7 
179.5 


186.7 
185.2 


452.0 
450.3 


582.8 
563.7 


118.5 
120.4 


161.0 
159.8 


301.2 
285.7 


111.8 
111.8 


396.5 
371.8 


295.3 
293.3 



COMMON STOCKS 



PREFERRED 
STOCKS 



Investors' Index 



Mining Index 



Industrials 

Industrial 
mines 



Utilities 



Total Telephone Power 

15 Trans- and and 

stocks portation telegraph traction 



Banks 

8 
stocks 



Total 

30 
stocks 



Gold 



Base 
metals 



Total 

37 
stocks 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1951 


98.9 
126.0 


86.1 
162.3 


56.0 
325.6 


109.3 
101.4 


88.9 
142.5 


102.5 
144.6 


104.5 
99.2 


95.6 
69.8 


121.7 
166.4 


101.6 
164.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


118.1 
125.6 
117.1 


148.6 
163.2 
158.9 


266.5 
315.2 
301.8 


102.5 
104.6 
104.0 


135.8 
146.0 
142.4 


155.6 
158.5 
150.0 


97.6 
104.7 
100.3 


68.8 
74.3 
71.2 


163.5 
174.5 
166.7 


166.0 
169.3 
166.0 


A 
M 
J 


118.3 
117.2 
117.0 


159.7 
156.0 
153.0 


304.7 
296.4 
290.7 


102.9 
102.0 
101.2 


143.9 
139.8 
136.0 


144.1 
141.7 
141.1 


96.7 
92.5 
90.6 


66.8 
63.7 
63.7 


165.3 
158.6 
152.3 


165.2 
164.3 
162.2 


J 

A 

S 


118.1 
127.1 
135.4 


155.4 
162.6 
172.3 


299.6 
328.8 
368.8 


101.2 
100.5 
100.8 


137.7 
142.1 
147.6 


140.0 
137.2 
140.2 


92.7 

97.7 

104.0 


65.5 
69.7 
73.7 


155.0 
161.7 
173.6 


163.1 
165.2 
166.4 


O 

N 
D 


141.0 
136.6 
140.2 


174.0 
167.2 
177.0 


378.4 
354.4 
402.1 


99.2 
99.2 
99.0 


149.1 
143.4 
146.0 


141.5 
141.0 
144.2 


107.5 
102.4 
103.4 


75.3 
71.9 
73.2 


181.2 
172.3 
172.4 


164.2 
162.8 
159.5 


1952 J 
F 


148.1 
151.3 


175.0 
169.5 


388.0 
375.7 


98.6 
97.3 


147.9 
141.2 


146.5 
143.8 


104.2 
102.6 


72.0 
71.2 


177.7 
174.6 


161.4 



Note: The number of stocks has varied over the period, the totals shown representing the current coverage. 
Source: Prices and Price Indexes, D.B.S. 



67 



FINANCE 

TABLE 64 



MARCH, 1952 



Commercial Failures* 

Monthly averages or calendar months <u 



FAILURES ■> 



LIABILITIES INVOLVED-' 



Total 



Trade 



Manu- 
factures 



Other Total 



Atlantic Prairie British 

Provinces Quebec Ontario Provinces Columbia 









Number 










Thousand Dollars 






1939 


116 


55 


18 


43 


1 


,257 


78 




556 


409 


135 


80 


1951 


117 


48 


22 


47 


2 


159 


79 


1 


,330 


493 


61 


197 


1950 N 


137 


52 


25 


60 


2 


,5041 

,957/ 


37 


1 


,512 


520 


84 


57 


D 


86 


37 


15 


34 


1 














1951 J 


136' 


61 


33 


42' 


2 


,3231' 














F 


134 


55 


21 


58 


2 


097 ' 


68' 


1 


,456 


547' 


71' 


88' 


M 


132' 


52 


25 


55' 


2 


,268]' 














A 


124 


56 


20 


48 


2 


3461' 














M 


97 


42 


22 


33 


1 


784 ' 


51' 


1 


,223' 


521 


39' 


99' 


J 


100' 


37 


16 


47' 


1 


666J' 














J 


107' 


50 


16 


41' 


2 


398]' 














A 


118' 


53 


22 


43' 


2 


409 ' 


147' 


1 


,463' 


379 


68' 


99' 


S 


87' 


29 


18 


40' 


1 


662] ' 














O 


129 


46 


27 


56 


2 


,380) 














N 


142 


53 


31 


58 


3 


,154 


50 


1 


,178 


526 


66 


499 


D 


93 


36 


18 


39 


1 


425] 















'Assignments made under the Bankruptcy and Winding Up Acts. 

"'Quarterly data for the last five columns are monthly averages. 

(2) In the Bankruptcy Act of 1949, provision is made for proposals from insolvent persons. Since July, 1950, agreement* 
made under this method are not included with the statistics of bankruptcies. Liabilities of insolvent persons making proposal* 
are not available. 

Source: Commercial Failures Under the Provisions of the Bankruptcy and Winding Up Acts, D.B.S. 



TABLE 65 



Miscellaneous Financial Statistics 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Government 
of Canada 
Theoretical 

15-year 
Bond Yield 



Three- 
Month 
Treasury 
Bill 
Yield 



Montreal Stock Exchange and Curb Market 



Toronto Stock Exchange 



Dividend 
Payments* ° 



Brokers' 
loans 



Ratio to 
value of 
stocks* 3 ' 



Industrial 
shares 
traded 



Value of 
listings 



Borrow- Ratio to <3) 
ings on quoted 
collateral values 



Salt 



Million dollars 



Thousand Billion 
shares dollars 



Million 
dollars 



Million 
shares 



Quoted 
market 
values'" 

Billion 
dollars 



1939 
1951 


3.16 
3.24 


0.707 
0.796 


25.43 
46.09 


11.34 
27.64 


23 
0.24 


707 
1,676 


7 oi w 
11.46 


16.8 
40.0 


0.36 
0.33 


10.1 
46.8 


4.77 
11.79 


1950 D 


2.99 


0.626 


117.92 


26 88 


0.25 


1,531 


9 95 


38.5 


0.37 


26.9 


10.19 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3.02 
3.02 
3.25 


0.626 
0.728 
0.755 


59.57 
31.26 
56.26 


22.46 
26.23 
25.68 


0.19 
0.23 
0.22 


3,442 
2,639 
1,275 


10.99 
11.02 
10.89 


37.6 
37.8 
33.1 


0.33 
0.34 
0.30 


70.6 
49.3 
29.5 


11.23 
11.22 
11.10 


A 
M 

J 


3 24 
3.24 
3.25 


0.755 
0.755 
0.754 


36.79 
11.63 
72.39 


25.87 
25.49 
24.45 


0.22 
0.23 
0.23 


1,954 
1,753 
1,078 


11.19 
10.94 
10.63 


36.2 
37.9 
35.8 


0.31 
0.34 
0.33 


27.2 
28.7 
21.9 


11.58 
11.30 
10.91 


J 

A 

S 


3 23 
3.24 
3.24 


0.771 
0.786 
0.880 


50.01 
25.14 
53 98 


24.82 
27.49 
30.55 


0.22 
23 
0.25 


1,071 
1,581 
1,667 


11.39 
11.99 
12.29 


36.8 
38.1 
52.7 


0.32 
31 
0.32 


29.2 
42.0 
70.7 


11.66 
12.39 
12.66 


O 
N 
D 


3 26 

3.38 
3.50 


0.927 
0.916 
0.894 


35.92 

13.06 

107.04 


34.86 
31.40 
32.31 


0.29 
0.26 
0.26 


1,624 

1,087 

940 


12.11 

11.88 
12.17 


44.0 
44.4 
45.4 


0.35 
36 
0.36 


99.8 
47.7 
44.8 


12.46 
12 33 
12.70 


1952 J 
F 


3.54 
3.55 


0.890 
0.909 


62.94 
26.98 


33.54 


0.27 


1,452 
1,340 


12.48 


45.8 


0.35 


65.2' 
58.4 


13.07 
12.84 



68 (1) As reported by Financial Post. (,) As of December 31. <3) Annual data obtained by averaging monthly ratios. <4, Ai 

of end of month. Annual data are end of month averages. 

Souce: Statistical Summary, Bank of Canada; Financial Post; Monthly Review, Montreal Stock Exchange; Monthly Review, 
Toronto Stock Exchange. 



LIST OF STATISTICAL TABLES 



INTRODUCTION Page 

1 Selected Economic Indicators: Canada 1 

2 Significant Statistics of United Kingdom 2 

3 Significant Statistics of United States 3 

4 Population, Births, Marriages and Deaths. ... 4 

5 National Accounts: Income and Expenditure. 6 

6 Industrial Production: Volume Indexes 6 

LABOUR 

7 Canadian Labour Force 10 

8 Canadian Labour Income 10 

9 Employment and Earnings: By Industries 11 

10 Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 14 

11 Employment and Earnings: By Cities 16 

12 Average Hourly Earnings 17 

13 Average Hours Worked per Week 19 

14 Percentage of Women in Reporting Establish- 

ments: By Industries 20 

13 Unemployment Insurance 20 

16 Time Lost In Labour Disputes 21 

PRICES 

17 Living Costs In Canada 22 

18 Wholesale Price Indexes: Component Material 

Classification 22 

19 Wholesale Price Indexes: Other Classifications 25 

FUEL AND POWER 

20 Electric Power: Production, Exports and Con- 

sumption 26 

: Consumption by Provinces. . . 26 

21 Coal and Coke 27 

22 Petroleum and Gas 27 

23 Refined Petroleum Products 28 

MINING 

24 Metals 29 

25 Non-Metallic Minerals 30 

MANUFACTURING 

26 Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and 

Shipments 30 

27 Tobacco and Beverages 33 

28 Rubber 33 

29 Leather: Stocks and Wettings of Hides and 

Skins 34 

: Production of Finished Leather 34 

: Production of Boots and Shoes 35 

30 Primary Textiles 35 

31 Production of Factory Clothing 36 

32 Wood and Paper Products 37 

33 Primary Iron and Steel Shapes: Shipments to 

Industries 38 

Primary Iron and Steel 39 

34 Motor Vehicles: Production and Sales 39 

35 Refrigerators and Washing Machines 40 

Radio and Television Receiving Sets 40 



CONSTRUCTION Page 

36 Value of Building Permits: 

By Municipalities 41 

By Provinces and Types 42 

37 Building Materials: Production, Imports and 



Sales. 



43 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

38 Production and Acreage of Principal Field 

Crops. See April issue, page 82. 

39 Farm Cash Income 44 

40 Grain Supply and Disposition — See April issue, 

page 85. 

41 Inspected Slaughterings of Live Stock and 

Cold Storage Holdings of Meat and Poultry 45 

Prices and Price Ratios: Live Stock and Live- 
stock Feeds 45 

Exports of Live-Stock Products 46 

42 Milk and Milk Products: Production, Stocks 

and Sales 46 

43 Fish: Landings, Exports and Stocks 47 

44 Manufactured Food: Production 47 

: Sugar: Production, Sales 
and Stocks 48 

DOMESTIC TRADE 

45 Value of Retail Trade 49 

46 Retail Sales and Stocks 50 

47 Retail Consumer Credit 51 

48 Indexes of Wholesale Sales 51 

EXTERNAL TRADE 

49 Merchandise Exports: By Commodities 52 

50 Merchandise Imports: by Commodities 54 

51 Merchandise Exports and Imports: By Areas 56 

52 Factors in the Balance of Payments 57 

TRANSPORTATION 

53 Shipping and Aviation 57 

54 Carloadings of Revenue Freight on Canadian 

Railways 58 

55 Operating Statistics of Canadian Railways — 59 



FINANCE 

56 Bank of Canada: Assets and Liabilities . 



.. 60 

57 Canadian Chartered Banks: Assets and Liabi- 

lities 61 

58 Currency and Active Bank Deposits 62 

59 Federal Government Revenues and Expend- 

itures 63 

60 Cheques Cashed in Clearing House Centres . . 65 

61 Life Insurance: Sales 65 

: Benefit Payments 66 

62 Bond Issues and Retirements 66 

63 Index Numbers of Security Prices 67 

64 Commercial Failures 68 

65 Miscellaneous Financial Statistics 68 



Note: Symbols used: Throughout the Review (. .) means "not available"; ( — ) means "nil" or "less than can be shown with number 
of digits used"; (•>) signifies "preliminary" and ( r ) indicates "revised". In some cases the annual data for 1949 and 1950 are 
■provisional. 



ndCloutikr, CMC, O.A., D.S I' . Quel n'i Printer and Controller of Stationery, Ottawa, 1952 



-- ;- 



- 




CANADIAN 



STATI STlCAi 
REVI E W 






APRIL 1952 






jvBR 



VOLUME XXVII NUMBER 4 



^/TyoFltt 






DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS, OTTAWA, CANADA, 



CANADIAN 

STATISTICAL 

REVIEW APRIL 1952 

(FORMKRLY MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS) 

Contents: 

Current Economic Conditions Page i 

Statistical Tables Page 1 

List of Statistical Tables Inside Back Cover 



Published by Authority 

of the Rt. Hon. C. D. HOWE 

Minister of Trade & Commerce 



Annual subscription: $3.00 
Single copies: 35c* each 



Subscription orders should be sent to the Queen's Printer, Ottawa, 

Ontario, and remittances made payable to the 

Receiver General of Canada. 

2101 - 501 
30-4-52 



Current Economic Conditions 



The release of official publicationssummariz- 
ing current economic conditions is concentrated 
in the first few months of each year beginning 
with the annual report of the Bank of Canada and 
ending with the "White Paper" which accompa- 
nies the Budget. Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
publications on "National Accounts", "Private 
and Public Investment Outlook" and the "Cana- 
dian Balance of International Payments", are 
timed to become available in this period and to 
provide at least a part of the basic information 
upon which decisions in the fields of monetary 
and fiscal policy are based. Preliminary esti- 
mates of Gross National Product and Expenditure 
were reviewed in the February issue of this 
Review and the Investment Outlook was reviewed 
in the March issue. The following article is 
devoted to a summary of the Budget "White 
Paper", which contains the most recent revisions 
of the National Accounts, together with certain 
details not hitherto available. In addition there 
is a summary of recent trends in the Canadian 
Balance of International Payments. The review 
of these documents is preceded by brief comments 
on certain of the leading economic indicators. 

Currenf Economic Indicators 

The index of the physical volume of industrial 
production began the year about 3 percent below 
the average for the preceding year. There is 
however, a preliminary indication of an upturn in 
this index, as the January figure was over 2 per 
cent above December, and the preliminary 
February figure of 207.7 was over 1 per cent 
above January. These recent indications of a 
cessation in the downward trend of industrial 
production can be found in numerous components 
of the series. Particularly noticeable among 
these are the upturns in production of motor 
vehicles, rubber products, leather footwear, 
clothing, cbemicals, iron and steel products and 
non-ferrous metals. 

The cost-of-living index at March 1 was 
189.1, 1.7 points below the preceding month, and 
approximately equal to the August 1951 figure. 
This most recent drop was more than accounted 
for bya 6point decline in food prices. The March 
figure incorporates the result of the quarterly 
rent survey which showed an increase of 1.5 



points in the rental index, bringing the level of 
this index to 146.3. The cost-of-living index 
averaged over the first three months of 1952 was 
190.5, about 3 per cent above the 1951 average 
of 184.5. 

The value of retail sales during February was 
6 per cent above February of a year ago. Depart- 
ment store sales, (included in the above figure), 
were more than 3 per cent higher in the same 
comparison, that is February over February. In 
March, department store sales were 3 per cent 
below March of a year ago. 

Monthly labour income during January a- 
mounted to $833 million, 0.5 per cent below the 
preceding month (a seasonal drop) but over 14 
per cent above the same month of a year ago. 



Budget White Paper 

The Budget "White Paper" is contained in 
"House of Commons Debates", Vol. 94, No. 29, 
Tuesday, April 8, 1952. (Queen's Printer, 
Ottawa, 5 cents). The keynote of the general 
review is in the words "inflationary potential" 
which are contained in the following sentence: 
"The underlying inflationary potential is still 
high but for the time being at least it appears to 
be under control" (p. 5). The major stimulants 
are of course, federal defence expenditure which 
is expected to amount to $2.1 billion in the 
fiscal year 1952-1953 and the continued high 
level of new capital expenditures in construction 
and machinery and equipment, which are expected 
to amount to $5.0 billion in 1952. The magnitude 
of these demands upon productive capacity is 
brought out by a comparison with Gross National 
Product figures as shown in the following table: 



Gross National Product 

Defence 

Capital Expenditures.... 



1951 



1952 



Inc 



(billions of dollars) 



21.2 
1.2 
4.6 



22.5 
2. V 
5.0 



1.3 
0.9 
0.4 



'Budget forecast for fiscal 1952-53. There is a minor amount 
or duplication in the capital expenditure and defence figures. 



GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURES ON GOODS AND SERVICES 
AS A PERCENTAGE OF GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT 



PERCENT 
50 



40 



PERCENT 
50 




1939 1940 



Defence and capital expenditures together 
about equal the expected increase in Gross 
National Product for 1952. The above figures 
are in current dollars. The capital expenditure 
forecast pointed out that the increase in physical 
volume would amount to about 4 per cent out of 
the 9 per cent expected value increase. The 
price and quantity components of the defence 
increase are not available. In summarizing the 
situation the Budget "White Paper" pointed 
out, "the prospects for 1952 indicate continued 
high levels of employment and general business 
activity, without any renewal of overt inflation, 
and with most of the increased output occurring 
in the defence and defence supporting sections 
of the economy. At some points and in some 
regions the economy is likely to be fully or more 
than fully extended. At other points and in other 
regions the available resources are likely to 
fall short of full utilization. While these con- 
trasting situations will not persist indefinitely, 
it may take time to adjust them since resources 
both in labour and in plant and equipment are 
not fully or easily transferable, either technically 
or geographically" (p. 7). The expected high 
levels of tax and other revenues are illustrated 
in the following chart. 



National Accounts, Revised Preliminary, 
1951 

According to the recent D.B.S. publication, 
"Natibnal Accounts, Revised Preliminary, 
1951", the Gross National Product of $21,241 
million in 1951 was 17 per cent above the 1950 
total of $18,122 million. A considerable part of 
this increase was due to a general increase in 
prices of approximately 11 per cent and to the 
effect which price increases have on the book 
values of business inventories. However, there 
remained an increase in total real output of over 
5 per cent. About one-quarter of this was due to 
a near record wheat crop and to other real in- 
creases in the agricultural sector. A further 
one-quarter was due to real output increases in 
manufacturing, while the remainder was due to 
increases in output of public utilities (including 
transportation) and to a number of smaller in- 
creases spread over construction, mining, 
forestry, etc. Turning to the manner in which the 
above increases were absorbed among the major 
categories of G. N. E., one-half of the increase in 
total real output was utilized by the government 
sector, largely as a result of the growing defence 
program. The remainder can be accounted for 



MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 
5000 



BUDGETARY REVENUES BY SOURCE 

FISCAL YEARS NEAREST CALENDAR YEAR 



MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 
5000 



4000 - 



3000 



2000 



1000 - 



14.3% 




OTHER REVENUES 

t TOTAL REVENUE — 

FROM TAXES ( 93 0%) 



CUSTOMS IMPORTS 
8 EXCISE DUTIES 



SALES a OTHER 
EXCISE TAXES 



CORPORATION 
INCOME TAX 



PERSONAL 
INCOME TAX 



4000 



3000 



2000 



1000 



1938 '39 '40 '41 '42 '43 '44 '45 '46 '47 '48 '49 '50 '51 I 



9 52-3 

ESTIMATES 



almost entirely by the building up of stocks and 
by the continued increase in investment in dur- 
able physical assets (with the exception of 
housing). It is evident from the above Budget 
statements that a continuation of these over-all 
trends is in prospect for 1952. In 1951, there 
was no increase in the real amount taken by 
consumers. The increase in total real output 
was accompanied by a gain of about 2Vi per 
cent in the employed labour force. There was a 
continuation of the shift from agricultural to 



non-agricultural pursuits so that the increase in 
the employed non-agricultural labour force was 
in excess of the general average of 2Vi percent. 

The major income recipients all showed 
substantial increases. Wages, salaries and sup- 
plementary labour income was up by 17 per cent. 
Investment income showed an average increase 
of 18 per cent but as the components are more 
interesting than the total these are set out in 
the following table: 



Components of Investment Income 



1950 



1951 



Per cent 
increase 



(mi II ion s of dollars) 



1. Corporation Profits before Taxes 

2. Interest and Net Rental Income of Persons 

3. Profits of Government Business Enterprises 

4. Miscellaneous Income 

5. Less: Interest on the public debt, transfer portion 

6. Dividends paid to non-residents 

7. Investment income 



2,450 

1,038 

240 

206 

- 442 

- 404 
3,088 



2,850 

1, 154 

239 

228 

- 447 

- 369 
3,655 



+ 16 
+ 11 



+ 18 



GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT 



BILLION 
i 22 — 



20 



18 



16 — 



14 



2 — 



— 




LABOUR 
I NCOME 

( i n eluding 

M 1 1 itory Pay 

and 

Allowo nces ) 



INVESTMENT 
I NCOME 



NET INCOME 

of 

AGRICULTURE 

and 

Other Unincorporated 
Business 



INDIRECT 

TAXES 

less 

SUBSIDIES 



DEPRECIATION 

ALLOWANCES 

etc 



949 



1950 



1951 



Accrued net income of farm operators from 
farm production was up by 38 per cent. Net 
income of non-farm unincorporated business 
increased by 5 per cent. 

Personal expenditure on consumer goods and 
services failed to keep up with the continued 
growth of incomes. Expenditure on durable goods 
declined significantly in real terms although in 
value terms 1951 expenditures were about equal 
to those of the previous year. 



Personal Exp 


enditure 








Percentage Change 
1950 to 1951 




Value 


Volume 


Price 





+ 11 
+ 9 

+ 13 
+ 10 


- 11 

- 1 

- 3 
+ 5 




+ 12 


Non-Durable Goods 


+ 12 




+ 12 




+ 8 
+ 10 



1. Including Net Expenditure Abroad. 



PERSONAL INCOME 



BILLION 

•\ 15 



I 2 




LABOUR 

INCOME 

(Less Contributions 

to Social Insuronce 

ond 

Government 

Pension Funds) 



NET INCOME 

Of 

AGRICULTURE 

ond 

Other Unincorporated 

Business 

INTEREST. DIVIDENDS 

ond 

Net Rental Income 

of Persons 

TRANSFER 
PAYMENTS 



1949 



950 



1951 



IV 



Personal income in 1951 amounted to $15,818 
million. The rise of over 1 7 per cent approximates 
those shown by important components such as 
wages and salaries, interest, dividends and net 
rental income of persons. A large increase in 
net income received by farm operators is also 
included in the above figure. Direct personal 
tax collections rose sharply from $735 million 
in 1950 to $1,016 million in 1951. Personal dis- 
posable income amounted to $14,802 million, 16 
per cent above 1950. After deduction of personal 
expenditure of $13,062 million the remaining 
amount of $1,740 million represents personal 
saving. It should be pointed out that the figure 
of $1,740 million represents saving of the unin- 
corporated business sector as well as individ- 
uals. Individual enterprisers such as farmers, 
unincorporated service establishments and 
retailers can be expected to retain a consider- 
able portion of their net income in the form of 
net new investment and in certain periods in 



DISPOSITION 

OF 

PERSONAL I NCOME 



BILLION 

■;■ 15 




PERSONAL 
DIRECT TAXES 

PERSONAL 
SAVING 



NON-DURABLE 
GOODS 



DURABLE 
GOODS 



SERVICES 



949 1950 1951 



GROSS NATIONAL 
EXPENDITURE 



BILLION 

i 22 - 



20 



I 4 



I 2 



10 



PERSONAL 

EXPENDITURE 

ON 

CONSUMER 

GOODS ft SERVICES 




GOVERNMENT 

EXPENDITURE 

ON 

GOODS a SERVICES 



1949 1950 



GROSS HOME 
I NVESTMENT 

(Housing, Plant 
& Equipment 

and I n ven tor ies ) 



NET INVESTMENT 
ABROAD 

(Export minus 
951 Imports) 



additions to inventories. Individuals may invest 
their savings in a variety of ways, including the 
savings portion of life insurance premiums or in 
repayment of debts and the reduction of residen- 



tial mortgages. It follows from these and other 
considerations that the above saving figure is 
only partly represented by assets which are in 
more or less liquid form. 



The Canadian Balance of International Payments, 1951 



Canada's current account with all countries 
shows a deficit of $524 million for the twelve 
months period of 1951. This excess of imports 
of goods and services followed a current deficit 
in 1950 of $329 million. 

The enlargement in the deficit in 1951 was 
due principally to the growth in the volume of 
imports which led to a large import balance on 
commodity account. But there was also a larger 
deficit from all other current transactions, and 
in both 1950 and 1951 the largest net contrib- 
utors to the current deficit were payments of 
interest and dividends, and miscellaneous 
current transactions. A substantial increase 
occurred in the latter in 1951, and a small defi- 
cit appeared on travel account in contrast to an 
appreciable surplus in previous years. 

Bilateral Changes 

Another salient change during the year was 
a widening in the disequilibrium with individual 
countries and areas. The current surplus with 
overseas countries increased substantially in 
1951, but was still less than in 1949 while the 
current deficit with the United States increased 
to $955 million which was only exceeded in the 
record year of 1947. The current surplus with all 
overseas countries increased in the year from 
$74 million to $431 million. Over half of this 
was due to an improvement in the surplus with 
the United Kingdom which rose from $28 million 
to $220 million. The remainder was distributed 
between 0. E. E.C. countries and other foreign 
countries, the former group rising from $109 mil- 
lion to $220 million and the change with the 
latter group being $60 million. 

One reason for these changes was that dur- 
ing 1951 there was a return in the second half 
of the year to something closer to the customary 
pattern of trade in which Canada has large ex- 
port balances with the United Kingdom and 
other overseas countries, and throughout most 



of the year there was again a substantial import 
balance with the United States. 

Trend in Recent Periods 

The current deficit in the first half of the 
year was greater than in the whole of 1951. The 
deficit in the third quarter dropped from the 
peak in the second quarter, and was more than 
offset by a current surplus which followed in 
the final quarter. 

The current surplus in the final quarter of 
1951 resulted from the large export balance, 
which accompanied the rise in the volume of 
exports overseas and the failure of imports to 
rise again to the peak reached in the second 
quarter. These opposite movements in the vol- 
ume of trade were combined with a favourable 
change in the terms of trade. The latter re- 
sulted from a decline in import prices in the 
last six months of the year, and some further 
increases in export prices in the same period. 
But dividend payments were again very heavy 
at the year end, and this reduced the size of 
the current account surplus in the final quarter. 

Capital Movements 

The year 1951 has been the second year of 
exceptionally large capital movements of a 
predominantly inward direction. Net inflows of 
capital from the United States were $560 million 
in 1951 compared with $960 million in 1950. The 
nature of these and the motivating forces behind 
them have been different in the two years. The 
most characteristic inflows in 1951 were long- 
term movements connected with the financing of 
Canadian development. Examples of these are 
the inflows for direct investment by foreign 
companies in Canadian branch and subsidiary 
companies and the sales of new issues of Ca- 
nadian securities in the United States by 
Canadian provinces, municipalities and com- 



VI 



BALANCE OF INTERNATIONAL PAYMENTS 



2000 



2000 



4000 



6000 



MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 
6000 



4000 



MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 
6000 



CREDITS 




DEBITS 



OTHER 



OTHER- 




1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



950 



1951 



4000 



2000 



2000 



4000 



6000 



panies. Each of these groups of inflows in- 
creased sharply during 1951 and together they 
account for a major part of the net inflow during 
the past year. These inflows are of a long-term 
character and contrast with many of the inflows 
in 1950 when movements into Canadian dollar 
forms of assets resulting from speculative 
motives by non-residents were prominent. An- 
other contrast lies in the fact that the decisions 
to borrow rested with residents of Canada, 
whereas in 1950 the decisions usually rested 
with non-residents. The rise in interest rates in 
Canada and the general credit stringency led 
Canadian borrowers to place new issues in the 
United States on a scale which is comparable 
with early peak years of this kind of borrowing. 



Inflows for direct investment in Canadian 
branches and subsidiaries by foreign concerns 
have been heavy in the last two years. While 
this movement has been under way throughout 
the post-war years it has been accelerated by 



the large-scale development of petroleum and 
other mineral resources and this continued on a 
larger scale in 1951 than in 1950. In the earlier 
post-war years the development of industrial 
plants was the major element in the growth of 
United States direct investments in Canada. The 
increase in the value of United States direct 
investments in Canada in the five years between 
the end of 1945 and the end of 1950 has been 
approximately $1,138 million. By the end of 1951 
the increase in value in the six post-war years 
was probably close to $1,500 million. 

Foreign capital has played an increasing 
role in Canadian development in the last few 
years, but that role is still a minor one in re- 
lation to the total financing of Canadian invest- 
ment. The proportion of foreign capital to total 
capital investment being made is much smaller 
than was the case in earlier periods of high 
investment activity. The net contribution by 
non-residents and foreign controlled companies 
to the savings used for all types of investment 



VII 



in Canada was only about one-seventh in 1950 
and 1951. But, in contrast, Canada was a net 
exporter of capital for a long period of years 
prior to 1950. (Balance of International Pay- 
ments, 1951, p. 9). 



Relative Size of Non-resident Capital 
Invested in Canada 

The total value of non-resident investments 
in Canada at the end of 1951 is estimated pro- 
visionally at about $9,424 million compared 
withS8,646 million at the end of 1950 and$7,939 
million in 1949. At the close of the recent war 
the value of non-resident investments was 
$7,092 million. The principal growth has been 
in United States investments. These have risen 
from $4,990 million in 1945 to $5,905 million in 
1949, $6,565 million in 1950 and estimated 
$7,235 million in 1951. In the same six years 
British investments in Canada have not changed 
so much in total value, although they also have 
risen in the last two years from $1,694 million 
in 1949 to $1,723 million in 1950 and an esti- 
mated $1,772 million in 1951. 

This growth in non-resident investments in 
Canada has occurred in a period of exceptional 
development in Canada. As the non-resident 
investment has only financed a comparatively 
small portion of the total capital investment 
there has been no wide change in the non- 
resident owned ratio of all investments in 
Canada. The latter has been influenced more 
by the investments in earlier periods of national 
development when the non-resident contribution 
was relatively greater. Earlier periods of rapid 
development this century were in the years 
immediately before the First Great War and in 
the period ending in 1930. A comprehensive 
valuation of all the capital invested in Canada 
at the end of 1951 is not available and in any 
case there are special problems of evaluating 



many types of Canadian owned asset. It is 
possible, however, to judge the relative position 
of foreign capital in Canada in some spheres. 
For example, non-resident holdings of Canadian 
bonds, estimated at $3,455 million at the end of 
1951, constituted 15.2% of the total funded 
debt of all Canadian governments and corpora- 
tions of approximately $22.6 billion. 

Another sphere of investments where the 
non-resident share of capital may be measured 
approximately is in the business sector of the 
Canadian economy. In this sphere the non- 
resident owned ratio is higher than in the case 
of bond ownership. The group of total invest- 
ments in Canada selected for this comparison 
includes corporate investments in manufacturing, 
mining, railways and public utilities, and in the 
case of merchandising an estimate of all invest- 
ments including those in non-corporate forms. 
But many groups of assets predominantly owned 
in Canada have not been taken into the calcu- 
lationsuch as residential properties, agricultural 
assets and other forms of real estate. 

The most recent year for which a detailed 
evaluation of Canadian owned investments in 
the business sector of the economy is available 
is 1949. This shows that Canadian ownership 
in that year amounted to about 68% of the total. 
An estimate for 1950 points to about the same 
proportion in that year and it is not likely that 
the corresponding ratio in 1951 was changed 
significantly. The non-resident owned ratio of 
32% in these years compares with 38% in 1939. 
United States ownership of Canadian industry 
amounted to less than a quarter of the total 
capital invested by the end of 1950. 

If it were possible to estimate satisfactorily 
the total value of all forms of Canadian invest- 
ment it seems likely that the ratio of non-resident 
ownership to all investments in Canada is 
somewhere closer to the 15% in the case of 
funded debt than to the 32% in the case of the 
narrower field of business investment. 



VIII 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 1 



INTRODUCTION 



Selected Economic Indicators 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION 



EMPLOYMENT IN 
MANUFACTURING 



Index of 
Industrial 
Production Gold (I) 



Steel 
Ingots 
and News- 
Copper Castings print' 1 ' 



Power by 
Central 

Electric' 1 ' 
Stations 



Automo- 
biles' 2 ' 



Total 
Index 



Durable 
Goods 



Non- 
durable 
Goods 



Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 
in Manu- 
factures 





1935-39 
= 100 


Thousand 
fine ounces 


Million 
pounds 


Thousand tons 


Million 
kwh. 


Thou- 
sands 




1939 = 100 


Cents 

per hour 


1939 


109.3 


425 


50.7 


129 


244 


2,362 


13.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


42.7 


1951 


212.0 


364 


44.9 


297 


460 


4,785 r 


34.5 


190.0 


236.3 


159.9 


116.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


210.0 
214.0 
217.1 


374 
347 
372 


45.6 
40.6 
48.6 


310 
281 
315 


453 
425 
473 


4,786 r 
4,378 r 
4,912 r 


39.2 
40.6 
47.8 


182.4 
184.5 
186.3 


223.3 
226.9 
229.9 


155.8 
156.9 
157.9 


109.0 
110.4 
111.4 


A 

M 

J 


218.2 
223.4 
218.8 


363 
369 
363 


47.7 
47.0 
45.2 


312 
313 
294 


448 
486 
464 


4,897 r 
5,132 r 
4,709 r 


41.1 
42.9 
36.2 


188.8 
189.9 
192.0 


234.8 
237.0 
240.9 


158.8 
159.2 
160.2 


112.8 
114.1 
115.9 


J 

A 

S 


208.0 
205.4 
208.2 


344 
345 
359 


45.0 
45.3 
43.5 


275 
287 
268 


452 
485 
431 


4,630 r 

4,597 r 
4,406 r 


30.3 
21.8 
29.9 


193.9 
194.0 
194.1 


242.9 
242.0 
242.1 


162.1 
162.8 
162.9 


118.4 
119.1 
120.6 


o 

N 
D 


212.6 
207.8 
200. 4 r 


378 
372 
376 


41.8 
44.2 
44.1 


309 
307 
297 


492 
472 
435 


4,921 r 
4,938 r 
5,113 r 


32.5 
29.5 
22.1 


194.2 
190.8 
189.1 


240.2 
238.4 
237.5 


164.4 
160.0 
157.6 


121.9 
123.5 
124.5 


1952 J 
F 


205. 1" 
207.7" 


355 
353 


45.0 
41.0 


317 
306 


470 
458 


5,269 r 
4,970 


34.2 
32.4 


183. 6 r 
185.0 


233. 8 r 
234.5 


151.2' 

153.0 


127.1' 

127.2 



Civil- 
ian 
Labour 
Force"' < 7 > 



Thou- 
sands 



Percentage of 

Paid 
Workers 
and Un- 



Ordinary 

Claimants 

on Live 

employed , Unem - . 
^ ' ployment 

Seeking Work (4 (7) Register' 5 ' 



Civilian 
Labour 
Force 



Total 
Labour 
Income 



Railway 
Revenue 
Freight 



New 

Dwelling 

Units 

Corn- 



Value of Retail 
Trade 



Loadings pleted ( 



Percentage 



Thou- 
sands 



Thou- 
Million sand 
dollars tons 



Number 



Building 
Permits: 
58 Muni- 
cipalities 

Thou- 
sand 
dollars 



Total 



Depart- 
ment 
stores 



Million dollars 



Index of 
Whole- 
sale 
Sales 



1935-39 
= 100 



1939 
1951 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 
D 

1952 J 
F 



4,598 11 
5,332 1 



2.2 138.8 



215 
803 



5,233 
10,164 



5,172 3.3 



5,332 1 
5,421 

5,210 



4.5 

2 
2^0 

2^6 



220.5 
208.0 
184.5 

136.8 
88.9 
86.5 

83.9 
80.9 
83.1 

99.8 
153.7 
239.0 

287.8 
276.3 



730 9,338 

733 8,280 

745 9,144 

763 9,413 

792 10,738 

821 10,902 

827 10,678 

833 10,913 

848 10,016 

855 12,048 

857 11,105 

837 9,387 

9,903" 
9,034" 



4,308 
7,068 

6,950 
6,712 
5,859 

5,688 
6,876 
6,609 

4,926 
7,183 
7,002 

8,164 
8,842 
6,499 



5,023 
35,876 

24,954 
29,957 
38,504 

46,825 
54,676 
36,588 

48,029 
33,439 
27,776 

38,251 
24,731 
26,778 

13,738 
20,373" 



870.4 75. l r 

703.8 58.3 

694.2 58.3 

851.6 72.6 

859.2 75.2 

931.1 76.6 

940.2 69.5 

865.8 54.4 

897.4 61.5 

891.2 72.4 

898.6 81.2 

906.1 101.9 

1005.7 119.8 

722 . 6 55 . 2 

735.1 60.2 



109.1 
347.1 

317.6 
307.9 
338.9 

352.4 
372.6 
357.3 

338.7 
367.7 
357.0 

383.7 
364.4 
307.2 

308. 7 r 
313.2 



(1) For newsprint, gold and power, Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949, May, 1949 and lanuary, 1950 
respectively. (2) Monthly data are producers shipments. (3 'Data exclude persons in certain remote parts of 

several provinces and Indians on reservations. Newfoundland included as of March, 1950 (4 'Includes only those 

not at work and seeking work. "'Newfoundland included as of April, 1949. "'Conversions are included with 
annual data only. ' 7 > As of June 1. 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 1- concluded 



APRIL, 1952 



Selected Economic Indicators 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Cost of 
Living 
Index 



Price 
Index 
of Resi- 
dential 
Building 
Materials 



Wholesale Price Index 

Cana- 
dian 
farm 
General products 



Exports 

of Imports 

Domestic of Total 

Commod- Merchan- expend- 

ities"' dise ltures 



Federal 
Government '' 



Total 



Cheques 
Cashed 

in 
Clearing 
Centres 



Index 

of 

Common 

Stock 

Prices 



Index 

of 
Long- 
Term 
Bond 
Yields 







1935-39 = 100 






Mill 


ion dollars 






1935-39 


■ 100 


1939 
1951 


101.5 
184.5 


102 .3 


99.2 


92 .6 


77 
326 


63 
340 


46 
242 


42 
259 


2,635 
9.349 


91.6 
168.3 


101.8 
104.6 


1951 F 
M 


175.2 
179.7 


274.9 
282.6 


238.5 
241.8 


262.5 
273.0 


234 
290 


274 
343 


168 


269 


7,984 
8,830 


166.5 
162.9 


97.7 
104.6 


A 
M 

J 


181.8 
182.0 
184.1 


287.2 
289 .5 
289.2 


242.2 
241.9 
242.7 


265.4 
265.3 
272.6 


295 
323 
313 


393 
405 
360 


97 
199 
234 


218 
353 
295 


9.017 
9,484 
9.500 


165.6 
164.2 
160.7 


104.9 
104.9 
105.3 


J 

A 

S 


187.6 
188.9 
189.8 


289 8 
290.4 
290.9 


244.2 
241.5 
240.1 


277 .1 
263 3' 
260 . 5' 


374 
350 
320 


371 
357 
312 


264 
221 
277 


336 
314 
288 


9,032 
9.072 
8,775 


162.0 
169.7 
179.8 


104.7 
104.9 
105.0 


O 
N 
D 


190.4 
191.2 
191.1 


290.8 
289.3 
289.1 


239.6 
239.1 
237.6 


259 3' 
264. 9' 
266. 8' 


371 
380 
379 


344 
326 
273 


263 
278 
249 


355 
308 
336 


10.619 
10,737 
10,134 


183.3 
174.0 
177.3 


105.7 
107.8 
112.0 


1952 J 
F 
M 


191.5 
190.8 
189.1 


287 . 9' 
287.9 


236.8 
232.6 


263.1' 
251.2 


324 
310 


307 
282 






9.734 
8.789 


181.7 
179.5 
177.6 


113.4 
113.9 
115.1 



Annual totals are for fiscal years ended March 31 of period shown. (2, As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 



TABLE 2 



Significant Statistics of United Kingdom 



UNEM- IMPORTS'*' 
PRODUCTION CONSUMPTION PLOYED ■»■ RETAINED EXPORTS 2 


PRICES 


WAGE 
RATES 


Steel Ingots Insured 
and Raw Raw'" Workers 
Index of Coal ' Castings Cotton Wool Registered 


Interim 
Retail 
Wholesale Prices 


Weekly 


Production Weekly average Including Munitions 





1946 = 100 



Thousand tons 



Million 
pounds 



Thousands 



Index of volume 
1947 = 100 



1938 



June 17, June 30, 
= 1001947 = 1001947 = 100 



1939 
1951 


144 


4.437 
4.274 


254 
301 


11.29 
8.79 


330 


1,251 
210 


132 


167 


101.4 
315.0 


125 


120 


1950 N 
D 


153 
140 


4,404 
4.143- 


336* 
296 


9.28- 
8.02 


43.6 
36.7 


326 I 

331 


111 


175 


285.0 
288.3 


116 
116 


113 
114 


1951 J 
F 
M 


140 
151 
141 


4,211 
4,517 
4,243* 


306* 

326 

318 


8 69* 

9.12 

8.25 


43 .2 
37.4 
36.0 


367 | 

335 

305 


120 


160 


295.8 

301.4 

[ 309.2 


117 
118 
119 


115 
116 
117 


A 

M 

J 


151 
144 
149 


4,605 
4,199 
4.301* 


323 

305- 

308 


9.55 

8.79* 

8.82 


37.2 
36.4 
34.4 


281 
241 

215 J 


134 


173 


i 314.3 
1 315.3 
[ 316.4 


121 

124 
125 


118 
118 
119 


J 

A 

S 


139' 

127 

145' 


3,940 
3,462 
4,437* 


256 

266* 

303 


8.38 
8 30* 
8.61 


33.0 
29.1 
28.8 


210 
228 
241 


140 


165 


f 315.4 
319.0 
320.6 


126 
127 
128 


120 
120 
121 


O 
N 
D 


150' 

152 

137 


4,507 
4.557 
4,272* 


30 r 

316 

288 


9 47* 
9 74 
7 70 


30.1 
27.7 

23 1 


290 
323 
343 


134 


169' 


324.2 

324.0' 

325.6 


129 
129 
130 


122 

126' 

126 


1952 J 




4.337» 


293* 






426 




186" 


329 9 


132 


127 



'Average of five weeks. ' Annual data as of middle of July. Monthly data for dates varying from 8th to 17th 

of month. Average quarterly statistics are given in the monthly section, except the recent data for exports which 

are monthly estimates. Great Britain. ' Monthly average or calendar months. 

Source: Monthly Digest of Statistics and Statistical Abstract for the United Kingdom. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 3 



INTRODUCTION 



Significant Statistics of United States 

Monthly averages or calendar months'" 



INDEX OF 
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 

Manufactured Goods 



LABOUR FORCE 



CONSTRUC- 
TION CON- 
TRACTS 
AWARDED 



Dur- Non- Em- Un- 

Total Total able durable ployed employed 



PASSENGER 
AUTO- 
MOBILES 



Factory 
Sales 



MANUFACTURING 



New- 
Orders 



Sales 



Inventories 
End of 
Period 



1935-39 = 100 
seasonally adjusted 



Million persons 



Billion 
Million dollars Billion dollars 

dollars Thousands unadjusted seasonally adjusted 



1939 
1951 


109 
219 


109 
229 


109 
273 


109 
194 


45.8 
61.0 


9.5 
1.9 


296 
1,313 


238.9 
444.8 


23. 9 r 


5.1 
22.1 


11.5 
42.0 


1951 J 
F 
M 


221 
221 
222 


231 
232 
234 


268 
271 
277 


201 
201 
199 


59.0 
58.9 
60.2 


2.5 
2.4 
2.1 


1,043 
1,141 
1,267 


478.6 
505.9 
617.4 


28.2 
25.8 
28.5 


22.6 
22.3 
22.6 


34.1 
34.7 
35.6 


A 
M 

J 


223 
222 
221 


234 
233 
231 


279 
276 
274 


198 
198 
197 


60.0 
61.2 
61.8 


1.7 
1.6 
2.0 


1,375 
2,573 
1,409 


503.0 
511.9 
482.0 


23.8 
23.6 
24.1 


22.5 
23.4 
22.1 


36.9 
38.1 
39.0 


J 
A 

S 


212 
217 
219 


222 
226 
228 


265 
267 
271 


187 
193 
193 


62.5 
62.6 
61.6 


1.9 
1.6 
1.6 


1,380 
1,263 
1,083 


381.4 
426.9 
365.9 


21.6 
23.0 
21.2 


21.3 
21.7 
20.6 


39.9 
40.6 
41.1 


o 

N 
D 


218 
219 
218 


226 
228 
228 


274 r 

277 

281 


188 
188 
185 


61.8 
61.3 
61.0 


1.6 

1.8 
1.7 


1,051 

932 

1,234 


414.5 
356.8 
293.3 


23. 9 r 
22.7 
20. 8 r 


22.5 
22.3 
21. 2 r 


41.4 
41.7 
42.0 


1952 J 
F 


220 r 
222? 


230 r 
232? 


281 r 
284" 


189 r 
190" 


59.7 
59.8 


2.1 
2.1 


902 
885 


273.6 


22.6 


23. r 


42.0 



Average 
Hourly 
Wholesale Consumers Earnings 
Personal Commodity Price Manufac- 
Income (1 > Prices* Index turing 



Merchandise 

Exports 
including 
re-exports* 2 ' Imports 



Consumer 
Credit Out- 
standing, 

End of 
Period. (3 > 



Department Stores 



Sales 



Stocks 



Common 

Stock 

Prices' 4 ' 

402-416 





Billion 
dollars 


1947-49 = 
100 


1935-39 = 
100 


Dollars 


Million dollars 


Billion 
dollars 


1947-1949 = 100 
seasonally adjusted 


1935-39 = 
100 


1939 
1951 


72.6 
251.1 


114.8 


99.4 
185.6 


0.633 

1.594 


265 
1,252 


193 
913 


7.0 
19.5 


34 
109 


119 


94.2 
176.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


243.6 
243.3 
245.5 


115.0 
116.5 
116.5 


181.5 
183.8 
184.5 


1.555 
1.561 
1.571 


974 • 
1,076 
l,285 r 


1 ,024 r 

910 r 

1,100 


19.9 
19.5 
19.4 


125 
115 
105 


127 
129 
133 


168.6 
174.7 
170.3 


A 
M 

J 


249.0 
249.8 
251.0 


116.3 
115.9 
115.1 


184.6 
185.4 
185.2 


1.578 
1.586 
1.599 


l,370 r 
l,354 r 
l,294 r 


1,033 
1,018 
930 r 


19.1 
19.2 
19.3 


104 
104 
105 


138 
136 
136 


172.3 
173.9 
171.7 


J 

A 

S 


252.4 
253.7 
253.6 


114.2 
113.7 
113.4 


185.5 
185.5 
186.6 


1.598 
1.596 
1.613 


1 , 190 r 

1,267 

1,232 


895 r 
880 
721 r 


19.1 
19.3 
19.4 


105 
109 
107 


138 
134 
128 


172.8 
181.5 
187.3 


O 
N 
D 


257.5 
256. 5 r 
258. 6 r 


113.7 
113.6 
113.5 


187.4 
188.6 
189.1 


1.615 

1.626 r 

1.636 r 


1,155 
1,388 
1,435 


833 r 
818 r 
801 


19.6 
20.0 
20.6 


108 
112 
109 


121 
117 
119 


185.0 
177.7 
182.5 


1952 J 
F 


257.3 


113.0 
112.6 


189.1 
187.9 


1.640 r 
1.638? 


1,246 


922 


20. 1" 


108 
105? 


118 
116" 


187.1 



'Revised series. Data reflect use of new base period, expansion of commodity coverage, and changes in the 
classification system, weights and calculation method. 

(1) Personal income is given on an annual basis for months as well as for years. (2) Includes army civilian supply 
exports from February, 1947. <3) Annual totals are averages of end-of-month figures. (4) Standard and Poor's 

Corporation. 

Source: Survey of Current Business U.S. Department of Commerce. 



INTRODUCTION 

Population,' Births, Marriages and Deaths 

TABLE 4 Monthly averages or calendar months**' 



APRIL, 1952 



< ANADA 



NEWFOUNDLAND 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



Population Mirths Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages 





1 housands 


Nunrtn-r 




Thousands 


Number 


Thousands 




Number 


1939 
1951 


14 


,267 
009 


19,122 
30,539 


8,638 
10,492 


9,079 
10,263 


361 




94 
98 


177 
223 


53 

49 


1950 D 






29,634 


8,516 


10,546 




. . 


. . 


162 


50 


1951 J 
F 
M 






27,118 

26,498 
30,475 


5,928 
5,220 
5,205 


10,297 

10,889 
12,275 








280 
186 
205 


23 
21 
22 


A 
M 

J 


14 


,009 


30,880 
32,371 
33,991 


7,475 

9,847 

14,152 


11,207 

10,284 

9,080 


361 




98 


224 
316 
220 


26 
35 
77 


J 

A 

S 






31,134 
32,746 
29,059 


16,559 
13,791 
14,179 


8,847 
9,926 
8,585 








219 
212 
219 


68 
72 
75 


O 
N 
D 






33,532 
29,348 
29,318 


13,971 

10,738 
8,842 


10,015 
10,487 
11,262 








255 
202 
142 


76 
64 
32 


1952 J 






29,612 


5,054 


11,088 




1.901 362 


407 


236 


24 



P.E.I. 



NOVA SCOTIA 



NEW BRUNSWICK 



QUEBEC 



Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births 





Number 


Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 


Number 


1939 
1951 


94 
74 


561 
643 


985 
1,421 


419 
433 


527 
480 


447 
516 


940 
1.359 


311 
362 


424 
414 


3,230 
4,056 


6,635 
9.761 


1950 D 


71 




1,253 


328 


492 




1,180 


247 


353 






11,446 


1951 J 
F 
M 


93 
95 
91 




1,544 
1.292 
1.319 


371 
332 
249 


488 
507 
661 




1,269 
1.193 
1,417 


241 
198 
178 


400 
419 
630 






6,563 

8,220 

10,536 


A 
M 

J 


97 
59 

74 


643 


1,269 
1,513 
1,408 


194 
411 
861 


610 
397 
327 


516 


1.346 
1,733 
1,297 


241 
372 
435 


474 
449 
331 


4 


056 


9,499 
10,924 
10,804 


J 

A 

S 


45 
95 
66 




1,439 
1.383 
1.441 


594 
363 
572 


407 
437 
483 




1,305 
1.666 
1.288 


486 
569 
519 


288 
413 
396 






10,917 
9.890 
9.745 


O 

N 


63 
60 

44 




1,519 
1.627 
1.297 


219 
690 
337 


333 
567 
537 




1.288 
1.507 
1.003 


432 
448 
225 


377 
468 
328 






9,910 

8,649 

11,469 


1952 J 


132 




1,642 


302 


637 




1.497 


282 


532 






6,798 



Note. — Until the end of 1949, annual and monthly data for births, deaths and marriages are based on tabulated 
figures by month of occurrence on the basis of residence. Figures for 1950 and 1951 are provisional and represent 
registrations filed in Provincial Vital Statistics offices during the month under review, regardless of the month of 
occurrence. 

1 ' Estimates are given by years as of lune 1, and in Canada as a whole, as of the first day of the last month of each 
quarter. "'Exclusive of stillbirths. p ' Not applicable to figures on population. ; Yukon and North-West 

Territories not included in figures for births, marriages and deaths. Newfoundland is included as of January, 1952. 

Source: Monthly Report of Births, Marriages and Deaths, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 INTRODUCTION 

Population, Births, Marriages and Deaths 

TABLE 4 - concluded Monthly averages or calendar months (,) 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



MANITOBA 



SASK. 



Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population 





Number 


Thousands 




Number 




Thousands 


Number 




Thousands 


1939 
1951 


2,409 
2,936 


2,782 
2,887 


3,708 
4,598 


5,344 
9,683 


2,888 
3,792 


3,128 
3,748 


726 
777 


1,132 
1,664 


640 
622 


513 
563 


906 
832 


1950 D 


2,483 


3,064 




8,567 


2,699 


3,783 




1,595 


626 


545 




1951 J 
F 
M 


908 

939 

1,104 


2,475 
3,019 
3,462 




9,139 
8,843 
9,159 


2,148 
2,163 
2,103 


3,880 
4,174 
4,282 




1,585 
1,353 
1,634 


501 
320 
290 


677 
554 
663 




A 
M 
J 


1,476 
2,467 
4,154 


3,147 
2,770 
2,417 


4,598 


10,234 

9,119 

11,644 


3,259 
3,678 
5,065 


4,111 
3,789 
3,531 


777 


1,720 
1,669 
1,910 


383 
471 
800 


627 
586 
569 


832 


J 

A 

S 


5,335 
4,796 
4,496 


2,559 
2,986 
2,283 




9,625 

10,124 

9,083 


6,103 
3,996 
5,495 


3,268 
3,276 
3,022 




1,729 
1,760 
1,663 


858 
797 
678 


459 
498 
457 




O 
N 
D 


3,995 
2,913 
2,652 


3,044 
2,611 
3,871 




11,065 

10,072 

8,086 


4,995 
3,496 
2,997 


3,536 
4,067 
4,034 




1,757 
1,523 
1,670 


919 
908 
537 


561 
552 
551 




1952 J 


717 


2,600 




10,103 


1,695 


3,627 




1,521 


368 


583 





SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths Population Births Marriages Deaths 







Number 




Thousands 


Number 




Thousands 




Number 




1939 
1951 


1,505 
1,832 


610 
570 


503 
538 


786 
940 


1,373 
2,269 


653 
788 


482 
593 


792 
1,165 


1,031 
2,327 


655 
941 


626 
968 


1950 D 


1,872 


610 


568 




1,729 


613 


803 




1,830 


860 


867 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1,660 
1,608 
2,031 


307 
245 
259 


589 
561 
608 




2,628 
1,853 
1,900 


735 
428 
311 


610 
671 
628 




2,450 
1,950 
2,274 


694 
574 
689 


1,085 

889 

1,250 


A 
M 

J 


1,914 
1,904 
2,023 


403 
738 
711 


510 
563 

445 


940 


2,505 
2,572 
2,322 


720 
714 
977 


673 
659 
488 


1,165 


2,169 
2,621 
2,363 


773 

961 

1,072 


958 

1,012 

898 


J 
A 

S 


1,688 
1,964 
2,064 


808 
853 
452 


593 
449 
439 




2,026 
2,979 
1,263 


1,091 

1,066 

775 


359 
815 
613 




2,186 
2,768 
2,293 


1,216 
1,279 
1,117 


869 
957 
826 


o 

N 
D 


1,874 
1,306 
1,945 


1,416 
350 
300 


570 
503 
620 




3,221 
2,273 
1,689 


875 

1,005 

755 


507 
697 
393 




2,643 
2,189 
2,017 


1,044 

864 

1,007 


1,024 
962 
884 


1952 J 


1,513 


209 


561 




1,963 


470 


764 




2,438 


625 


1,245 



("As of June 1. 



(2) Exclusive of stillbirths. 



(3> Not applicable to figures on population. 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 5 



National Accounts: Income and Expenditure 



APRIL, 1952 



NET NATIONAL INCOME AT FACTOR COST AND GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT AT MARKET PRICES 



Salaries, 
wages and 
supplemen- 
tary labour 
income 



Net Income oi 
Unincorporated Business 



Military 

pay and 

allowances 



Investment 
income 



Farm 
operators* n 



Net Depreciation Cross 

Other national allowances national 

unin- income at Indirect and similar Residual product 

corporated factor taxes less business error of at market 

business cost subsidies costs" estimate prices 



Million dollars 



1939 


2,575 


32 


917 


385 


464 


4,373 


733 


610 


- 9 


5,707 


1949 


7,761 


115 


2,445 


1,504 


1,369 


13,194 


1,830 


1,437 


+ 1 


16,4(,2 


1950 


8,271 


137 


2,921 


1,579 


1,498 


14,406 


1,986 


1,614 


+23 


18,029 


1951" 


9.660 


201 


3,494 


2,102 


1,640 


17,097 


2,386 


1,760 


-26 


21,217 



GROSS NATIONAL EXPENDITURE AT MARKET PRICES 



Gross Domestic Investment*" 



Personal Government 
expenditure expenditure 
on consumer on goods 
goods and and 



New Construction 












Gross 
national 






New 




Exports 






expend- 




machinery 


Change 


oi goods 


Imports oi 


Residual 


iture at 


Non 


and 


in 


and 


goods and 


error oi 


market 


Residential residential 


equipment 


inventories 


services 


services 


estimate 


prices 













Million dollars 










1939 
1949 
1950 
1951" 


3,904 
10,963 
11,862 
13,062 


735 
2,128 
2,314 
3,112 


185 
742 
801 
796 


166 

903 

1,010 

1.240 


254 
1.323 
1,378 
1,845 


331 

231 

995 

1,707 


1,451 
4,011 
4,173 
5,060 


-1,328 
-3,837 
-4.482 
-5,632 


+ 9 
- 2 
-22 
+27 


5,707 
16,462 
18,029 
21,217 



Note: Newfoundland is included as oi 1949. 

ll) Accrued net income from iarm production. (2; Includes outlay on new durable assets such as building and highway 
construction by governments, other than government business enterprises. Also includes the change in inventories oi government 
commodity agencies and oi the Defence Production Revolving Fund. Excludes shipments, under NATO, oi previously produced 
military equipment but includes replacements oi new equipment. "'Includes capital expenditures by private and government 

business enterprises, private non-commercial institutions and outlays on new residential construction by individuals and business 
investors. 

Source: National Accounts, Income and Expenditure 1926-1950 and "Preliminary 1951", D.B.S. 



TABLE 6 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 



100' 



INDUSTRIAL 
PRODUCTION 



MINING 



MANU- 
FACTURES 



Metals 



Fuels 





Total 


Total 


Total 


Gold 


Copper 


Nickel 


Total 


Coal 


Non-Metals 


Total 


1939 


109.3 


118.4 


119.1 


122.4 


120.0 


117.3 


117.3 


104.7 


113.9 


107.8 


1951 


212.0 


165.1 


112.4 


103.9 


104 2 


141.1 


271.6 


122.6 


302.3 


219.5 


1951 J 


210.0 


158.3 


111.7 


105.2 


103.8 


132 5 


238.8 


127.6 


336.6 


218.9 


F 


214.0 


157.6 


110.5 


105.6 


102.5 


129.5 


230.2 


117.4 


355 8 


224.3 


M 


217.1 


156.5 


112.9 


104.6 


110.6 


140.7 


210.4 


109.6 


332.9 


227.9 


A 


218.2 


153.8 


111.3 


106.1 


112.3 


132.0 


215.9 


122.6 


287.6 


228.5 


M 


223.4 


167.6 


111.6 


99.9 


107 


150.9 


278.0 


119.3 


304.8 


231.9 


J 


218.8 


174.0 


114.5 


101.9 


106.4 


148.1 


299.9 


122.5 


310.8 


225.9 


J 


208.0 


165.9 


109.8 


100.6 


102.4 


142.5 


290.1 


111.1 


280.5 


213.5 


A 


205.4 


168.1 


109 2 


93.3 


103.2 


148.3 


309.6 


115.2 


296.6 


210.5 


S 


208.2 


174.4 


115.6 


109.2 


102.5 


145.5 


311.6 


126.3 


294.7 


214.1 


O 


212.6 


172.5 


112 8 


106.3 


95 3 


141.7 


316.3 


137.7 


294.9 


219.4 


N 


207.8 


169.8 


114.6 


104.6 


104.0 


144.1 


288. 5' 


140.2' 


285.0 


213.9 


D 


200.4' 


163.0 


115.0 


109.8 


100.5 


137.0 


270.4 


121.9 


247.0' 


204.9 


1952 J 


205.1" 


167.2" 


111.4' 


100.1 


103.0 


143.0 




130 5 


316.4 


208.9" 


F 


207.7" 


168.4" 


111.5 


103.6 


100.1 


138.6 






335.5 


212.1' 



"Only series with definite seasonal patterns are adjusted. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 6 -continued 



INTRODUCTION 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



Total 



Foods and Beverages 



Total 



Foods 



Total 



Meat products 



Dairy products 



Flour and 
feed 











Total 


Cattle 
slaughterings 


Hog slaught 

e rings 


Total 


Butter and 
cheese 


Concen- 
trated milk 


Total 


1939 
1951 


108.0 
193.3 


111.7 
199.0 


110.2 
177.7 


105.1 
134.7 


101.4 
140.8 


108.2 
141.9 


111.4 
123.9 


109.6 
96.8 


124.2 
298.2 


118.7 
154.9 


1951 J 
F 
M 


189.3 
193.9 
197.4 


180.4 
184.5 
194.5 


166.1 
165.8 
169.3 


125.7 
117.3 
126.9 


134.2 
131.0 
143.9 


126.7 
116.0 
127.7 


129.1 
120.5 
117.9 


103.6 
91.2 
89.3 


286.0 
280.2 
223.4 


150.5 
163.2 
172.6 


A 
M 

J 


199.3 
202.5 
196.4 


197.0 
202.6 
203.1 


170.1 
182.5 
181.3 


135.7 
162.3 
158.9 


184.3 
220.1 
206.4 


118.6 
141.5 
145.3 


107.9 
119.8 
120.5 


85.8 
90.2 
91.9 


268.2 
315.6 
322.0 


160.1 
156.4 
162.8 


J 

A 

S 


191.6 
191.4 
189.8 


204.7 
212.1 
203.8 


179.1 
187.9 
184.5 


134.9 
148.0 
142.5 


142.7 
122.8 
122.7 


144.1 
177.3 
166.2 


114.6 
121.5 
124.9 


87.0 

94.9 

100.7 


321.6 
319.8 
292.2 


130.6 
143.8 
153.4 


O 

N 
D 


196.4 
189.1 
183.0 


209.0 
200.1 
195.9 


188.4 
179.2 
178.8 


140.0 
114.4 
109.5 


121.6 
85.1 
75.3 


162.3 
138.7 
139.0 


130.1 
132.3 
147.6 


106.8 
103.4 
117.5 


290.4 
328.7 
330.8 


152.6 
156.6 
156.2 


1952 J 
F 


181. 4^ 

184.6* 


186. 6 r 
185.9 


172.2' 
170.5 


137.6 
146.0 


119.3 
120.9 


159.4 
172.9 


124.8 
128.1 


98.2 
93.2 


295.1 
310.4 


149.9 
158.7 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



Foods and Beverages 



Tobacco Products 



Foods 



Beverages 



Flour and 

feed: 

Wheat flour 



Sugar 



Total Liquors Beer 



Total Cigars Cigarettes 



Cut 
tobacco 



Rubber 
Products 



1939 
1951 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 
D 

1952 J 
F 



114.9 
157.0 

155.2 
174.8 
179.0 

174.3 
165.6 
167.3 

121.2 
138.8 
146.8 

146.9 
155.3 
158.8 

145.1 
159.5 



108.1 
139.1 

85.8 
113.1 
142.8 

147.9 
186.1 
172.4 

142.6 
144.7 
107.6 

182.8 

149.0 

94.8 

89. 6' 
85.8 



117.8 
281.3 

235.6 
257.0 
292.2 

301.5 
280.6 
287.7 

303.9 
305.7 
278.7 

289.3 
281.3 
262.2 

242.4 
245.6 



125.3 
284.4 

261.0 
298.4 
343.1 

286.2 
222.5 
209.4 

201.2 
273.7 
300.5 

374.9 
361.8 
280.4 

276.4 
276.0 



104.6 
309.4 

222.7 
242.9 
294.5 

346.2 
341.7 
348.7 

396.6 
367.8 
311.8 

289.8 
275.8 
273.8 

234.8 
237.3 



111.7 
201.7 

219.9 
235.6 
255.7 

230.9 
230.5 
216.9 

187.8 
147.2 
108.7 

226.4 
203.8 
157.0 

197.6 
195.5 



106.2 
129.9 

167.0 
135.7 
140.2 

151.6 
171.2 
138.5 

100.6 
89.4 
56.2 

129.9 
142.5 
135.7 

130.1 
131.9 



112.9 
250.6 

270.4 
305.5 
327.5 



305 
281 
264 



238.1 
173.8 
131.1 

290.9 
244.0 
175.3 

231.7 
230.2 



113.6 
130.8 

141.5 
128.2 
150.5 

108.5 
154.9 
151.1 

116.8 

118.5 

84.8 

129.7 
149.0 
136.7 

159.4 
154.2 



108.7 
291.5 

319.4 
340.2 
336.7 

357.2 
299.6 
246.3 

262.2 
222.6 
288.9 

281.6 
263.3 
279.8 

279.7 
304.4 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 6 - continued 



APRIL, 1952 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 



100 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 


Leather Producta 


Textiles ex. Clothing 

Cotton 
con- Wool, yarn 
Total sumption and cloth 


Silk 

and 

rayon 


Clothing 


Paper Products 


Boots 
and 
Total Tanneries shoes 


Pulp and 
paper : 
Total Total 



1939 
1951 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 
D 

1952 J 

F 



109.3 
115.8 

143.5 
145.9 
138.0 

135.3 
125.0 
104.9 

85.5 
112.0 
101.8 

106.8 

100.8 

89.7 

111 7 



108.4 
88.1 

134.9 
133.8 
112.9 

107.9 
99.4 

73.7 

52.4 
63.4 
63.5 

78 
70.0 
67.4 



109.9 
135.2 

149.5 
154.4 
155.7 

154.5 
143.0 
126.9 

108.8 
146.2 
128.7 

127.0 
122.4 
105.3 



106.3 
171.1 

184.1 
186.5 
190.8 



110.8 
144.0 



153 
158 

175 



192 
193 
179 

156 

151. 

158. 



173.7 
173.3 
161.2 

114.4 
110.9 
130.8 



72.6 139.2 



161.2 
154.8 
143.2 

146.3 
143.9 



139 
131 
106. 

121. 

115. 



101.6 
190.3 

208.2 
209.9 
209.5 

212.6 
212.6 
192.0 

185.3 
172.5 
170.7 

174.2 
168.8 
167.9 



99.9 

243.4 

263.6 
262.9 
253.1 

261.7 
262.6 
249.7 



158 
160 



238 
237 
234 

227 
218 
211 

211 

207 



106.9 
136.1 

140.4 
146.4 
148.5 

149.8 
148.5 
138.1 

129.0 
127.0 
130.4 

130.1 
123.4 
121.4 

111.8 
122.4 



99.5 
210.3 

202.9 
207.5 
207.1 

212.3 
214.6 
213.3 

211.3 
213.5 
212.5 

214.9 

210.7 
203.5 

205.8 
211.4 



96.7 
201.3 

192.1 
197.4 
197.6 

202.5 
204.0 
204.6 



201 
204 
202 



205.7 
204.8 
199.1 



202 
207 



NON-DURABLE MANUFACTURES 



Paper Products 
Pulp and paper 



Printing 

and 

Publishing 



Petroleum and Coal Products 



Chemical Products 



Coke and 



Petroleum refining 





Pulp 


Paper 




Total 


gas 
products 


Total 


Gasoline 


Heavy 
fuel oils 


Total 


Paints and 
varnishes 


1939 
1951 


97.6 
218.7 


95.1 
171.8 


104.1 
173.9 


106.7 

252 9 


99.2 
173.0 


115.5 
345.9 


305.2 


229 8 


112.7 

201.9 


111.1 

373.1 


1951 J 
F 
M 


208.0 
215 4 
211.9 


165.0 
166.7 
173.2 


173.1 
178.8 
176.4 


225.7 
223.3 
219.8 


177.1 
185.5 
167.8 


282.2 
267.3 
280.5 


251.7 
236.5 
240.8 


204.9 
169.3 
192.0 


196.7 
199.3 
197.6 


392.4 
387.7 
384.2 


A 
M 
J 


221.1 
220.5 
220.7 


170.8 
175.8 
177.2 


167.0 
177.1 
170.5 


210.4 
274.4 
283.7 


177 3 
173 8 
169.3 


249.6 
391.6 
416.8 


211.9 
337.0 
352.4 


185.5 
245.0 
245.8 


212.5 
216.2 
216.2 


455.9 
455.1 
454.3 


J 

A 

S 


220 .6 
221.9 
222.5 


168.1 
174.7 
169 


170.2 
173.2 
168.4 


275.2 
285.3 
263.2 


170 4 
163.4 
164.4 


397.1 
427.2 
378 2 


346.5 
370.7 
335.0 


237.7 
260.3 
246.3 


207.0 
198.0 
199.9 


406.6 
347.6 
334.6 


O 
N 
D 


223.6 
222.1 
215.9 


175.2 
175.3 
170.6 


180.5 
177 3 
174.0 


268.3 
257.7 
247.8 


175 .5 
172.1 
180.0 


376.3 
357.4 
326.7 


351.2 
335.4 
293.3 


255.6 
269.6 
245.5 


197.9 
194.7 
186.5 


324.4 
289.0 
245.8 


1952 J 
F 


222 1 
225.5 


170 2 
178.0 


167 .1 

171.3 




180.1 








195.3' 
200.5 


304.8 
352.0 



APRIL, 1952 

TABLE 6 - concluded 



INTRODUCTION 



Industrial Production 

Volume indexes, seasonally adjusted 1935-39 = 100 











DURABLE MANUFACTURES 










TOTAL 


Wood 
Products 






Iron and Steel Products 






Transportation 
Equipment 




Total 


Primary iron and steel 


Iron 
castings 


Wire and 

wire 
products 


Total 


Motor 
vehicles 




Total 


Pig iron 


Steel 


1939 


107.5 


107.8 


108.7 


110.3 


104.4 


115.1 


99.1 


114.7 


94.5 


93.4 


1951 


264.3 


182.4 


251.3 


308.1 


311.2 


253.2 


337.3 


166.2 


317.4 


266.6 


1951 J 


269.8 


197.6 


252.6 


300.4 


288.5 


256.5 


372.7 


170.9 


309.6 


299.6 


F 


276.4 


202.0 


249.4 


308.1 


307.3 


265.2 


354.8 


158.8 


340.0 


336.3 


M 


280.3 


197.8 


252.6 


316.1 


316.6 


261.8 


369.3 


166.3 


358.0 


365.8 


A 


278.5 


151.0 


263.5 


321.5 


313.1 


266.6 


394.9 


183.4 


340.4 


323.7 


M 


282.4 


184.4 


261.7 


321.5 


314.2 


259.7 


359.3 


175.1 


339.5 


314.1 


J 


276.5 


207.2 


254.2 


306.7 


316.2 


252.4 


348.2 


170.0 


317.7 


273.3 


J 


251.0 


176.6 


237.3 


286.3 


301.7 


219.3 


264.4 


145.5 


300.9 


241.0 


A 


243.3 


176.4 


238.9 


286.1 


291.6 


233.1 


306.5 


138.8 


257.1 


161.3 


S 


255.6 


166.4 


249.3 


305.3 


315.2 


240.8 


336.8 


172.7 


319.9 


244.6 


o 


258.7 


168.0 


258.7 


317.1 


322.2 


263.7 


351.4 


182.4 


321.4 


243.2 


N 


256.5 


177.7 


254.3 


326.6 


331.5 


273.8 


329.9 


163.4 


313.5 


220.0 


D 


242.4 


183.6 


243.0 


302.0 


316.5 


245.5 


259.0 


166.9 


290.9 


176.2 


1952 J 


256. Op 


186.6 


249. 4 r 


322. 5 r 


301.4 


269.7 


279.5 


184.9 


343.2 


263.9 


F 


259.3" 




254. 6p 




306.5 


282.7 


339.0 


187.9 


341.0 


261.7 










DURABLE MANUFACTURES 








Electric 
Power 




Non-Ferrous Metals 
and Products 


Electrical Apparatus 
Total Radios 


and Supplies 

Electric 
refrig- 
erators 


Non-Metallic Mineral Products 






Total 


Smelting 

and 
refining 


Total 


Cement 


Lime and 
gypsum 
products 


Clay 
products 




1939 


119.5 


121.0 


102.0 






106.1 


109.5 


118.7 


119.3 


108.4 


1951 


269.7 


155.6 


339.6 


251 '. 3 


632^7 


259.1 


336.7 


295.9 


248.8 


219.6 


1951 J 


265.8 


157.1 


399.5 


300.1 


936.1 


250 8 


321.2 


293.7 


282.5 


211.3 


F 


266.0 


157.2 


406.8 


341.9 


914.0 


262.1 


394.0 


293.3 


266.8 


210.3 


M 


268.0 


150.8 


400.2 


234.8 


999.5 


269.6 


378.6 


300.3 


271.1 


216.0 


A 


285.8 


169.0 


418.6 


345.4 


955.2 


273.4 


362.1 


303.8 


262.9 


229.2 


M 


293.3 


166.0 


392.2 


305.1 


851.4 


276.8 


368.5 


297.6 


258.9 


236.2 


J 


292.8 


168.8 


362.3 


300.4 


723.0 


267.3 


294.8 


300.0 


244.1 


226.8 


J 


270.8 


158.8 


283.1 


175.2 


461.9 


255.2 


319.1 


268.5 


230.6 


227.5 


A 


266.1 


164.0 


284.1 


183.8 


447.6 


260.4 


309.5 


329.1 


246.8 


219.5 


S 


253.7 


152.6 


312.3 


263.4 


414.3 


256.4 


316.3 


322.4 


229.7 


209.3 


O 


262.6 


147.5 


291.7 


192.6 


360.8 


254.4 


311.9 


307.1 


239.0 


215.3 


N 


258.0 


137.6 


294.7 


237.9 


344.1 


247.5 


320.6 


283.4 


232.4 


213.1 


D 


253.8 


137.6 


229.7 


135.4 


184.2 


235. 7 r 


344.3' 


251.4' 


220.3 


220.4 


1952 J 


255. 4 r 


143.0 


244.9 


159.3 


225.1 


240.2 


344.5 


273.3 


253.5 


233.3 


F 


257.7 


145.3 








262. 3p 


447.9 


282.4 




232.6 



LABOUR 



TABLE 7 



APRIL, 1952 



The Canadian Labour Force 



1948 



1949 



1950* » 1951 1950 



1951 



CLASSIFICATION 



Survey Averages 



Nov. 4 March 3 June 2 Aug. 18 Nov. 3 



Thousands oi persons 14 years of age and over 



Non-institutional Civilian Popula 
bon 



Civilian Labour Force 

Agricultural 

Non-agricultural 



With jobs 

At work — 35 hours or more 
At work — 15 to 34 hours. . . 

At work— 1 to 14 hours 

Not at work but with jobs . . . 



Paid workers 

Agricultural. . . . 
Non-agricultural . 



Without jobs and seeking work 
Persons not in the Labour Force. . . 



9.132 9,324 9,709 9,833 9,751 9,800 9,854 9,887 9,790 



4,982 

1.100 

3,882 

4,879 

4,301 

337 

109 

132 

3,372 

134 

3,238 

103 



5,090 

1,094 
3,996 

4.957 
4.377 

348 
97 

135 

3,469 

144 

3,325 

133 



5,216 

1.038 
4,178 

5,046 

4,422 

373 

100 

151 

3,571 

112 

3,459 

170 



4,150 4,234 4,493 



5,284 

960 

4,324 

5,175 
4.512 

384 
98 

181 

3.779 

102 

3.677 

109 

4.549 



5,201 

974 
4,227 

5.084 

4,513 

378 

94 

99 

3.683 

102 

3,581 

117 

4,550 



5,172 

854 
4,318 

5,000 

4,245 

433 

111 

211 

3,665 

69 

3,596 

172 

4,628 



5,332 
1,017 
4,315 

5,247 

4,699 

339 

117 

92 

3,802 

114 

3,688 

85 

4,522 



5,421 

1,090 
4,331 

5 

4 



3,849 

133 

3,716 

78 

4,466 



5,210 

880 
4,330 



343 


5,110 


646 


4,458 


312 


451 


81 


82 


304 


119 



3,800 

90 

3,710 

100 

4,580 



Note. — These estimates are derived from a sample survey and are subject to sampling error. In general the smaller 
the estimate the larger is the relative sampling error. 

1 Newfoundland included in estimates from March, 1950. 
Source: Labour Force Bulletin, D.B.S. 



TABLE 8 



Canadian Labour Income 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



SALARIES AND WAGES 



Agriculture, 

Logging, 

Fishing, 

Trapping, 

Mining 



Manufacturing Construction 



Public Utilities, 

Transportation, 

Communications, 

Storage 

Trade 



Finance, 

Services 

(including 

government) 



SUPPLEMEN- 
TARY 
LABOUR 
INCOME 



TOTAL 



Million dollars 



1939 


23 


62 


8 


58 


59 


5 


215 


1951 


65 


271 


61 


206 


174 


26 


803 


1950S 


59 


241 


58 


186 


159 


25 


728 


O 


61 


244 


58 


188 


160 


25 


736 


N 


62 


247 


56 


193 


161 


25 


744 


D 


60 


250 


51 


190 


162 


25 


738 


1951 J 


59 


252 


47 


187 


160 


25 


730 


F 


59 


254 


46 


188 


162 


24 


733 


M 


55 


260 


46 


191 


168 


25 


745 


A 


55 


266 


53 


196 


166 


27 


763 


M 


61 


269 


59 


202 


174 


27 


792 


J 


67 


276 


64 


208 


179 


27 


821 


J 


66 


276 


68 


209 


178 


30 


827 


A 


68 


279 


71 


211 


176 


28 


833 


S 


70 


284 


74 


214 


178 


28 


848 


O 


74 


283 


73 


216 


180 


29 


855 


N 


76 


283 


71 


219 


179 


29 


857 


D 


73 


268 


55 


225 


188 


28 


837 



10 Note: As of January, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 

Source: Monthly Estimates of Canadian Labour Income, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 9 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



INDUSTRIAL COMPOSITE FORESTRY 



MINING 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly Employ- Aggregate 
merit payrolls earnings* ment payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
180.2 


100.0 

381.3 


23.44 
49.61 


100.0 
220.3 


100.0 
616.8 


17.37 
48.40 


100.0 
117.7 


100.0 
245.4 


28.69 
59.82 


1951 J 
F 
M 


175.3 
172.3 
172.3 


338.2 
351.5 
353.8 


45.27 

47.87 
48.19 


256.0 
248.3 
244.1 


632.1 
609.0 
633.7 


42.58 
42.45 
44.94 


115.1 
114.9 
114.7 


217.0 
233.1 
235.2 


54.08 
58.22 
58.85 


A 
M 
J 


173.3 
175.6 
180.3 


357.8 
367.9 
379.0 


48.43 
49.17 
49.34 


208.0 
167.9 
188.6 


549.8 
472.8 
539.8 


45.76 
48.74 
49.54 


114.7 
115.0 
116.4 


230.1 
237.4 
238.3 


57.56 
59.20 
58.74 


J 

A 

S 


183.6 
184.3 
185.4 


392.5 
394.0 
400.2 


50.17 
50.16 
50.66 


197.6 
180.5 
181.8 


589.7 
495.2 
505.5 


51.66 
47.49 
48.15 


119.0 
120.0 
119.5 


250.2 
254.2 
252.3 


60.32 
60.77 
60.77 


o 

N 
D 


186.5 
186.4 
186.6 


410.0 
413.4 
416.7 


51.59 
52.05 
52.41 


214.6 
262.3 
293.4 


630.2 
820.3 
923.3 


50.83 
54.14 
54.47 


120.1 
121.4 
121.6 


263.0 
264.7 
268.7 


63.01 
62.74 
63.60 


1952 J 
F 


181.0' 
177.9 


388.8' 
401.9 


50.42' 
53.03 


288. 4' 
273.4 


859.5' 
813.0 


51.60' 
51.47 


120.2' 
121.1 


252.5' 
267. 8 


60.42' 
63.62 



MANUFACTURING 



Total 



Durable Goods <»> 



Non-durable Goods (2) 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
190.0 


100.0 
427.6 


22.79 
51.25 


100.0 
236.3 


100.0 
536.6 


24.28 
54.89 


100.0 
159.9 


100.0 
348.8 


21.82 
47.74 


1951 J 
F 
M 


182.4 
184.5 
186.3 


373.1 
402.1 
405.3 


46.60 
49.64 
49.56 


223.3 
226.9 
229.9 


457.1 
497.4 
501.3 


49.72 
53.23 
52.94 


155.8 
156.9 
157.9 


312.1 
332.9 
335.6 


43.68 
46.27 
46.35 


A 
M 
J 


188.8 
189.9 
192.0 


414.6 
423.7 
429.0 


50.03 
50.84 
50.90 


234.8 
237.0 
240.9 


542.5 
530.8 
537.6 


53.47 
54.39 
54.20 


158.8 
159.2 
160.2 


329.0 
345.9 
350.1 


46.72 
47.39 
47.67 


J 

A 

S 


193.9 
194.0 
194.1 


440.0 
440.1 
446.1 


51.70 

51.68 
52.37 


242.9 
242.0 
242.1 


552.0 
550.2 
559.8 


55.24 
55.25 
56.17 


162.1 
162.8 
162.9 


358.8 
355.5 
363.9 


48.25 
48.22 
48.71 


O 

N 
D 


194.2 
190.8 
189.1 


454.4 
451.4 
451.8 


53.31 
53.89 
54.44 


240.2 
238.4 
237.5 


567.5 
569.5 
573.8 


57.40 
58.04 
58.68 


164.4 
160.0 
157.6 


372.6 
366.0 
363.7 


49.42 
49.87 
50.30 


1952 J 
F 


183.6' 
185.0 


417.8' 
448.9 


51.82' 
55.26 


233.8' 
234.5 


532.1' 
574.9 


55.29' 
59.55 


151.2' 
153.0 


335.4' 
358.1 


48.35' 
51.01 



Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. Statistics throughout Tables 9 to 11 are compiled 
from data which relate to the last pay period of the preceding month. 

'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

U) Includes wood products, iron and steel products, transportation equipment, non-ferrous metal products, 
electrical apparatus and supplies, and non-metallic mineral products. <2) Includes foods and beverages, tobacco 

and tobacco products, rubber products, leather products, textile products except clothing, clothing, paper products, 
printing, publishing and allied industries, products of petroleum and coal, chemical products, and miscellaneous 
manufacturing industries. 

Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



11 



LABOUR 



TABLE 9 - continued 



APRIL, 1952 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



MANUFACTURING 



Textile Products except Clothing 

Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Clothing 



Wood Products 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
154.9 


100 
369 1 


18 00 
42.88 


100 
142 4 


100 
297 9 


17 15 
35.88 


100 

178.7 


100 
423.9 


19 32 
45.79 


1951 J 
F 
M 


157.6 
159.4 
160.0 


346 6 
384.4 
381 5 


39.57 
43.40 
42.91 


140 8 
147.1 
150.4 


262 9 
311.1 

319 5 


32 02 
36.28 
36.43 


170 7 
172 8 
175 


359.7 
393.3 
399.6 


40.70 
43.96 
44.09 


A 
M 
J 


161.3 

160.8 
158.5 


390 4 
393 5 
378.7 


43.56 
44.04 
43.00 


152.0 
150 2 
146.2 


323 1 
320.1 
301.5 


36 48 
36 54 
35.35 


177.2 
177.9 
184.2 


406.4 
422.1 
428.6 


44 29 
45.81 
44.93 


J 

A 

S 


156.1 
152.8 
150.9 


370 3 
352.6 
355.0 


42 68 
41.52 
42.35 


140 8 
137.1 
138.5 


287.5 
284 5 
293 8 


35.02 
35 57 
36.37 


187.1 
188.3 
187.3 


448.6 
449.6 
454.9 


46.30 
46.09 
46.88 


O 

N 
D 


149.5 
147.7 
144.3 


362 9 
357 3 
355.6 


43 68 
43.53 
44.37 


137.2 
135 4 
133 


296.9 
289.5 
284.7 


37.10 
36 67 
36.70 


181.2 
175.5 
167.1 


454.6 
443.0 
426.1 


48.43 
48 77 
49.26 


1952 J 
F 


140 6 r 
141.8 


321.4' 
351.9 


41.23' 
44.76 


124 3' 
133 


240 1' 
293 8 


33.11' 
37 87 


161 0' 
160 4 


363 4' 
406 3 


43 . 59' 
48 92 



MANUFACTURING 



Paper Products 



Iron and Steel Products 



Transportation Equipment 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100 

183.8 


100 
426.8 


26 87 
62.21 


100 
242.2 


100 
544.8 


25.14 
56.74 


100 
252 6 


100.0 
549.4 


26.73 
57.89 


1951 J 
F 
M 


172.5 
172.2 
172.9 


359 8 
376.9 
377 


56 05 
58 78 
58.57 


230 8 
234 
236 1 


468 5 
500 5 
505 3 


51 03 
53 93 
53.95 


229 4 
235.0 
240.4 


462.6 
519 1 
520.6 


53.90 
58.85 
57.69 


A 
M 

J 


175.4 
177.7 
184.5 


379 2 
390.1 
423 9 


58.07 
58 99 
61.74 


240 6 
243.2 
245.6 


525 4 
545.1 
548.4 


55 05 
56.55 
56.34 


248.4 
250.8 
255.8 


531.8 
534.4 
547.4 


57.04 
56.75 
57.00 


J 

A 

S 


192.4 
193.6 
194.9 


464 
470.1 
475.4 


64.78 
65.21 
65.52 


246.7 
244.6 
245.3 


559 4 
558 3 
563 9 


57.34 
57.71 
58.13 


258 7 
259.8 
261 7 


561.3 
553.8 
578 6 


57.81 
56.80 
58.85 


O 

N 
D 


192 9 
189 8 
186.8 


475 
466 2 
463 4 


66 16 
65 98 
66.66 


247 
245.4 
247 1 


581 4 
584 1 
597 


59.54 
60 23 
61.12 


261 
263.3 
266 9 


586.1 

595.7 
601 3 


59.78 
60.21 
59 96 


1952 J 
F 


183 5 

182 9 


435 0' 
452 2 


63 67' 
66 39 


243 6' 
245 


547 9' 
599 6 


56.92' 
61 93 


268 0' 
270 9 


583 8' 
626 3 


58 01' 
61.55 



12 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 






APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 9 - continued 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



MANUFACTURING 


CONSTRUCTION 


Electrical Apparatus and Supplies Chemical Products 


Total 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
merit payrolls earnings* ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
323.0 


100.0 
730.0 


24.38 
55.25 


100.0 
230.2 


100.0 
455.2 


28.14 
55.58 


100.0 
177.6 


100.0 
460.6 


18.83 
48.36 


1951 J 
F 
M 


316.0 
318.1 
320.2 


628.2 
686.7 
691.4 


48.62 
52.79 
52.79 


217.7 
221.0 
222.6 


403.2 
420.3 
424.2 


52.12 
53.51 
53.63 


158.1 
145.1 
139.7 


343.8 
359.8 
353.8 


40.82 
46.56 
47.56 


A 
M 

J 


326.2 
328.7 
331.6 


720.3 
735.3 
749.1 


53.99 
54.69 
55.22 


225.2 
229.5 
232.3 


436.7 
449.9 
454.6 


54.57 
55.16 
55.08 


141.9 
163.4 
182.7 


352.0 
408.9 
459.3 


46.59 
46.99 
47.15 


J 

A 

S 


333.1 
325.8 
323.5 


759.7 
748.9 
749.5 


55.74 
56.18 
56.62 


234.4 
234.6 
236.6 


465.7 
469.4 
477.7 


55.92 
56.30 
56.82 


190.4 
199.5 
206.7 


495.7 
526.3 
556.0 


48.81 
49.48 
50.44 


O 

N 
D 


322.5 
317.6 
312.9 


758.4 
762.2 
770.8 


57.48 
58.65 
60.21 


235.3 
237.0 
236.6 


481.3 
489.4 
489.4 


57.57 
58.11 
58.22 


206.1 
203.1 
194.3 


570.8 
559.0 
542.3 


51.95 
51.60 
52.34 


1952 J 
F 


308. 7 r 
306.4 


714. 4 r 
758.6 


56.55 r 
60.51 


234. 8 r 
235.1 


484. 4 r 
499.4 


58.13 r 
59.86 


167. r 
157.2 


410. 4 r 
453.3 


46.14' 
54.13 



CONSTRUCTION 


AND COMMUNICATION 


PUBLIC UTILITY OPERATION 


Buildings and Structures 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 




Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


1939=100 Dollars 


1939 = 100 Dollars 


1939 = 100 Dollars 



1939 
1951 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 
J 

J 

A 

S 

O 

N 
D 

1952 J 
F 



100.0 
395.3 



100.0 
851.3 



347.8 614.2 
338.0 687.5 

334.6 688.2 

339.7 681.0 

363.0 763.8 
398.2 827.8 

415.4 899.7 

427.5 941.9 
449.2 1,011.3 

449.7 1,047.8 

448.1 1,033.4 

432.9 1,018.9 



368. 9 r 
369.0 



718. 5 r 
880.8 



24.29 
51.68 

42.73 
49.22 
49.77 

48.51 
50.92 
50.23 

52.32 
53.22 
54.39 

56.29 
55.72 
56.85 

47.12 r 
57.75 



100.0 
177.6 

168.1 
165.0 
165.7 

166.7 
171.5 
176.5 

183.2 
186.4 
189.0 



186 
186 
185. 



181. 3 r 
178.6 



100.0 
333.7 

299.6 
302.7 
303.8 

308.8 
317.6 
331.2 

346.2 
352.9 
361.3 

359.2 
360.5 
361.0 

353.0' 
345.0 



28.68 
53.76 

51.07 
52.55 
52.53 

53.05 
53.03 
53.72 

54.12 
54.20 
54.74 

55.06 
55.35 
55.71 

55.73' 
55.26 



100.0 
187.5 

179.8 
180.1 
178.3 

179.4 
183.2 
190.9 

193.8 
195.8 
195.3 

191.8 
190.7 
190.5 

187. 3 r 
186.1 



100.0 
355.5 

321.2 
326.1 
331.1 

331.5 
343.3 
359.2 

369.3 
373.7 
371.0 

375.8 
377.9 
385.7 

378.8' 
384.3 



29.53 
55.93 

52.76 
53.48 
54.85 

54.57 
55.36 
55.57 

56.22 
56.32 
56.03 

57.79 
58.47 
59.73 

59.65' 
60.92 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



13 



LABOUR 



TABLE 9 -concluded 



APRIL, 1952 



Employment and Earnings: By Industries 
Monthly averages or first of month 



TRADE 



FINANCE, INSURANCE 
AND REAL ESTATE 



SERVICE 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 


100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
174.0 


100.0 
340.0 


21.83 
42.71 


100.0 
169.8 


100.0 

270.4 


29.59 
46.26 


100.0 
181.3 


100.0 
349.4 


16.33 
31.61 


1951 J 
F 
M 


184.4 
169.5 
168.1 


333.9 

317 4 
319.5 


39.55 
40.91 
41.58 


159 8 
160.8 
161.7 


246.5 
251.2 
252.1 


44.78 
45.35 
45.28 


172 9 
173.3 
172.5 


318.7 
327.1 
330.8 


30.23 
30.97 
31.45 


A 
M 

J 


170.9 
171.0 
172.8 


325.6 
332.9 
338.4 


41.60 
42.51 
42.77 


167.5 
170.8 
171.0 


264.6 
271.3 

272.0 


45.91 
46.16 
46.23 


172 9 
175.9 
180.9 


332.0 
340.9 
350.4 


31.50 
31.79 
31.77 


J 

A 

S 


173.3 

170.8 
171.0 


345.5 
342.9 
342.4 


43.53 
43.85 
43.74 


172.0 
172.6 
173.0 


273.6 

274.7 
276.1 


46.23 
46.27 
46.40 


188.8 
193.4 
193.7 


363.7 
368.0 
369.3 


31.60 
31.21 

31.28 


O 
N 
D 


175.5 
176.7 
183.6 


354.4 
358 1 
368.6 


44.17 
44 34 
43.91 


173.3 

176 4 
178.4 


280.9 
289.6 
292.4 


47.11 
47.72 
47.65 


187.9 
183.2 
180.7 


367.0 
363.7 

361.5 


32.07 
32.59 
32.84 


1952 J 
F 


185 2' 
171.1 


374.6' 
356.6 


44 25' 
45.59 


178.7' 
178.5 


292 0' 
293.2 


47 . 50' 

47.75 


178.1' 
176.4 


351.2' 
355.1 


32 69' 
33.39 



TABLE 10 



Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 
Monthly averages or first of month 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 


NOVA SCOTIA 


NEW BRUNSWICK 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 


1939 = 100 Dollars 


1939 = 100 Dollars 


1939 = 100 Dollars 



1939 
1951 



100.0 
176.8 



100.0 
333.5 



19.79 
37.52 



100.0 
149.4 



100.0 
296.4 



21.42 
42.51 



100.0 
180.5 



100.0 
383.6 



14 'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. 
Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



20.21 
43.02 



1951 J 
F 
M 


184.2 
165.3 
160.1 


318.5 
298.6 
298.2 


34.42 
35.96 
37.06 


149 .1 
142.2 

135.7 


264.1 
271.6 

265.9 


37.99 
40.97 
42.02 


187.5 
179.3 
179.0 


362.4 
368.5 
371.3 


39.08 
41.56 
41.94 


A 

M 

J 


152.0 
161.8 

178.1 


289.9 
304.4 
338.9 


37.95 
37.43 
37.87 


140.3 
140.3 
149.4 


279.4 
280.9 
293.7 


42.70 
42.93 
42.15 


177 1 
171.7 
171.6 


372.6 
357.2 
357.2 


42.53 
42.06 
42.09 


J 

A 

S 


186.9 
188.7 
192.4 


353.5 
363.4 
365.9 


37.63 
38.32 
37.85 


149.6 
155.3 
157.8 


303.7 
314.5 
313.2 


43.52 

43.44 
42.56 


174.9 
179.9 
182.3 


377.1 
387.3 
394.2 


43.60 
43.63 
43.85 


O 
N 
D 


188.6 
182.6 
181.0 


362.9 
356.3 
351.1 


38.29 
38.82 
38.60 


158.6 
158.4 
156.2 


323 .1 
324 7 
321.9 


43 67 
43.95 
44.19 


183.6 
186.2 
192.3 


407.3 
422.6 
426.0 


44.97 
46.02 
44.91 


1952 J 
F 


175 2 
183.4 


327.9 
336.5 


37.25 
36 51 


149.2' 
150.8 


287 3' 
315.5 


41.24' 
44.82 


190 7' 
185.7 


419 7' 
419 4 


44.61' 
45.79 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 10 - concluded 



Employment and Earnings: By Provinces 
Monthly averages or first of month 



LABOUR 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



MANITOBA 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
168.5 


100.0 
375.7 


21.26 
47.37 


100.0 
191.0 


100.0 
403.4 


24.45 
51.69 


100.0 
173.2 


100.0 
326.0 


25.69 
48.37 


1951 J 
F 
M 


162.3 
159.9 
161.0 


327.8 
343.1 
349.6 


42.99 
45.67 
46.21 


186.9 
185.6 
185.7 


361.4 
379.5 
378.6 


47.34 
50.07 
49.92 


171.2 
165.5 
164.3 


296.8 
298.1 
302.6 


44.61 
46.35 
47.41 


A 
M 
J 


160.3 
163.3 
167.9 


348.2 
359.8 
372.0 


46.23 
46.90 
47.16 


187.3 
188.5 
191.9 


386.6 
395.0 
402.3 


50.53 
51.31 
51.34 


165.2 
167.5 
172.6 


302.6 
309.2 
324.7 


47.13 
47.51 
48.42 


J 

A 

S 


171.0 
171.6 
173.2 


381.8 
387.0 
396.1 


47.52 
47.99 
48.66 


194.7 
193.5 
194.1 


416.4 
413.6 
417.8 


52.38 
52.34 
52.72 


177.6 
179.7 
180.4 


339.2 
344.3 
348.7 


49.15 
49.31 
49.69 


O 
N 
D 


175.3 
178.0 
178.6 


406.5 
414.4 
421.7 


49.33 
49.54 
50.23 


195.4 
193.9 
194.7 


428.5 
428.8 
432.2 


53.73 
54.18 
54.39 


178.6 
178.4 
177.5 


348.5 
349.0 
347.8 


50.17 
50.30 
50.38 


1952 J 
F 


171. 7 r 
169.0 


389. 2 r 
403.9 


48.27' 
50.88 


190. 3 r 
187.6 


406.6 
424.1 


52.35 r 
55.39 


173. r 
169.1 


334. 2 r 
333.1 


49.66 r 
50.64 



SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
148.1 


100.0 
285.6 


24.18 
46.68 


100.0 
202.6 


100.0 
402.1 


25.39 
50.37 


100.0 
190.3 


100.0 
388.0 


26.01 
52.86 


1951 J 
F 
M 


144.4 
134.9 
133.3 


262.8 
249.9 
250.8 


44.13 
44.89 
45.60 


193.7 
186.5 
186.7 


355.8 
356.9 
362.3 


46.73 
48.69 
49.37 


180.4 
177.0 
176.9 


331.3 
342.6 
347.6 


47.78 
50.36 
51.10 


A 
M 
J 


135.3 
137.9 
149.8 


256.8 
258.5 
288.1 


46.01 
45.43 
46.62 


187.0 
192.9 
202.5 


356.1 
373.0 
395.9 


48.44 
49.19 
49.74 


181.0 
187.2 
192.3 


353.2 
378.1 
390.9 


50.74 
52.49 
52.82 


J 

A 

S 


154.6 
157.5 
157.8 


298.0 
307.9 
310.0 


46.71 
47.37 
47.61 


208.9 
218.0 
219.0 


418.3 
434.3 
441.3 


50.93 
50.68 
51.28 


197.4 
198.1 
198.9 


408.2 
400.3 
412.1 


53.76 
52.52 
53.86 


O 
N 
D 


156.9 
157.7 
156.5 


312.8 
315.5 
315.8 


48.32 
48.48 
48.94 


214.0 
211.3 
210.9 


446.2 
441.6 
443.1 


52.77 
53.16 
53.46 


201.0 
197.9 
195.1 


426.1 
433.6 
432.5 


55.12 
56.97 
57.64 


1952 J 
F 


152.1' 
142.9 


305.3' 
292.8 


48.67' 
49.68 


206. 0' 
201.6 


422.3 
424.3 


52.17' 
53.55 


186.4' 
180.5 


386.9' 
394.8 


53.97' 
56.86 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



15 



LABOUR 






APRIL, 1952 




Employment and Earnings: By Cities 




TABLE 11 


Monthly averages or first of month 








HALIFAX MONTREAL 




QUEBEC CITY 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate Weekly Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
payrolls earnings* ment payrolls earnings* 


Employ- 
ment 


Aggregate Weekly 
payrolls earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
203.8 


100.0 
344.9 


23.42 
39.61 


100.0 
173 9 


100.0 
363.3 


22.82 
47.69 


100.0 

151 9 


100.0 
331.0 


18.62 

40.48 


1951 J 
F 

M 


199.2 
192.5 
192.6 


303.4 
308.9 
316.6 


35 71 
37.64 
38.50 


168.8 
167.5 
168.2 


320.1 
336.9 
343.1 


43.33 

45.97 
46.60 


146.2 
142.6 
142.7 


295.1 
301.0 
299.9 


37 14 
39.29 
39.13 


A 
M 

J 


209.1 
195.7 
198.6 


349.9 
328.6 
329.6 


39.20 
39.33 
38.87 


170.9 
173.6 
174.6 


346.8 
361.1 
361.5 


46.36 
47.55 
47.31 


144.6 
148.1 
152.0 


301.4 
317.6 
333.0 


38.80 
39.88 

40.77 


J 

A 

S 


202.5 
200.0 
211.8 


346.0 
348.6 
366.4 


40.02 
40.84 
40.52 


176.3 
174.8 
175.8 


367.6 
366.7 
377 1 


47.65 
47.93 
49.00 


155 4 
159 1 
159.3 


339.5 
351.8 
355.7 


40.70 
41.18 
41.59 


O 
N 
D 


212.3 

214.8 
216.0 


376.5 
381.1 
383.1 


41.54 
41.55 
41.54 


178 
178.6 
179.9 


386.5 
392.3 
399.7 


49.60 
50.18 
50.75 


158.6 
158.2 

156.0 


361.2 
357.6 
358.2 


42.41 
42.11 
42.78 


1952 J 
F 


216. 8 r 
218.9 


375 8 r 
403.8 


40 . 60 r 
43.20 


174. 9 r 
173.5 


368 5 r 
387.2 


48.15' 
51.01 


149.0' 
145.1 


320.1' 
326.6 


40.03 r 
41.96 



TORONTO 



OTTAWA-HULL 



HAMILTON 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 

payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


=-100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


-100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
195.3 


100.0 
402.2 


25.05 
51.68 


100.0 
189.3 


100.0 
368.1 


23.17 
45.01 


100.0 
203.7 


100.0 
455.4 


24.19 

54.11 


1951 J 
F 
M 


194.0 
191 
191.1 


362.0 
377.4 
376.9 


46.81 
49.58 
49.48 


188.7 
183.6 
181.7 


335.0 
339.3 
338.3 


41.12 

42.80 
43.13 


197.4 
196.2 
196.7 


403.8 
421.3 
420.8 


49.49 
51.96 
51.84 


A 

M 

J 


194.1 
195.4 
196.2 


390.0 
401.1 
401.8 


50.40 
51.49 
51.37 


183.5 
186.6 
190.4 


343.5 
356.2 
372.6 


43.36 
44.22 
45.32 


199.5 
205.9 
208.6 


434 3 
459.8 
468.8 


52.74 
54.09 
54.45 


J 

A 

S 


197.9 
194.4 
195.5 


412.3 
407.4 
413.9 


52.27 
52.57 
53.20 


192.8 

192.5 
192 1 


382.5 
387.0 
387.2 


45.93 
46.57 
46.73 


211.8 
210.5 
206.8 


483.1 
482.1 
470.4 


55.26 
55.47 
55.11 


O 
N 
D 


197 .3 
197.4 
198 9 


425.7 
426.8 
431 


54.21 
54.35 
54.47 


192 4 
194.6 

193 1 


390.7 
394.5 
390.9 


47 09 
47.02 
46.85 


206.9 
201.5 
202.9 


477.0 
463.9 
479.8 


55.89 
55.80 
57.23 


1952 J 
F 


196.4' 
192.4 


407 5 r 
422.4 


52.32' 

55 37 


192.2' 

186.2 


375 7 r 
384.3 


45 28 r 
47.80 


199.5 
197 1 


447 5 r 
471.5 


54.33 r 
57.92 



16 Reported by firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. 'Average weekly wages and salaries. 

Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 11 - concluded 



LABOUR 



Employment and Earnings: By Cities 

Monthly averages or first of month 



WINDSOR 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



Employ- Aggregate Weekly 
ment payrolls earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
payrolls 



Weekly 
earnings* 





1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 = 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 


= 100 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


100.0 
228.7 


100.0 

477.5 


27.79 
58.22 


100.0 
172.2 


100.0 
320.2 


24.29 
45.27 


100.0 
203.3 


100.0 
406.8 


25.07 
50.12 


1951 J 
F 
M 


231.2 
234.6 
237.9 


457.7 
524.5 
530.9 


55.15 
62.28 
62.25 


173.3 
168.1 
166.8 


295.1 
298.3 
302.8 


41.41 
43.15 
44.17 


199.4 
195.9 
197.2 


361.2 
375.2 
378.8 


45.47 
48.07 
48.31 


A 
M 
J 


240.2 
235.8 
237.3 


509.2 
480.7 
493.1 


59.14 
56.84 
57.97 


167.9 
168.7 
172.5 


304.4 
308.8 
319.4 


44.09 
44.52 
45.18 


201.0 
203.7 
204.8 


384.7 
402.3 
403.9 


47.97 
49.48 
49.41 


J 
A 

S 


235.7 
231.9 
223.7 


477.5 
452.0 
460.5 


56.51 
54.37 
57.38 


175.3 
174.5 
175.1 


332.5 
331.3 
333.8 


46.29 
46.32 
46.49 


208.4 
207.4 
207.8 


423.4 
424.1 
430.8 


50.90 
51.23 
51.94 


O 
N 
D 


211.8 
211.4 
212.3 


439.9 
449.0 
454.4 


57.91 
59.22 
59.67 


173.9 
174.8 
175.8 


335.2 
339.4 
341.0 


46.97 
47.33 
47.29 


207.3 
203.9 
203.1 


435.2 
432.4 
429.0 


52.59 
53.13 
52.92 


1952 J 
F 


209. 2 r 
208.3 


438 . 2 r 
470.7 


58.41 r 
63.00 


171. 5 r 
168.9 


329. l r 
333.0 


46.75 r 
48.03 


197.7 
195.2 


405. 5 r 
420.1 


51.39 r 
53.92 



'Average weekly wages and salaries. 



TABLE 12 



Average Hourly Earnings 

Monthly averages or first of month 





MINING 










MANUFACTURING 






Total 


Metal 
Mining 


Coal 
Mining 


Total 


Durable 
Goods 


Non- 
durable 
Goods 


Foods and 
Beverages 

Total Meat 


Tobacco 
and 
• Tobacco 
Products 


Rubber Leather 
Products Products 



products 













( 


I^ents per 


bour 










1949 
1951 


117.2 
133.4 


115.9 
134.8 


128.3 
136.7 


98.6 
116.8 


106.5 
125.8 


90.6 
107.2 


86.0 
99.3 


105.9 
126.7 


85.7 
109.2 


104.5 
124.5 


74.9 
85.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


127.1 
127.7 
130.1 


127.9 
128.1 
130.0 


131.0 
131.8 
135.5 


109.0 
110.4 
111.4 


117.1 
119.0 
119.9 


100.5 
101.2 
102.3 


95.1 
95.5 
96.6 


117.9 
118.9 
120.7 


96.6 
94.3 
93.7 


114.6 
118.8 
120.9 


82.1 
82.4 
82.9 


A 
M 
J 


130.5 
131.5 
131.6 


130.2 
131.6 
132.0 


136.3 
137.6 
137.3 


112.8 
114.1 
115.9 


121.6 
122.9 
123.8 


103.4 
104.6 
107.2 


98.5 

98.6, 

100.4 


121.3 
120.7 
128.0 


100.8 
110.9 
110.5 


122.6 
123.6 
123.5 


83.9 
84.8 
86.2 


J 
A 

S 


133.3 
136.1 
137.1 


134.3 
139.3 
140.4 


139.0 
137.4 
138.7 


118.4 
119.1 
120.6 


127.0 
128.2 
130.0 


109.1 
109.4 
110.6 


100.1 

99.2 

100.8 


127.8 
126.9 
132 9 


114.6 
112.1 
112.2 


122.7 
125.2 
127.7 


86.4 
85.9 
86.3 


O 
N 
D 


138.2 
138.3 
139.3 


141.2 
140.4 
141.8 


138.5 
138.7 
138.7 


121.9 
123.5 
124.5 


132.1 
133.3 
134.6 


111.2 
113.0 
113.5 


99.7 
102.8 
103.9 


133.6 
135.7 
136.1 


122.4 
125.9 
116.0 


129.7 
131.9 
133.2 


87.5 
88.7 
89.0 


1952 J 
F 


142.6' 
140.6 


145. l r 
142.0 


140. 3 r 
140.2 


127. l r 
127.2 


136. 4 r 
137.5 


116.8' 
115.8 


109. 3 r 
108.2 


136.9' 
136.7 


118.4 
112.3 


132.8' 
133.8 


89. 4' 
89.7 



Data are for hourly rated wage earners of firms customarily employing 15 persons or more. Statistics throughout 
Tables 12 and 13 are compiled from data which relate to the last pay period of the preceding month. 
Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 



17 



LABOUR 



TABLE 12 - concluded 



APRIL, 1952 



Average Hourly Earnings 

Monthly averages or first of month 













MANUFACTURING 












Textile Products 
except Clothing 


Clothing 


Wood Products 

Total Saw and Furniture 

planing 

mills 


Paper Products 

] 

Total Pulp and 
paper 

mills 


Printing Iron and Steel Product: 

Publishing 

ind Allied 

industries Total Primary 
iron and 
steel 




Total 


Cotton 
goods 












Cents per hour 












1949 


83 .0 


85.1 


76.4 


90.2 


95.3 


86.0 


106.3 


113.7 


112.8 


108.4 


117.5 


1951 


96 6 


99 8 


86.0 


106.0 


113.6 


96.6 


128 7 


137 3 


132.2 


130 1 


141.3 


1951 J 


91.3 


95 7 


80.6 


99.8 


107.1 


91.7 


118 4 


126.5 


125.7 


119.9 


131.3 


F 


92.9 


97.9 


82.9 


99.7 


106.8 


92.7 


119.9 


128.2 


126.0 


122.0 


134 2 


M 


94.0 


99.4 


84.2 


101.1 


108.5 


93.4 


120.5 


128.2 


129.5 


123.6 


134.9 


A 


94 .6 


99.7 


85.1 


103.9 


112.7 


93.9 


119.7 


127.2 


131.7 


125.3 


135.4 


M 


95.4 


100.3 


85.4 


105.5 


113.6 


96.2 


120.8 


128.4 


132.9 


127.4 


136.8 


J 


96.3 


100.8 


85.8 


105.0 


112.0 


96.8 


128.2 


136.7 


132.9 


128.8 


137.7 


J 


97.3 


99.9 


86.7 


105.9 


112.6 


97.2 


133.6 


142.9 


133.1 


131.1 


138.6 


A 


97.5 


99.8 


86.9 


105.5 


111.8 


97.4 


135.0 


143.9 


131.8 


133.1 


143.9 


S 


99.0 


101.3 


87.7 


108.8 


116.5 


98.3 


135.0 


143.8 


133.9 


134.8 


147.1 


O 


100.0 


101.4 


88.6 


110.6 


118.4 


99.7 


136.9 


146.3 


135.2 


137.0 


150.2 


N 


100.4 


101.2 


89.3 


112.4 


120.9 


100.9 


137.7 


147.1 


136.4 


138.1 


151.8 


D 


100 4 


100.5 


89.1 


113.2 


122.5 


101.3 


139.1 


148.8 


137.4 


139.6 


153.3 


1952 J 


101 5' 


100 2' 


90. 2' 


113. 6' 


123.9 


101.4' 


140.8 


150.0 


139.5' 


140.0' 


154.7 


F 


102.0 


101.4 


90.9 


114.8 


125.1 


102.3 


140.4 


149.3 


139.5 


142.4 


156.5 










MANUFACTURING 








CONSTRUCTION 




Iron and St 
Products 

Agricultur 

implement 


sel Transportation Equipment 


Non-ferrous Electrical 
Metal Apparatus 
Products and 

Supplies 


Non- 
Metallic 
Mineral 
Products 


Products of Chemical 
Petroleum Products 
and Coal 


Total 


Buildingt 




— Total 
ll 

s 


Railroad and Motor 
rolling stock vehicles 
equipment 


Structure! 












Cents per hour 












1949 


114.5 


116 


114.0 


130.7 


106.9 


109.1 


96.2 


122.6 


98.6 


101.2 


107.9 


1951 


144.5 


133.8 


129.7 


148.2 


127.6 


127.5 


115.8 


151 2 


118.2 


117.6 


127.1 


1951 J 


130.8 


125.5 


118.4 


141.8 


118.8 


117.5 


108.0 


141.8 


110.4 


109.7 


118.7 


F 


132.0 


128.7 


118.2 


148.5 


119.9 


120.4 


108 3 


140.1 


112 


113.5 


121.2 


M 


133.0 


129.0 


119.5 


149.1 


119.9 


120.9 


109.5 


142.0 


113.1 


114.1 


122 1 


A 


140.3 


129.5 


119.2 


150.5 


121.5 


123.0 


111.3 


141.9 


114.2 


115.0 


122.5 


M 


140.3 


129 6 


122.5 


146.3 


121.9 


125.3 


112.7 


148.4 


116.1 


115.4 


124.0 


J 


146.5 


130.0 


121.9 


146.9 


122.3 


128.2 


114.7 


152.0 


116.9 


116.2 


125 9 


J 


149.5 


136.6 


138.9 


147.0 


127.6 


130.0 


117.1 


149.6 


118.9 


117.5 


127.7 


A 


150.5 


137.1 


139.1 


148.9 


132.9 


130.1 


117.9 


151.0 


120.8 


117.7 


127.9 


S 


150.4 


137.7 


137.4 


148.1 


134.0 


131.7 


120 1 


159.7 


122 3 


120.3 


131.0 


O 


153 9 


140 5 


141.3 


151.3 


135.7 


132.7 


121 5 


163 4 


123 6 


122.4 


133.8 


N 


151 5 


140.1 


139 2 


149.8 


137.8 


134.6 


123.3 


163 


124.7 


123.9 


134 9 


D 


155 7 


141 


140 2 


149.6 


138.5 


135.6 


124.7 


161.4 


124.9 


125.3 


135 7 


1952 I 


155.8 


142. 9' 


140.8 


153.5* 


142.4' 


137.0' 


125.8' 


164.1 


128 0' 


123.9' 


136 .2' 


F 


160.1 


143.3 


139 


155.9 


142.2 


138.8 


126 


162 7 


130.0 


128.9 


138.7 



18 



APRIL 


, 1952 


















LABOUR 








Average Hours Worked 


per Week 








TABLE 13 


























MINING 










MANUFACTURING 








Total 


Metal 


Coal 


Total 


Durable 


Non- 


Foods and 


Rubber 


Leather 


Textile 


Clothing 






mining 


mining 




goods 


durable 
goods 


beverages 


products 


products 


products 
except 
clothing 




1949 


42.6 


45.3 


37.4 


42.3 


42.5 


42.0 


42.4 


40.9 


40.1 


42.7 


38.2 


1951 


43.1 


44.1 


39.5 


41.8 


42.0 


41.7 


42.2 


41.1 


38.8 


41.5 


37.4 


1951 J 


40.5 


42.6 


34.9 


40.1 


40.2 


39.9 


40.4 


38.4 


37.0 


40.4 


35.0 


F 


44.1 


45.4 


40.6 


42.9 


43.1 


42.6 


42.3 


43.0 


41.6 


44.0 


39.3 


M 


43.7 


44.9 


39.5 


42.3 


42.5 


42.2 


42.0 


42.7 


41.4 


43.0 


39.0 


A 


42.5 


44.4 


36.4 


42.2 


42.3 


42.1 


41.8 


41.7 


39.8 


43.6 


38.7 


M 


43.4 


44.6 


39.5 


42.5 


42.6 


42.5 


42.2 


42.8 


40.4 


43.7 


38.9 


J 


43.0 


44.3 


38.0 


41.9 


42.1 


41.6 


42.3 


41.4 


37.7 


41.8 


37.1 


J 


43.3 


43.9 


40.5 


41.7 


42.0 


41.4 


42.5 


40.8 


37.1 


41.1 


35.8 


A 


43.0 


43.3 


41.2 


41.4 


41.4 


41.3 


42.3 


39.8 


38.4 


39.2 


36.4 


S 


42.2 


42.5 


39.1 


41.5 


41.7 


41.4 


41.8 


40.6 


38.2 


39.5 


37.3 


O 


43.9 


44.2 


41.2 


41.9 


42.0 


41.8 


43.0 


40.7 


38.4 


40.5 


37.8 


N 


43.5 


43.7 


41.2 


41.8 


42.1 


41.5 


42.7 


41.6 


37.1 


40.0 


36.8 


D 


44.2 


44.8 


41.6 


41.9 


42.2 


41.6 


42.6 


40.0 


38.5 


41.0 


36.8 


1952 J 


40. 2' 


42. 5 r 


32.7 


38. V 


38.3' 


37. 9 r 


39. r 


35. 8 r 


34. 8 r 


36.7 


31 l r 


F 


43.1 


44.5 


38.4 


41.5 


41.8 


41.1 


41.0 


40.8 


40.1 


40.4 


37.4 










MANUFACTURING 








CONSTRUCTION 


Wood 


Paper 


Printing 


Iron and 


Transporta- 


Non-ferrous Electrica 


Non- 


Chemical Total 


Buildings 




products 


products 


publishing 


steel 


tion 


metal 


apparatus metallic 


products 




and 








and allied 


products 


equipment 


products 


and 


mineral 






structures 








industries 








supplies 


products 








1949 


41.3 


46.4 


40.6 


42.9 


42.2 


43.2 


41.1 


44.9 


43.5 


39.7 


40.1 


1951 


41.6 


46.7 


40.2 


42.2 


41.9 


42.6 


41.0 


44.7 


42.9 


40.3 


39.5 


1951 J 


38.3 


44.9 


39.4 


40.3 


41.2 


41.7 


38.0 


43.1 


42.3 


35.0 


33.7 


F 


42.4 


46.8 


40.2 


42.5 


44.5 


43.6 


41.6 


45.4 


43.4 


40.1 


39.2 


M 


41.9 


46.7 


39.7 


42.0 


43.3 


43.1 


41.3 


44.8 


42.7 


40.6 


39.4 


A 


40.9 


46.2 


40.2 


42.4 


42.6 


43.3 


41.4 


44.6 


43.4 


39.0 


37.9 


M 


41.9 


47.0 


40.3 


43.0 


42.2 


43.8 


41.4 


45.6 


43.5 


39.8 


39.7 


J 


41.0 


46.7 


40.2 


42.2 


42.4 


42.7 


40.8 


44.9 


43.0 


39.6 


38.7 


J 


42.1 


47.2 


40.3 


42.5 


40.9 


42.6 


40.8 


44.7 


42.6 


40.7 


40.0 


A 


42.1 


47.3 


40.3 


41.9 


39.8 


42.1 


40.9 


44.5 


42.6 


41.5 


40.7 


S 


41.3 


47.3 


40.1 


41.8 


41.5 


42.1 


40.8 


44.1 


42.6 


41.7 


40.9 


o 


42.3 


47.2 


40.6 


42.2 


41.4 


42.3 


41.2 


44.8 


42.7 


42.4 


41.6 


N 


42.2 


46.7 


40.4 


42.4 


41.7 


41.7 


41.5 


44.9 


42.8 


41.5 


40.7 


D 


42.2 


46.7 


40.4 


42.6 


41.2 


41.7 


42.5 


45.0 


42.7 


41.5 


41.3 


1952 J 


35. 6 r 


43. 4 r 


38.1 


38.7 


38. 8 r 


39.9 


37. 4 r 


40. 8 r 


41.2 


35. 4 r 


32. 3 r 


F 
Data r 


41.3 


45.8 


39.5 


42.3 


41.4 


41.8 


41.4 


44.4 


42.2 


41.4 


40.6 


3ier to hourly rated wage earners of firms customarily employing 15 persons or more as reported at the first of the month. 19 


Source 


s: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, 


D.B.S. 

















LABOUR APRIL, 1952 

Percentage of Women in Reporting Establishments : By Industries 
TABLE 14 First of month 



MANUFACTURING 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 
STORAGE AND 
COMMUNI- 
CATION 



TRADE 



FINANCE 
INSURANCE 
AND REAL 

ESTATE 



SERVICE 



INDUS- 
TRIAL 

co.urosi u 



Tota 



Non- Textiles Clothing 

Durable Durable (except (Textile 

Goods Goods Clothing) and Fur) 



1944 O 
1950 O 


29.1 
23.6 


19.4 
11.2 


40.2 
34 7 


48.0 
36.8 


68.6 
65.1 


12.2 
14.1 


49.3 

37 4 


53.9 
48.2 


58.2 
50 7 


27.1 
22.3 


1951 F 
M 


23.3 
23.3 


11.4 
11.5 


34.4 
34 6 


36.9 
36.8 


65.7 
65.8 


14.5 
14.4 


37 .0 
36.3 


49.6 
49.6 


50 2 
50.1 


22.5 
22.5 


A 
M 

J 


23.2 
23.0 
22.7 


11.4 
11.4 
11.3 


34.6 
34.3 
34.0 


36.5 
36.6 
36.6 


66.2 
66.5 
66.5 


14.6 
14.4 
14.3 


37.1 
36.9 
37.1 


49.1 
49.1 
48.9 


50 2 
50 1 
50.2 


22.7 
22.4 
22.1 


J 

A 

S 


22.4 
22.2 
22.3 


11.0 
10.9 
10.8 


33.5 
33.2 

33.5 


36.2 
35.5 
35.6 


65.9 

64.8 

65.0 


14.0 

14.0 
13.8 


37.3 
36.6 
36.2 


48.9 
48.9 
49.1 


50 4 
50.6 
50.8 


21.8 
21.6 
21.5 


O 

N 
D 


22.7 
22.3 
22.2 


10.7 
10.6 
10.5 


34.0 
33.6 
33.5 


35.8 
35.9 
35.4 


65.3 
65.3 

65.6 


13 8 
13.8 
14.0 


37 .6 
37.8 
39.0 


48 .9 
49 4 
49.4 


50 6 
50 2 
50.2 


21.7 
21.5 
21.6 


1952 J 
F 


21.5 
21.7 


10.6 
10.4 


32.4 
33.0 


34.8 
35.1 


64.7 
65.2 


14.1 
14.2 


39.0 
36.3 


49.4 
49.3 


50.0 
50.0 


21.7 
21.5 



Source: Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Earnings, D.B.S. 



Unemployment Insurance 



TABLE 15 




Monthly averages or calendar months 




Ordinary 




Number ot 




claimants 




persons Employer 




on live 


Number ot 


commenc- Number of and 


Balance in 


unem- 


persons 


ing the days' Amount of employee 


fund at 


ployment 


receiving 


receipt of benefit benefit contribu- Total 


end of 


register' 1 ' 


benefit : 


benefit paid paid' 3 ' tions revenue 


period ' 



Employment Offices 1 " 

Live 
applications 

for Unfilled 

employment vacancies 







Thousands 




Thousand 
days 




Million 


dollars 




Thousands 


1949 
1951 


135.6 
138.8 


130.3 
100.1 


54.99 
58.06 


2.574 
2.441 


5.78 
6.06 


8.83 
12.66 


11.76 
16.86 


552.2 
707.8 


197 
202 


35 
52 


1951 J 
F 
M 


220.5 
208.0 
184.5 


149.8 
158.0 
147.2 


104.67 
79.42 
68.45 


3.788 
3.853 
4,193 


9.37 

9.59 

10.47 


12.27 
12.22 
11.44 


16.09 
16.04 
17.11 


654.1 
659.4 
664.6 


301 
298 
291 


37 
40 
45 


A 
M 

J 


136.8 
88.9 
86.5 


109.4 
75.9 
57.1 


54.74 
41.29 
31.28 


3.088 
2.323 
1,481 


7 68 
5.66 
3 .51 


12.77 
12.81 
11.68 


16.72 
16.85 
15.46 


672 8 
683.9 
695.9 


218 
152 
140 


58 
71 
63 


J 

A 

S 


83.9 
80.9 
83.1 


57.5 
60.1 

64.3 


39.13 
37.88 
38.18 


1.417 
1.487 
1.378 


3.43 
3.67 
3.46 


12.16 

16.25" 

12.57 


16.23 

20.95" 

16.64 


708.7 
726.0 ; 
739.1 


131 
128 
133 


55 
61 
70 


O 
N 
D 


99.8 
153.7 
239.0 


72.3 

97.5 
152.3 


46.10 
67.86 
87 74 


1,567 
2.033 
2,681 


3.90 
5 11 
6.92 


12.21 

13.65 
11.84 


16.26 
18.02 
15.97 


751.5 
764.4 
773.5 


157 
210 
269 


57 
42 
30 


1952 J 
F 


287.8 
276 3 


216.9 
228.1 


154.29 
107 68 


5,037 
5.266 


13.43 
14.16 


12.44 
13.30 


16.67 
17.63 


776 .1 
778.2 


364 

373 


25 

28 



20 Note: Newfoundland data are included as of April, 1949. In the first five columns "unemployment assistance" for 

that province is disregarded. 

•"Monthly data as of end of month while annual section is based on averages of month-end statistics. ''' As of 

January 1950, the number of benefit payments (equivalent to the number of beneficiaries) in the week which includes 
the last day of the month has been substituted for the number of payments in the week which includes the third Friday 
of the month. "Supplementary benefit payments are excluded. "Includes prepayment of $4,000,000 by Post 

Office. 

Source: Unemployment Insurance Commission and Monthly Report of Unemployment Insurance Branch, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 16 



LABOUR 



Time Lost in Labour Disputes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Total all 
industries 



MANUFACTURING 



Food, 

animal and 

vegetable 

products 



Tobacco 
and 

beverages 



Rubber 



Fur and Textiles 

leather and 

products clothing 



Aircraft, 
Printing Logging, Automo- ship- 
Pulp and and lumber biles building 
paper publish- and its and and farm 
products ing products parts implements 













Thousand 


man-working days 










1939 
1950 


18.7 
115.8 


0.2 


— 


3.5 
0.3 


1.1 


2.3 

4.6 


0.3 





0.1 
1.3 


1.4 


0.1 
0.9 


1951 J 
F 
M 


16.8 
18.9 
15.1 


0.7 
1.3 


— 


0.3 
1.6 
0.4 


0.2 
1.7 
0.3 


0.4 
0.3 
1.1 


— 


0.1 
0.4 


0.2 
2.8 


0.3 


0.4 


A 

M 

J 


9.7 

34.9 

128.2 


0.6 
0.9 


0.6 


4.4 
35.4 


— 


0.1 
5.0 
7.1 


0.2 


— 


2.6 
3.5 
2.2 


0.2 
0.4 
3.3 


2.8 


J 

A 

S 


119.4 
219.5 
105.2 


0.1 


48.1 
55.0 


0.7 


0.6 


0.8 
0.5 
0.3 


0.7 
0.8 
5.3 


0.8 
0.2 


2.1 
3.9 
1.6 


0.6 
0.1 


2.1 
1.5 


o 

N 
D 


49.3 

38.3 

117.0 


1.7 
2.2 


2.5 
9.7 
2.0 


— 


5.2 
0.4 
0.3 


0.4 


6.0 
7.4 
0.6 


— 


6.8 
2.9 
0.6 


3.9 

5.0 
100. r 


6.7 
0.7 
0.9 


1952 J 
F 


75.2 
47.6 


2.2 
2.1 


— 


— 


0.3 
0.5 


6.8 


— 


4.5 


0.9 
5.7 


— 


— 



MANUFACTURING 



Other iron Electrical 
and steel apparatus 



Other 
Non- 
ferrous 



Non- 
metallics, 
chemicals 
and 
miscel- 
laneous 



Con- 
struction 



Fishing 

and 
Trapping 



Mining 



Transport Trade, 
and Public Finance 
Utilities and 

Service 



Coal 



Other 











Thousand man 


-working days 








1939 
1950 


0.5 
7.1 


0.5 


2.4 


0.2 
0.3 


0.1 
2.4 


0.1 


9.3 
1.2 


0.9 
2.7 


84.0 


1.6 
4.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1.1 

12.7 

2.3 


— 


5.9 
0.2 


0.2 
1.1 
0.1 


0.2 
0.9 
0.2 


— 


7.2 
0.2 
0.5 


— 


— 


0.2 
0.1 
5.2 


A 
M 
J 


1.5 
11.5 
59.9 


1.6 


0.6 
2.8 
5.3 


0.2 
0.6 


3.7 
8.3 


— 


1.8 
0.8 
0.7 


0.1 


0.2 
0.1 


1.6 
1.0 
1.3 


J 

A 

S 


48.6 

55.1 

5.8 


— 


2.4 

6.8 

21.4 


3.1 
0.9 
0.7 


25.0 

18.0 

7.4 


— 


25.5 


32.0 

58.0 

4.4 


0.8 

0.2 
0.1 


0.4 
0.9 
0.9 


O 
N 
D 


9.7 
0.8 
5.4 r 


0.1 
0.9 
0.3' 


5.6 


0.4 


0.5 





0.4 
0.2 
2.9 


1.0 
8.2 
1.0 


0.1 


0.7 
0.5 
0.4 


1952 J 
F 


6.8 
24.0 


— 


0.5 
0.5 


— 


4.2 


— 


3.0 


— 


60.3 
0.5 


— 



The distribution of monthly data for metal products in the last two months is on a preliminary basis. 
Source: Labour Gazette, Department of Labour. 



21 



PRICES 

TABLE 17 






Living Costs in Canada 

Monthly averages or first of month 




APRIL 


, 1952 








COST-OF-LIVING INDEX 






Index oi 
Retail 

Prices; 
Commod- 
ities Only 


Index oi 




Total 


Food 


Fuel and 
Rent Lighting Clothing 


Home 

Furnishings 

and 

Services 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Farm 
Living 
Costs 


Base period 
weight 


100 


31 


19 6 12 


9 


23 















1935-39 = 


100 










1939 
1951 


101.5 
184.5 


100.6 
241.1 


103.8 
140.0 


101.2 
147.1 


100.7 
203.1 


101.4 
194.4 


101.4 
141.3 


101.0 

214.5 


99 
198 


5 
6 


1951 F 
M 


175.2 
179.7 


224.4 
233.9 


136.4 
137.6 


141.7 
146.5 


192.4 
196.3 


185.1 
188.6 


137.0 
137.8 


201.4 
207.9 






A 
M 
J 


181.8 
182.0 
184.1 


238.4 
235.4 
239.8 


137.6 
137.6 
139.8 


146.7 
146.2 
146.2 


198.8 
201.5 
202.5 


190.7 
194.9 
197.1 


138.8 
140.7 
141.0 


211 2 
211.3 
214.0 


197 


1 


J 

A 

S 


187.6 
188.9 
189.8 


249.7 
251.4 
251.1 


139.8 
139.8 

142.7 


147.2 
148.2 
149.5 


202.9 
204.6 
206.9 


197.4 
199.0 
199 1 


142.2 
143.7 
144.0 


219.6 
221.1 
221.6 


214 


7 


O 

N 
D 


190.4 
191.2 
191.1 


249.7 
250.2 
249.3 


142.7 
144.8 
144.8 


150.2 
150.8 
150.8 


213.8 
214.6 
215.5 


200.1 
199.9 
200.6 


144.3 
144.9 
144 9 


222.4 
223.0 
222.7 






1952 J 
F 
M 


191.5 
190.8 
189.1 


250.0 
248 1 
241.7 


144.8 
144.8 
146.3 


151.2 
151.3 
152.5 


215.3 
213.0 
211.2 


201.1 
200.1 
200.8 


145.7 
146 .5 
146 9 


223 1 
221 6 
218 .3 


215 


8 



The Index of Farm Living Costs is available for January, April and August only. 

Source: Prices and Price Indexes: Price Index Numbers of Commodities and Services Used by Farmers, D.B.S 



TABLE 18 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



GENERAL 
INDEX 



VEGETABLE PRODUCTS 



Total 



Fresh 

fruits 



Milled Rubber Sugar Tea, coffee 

cereal Bakery and its and its and 

foods products products products cocoa 



Potatoes 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


99.2 
211.2 


89.1 
202.0 


93.8 

178.3 


70.5 
219.4 


81.4 
188.6 


97.2 
155.2 


102.3 
178.1 


107.7 
185.9 


101.2 
326.8 


121.2 
143.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


232.3 

238.5 
241.8 


214.1 
219.0 
220.6 


172.9 
183.6 
186.5 


213.0 
217.1 
219.0 


199.2 
200.8 
200.5 


161.7 
171.2 
171.7 


238.0 
241.8 
245.0 


203.1 
203.1 
203.8 


359.5 
374.0 
377.7 


123.2 
134.6 
140.0 


A 

M 

J 


242.2 
241.9 
242.7 


221.7 
220.0 
217.6 


176.6 

172.7 
154.4 


220.8 
215.1 
211.1 


200.5 
199.2 
200.2 


171.7 
171.7 
171.7 


248.8 
244.0 
240.1 


205.8 
220.9 
234.2 


374.5 
372.0 
371.3 


139.6 
134.5 
144.2 


J 

A 

S 


244.2 
241.5 
240.1 


216.1 
215.9 
217.1 


150.4 
167.6 
174.3 


213.3 
215.1 
217.6 


199.3 
201.3 
202.0 


174.8 
174.8 
174.8 


230.1 
230.1 
232.2 


230.6 
214.5 
211.6 


353.2 
357.8 
353.0 


187.7 
175.8 
192.0 


O 
N 
D 


239.6 
239 . 1 
237.6 


218.9 
220.9 
221.0 


171.3 
167.1 
171 6 


220.6 
223.2 
219.7 


202.9 
203.7 
202.9 


176 4 
176.4 
176.4 


231.9 
230.3 
228.0 


211.3 
204.8 
203.7 


347.8 
337.2 
346 


234.3 
348.6 
374.3 


1952 J 
F 


236.8 
232 . 6 


220.2 
218.2 


176.9 
165.6 


216.7 
213.5 


199 8 
198.1 


177.0 
177.0 


226.5 
222.3 


203.7 
200.7 


346.1 
358.5 


407.7 
395.1 



The data for 1951 and 1952 are subject to revision. 
Source: Prices and Price Indexes, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 18 - continued 



PRICES 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 











ANIMALS AND THEIR PRODUCTS 










Total 


Fishery 
products 


Hides and 
skins 


Leather 
unmanu- 
factured 


Boots and 
shoes 


Live 
stock 


Milk 

and its 

products 


Eggs 


Meats 




Fresh 


Cured 












1935-39 = 100 










1939 


100.6 


102.2 


103.8 


102.8 


101.8 


104.1 


97.6 


94.8 


107.8 


100.0 


1950 


251.3 


260.7 


258.2 


235.1 


178.8 


334.1 


214.2 


168.9 


337.7 


205.8 


1951 J 


281.2 


288.1 


380.3 


309.5 


200.4 


375.4 


228.6 


163.2 


383.5 


208.5 


F 


294.5 


287.1 


400.8 


327.9 


204.1 


402.2 


229.3 


173.6 


410.0 


216.7 


M 


302.4 


288.6 


403.1 


327.9 


211.4 


409.0 


247.9 


195.6 


414.8 


216.2 


A 


296.7 


288.4 


368.2 


324.4 


219.1 


402.6 


230.7 


204.4 


417.9 


209.5 


M 


299.1 


275.1 


351.4 


324.4 


224.8 


410.1 


231.6 


219.7 


418.9 


219.5 


J 


309.1 


267.1 


346.0 


318.1 


223.4 


434.4 


233.5 


236.3 


449.2 


227.7 


J 


312.7 


286.6 


312.7 


312.6 


223.4 


438.6 


235.6 


255.4 


453.4 


234.0 


A 


305.4 


281.4 


256.5 


298.8 


223.7 


422.6 


235.7 


253.7 


438.8 


239.7 


S 


300.9 


281.9 


257.2 


274.3 


222.8 


410.3 


234.5 


253.5 


435.4 


249.7 


o 


294.8 


280.9 


274.6 


274.3 


218.8 


397.5 


235.3 


243.2 


421.9 


238.5 


N 


289.4 


284.4 


208.2 


245.0 


216.3 


393.8 


240.9 


229.1 


413.2 


226.7 


D 


285.8 


290.4 


201.7 


234.1 


209.3 


397.5 


244.8 


176.2 


420.2 


190 9 


1952 J 


282.2 


301.4 


191.1 


230.7 


209.6 


383.1 


247.1 


153.2 


416.4 


194.2 


F 


264.8 


299.6 


144.9 


212.0 


209.1 


347.4 


246.3 


151.0 


374.8 


179.6 








FIBRES, TEXTILES AND THEIR PRODUCTS 






WOOD, WOOD 

PRODUCTS AND 

PAPER 




Total 


Cotton 
fabrics 


Miscel- 
laneous 
fibres 
and 
products 


Rayon «> 
fabrics 


Rayon (2 » 
yarns 


Wool 

raw, 

domestic 


Hosiery 

and knit 

goods, 

chiefly 

wool 


Wool 
cloth 


Total 


Newsprint 












1935-39 


= 100 










1939 


98.9 


95.2 


99.1 


112.8 


97.3 


95.6 


103.0 


98.6 


107.5 


116.3 


1950 


246.7 


241.0 


276.5 


191.9 


154.0 


328.6 


208.9 


293.6 


258.3 


248.7 


1951 J 


298.8 


267.3 


312.1 


200.5 


168.5 


561.4 


219.1 


408.4 


284.5 


255.6 


F 


314.6 


277.3 


313.5 


200.5 


168.5 


644.9 


268.0 


434.3 


286.5 


254.9 


M 


327.1 


278.1 


341.4 


203.7 


187.3 


753.3 


283.3 


452.9 


289.0 


253.9 


A 


324.7 


278.1 


375.0 


203.7 


195.8 


649.2 


288.5 


463.3 


293.6 


255.1 


M 


316.5 


278.1 


375.0 


203.7 


195.8 


591.1 


286.6 


425.1 


294.3 


256.4 


J 


306.6 


278.1 


375.0 


203.7 


195.8 


532.2 


286.6 


387.8 


293.3 


258.0 


J 


294.1 


278.1 


368.0 


203.7 


195.8 


470.0 


286.6 


337.1 


303.7 


283.8 


A 


283.0 


278.1 


356.4 


199.4 


195.8 


390.2 


286.6 


328.0 


302.9 


282.3 


S 


270.2 


268.6 


373.4 


199.4 


195.8 


310.0 


286.6 


292.2 


302.4 


280.7 


O 


269.0 


257.2 


373.4 


199.4 


195.8 


310.0 


286.0 


280.0 


301.7 


279.9 


N 


270.6 


257.2 


372.5 


210.1 


195.8 


313.2 


286.0 


283.7 


299.0 


277.8 


D 


268.8 


257.2 


372.5 


210.1 


195.8 


304.5 


271.3 


283.5 


295.2 


272.6 


1952 J 


266.4 


257.2 


368.1 


210.1 


195.8 


295.2 


271.2 


285.4 


294.6 


268.8 


F 


260.4 


257.2 


359.2 


210.1 


176.9 


277.7 


271.2 


264.2 


294.1 


267.2 



(1) Changed from silk fabrics to rayon fabrics in January, 1942. 
silk hosiery. 



< 2 > From 1926 to 1941 rayon yarns and artificial 23 






PRICES 



TABLE 18 continued 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



APRIL, 1952 



WOOD, WOOD 

PRODUCTS AND 

PAPER 



IRON AND ITS PRODUCTS 



NON-FERBOUS 
METALS 



Lumber 

and 

timber 



Pulp 



Total 



Rolling 

mill 

Pig iron products Hardware 



Wire 



Scrap iron 
and steel 



Total 



Copper 

and its 

products 



1935-39 = 100 



1939 
1950 


106.4 
388.2 


93.4 
195.1 


104.8 
183.6 


101.5 
218.1 


104.2 
170.6 


101.1 
180.4 


102.2 
205.1 


109.1 
244.4 


100.0 
159.5 


101.9 
222.0 


1951 J 
F 
M 


445.4 
455.2 
468.2 


233.7 
233.0 
232.2 


196.4 
201.4 
201.5 


233.8 
233.8 
233.8 


178.0 
185.8 
185.8 


196.0 
203.0 
203.0 


216.5 
222.6 
222.6 


272.6 
276.0 
278.3 


174.7 
175.5 
174.4 


243.4 
243.8 
243.5 


A 
M 

J 


469.8 
469.7 
459.6 


256.4 
257.6 
259.1 


204.5 
206.4 
206.8 


233.8 
233.8 
239.3 


187.6 
187.6 
187.6 


207.1 
207.1 
207.1 


225.6 
225.6 
225.6 


281.7 
322.3 
322.3 


175.9 
176.3 
185.1 


246.6 
247.5 
275.6 


J 

A 

S 


458.1 
456.4 
457.4 


257.3 
255.7 
255.6 


210.8 
212.0 
214.5 


255.6 
255.6 
255.6 


194.5 
197.3 
198.2 


208.7 
209.6 
215.0 


225.6 
225.6 
234.9 


314.3 
314.3 
317.0 


184.2 
183.4 
183.6 


275.5 
274.5 
274.7 


O 

N 
D 


456.1 
449.5 
445.4 


255.0 
253.2 
248.2 


215.7 
216.8 
216.8 


255.6 
255.6 
255.6 


200.4 
202.2 
202.2 


217.2 
217.2 
217.2 


234.9 
234.9 
234.9 


317.0 
317.0 
317.0 


184.8 
185.3 
183.4 


273.7 
271.9 
268.1 


1952 J 
F 


451.1 
452.8 


244.0 
242.6 


218.6 
218.1 


255.6 
255.6 


202.2 
202.2 


217.9 
217.9 


234.9 
234.9 


317.0 
318.2 


180.9 
179.7 


263.2 
262.0 



NON-FERROUS 
METALS 

Lead Zinc 

and its and its 
products products 



NON-METALLIC MINERALS 



Total 



Clay and 

allied 
products 



Coal 



Coke 



Window 
glass 



Petroleum 
products 



Salt 



Cement 













1935- 


39 = 100 










1939 
1950 


93.0 
299.6 


94.6 
334.9 


99.7 
164.8 


97.9 
172.6 


101.6 
167.9 


109.0 
204.1 


95.4 
172.5 


96.4 
167.7 


127.1 
252.4 


93.5 
128.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


372.2 
372.0 
372.0 


417.0 
417.6 
416.1 


167.3 
168.3 
169.3 


182.1 
184.9 
185.1 


171.4 
173.9 
173.9 


211.4 
213.5 
224.1 


182.7 
182.7 
182.7 


163.6 
162.7 
162.7 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


134.3 
134.9 
139.5 


A 
M 

J 


374.5 
377.1 
379.8 


421.5 
423.7 
426.6 


169.0 
169.6 
169.3 


186.8 
191.6 
189.6 


173.2 
172.5 
171.0 


224.1 
224.1 
224.1 


195.1 
197.8 
197.8 


162.7 
164.2 
164.3 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


139.8 
139.8 
139.8 


J 

A 

S 


376.7 
374.2 
374.2 


423.5 
421.2 
421.7 


169.5 
170.7 
170.9 


189.6 
195.3 
195.3 


172.1 
172.3 
172.7 


224.1 
224.1 
224.1 


197.8 
197.8 
197.8 


164.2 
166.2 
166.3 


257.2 
257.2 
257.2 


139.8 
145.8 
146.6 


O 
N 
D 


392.6 
406.2 
406.5 


443.0 
459.7 
459.7 


170.8 
170.7 
171.3 


195.3 
195.3 
195.3 


172.7 
172.7 
173.6 


224.1 
224.1 
224.1 


197.8 
197.8 
197.8 


166.3 
166.2 
166.2 


282.4 
282.4 
282.4 


146.8 
146.8 
146.8 


1952 J 
F 


406.5 
396.2 


459.7 
449.4 


173.8 
174.2 


195.3 
195.3 


175.2 
176.7 


224.1 
224.1 


197.8 
204.6 


166.2 
165.9 


282.4 
282.4 


151.5 
152.8 



24 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 18 - concluded 



Wholesale Price Indexes 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRICES 



NON- 
METALLICS 



CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS 



Asbestos Total 



Inorganic Organic 
chemicals chemicals 



Coal tar Dyeing Paints, 

products materials Explosives prepared 



Drugs and 
pharma- Fertilizer 
ceuticals materials 













1935-39 


= 100 










1939 
1950 


102.6 
211.3 


100.3 

157.7 


99.4 
116.9 


95.0 
182.2 


100.3 
158.8 


101.6 
185.8 


97.5 
120.5 


97.8 
163.4 


100.7 
145.6 


107.5 
150.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


232.5 
232.5 
233.9 


' 179.7 
183.1 

184.8 


123.4 
126.1 
128.0 


259.8 
259.8 
260.6 


177.9 
177.9 
177.9 


202.1 
202.1 
202.1 


134.5 
134.5 
134.5 


176.1 
176.1 
176.1 


181.4 
181.9 
192.2 


155.3 
158.5 
158.1 


A 
M 

J 


233.9 
233.9 
233.9 


187.5 
188.0 
189.1 


129.6 
129.6 
130.0 


260.6 
260.6 
267.9 


177.9 
177.9 
177.9 


202.1 
202.1 
202.1 


134.5 
134.5 
134.5 


184.2 
184.2 
184.2 


200.9 
206.2 
206.2 


158.1 
158.1 
158.1 


J 
A 

S 


233.9 
233.9 
233.9 


190.2 
189.6 
189.3 


130.1 
131.3 
134.1 


267.9 
267.9 
267.9 


187.5 
187.5 
187.5 


202.1 
202.1 
202.1 


134.5 
134.5 
134.5 


184.2 
184.2 
184.2 


206.2 
207.9 
207.9 


164.2 
168.4 
168.4 


o 

N 
D 


233.9 
233.9 
234.5 


190.3 

187.7 
188.0 


134.4 
134.3 
134.3 


264.8 
264.8 
261.9 


187.5 
187.5 
187.5 


202.1 
202.1 
202.1 


134.5 
134.5 
134.5 


184.2 
184.2 
184.2 


207.9 
207.9 
207.2 


168.4 
168.4 
173.7 


1952 J 
F 


267.0 
267.0 


188.8 
187.3 


136.0 
137.7 


261.9 
236.1 


187.5 
187.5 


202.1 
202.1 


134.5 
142.0 


184.2 
184.2 


207.2 
207.2 


178.5 
178.5 



TABLE 19 



CLASSIFICATION BY PURPOSE OR USE 



Canadian Farm Products 



Raw and Fully and 
partly man- chiefly man- 



ufactured 
goods 



ufactured 
goods 



Iron and 
General Residential non-ferrous 
Industrial building building metals and 
materials materials materials products 



Total 



Field 



Farm prices 
of agricul- 
tural 
Animal products' 1 ' 



1935-39 = 100 



1939 
1950 

1951 J 
F 
M 

A 
M 

J 

J 

A 

S 

O 
N 
D 

1952 J 
F 



94.9 
212.8 

231.1 
237.1 
238.8 

238.6 
238.9 
242.9 

242.5 
237.1 
235.8 

236.3 
237.0 
235.9 

233.3 
227.8 



101.9 
211.0 

233.6 
240.0 
244.1 

244.9 
244.4 
243.7 

246.6 
245.1 
243.7 

242.7 
241.4 
239.7 

239.7 
236.2 



99.0 
244.6 

294.0 
303.4 
305.3 

305.4 
305.4 
303.9 

297.0 
287.4 
285.8 



289 
287 
284 

281 
270 



102.0 
249.9 

279.7 
287.4 
291.5 

293.9 
294.2 
290.2 

289.8 
290.4 
291.2 

291.4 
289.5 
289.5 

289.3' 
289.6 



102.3 
242.7 

269.6 
274.9 
282.6 

287.2 
289.5 
289.2 

289.8 
290.4 
290.9 

290.8 
289.3 
289.1 

287. 9 r 
287.9 



102.0 
190.8 

210.9 
214.3 
213.7 

216.2 
217.4 
224.1 

226.0 
226.2 
227.9 

229.7 
230.9 
230.1 

230.0 
228.9 



92.6 
236.7 

251 
262.5 
273.0 

265.4 
265.3 
272.6 

277.1 
263. 3 r 
260. 5 r 

259. 3 r 
264. 9 r 
266. 8 r 

263. l r 
251.2 



83.7 
191.9 

191.1 
195.5 
198.8 

199.2 
194.6 
192.0 

195.4 
178. 3 r 
181. 7 r 

188. l r 
201. 4 r 
204. 4 r 

208. r 
205.1 



101.5 
281.4 

310.9 
329.6 
347.2 

331.6 
336.1 
353.1 

358.9 
348.3 
339.2 

330.3 
328.5 
329.1 

318.2 
297.3 



91.8 
260. 8 r 

274. 6 r 
285. 2 r 
294. l r 

292. l r 
292. 9 r 
300.7' 

307. 7 r 
294. 3 r 
293. 2 r 

288. T 
287. 7 r 
286. 2 r 

283.0 



C1) Excluding Newfoundland. From August, 1950, to July, 1951, prairie farm prices for wheat, oats and barley are 
final prices. Since August, 1951, prairie grain prices are initial prices plus interim payments for wheat and barley. 
Source: Prices and Price Indexes, and Index Numbers of Farm Prices of Agricultural Products, D.B.S. 



25 



FUEL AND POWER 



TABLE 20 



APRIL, 1952 



Electric Power 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION 



EXPORTS'" 



CONSUMPTION 



Hydraulic Thermal Total 



Primary Secondary 



Total 



Primary Secondary 











Million kilowatt hours 








1939 
1951 


2.320 
4,633' 


41 
152 


2,362 

4,785' 


1.735 
4,461' 


627 
325 


159 
197 


2.202 
4,588' 


1.616 
4,326' 


586 
261 


1951 J 
F 
M 


4,621' 
4.232' 
4,753' 


165 
145 
159 


4,786' 
4,378' 
4,912' 


4,502' 
4,107' 
4,537' 


284 
270 
376 


172 
165 
221 


4,614' 
4,213' 
4,692' 


4,370' 
3,984' 
4.397' 


244 
229 
295 


A 
M 

J 


4,747' 
4.988' 
4,576' 


150 
144 
133 


4,897' 
5,132' 
4,709' 


4,358' 
4,543' 
4,378' 


539 
589 
331 


208 
231 
224 


4,689' 
4,901' 
4,484' 


4,229' 
4,409' 
4,243' 


460 
492 
241 


J 

A 

S 


4,497' 
4,452' 
4,261' 


133 
146 

145 


4,630' 
4,597' 
4,406' 


4,347' 
4.448' 
4,273' 


284 
150 
133 


238 
160 
129 


4,393' 
4,438' 
4,277' 


4.206' 
4.317' 
4,149' 


186 
121 
128 


O 

N 
D 


4.752' 
4.777' 
4.933' 


169 
161 
180 


4,921' 
4,938' 
5,113' 


4,656' 
4,611' 
4,767' 


265 
327 
346 


203 
204 
214 


4,719' 
4,735' 
4,899' 


4,512' 
4,473' 
4,626' 


206 
262 
272 


1952 J 
F 


5.084' 
4,799 


185 
171 


5,269' 
4,970 


4,926 
4,630 


343 
339 


210 
206 


5,059' 
4,764 


4,784 
4,500 


274 
264 



CONSUMPTION 



Canada 



Prince 
New- Edward 
foundland Island 



Nova New 

Scotia Brunswick Quebec Ontario 



Mani- 
toba 



Saskat- 
chewan 



British 
Alberta Columbia 













Million 


kilowatt hours 










1939 
1951 


2,202 

4,588' 


12^20' 


65 
1.95 


36 
73 


37 
60 


991 
2.010 


788 
1,714 


148 

244 


14 
38 


21 
85 


166 
349 


1951 J 
F 
M 


4,614' 
4,213' 
4,692' 


12.78' 
11.46' 
12.14' 


2.08 
1.83 

1.94 


76 
68 
74 


63 
56 
63 


1,954 
1,793 
2,006 


1,716 
1,574 
1,775 


283 
257 

275 


41 
36 
38 


91 
78 
84 


375 
337 
363 


A 
M 
J 


4,689' 
4,901' 

4,484' 


11.06' 
11.04' 
10.42' 


1.81 
1.81 
1.73 


69 
72 
69 


52 
60 
59 


2.142 
2,320 
2,033 


1,716 
1,737 
1,664 


247 
239 
219 


35 
35 
34 


78 
80 
77 


337 
346 
318 


J 

A 

S 


4,393' 
4,438' 

4,277' 


10.71' 
10 88' 
12.43' 


1.88 
1.99 
1.88 


68 
69 
70 


57 
63 
55 


1,984 
1,994 
1,851 


1,627 
1,624 
1,633 


203 
214 
211 


34 
36 
36 


78 
83 
82 


328 
342 
325 


O 
N 
D 


4,719' 

4,735' 
4,899' 


13.84' 
14.51' 
15.20' 


2.04 
2.11 
2.30 


80 
80 
81 


58 
64 
66 


2,002 
1,992 
2,054 


1,822 
1.824 
1.860 


244 
256 
281 


41 
43 
48 


91 
96 

104 


364 
363 
389 


1952 J 
F 


5,059' 
4,764 


15.49 
14.63 


2.22 
2.00 


85 

78 


68' 
56 


2,130 
2,039 


1,898 
1,797 


302 
273 


49 
42 


108 
94 


400 
363 



26 Note: As of January, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 

<» Les9 imports. 
Source: Monthly Report, Central Electric Stations, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 21 



FUEL AND POWER 



Coal and Coke 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



COAL 



COKE™ 



Production 



Bitu- Sub-bitu- 
minous ruinous Lignite Total 



Nova 
Scotia 



Imports™ Exports n Co ^\ Production 

Available 

British for 



Alberta Columbia 



Consumption 













Thousand tons 










1939 
1951 


1,051 
1,113 


176 
250 


80 
185 


1,308 
l,549 r 


588 
526 


460 
638 


141 
145 


1,250 
2,209 


31 
36 


2,456 
3,721 


201 
325 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1,273 
1,109 
1,117 


377 
280 
181 


284 
228 
195 


1,934 
1,618 
1,492 


612 
529 
570 


816 
672 
538 


164 
141 
147 


1,212 

911 

1,039 


19 
13 
20 


3,127 
2,516 
2,511 


342 
312 
335 


A 
M 

J 


1,148 
1,165 
1,102 


139 
123 
140 


106 
61 
62 


1,394 
1,349 
1,303 


571 
592 
519 


517 
479 
512 


155 
159 
153 


2,358 
3,040 
2,978 


33 
32 
21 


3,719 
4,357 
4,259 


322 
328 
318 


J 

A 

S 


955 

978 

1,059 


91 

174 
249 


38 

95 

203 


1,084 
1,247 
1,512 


443 
335 
508 


448 
603 
616 


100 
153 
128 


2,510 
3,161 
2,669 


27 
26 
62 


3,568 
4,383 
4,119 


314 
322 
306 


O 
N 
D 


1,188 
l,242 r 
1,026 


370 
475 
400 


319 

330 r 

300 


1,877 

2,048 r 

1,725 


583 
589 
457 


755 
919 
785 


154 

154 r 

131 


2,804 
2,574 
1,249 


46 
69 
67 


4,635 

4,552 r 

2,903 


336 
334 
335 


1952 J 
F 


1,190 
1,088 


452 
281 


335 
197 


1,977 
1,566 


559 
489 


879 
678 


145 
150 


1,010 
921 


52 
27 


2,934 
2,460 


342 
323 



("As of April, 1949, Newfoundland data are included. (2) Annual computation to 1950 entails considerable 

adjustments in production and external trade as described on page 19 of the Coal Report for 1950. 
Source: Monthly Report, Coal and Coke Statistics, D.B.S. 



TABLE 22 



Petroleum and Gas 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



CRUDE PETROLEUM 



NATURAL GAS 



Sales 



Imports 



Producers' 
Shipments 



Shipments Total 



Domestic 



Industrial 

and 

commercial 



MANUFACTURED GAS 
Sales 



Total Domestic* 1 ' Industrial 





Thousand barrels (a) 








Million cu. ft. 








1939 
1951 


3,090 
6,940 


652 
4,010 


2,932 
6,540 


5,421 


2,370 


3,040 


1,245 
2,345 


1,421 


338 


1951 J 
F 
M 


7,099 
5,153 
5,840 


2,996 
2,801 
2,494 


9,038 
7,773 
8,014 


7,894 
8,094 
7,602 


3,870 
4,179 
3,744 


4,011 
3,898 
3,844 


2,655 
2,594 
2,462 


1,716 
1,691 
1,579 


378 
347 
346 


A 
M 
J 


6,909 
7,420 
6,697 


2,449 
4,474 
4,757 


6,004 
5,089 
4,846 


5,893 
4,174 
3,289 


2,817 
1,783 
1,238 


3,066 
2,382 
2,047 


2,490 
2,404 
2,263 


1,520 
1,426 
1,323 


347 
338 
341 


J 

A 

S 


8,510 
7,836 
7,658 


4,936 
5,324 
4,925 


4,305 
4,682 
5,399 


2,774 
2,803 
3,378 


867 

744 

1,044 


1,904 
2,055 
2,331 


2,083 
1,956 
2,039 


1,164 
1,056 
1,145 


337 
332 

314 


O 

N 
D 


7,100 
6,544 
6,518 


4,882 
4,106 
3,980 


6,947 
7,437 
8,950 


4,877 
6,779 
7,500 


1,719 
3,029 
3,408 


3,152 
3,738 
4,046 


2,281 
2,288 
2,625 


1,358 
1,445 
1,626 


321 
325 
327 


1952 J 
F 


6,579 
5,894 






9,624 


4,886 


4,718 


2,726 


1,817 


331 



(1) Includes gas used for house heating. (2) Barrels of 35 Imperial gallons. 

Source: Monthly Report?; Petroleum and Natural Gas Production; Imports entered for Consumption; Trade of Canada, 



27 



FUEL AND POWER 



TABLE 23 



Refined Petroleum Products 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



APRIL, 1952 



CRUDE PETROLEUM 



Received Consumed 



NET PRODUCTION OF SALEABLE PRODUCTS 



Fuels 



Total 



Motor Heavy Light 

gasoline fuel oils fuel oils 



Total 



DOMESTIC 
CONSUMPTION 

Fuels 

Motor 
Total gasoline 



Thousand barrels 



1940 
1951 


4,255 
10,860 


4,163 
10.603 


3,882 

9,9<>1 


3,635 
9,198 


1 ,947 
4,423 


1,067 
2,134 


462 
1,808 


3.927 
10.512 


2,071 
4.576 


1950 N 
D 


10.346 
9,723 


9.871 
9.146 


8,967 
8,528 


8,440 
8.096 


4,165 
3,757 


1.873 
2.030 


1,586 
1,665 


10,056 
10,771 


3,956 
3,461 


1951 J 
F 
M 


8,353 
7.919 
7,771 


9.541 
8,301 
8.690 


8,671 
7,199 

8,145 


8,126 
6,721 
7,589 


3,659 
3,168 
3,560 


1.936 
1,443 
1,814 


1,568 
1,283 
1,355 


9.879 
9.388 
9.322 


3,016 
2,931 
3.161 


A 
M 

J 


9,740 
11.960 
12,165 


7,585 
11,624 
11,550 


6,956 
11,039 
11,207 


6,417 
10,239 
10,182 


3,009 
4.967 
5,028 


1.696 
2.315 
2.247 


1,208 
2.078 
2.039 


8.897 
11,126 
10,161 


3,853 
6,030 
5,316 


J 

A 

S 


13,482 
12.986 
12,657 


11,763 
12,599 
11,795 


11,277 
12,163 
10,677 


10.262 

11,012 

9,720 


5,122 
5,489 
4,753 


2.246 
2.459 
2.251 


2,195 
2,247 
1.837 


10,486 

11.078 

9.704 


5.831 
6,167 
5,063 


O 
N 
D 


12,504 

11,106 

9.685 


11.867 
11,282 
10.643 


11,552 
10,648 
10,005 


10,672 

10.026 
9,404 


5,215 

4,759 
4.343 


2.415 
2.464 
2.319 


2.229 
1,845 
1,807 


12,000 
12,410 
11.690 


5,623 
4.297 
3.621 



28 



DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION 



STOCKS AT END OF PERIOD 



At Refinery 



In Market Channels 



Fuels 



Refined Products 



Heavy 
fuel oils 



Light 
fuel oils 



Crude oil 



Unfinished 
products 



Total 



Motor 
gasoline 



Total 
fuel 



Motor 
gasoline 











Thousan 


d barrels 








1940 
1951 


1.214 
2.669 


476 
2.194 


5,561 
8,154 


1,954 
3,521 


6,331 
15,252 


2,708 
5,130 


6,442 
14,214 


3,788 
5,900 


1950 N 
D 


2,680 
2,825 


2.275 
3.149 


4.593 
5.097 


3,274 
3,130 


12,547 
11 ,685 r 


3,751 
4,259 


13.067 
12,571 


5,453 
5.377 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2,486 
2.144 
2,330 


2,842 
2.989 
2.615 


3,908 
3.526 
2,607 


3,304 
3,725 
3.616 


12,615 
13,067 
14,327 


5,663 
6,815 
8,127 


11.398 
9.471 
7.757 


4.933 
4.088 
3,480 


A 
M 

J 


2,201 
2.642 
2,674 


2,005 
1.639 
1,517 


4,761 
5,097 
5,713 


3,736 
3.631 
3.435 


13,426 
13,530 
14,408 


7,300 
6,079 
5,808 


7,891 

9,086 

10,442 


4,015 
4,383 
4,631 


J 

A 

S 


2,894 
2,733 
2,437 


1,191 
1.521 
1.346 


7,431 
7,818 
8,681 


3.495 
3,328 
3.855 


15.329 
15.925 
16,312 


5.386 
4,573 
3,825 


11,818 
13.012 
14,361 


4,630 
5,088 
5,872 


O 
N 
D 


3.088 
3.528 
2.873 


2.057 
3,049 
3,560 


9.317 
9.142 
8.184 r 


3,613 
3.707 
3,521 


16,346 
15,233 
15,252 


3.753 
3.937 
5.130 


14,456 
14.990 
14.214 


5,770 
6.211 
5.900 



Source: Monthly Report on Refined Petroleum Products, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 24 



MINING 



Metals 

Monthly averages or calendar months 







COPPER 




NICKEL 




LEAD 






Production 


Exports 


Production 


Exports 


Production 


Exports Production' 1 ' 


Exports 


Production 


Exports 




Total metal content 


Refined 


copper 






Total metal content 


Refined lead 












Million pounds 










1939 
1951 


50.7 
44.9 


45.2 
25.3 


38.6 
41.0 


27.6 
17.0 


18.8 
22.8 


19.6 
21.9 


32.4 
26.3 


30.8 
20.9 


31.8 
27.1 


30.1 
17.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


45.6 
40.6 
48.6 


25.6 
20.4 
21.0 


41.8 
36.8 
41.2 


16.2 
13.2 
14.8 


21.8 
19.3 
23.2 


24.4 
15.8 
22.4 


32.2 
24.0 
25.3 


23.7 
13.9 
22.6 


30.3 
27.4 
29.9 


20.2 
13.1 

21.7 


A 
M 
J 


47.7 
47.0 
45.2 


35.9 
21.2 
24.0 


40.8 
45.6 
42.7 


24.7 
13.9 
16.2 


21.1 
24.9 
23.6 


23.3 
18.7 
17.8 


20.1 
22.3 
27.6 


17.9 
30.1 
12.3 


28.3 
28.9 
28.2 


17.1 
29.6 
11.5 


J 

A 

S 


45.0 
45.3 
43.5 


27.5 
18.8 
23.6 


40.4 
43.6 
37.3 


18.3 
13.0 
16.0 


23.5 
24.5 
23.2 


24.5 
22.5 
20.7 


22.0 
27.6 
23.8 


18.5 
16.4 
20.8 


12.9 
29.7 
28.0 


11.6 

9.8 

13.9 


O 
N 
D 


41.8 
44.2 
44.1 


21.4 
24.9 
39.5 


42.6 
38.5 
40.8 


13.9 
16.8 
26.7 


23.4 
23.0 
22.6 


24.8 
23.3 
24.3 


30.1 
29.6 
31.1 


18.1 
26.7 
29.8 


27.1 
26.8 
28.0 


17.3 
25.9 
19.9 


1952 J 
F 


45.0 
41.0 


24.8 
18.2 


40.7 
37.8 


18.5 
9.7 


23.5 
21.3 


20.1 
25.4 


29.7 
22.0 


21.5 
20.2 


26.9 
25.8 


16.3 
19.4 






ZINC 




ALUMI- 
NUM 


IRON ORE 


GOLD 


SILVER 




Production Exports 
Total metal content 


Production 
Refined 


Exports 
zinc 


Imports of 

Bauxite 

Ore 


Producers' 
Shipments 


Production 


Mint 
Receipts 


Production 


Exports 






Million pounds 






Thousand 
short tons 




Thousand fine ounces 




1939 
1951 


32.9 

54.7 


29.4 
50.1 


29.3 
36.5 


26.0 
24.4 


85.1 
401.4 


10.3 
388.2 


425 
364 


404 
331 


1,930 
1,892 


1,753 
1,483 


1951 J 
F 
M 


51.4 
50.4 
52.0 


56.5 
21.2 
38.8 


36.5 
33.4 
36.3 


26.6 

9.2 

24.4 


80.3 
48.8 
41.6 


44.4 
31.3 
36.5 


374 
347 
372 


363 
342 
322 


2,015 
1,589 
1,755 


1,398 
1,316 
2,142 


A 
M 
J 


51.2 
51.7 
54.2 


37.5 
44.6 
55.3 


35.0 
36.2 
36.4 


22.0 
27.6 
28.7 


120.4 
377.0 
454.2 


158.1 
521.8 
649.7 


363 
369 
363 


419 
376 
364 


1,468 
1,854 
2,405 


964 
1,474 
1,377 


J 
A 

S 


55.4 
60.3 
56.2 


72.5 
50.6 
58.1 


36.5 
36.7 
35.9 


27.2 
23.3 
20.9 


582.3 
750.9 
707.5 


715.4 
691.0 
594.3 


344 
345 
359 


324 
357 
313 


1,794 
2,006 
1,896 


1,518 
1,777 
1,538 


o 

N 
D 


57.8 
57.7 
58.3 


56.2 
63.6 
46.5 


37.6 
37.4 
40.5 


32.7 
24.7 
25.0 


880.7 
622.0 
151.3 


612.6 
347.7 
255.9 


378 
372 
376 


314 
245 
234 


1,983 
1,977 
1,968 


889 
1,709 
1,692 


1952 J 
F 


59. 6' 
54.9 


53.1 
58.9 


38 6 
35.0 


18.4 
35.3 


63.4 
31.1 


163.9 
85.8 


355 
353 


265 
235 


1,778 
2,016 


1,637 
1,643 



Note: Iron ore shipments and silver and gold production include Newfoundland as of April and as of May, 1949 
respectively. (1) Includes Newfoundland as of May, 1949. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Silver, Lead and Zinc; Gold; Copper and Nickel; Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



29 



MINING 



TABLE 25 



APRIL, 1952 



Non Metallic Minerals: Production, Shipments and Exports 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



ASBESTOS 



GYPSUM 



FELDSPAR 



CEMENT 



LIME 



SALT 



Producers' 
Shipments 



Exports 



Producers' Producers' 
Shipments Shipments Exports 



Thousand tons 



Producers' 
Production Shipments 



Thousand barrels 



Commer- For Use in 
cial Chemicals 



Producers' shipments 



Thousand tons 



1939 
1951 


30 4 
81 .0 


28.8 
78 .5 


118 
302' 


1.0 
3 1 


0.6 

17 


477 
1 ,428' 


478 
1,405 


46 
103.2' 


19.7 
39 


15.7 
41.9 


1951 J 
F 
M 


74.1 
71 5 
94.9 


77.5 
53.5 
99 8 


193 
178 
178 


2.6 

29 
2.5 


1.4 
1.4 
1.1 


1,262 
1.241 
1.409 


887 

908 

1,380 


98 .0 

91 1 

103.6 


33.6 
32 2 
28.2 


44.1 
42.3 
47 .0 


A 
M 

J 


86.8 
93 2 
83.0 


89.0 
83.2 
77.9 


222 
264 
342 


1.6 
3.1 

5.5 


0.1 
1.7 
2.6 


1.492 
1.525 
1,429 


1,533 
1,880 
1,681 


103.8 

110.8' 

103.9' 


32.2 
37.1 
40.7 


39.4 
43.2 
40.1 


J 

A 

S 


71 .0 
80.4 
82.5 


73.5 

81.1 
80.2 


449 
465 
452 


3 

4 4 
3.6 


2.4 
2.8 

2.2 


1,538 
1,513 
1,479 


1,589 
1,754 
1.542 


102.9' 

108.8 

100.8 


46.6 
43.1 
39.9 


42.3 

40.8 
40.5 


O 

N 
D 


82 5 
85.6 
66.1 


81.8 
65.6 
79.2 


422 
289 
165' 


4.0 
2 3 
2.2 


2.7 
0.8 
0.8 


1,527 
1,441 
1,281' 


1.649 

1,277 

783' 


114.8 

105.0 

94 6' 


46.6 
54.7 
33 2 


40.8 
40.7 

41.2 


1952 J 
F 


76.3 

69 


71 4 
60.6 


136 
151 


1.3 

2.1 


0.4 

0.7 


1,353 
1,410 


851 
1,175 


100.2 
96 2 


40 1 
37.2 


43.0 
43.0 



Source: Monthly Reports: Production of Canada's Leading Minerals, Cement; Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 

MANUFACTURING 

Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and Shipments 

TABLE 26 Monthly averages or calendar months 

OUTSTANDING BINDING ORDERS" -SELECTED INDUSTRY GROUPS 



Flour 
Milling 



Rubber 
Goods 



Textile Clothing 
Industries Industries 



Motor 
Vehicle 
Primary Machinery Other Parts and Railway 
Iron and and Tools Iron and Acces- Rolling 
Steel Industries Steel sories Stock 



Non- 
Ferrous 
Smelting 

and Electrical 

Refining Apparatus 













January, 1951 = 


100 










1950 
1951 


47.2 
89.9 


94.3 
108.3 


70.3 

81.9 


63 .0 
75.7 


54 9 
104.3 


69.5 
139.1 


65.6 

119 1 


67.8 
85.7 


44 1 
120.8 


55.8 


74.7 
124.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


100.0 
167.3 
128.5 


100.0 
100.7 
117.0 


100.0 

105.9 

97.5 


100.0 
96 7 
93.4 


100.0 

96 1 
95 3 


100.0 
112.5 
123.4 


100.0 
108.8 
107.7 


100.0 

100.9 

99.3 


100.0 
118.6 
124.4 


100.0 
99.8 
98.0 


100.0 

92.6 

109.3 


A 
M 
J 


111 .0 
82.6 

46 6 


113.3 
113.3 
120.0 


99.3 
94.0 
84.0 


84.1 
87.6 
98.4 


103 3 
102.1 

102 9 


131 6 
135.3 
135.8 


119.2 
113.2 
117.5 


92.5 
89.9 
84.8 


117.7 
109.1 
124.5 


90.9 
84 8 
76.0 


112.0 
116.4 
125.7 


J 

A 

S 


43 8 
58 .0 
64 1 


108.9 
100.7 
137.8 


77 3 
66.4 
61.8 


81 6 
73.1 

54 7 


102 4 
100.3 
106 5 


150.0 
140 5 
151.1 


114.5 
128.4 
126.8 


77.3 
74.6 
74.7 


125.5 
127.0 
139.3 


73.8 
64.4 
65.9 


128.7 
133.7 
135.1 


O 
N 
D 


101.1 

85 .9 
89.5 


119.3 
80.0 
89.0 


62.5 
61.6 
71 9 


45 6 
47.1 

46 2 


115 9 
111 3 
115 9 


156.5 
163.8 
168.9 


141.4 
141 6 
110.5 


76 
79 8 
78.2 


137 3 

128.6 

97.3 


176.5 
172.8 


137.5 
140.4 
161.6 



30 ' Indexes of value of total outstanding binding orders (those for which acceptance when shipped is obligatory under normal 

circumstances) at the end of each month, as reported by co-operating firms and based on the values of the same firms in January, 
1951. 

Source: Monthly Report on Inventories and Shipments by Manufacturing Industries, D.B.S. 



APRIL 


, 1952 














MANUFACTURING 






Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and Shipments 


> 




TABLE 26— continued 


Monthly averages or calendar months 
















INVENTORIES' 1 ' 


AND SHIPMENTS 








Inventories All Industries by Components 

Raw Goods in Finished 
Total Materials Process Products 


Inventories and Shipments by Economic Use Groupings 


All Industries 




Consumers' Goods 




Total 


Non-durable 


Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 




Million dollars 








1947 average = 100 






L949 
1951 


2,498.2 
3,577.6 


1, 855^0 


626^6 


1,096^0 


134.3 
192.2 


125.1 
172.3 


140.4 
191.9 


123.0 
162.3 


156.5 
192.0 


125.4 
167.9 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2,806.3' 
2,878.3' 
2,956.0' 


1,504.8' 
1,533.6' 
1,553.0' 


484.7' 
514.8' 
540.4' 


816.7' 
829.9' 
862.6' 


150.8 
154.6' 

158.8' 


160.9 
160.1 
175.0 


160.9 
164.5 
168.7 


159.1 
158.1 
169.5 


164.1 
165.3 
167.1 


157.5 
149.6 
155.5 


A 
M 
J 


3,039.4' 
3,121.5' 

3,293.7' 


1,587.3' 
1,608.9' 
1,690.4' 


553.4' 
562.7' 
588.1' 


898.7' 

950.0' 

1,015.2' 


163.3 

167.7' 

176.9' 


171.4 
186.5 
183.6 


173.9 
177.1 
185.1 


166.4 
174.3 
169.2 


169.2 
168.9 
175.7 


158.2 
177.4 
178.4 


J 

A 

S 


3,388.9' 
3,443.0' 
3,505.2' 


1,770.2' 
1,809.4' 
1,827.1 


594.3' 
626.8' 
644.8' 


1,024.4' 
1,006.8' 
1,033.4' 


182.1 
185.0 

188.3' 


173.1 
174.6 
165.2 


188.5 
189.0 
191.6 


154.4 
159.0 
151.8 


179.5 
179.5 
186.1 


173.0 
172.9 
157.3 


o 

N 
D 


3,560.9'1,854.5' 
3, 520.3' 1,820. 8 r 
3,577.6 1,855.0 


633.3' 

643.2 

626.6 


1,073.1' 

1,056.3 

1,096.0 


191.3' 

189.1 

192.2 


183.9 
175.6 
157.5 


194.2 
190.9 
191.9 


173.8 
165.8 
146.6 


194.7 
191.7 
192.0 


188.4 
186.7 
160.1 


L952J 
F 


3,574.1 
3,503.9 


1,847.9 


660.7 


1,065.5 


192.0' 

188.2 


168.1' 

168.8 


191.0' 
186.0 


158.2' 
154.4 


195.2' 
185.4 


170.8' 
155.1 










INVENTORIES"' 


AND SHIPMENTS 














inventories and Shipments 


by Economic Use Groupings 








Consumers' Goods 




Capital Goods 


Produce 


rs' Goods 


Constructs 




Semi-durable 


Durable 


>n Goods 


Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 


Invt. 


Ship. 










1947 average = 100 










1949 

1951 


122.4 
185.6 


114.3 
137.9 


118.3 
201.9 


128.2 
181.9 


106.2 
176.2 


151.2 
198.7 


130.5 
196.2' 


125.0 
174.0 


152.9 
220.4 


117.0 
222.0 


1951 J 
F 
M 


155.5 
161.9 
168.3 


144.8 
154.5 
167.7 


160.0 
166.6 
175.4 


191.1 
200.8 
232.3 


114.8 
118.9 
125.9 


158.7 
162.8 
190.6 


141.1' 
140.8' 
141.6' 


164.2 
154.9 
175.3 


166.0 
183.7 
191.0 


169.0 
186.8 
202.3 


A 
M 
J 


197.2 
184.2 
195.5 


157.0 
142.7 
135.0 


184.9 
193.2 
198.9 


218.0 
217.2 
190.3 


129.6 
132.9 
139.3 


194.4 
221.3 
197.3 


147.7' 
154.3' 
164.9' 


173.7 
185.0 
181.5 


185.6 
197.5 
220.8 


183.0 
252.5 
291.9 


J 

A 

S 


197.4 
196.6 
193.8 


104.8 
139.5 
133.9 


204.2 
209.2 
207.9 


162.7 
134.4 
160.1 


146.1 
150.0 
158.1 


200.9 
199.1 
188.9 


173.6' 
180.0' 
186.8' 


162.2 
174.7 
170.5 


227.7 
241.1 
230.5 


324.1 
275.7 
235.7 


O 
N 
D 


188.0 
183.7 
185.6 


139.1 
130.3 
105.2 


204.9 
203.3 
201.9 


173.3 
140.2 
162.3 


165.4 
168.5 
176.2 


218.3 
225.1 
227.4 


193.9' 
192.6' 
196.2' 


188.9 
185.9 
171.1 


216.2 
209.5 
220.4 


218.9 
179.9 
144.1 


1952 J 
F 


176.6' 
180.0 


125.3' 
142.7 


205.1' 
200.9 


162.7' 
172.3 


177.6' 
169.7 


199. 4' 
212.6 


194.7' 
192.2 


177.2' 
180.6 


226.4' 
239.6 


195.3' 
212.4 


Note: 
urvey. 
("As; 


This series has been revised from December, 1950 to allow for final figures, 
it end of period. 


and for re-weighting, from the 1950 yeax 


•end 31 



MANUFACTURING APRIL, 1952 

Manufacturing Orders, Inventories and Shipments 

TABLE 26 concluded Monthly averages or calendar months 



INVENTORIES ' AND SHIPMENTS 


Inventories and Shipments for Selected Industry Groups 


Foods 


Rubber Pulp and 
goods Textiles Clothing Paper Mills 


Iron and 
Steel 


Invt. Ship. 


Invt. Ship. Invt. Ship. Invt. Ship. Invt. Ship. 


Invt. Ship. 













1947 average 


- 100 












1949 
1951 


146.5 
171 7 


127.6 
154.6 


116.4 

221 1 


97.1 

164.8 


132 3 
215.3 


119.8 
151.8 


118.5 
159.4 


119.1 
122.7 


210 1 
257.9' 


98.7 
148.9' 


136.3 
194.6' 


128.0 
176.0' 


1951 J 
F 
M 


156.1 
148 1 
150.9 


150.1 
137.7 
144 4 


163.5 
172.2 
186.2 


182.7 

169.6 
179.5 


172.1 

175.7 
180.0 


173.7 
180.7 
189.9 


143.0 
151.1 
156.8 


113.7 
133.8 
154.7 


178 4 
181.3 
186.5 


129.2 
124.3 
140.0 


140.0 
141.1 
141.5 


168.4 
157.1 
174.3 


A 
M 

J 


151.2 

157.0 

157.4 


150.4 
164.3 
171.7 


191.5 
209.1 
221.6 


193.3 
168.1 
154.0 


195.2 
193 7 
216.9 


170.0 
163.2 
150.9 


162.8 
169.0 
176.2 


143.0 
121.2 
122.8 


184.4 
191.1 
203.6 


140.6 
153.2 
149.5 


148.6 
157.6 
168.5 


170.7 
183.2 
187.7 


J 

A 

S 


162.4 
157.1 
170.7 


158.6 
149.5 
149.0 


221.4 
223.6 
216.8 


137.1 
136.6 
160.7 


218.6 
220.2 
220.3 


118.5 
147.4 
132.9 


179.8 
177.3 
172.1 


84.4 
127.0 
135.8 


218.1 
229.6 
244.8 


151.0 
165.6 
144.6 


179.1 
182.4 
184.7 


166.7 
178.4 
180.1 


O 
N 
D 


187.4 

170.4 
171.7 


170.0 
175.0 
134.0 


210.3 

204.9 
221.1 


190.8 
165.0 
140.1 


214.9 
213.3 

215.3 


131.8 
137.7 
124.7 


165.1 
157.9 
159.4 


134.1 

118.7 

83.5 


253.4 
252.1 
257.9 


166.7 

167.8- 

154.3 


194.8 
190.2 
194.6 


193.4 
187.5 
164.3 


1952 J 
F 


174.1' 

162.2 


153.4 r 
134.6 


210. l r 
207.1 


148. 1' 
165.1 


212.4' 
208.8 


152.2 
155.8 


142.2' 
157.3 


97.9' 
134.3 


267 7' 
231.1 


152.1' 
,128.1 


193 5' 
189.8 


172.6' 
178.3 



Machinery 3 ' 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Motor 
Vehicles 



Invt. 



Ship. 



Other 
Transportation 
Equipment'" 

Invt. Ship. 



Non-ferrous 
Metals 



Invt. 



Electrical 
Apparatus 



Ship. Invt. 



Ship. 



Petroleum 
Products 



Invt. 



Ship. 













1947 


average 


= 100 












1949 
1951 


110.6 

205.4 


131.2 
183.8 


126.5 
218.3 


124.1 
198.6 


86.2 
135.4 


185.7 
241.0 


133.5 
199.2 


128.5 
183.5 


100.2 
213.4 


127.4 
179.4 


237.6 
348.1 


151.4 

300.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


142.3 
148.8 
157.4 


168.9 

165.4 
188.0 


170.7 
174.9 
177.9 


202.4 
229.4 
268.9 


71.2 
73 7 
82.4 


138.4 
161.3 
195.0 


156.4 
157.8 
157.2 


165.0 
154.8 
190.5 


137.5 
142.6 
155.2 


190.6 
180.1 
200.8 


272.0 
269.2 
269.3 


269.6 
256.6 
235.5 


A 
M 

J 


161.6 

164.9 
174 4 


198.6 
193.9 

183.7 


190.6 
190.0 
196.2 


243.7 
252.9 
213.0 


84.7 
87.2 
92.6' 


186.4 
270.0 
207.7 


158.8 
168.9 
174.2 


178.7 
188.1 
188.1 


161.4 
169.1 
183.6 


209.6 
195.9 
186.1 


277.8 
287.1 
307.6 


241.5 
326.4 
304.2 


J 

A 

S 


177 .6 
187.2 
194.2 


169.9 
158.4 
178.9 


202.1 
206.4 
206.9 


176.2 
135.1 
168.6 


106.3 
106.4 
116.5 


266.7 
278.6 
234.5 


187.4 
191.7 
203.5 


169.4 
189.1 
169.6 


188.7 
199.2 
201.0 


140.6 
155.6 
171.5 


324.3 
337.7 
356.2 


312.5 
323.4 
365.3 


O 
N 

D 


195.4 
205 3 
205.4 


225.8 
191.7 
182.5 


203.1 
208.0 
218.3 


181.9 
118.3 
192.2 


126.7 
130.1 
135.4 


273.1 
299.3 
381.4 


204.7 
202.0 
199.2 


203.4 
209.8 
195.7 


201.1 
200.3 
213.4 


194.4 
174.5 
153.2 


360.9 
352.9 
348.1 


338.8 
330.0 
303.2 


1952 J 
F 


225.4' 
223.7 


166.6' 
191.5 


207 2' 
210.1 


188.7 
189.9 


144 2' 
100.7 


251 3' 
274.5 


203.8' 
203.9 


188.3' 
200.7 


212 2' 
212.7 


154.9' 
169.8 


331 7' 
312.1 


313 3' 
279.5 



32 (1, As at end of period. " Includes primary iron and steel, iron castings, sheet metal products and wire and wire product*. 

Includes heavy electrical machinery, office, household and store machinery and industrial machinery. '"Includes ship- 
building, railway rolling stock and aircraft. Excludes heavy electrical machinery. 

Source: Monthly Report of Inventories and Shipments by Manufacturing Industries, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 27 



MANUFACTURING 



Tobacco and Beverages 

Monthly averages or calendar months 









TOBACCO 








BEVERAGES 








Releases for Consumptior 


i in Canada 11 


> 


Stocks <2 > 




Production 




Stocks 12 ' 




Cut Plug 
tobacco tobacco 

Thousand pounds 


Snuff 


Cigarettes Cigars 
Millions 


Unmanu- 
factured 

Million 
pounds 


Beer (3 > 


New Spirits 
spirits bottled (4) 

Million proof g< 


Distilled 
liquor 




Thousand 
barrels 


illons 


1939 
1951 


1,977 
2,275 


267 
168 


70 
72 


594 
1,306 


11.1 
14.1 


75 
164 


5 
.9 


209.3 
624.5 


0.96 
2.09 


0.26 
0.96 


85.92 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2,326 
2,154 
2,362 


190 
163 
188 


89 
78 
85 


1,518 
1,477 
1,578 


17.7 
14.9 
15.9 


193 


4 


456.1 
459.6 
603.2 


2.40 
2.42 
2.31 


0.83 
0.90 
1.21 


80.59 
81.60 
81.88 


A 
M 
J 


1,804 
2,733 
2,566 


130 
205 
196 


79 

109 

90 


1,429 
1,487 
1,357 


17.0 
17.8 
13.7 


176 


.0 


681.9 
727.2 
714.0 


2.12 
2.19 
1.75 


0.94 
0.73 
0.69 


82.64 
83.69 
84.12 


J 
A 

S 


1,857 
2,242 
1,681 


141 
130 
123 


34 

46 

1 


1,013 
932 
754 


9.4 
8.5 
6.3 


156 


8 


781.2 
782.8 
590.0 


1.40 
1.81 
1.78 


0.67 
1.02 
0.99 


84.31 
84.59 
84.65 


O 

N 
D 


2,763 
2,682 
2,125 


205 
205 
134 


99 
81 
78 


1,835 

1,381 

906 


16.4 
16.9 
14.7 


164 


9 


593.6 
564.8 
539.4 


2.43 
2.40 
2.07 


1.34 
1.28 
0.92 


84.97 
85.24 
85.92 


1952 J 
F 


2,620 
2,591 


142 
119 


89 
78 


1,316 
1,088 


13.8 
14.0 






478.6 
464.8 


2.29 
2.25 


0.91 
0.87 


86.60 
87.34 



(1) Releases of domestically manufactured tobacco for consumption in Canada. (2, End of period. (3, The 
production of beer is shown in thousand barrels of 25 gallons each. Commencing with April, 1949, Newfoundland 

is included. l4) Includes bottling of imported liquors. 

Source: Department of National Revenue: and Quarterly Report, Stocks and Consumption of Unmanufactured 
Tobacco, D.B.S. 



TABLE 28 



Rubber 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRO- 
IMPORTS DUCTION 



CONSUMPTION 



CONSUMPTION OF NATURAL 
AND SYNTHETIC 



STOCKS 



Natural* 1 ' Synthetic Natural Synthetic Reclaim Total 



Tires and 
Tubes 



Foot- 
wear 



Wire 

and 

Cable 



End of Period 
Natural Synthetic 



Million pounds 



1939 
1951 


6.07 
8.96 


11.63 


5.90 
8.28 


4^93 


1.40 
2.95 


13.22 


8.94 


1.47 


0.41 


9.90 


11.39 


1951 J 
F 
M 


16.37 

9.16 

13.20 


11.85 
10.59 
11.82 


9.68 

9.72 

10.36 


4.99 
4.98 
5.07 


3.28 
3.33 
3.60 


14.67 
14.70 
15.43 


9.81 

9.86 

10.25 


1.71 
1.68 
1.83 


0.45 
0.38 
0.40 


9.23 

9.30 

11.18 


7.09 
5.99 
6.74 


A 
M 
J 


8.54 

11.21 

8.88 


10.38 

8.46 

10.09 


10.68 

10.17 

7.47 


5.42 
4.80 
4.10 


3.74 
3.67 
2.78 


16.10 
14.96 
11.56 


10.67 

10.11 

7.37 


1.93 
1.75 
1.45 


0.41 
0.42 
0.43 


10.95 
10.26 
12.26 


6.87 
6.83 
7.36 


J 
A 

S 


8.02 

10.29 

4.58 


12.17 
11.28 
12.47 


7.36 
6.34 
7.12 


4.17 
4.35 
5.11 


2.59 
2.45 
2.48 


11.53 
10.70 
12.23 


8.16 
6.40 
8.22 


1.01 
1.70 
1.36 


0.22 
0.46 
0.44 


12.05 
14.56 
14.53 


8.23 
8.15 
9.88 


o 

N 
D 


6.10 
4.69 
6.50 


13.52 
13.16 
13.75 


7.31 
6.61 
6.58 


5.31 
5.35 
5.57 


2.83 
2.41 
2.29 


12.62 
11.95 
12.16 


8.76 
8.59 
9.08 


1.40 
1.03 
0.80 


0.44 
0.48 
0.37 


12.36 
8.26 
9.90 


10.27 

9.86 

11.39 


1952 J 
F 


9.15 


15.25 
14.96 


6.58 
6.52 


5.66 
6.39 


2.52 
2.48 


12.24 
12.92 


8.66 
8.98 


1.17 
1.35 


0.47 
0.44 


11.04 
11.69 


12.41 
14.78 



'"Includes crude rubber, Gutta-percha unmanufactured, Latex and Balata crude. 
Source: Monthly Report on Consumption, Production and Inventories of Rubber, D.B.S. 



33 



MANUFACTURING 



TABLE 29 



Leather 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



APRIL, 1952 



HIDES AND SKINS 



Stocks; End ot Period 



Wettings 



Cattle 
hides 



Cali and 
kip skins 



Goat and 
kid skins 



Sheep and 
lamb skins 



Cattle 
hides 



Calf and 
kip skins 



Goat and 
kid skins 



Sheep and 
lamb skins 



Horse 
hides 







Thousands 




Thousand 
dozen 




Thousands 




Thousand 
dozen 


Thousands 


1940 
1951 


627 
342 


591 
653 


87 
118 


69 
62 


146 
125 


111 

52 


25 
12 


13 
11 


4.7 
0.1 


1950 N 
D 


357 
368 


512 
467 


81 
64 


53 
52 


176 
179 


102 
76 


25 
24 


16 
11 


0.1 

0.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


345 
311 
286 


432 
417 
408 


44 
57 
56 


47 
39 
39 


185 
171 
162 


92 
80 
67 


25 
11 
25 


16 
16 
17 


0.1 
0.2 
0.1 


A 
M 

J 


294 
312 
347 


441 
479 
596 


40 

80 

101 


37 
38 
42 


152 
139 
108 


67 
72 
42 


31 
22 
11 


16 

11 

8 


0.2 
0.1 
0.2 


J 

A 

S 


352 
337 
335 


626 
676 
687 


128 
128 
139 


48 
47 
55 


85 

113 

96 


20 
22 
25 


2 

1 


7 

9 

10 


0.1 


O 
N 
D 


313 

325 
342 


689 
650 
653 


122 
121 
118 


64 
56 
62 


103 

101 

84 


57 
41 
46 


17 
2 
2 


10 

10 

5 


0.1 
0.1 


1952 J 


333 


653 


103 


52 


113 


39 


16 


8 


2 



PRODUCTION OF FINISHED LEATHER 



Cattle Leather 



Glove and Bag, case 
Upper garment and strap Harness 
leather leather leather leather 



Sole 
leather 



Call and 
Kip Skin 



Upper 

leather 



Goat and 

Kid 
Leather 



Sheep and Lamb 
Leather 

Glove and 
garment Shoe 
leather leather 



Horse 
Hide 

Glove and 
garment 
leather 





Thousand 
pounds 


Thousand 


square feet 


Thousand sides 


Thousand 
square feet 


Thousand 
skins 


Dozen skins 


Thousand 
square feet 


1940 
1951 


2,056 
1,232 


2,911 


288 


12 


5 


621 


20 


4,517 


2,937 


323 


1950 N 
D 


1,443 
1,938 


4.207 
3,872 


488 
434 


13 
11 


7 
5 


1,038 
1,104 


16 
14 


6,966 
6,279 


4,504 
3,469 


211 
186 


1951 J 
F 
M 


1,607 
1,589 
1,596 


4,395 
3,743 
3.781 


435 
338 
361 


15 
15 
18 


8 
6 
5 


1,123 
983 
817 


38 
31 
35 


6,825 
5,643 
7,367 


4,279 
4,190 
4,696 


226 
281 
387 


A 
M 

J 


1,469 
1.451 
1,268 


3,173 
2,941 
2,361 


327 
179 
237 


18 

15 

9 


4 
4 
3 


812 
781 
679 


28 
23 
19 


5.937 
4,293 
3,198 


4,475 
2.990 
2,013 


457 
465 
324 


J 

A 

S 


819 
996 
906 


1.712 
2,393 
2,017 


195 
264 
209 


4 

5 

12 


2 
5 
7 


179 
388 
245 


5 
14 

13 


3.476 
3,551 
3,877 


1,078 
1,981 
1,993 


180 
265 
273 


O 

N 
D 


995 

1,305 

784 


2,911 
2,902 
2,598 


325 
311 
270 


13 

12 

9 


7 
8 
5 


422 
554 
472 


8 

12 

9 


3,099 
4,519 
2,413 


3,047 
2,688 
1,809 


279 
355 
388 


1952 J 


829 


2,970 


308 


9 


6 


507 


23 


3,230 


2,332 


317 



34 



Source: Statistics of Hides, Skins and Leather, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 29 - concluded 



MANUFACTURING 



Leather 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION OF BOOTS AND SHOES 



Men's 



Women's 



Leather or 
Boys' and Misses' and Babies' and Total Fabric 

Youths' Children's Infants' All Kinds Uppers 



All Other 











Thousand 


pair 








1939 
1951 


623 
663 


978 
1,295 


104 
119 


268 
443 


93 

224 


2,067 
2,743 


1,779 
2,275 


289 
468 


1950 D 


634 


1,165 


133 


391 


214 


2,538 


2,054 


484 


1951 J 
F 
M 


646 
702 
798 


1,392 
1,455 
1,671 


110 
135 
163 


450 
441 
517 


213 
233 
263 


2,812 

2,967 
3,412 


2,509 
2,677 
2,977 


303 
290 
435 


A 
M 
J 


791 
793 
584 


1,589 
1,556 
1,234 


146 
130 
110 


516 
468 

444 


245 
231 
219 


3,287 
3,179 
2,590 


2,885 
2,714 
2,143 


402 
465 
448 


J 

A 

S 


451 
667 
587 


894 
1,404 
1,255 


91 
VJj 
106 


303 
456 
424 


163 
243 
214 


1,902 

2,895 
2,586 


1,467 
2,318 
1,995 


435 
577 
591 


O 
N 
D 


702 
689 
540 


1,189 

1,086 

819 


117 

111 

80 


458 
499 
336 


260 
251 
153 


2,726 
2,637 
1,928 


2,094 
1,948 
1,580 


632 
689 
349 


1952 J 


608 


1,090 


184 


436 


199 


2,517 


2,337 


180 



Note: As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 
Source: Production of Leather Footwear, D.B.S. 



TABLE 30 



Primary Textiles: Cotton, Wool and Rayon 
Monthly averages or calendar months (4) 



Raw Cotton' 1 ' 



Broad Woven Woollen and 

Cotton Cotton Worsted Worsted Broad Woven 

Yarn Fabric Yarn Fabrics Rayon Fabric 



Imports 



Bale Openings 



Production 



Shipments Production 





Thousand 
pounds 


Number of 
bales' 2 * 


Thousand 
pounds' 3 ' 


Thousand 
pounds 


Thousand 
yards 


Thousand 
pounds 


Thousand yards 


1940 
1951 


18,052 
17,121 


37,930 
36,898 


18,950 
18,368 


16,412 
17,158 


25,774 
25,828 


1,306 
1,241 


2,199 
1,758 


4,821 
9,592 


1951 J 
F 
M 


23,255 
14,704 
25,753 


39,838 

41,441 
45,473 


19,833 ] 
20,447 
22,653 J 


19,646 


29,574 


( 1,578 1 
{ 1,487 
I 1,492 j 


2,099 


10,599 


A 
M 
J 


23,103 
25,250 
14,140 


44,518 
44,498 
41,257 


22,182 ] 
22,208 
20,568 J 


20,192 


30,397 


( 1,469 1 

1,350 
1 1,277 J 


1,831 


10,769 


J 

A 

S 


6,490 
7,824 
9,747 


28,106 
27,882 
33,384 


13,995 ) 
13,873 
16,613 J 


13,853 


20,854 


[ 907 1 

\ 1 ' 111 
( 1,127 J 


1,423 


8,156 


o 

N 
D 


12,607 
25,101 
17,483 


35,642 
33,708 
27,029 


17,783 ) 
16,796 
13,461 j 


14,939 


22,488 


[1,108 1 
1,019 

( 970 J 


1,679 


8,844 


1952 J 
F 


23,226 


31 ,067 
29,968 


15,477 
14,965 













(1) Monthly data include estimate for non-reporting companies. (2) Bales of 500 pounds gross weight, 
weight. < 4 > Quarterly data for the last five columns are monthly averages. 



("Invoice 



35 



MANUFACTURING 



TABLE 31 



APRIL, 1952 



Production o! Factory Clothing 

Quarterly averages or quarters 



WOMEN'S AND MISSES' 



Coats 



Suits 



Dresses 



Skirts 



Wool and Rayon and Cotton, 

wool rayon linen and 

mixtures mixtures other 



Wool and Rayon and 

wool rayon 

mixtures mixtures 



Blouses Slips 

and 

Cotton Rayon and Petti- 
rayon coats' 
mixtures 











Thousands 








Thousand dozen 


1950 


408.0 


217.1 


90.2 


1.815.0 


1.410.3 


209.0 


228.2 


26.6 


96.9 


170.8 


1951 


401 9 


207.7 


57.1 


1.723.6 


1,193.8 


167.3 


241.5 


37.0 


86.6 


163.8 


1950 






















4th qtr. 


284 


105.1 


99.6 


1.727.8 


1.083.1 


209.8 


210.9 


15.1 


96.1 


185.8 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


527.6 


389.6 


23.3 


2,049.7 


1.523 .2 


212.1 


365.7 


35 2 


117.0 


196.1 


2nd qtr. 


292.1 


163.8 


17 .8 


1.891.1 


1.682.0 


105.8 


175.4 


61.8 


61.6 


184.9 


3rd qtr. 


453.3 


169.1 


124.5 


1.517.1 


762.5 


186.4 


242.3 


27.7 


89.8 


133.7 


4th qtr. 


334.7 


108.2 


62.6 


1.436 4 


807.3 


164.8 


182.6 


23.4 


78 .0 


140.4 



CHILDREN'S 








BOYS' 








Coats Suits Dresses, 
All 
Kinds 


Suits 


Overcoats 

and 
Topcoats 


Trousers 

and 
Slacks, 

Fine 


Overalls, 

Bib and 

Waist 




Shirts 




Dress, 

Fine, 

Cotton 


Sport, 
Fine 


Work 









Thousands 








Thousand dozen 




1950 


170.6 


22.4 


748.3 


70.8 


15.9 


364.8 


19.1 


16.5 


8.9 


8.1 


1951 


181.9 


23.2 


864.3 


54.1 


16.5 


374.4 


21.5 


12.9 


13.1 


7.0 


1950 






















4th qtr. 


165.2 


24.2 


709.4 


55 5 


30.8 


313 8 


15 9 


11 6 


5 9 


8.9 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


205.1 


40.0 


1,118.1 


89.0 


10.0 


455.4 


24.2 


15.6 


10.6 


6.4 


2nd qtr. 


129.0 


16.7 


927.2 


60.2 


13.6 


389.0 


28 4 


15 8 


12.4 


5.3 


3rd qtr. 


233.8 


14.6 


652.8 


33.4 


22.0 


369.0 


16.0 


12 9 


13.2 


3 4 


4th qtr. 


159.8 


21.4 


759 .1 


33.9 


20.3 


284.1 


17.4 


7.2 


16 


7.7 



MEN'S AND YOUTHS' 



Dress Clothing 



Work Clothing 



Suits 



Overcoats 

and 
topcoats 



Trousers 

and 

slacks, 

fine 



Shirts 



Overalls 



Dress or business, Sport, 

fine fine 

Cotton Other'" 



Bib and 
waist 



Combin- 
ation 



Work 
pants 



Thousands 



Thousand dozen 



Work 
shirts 



1950 


424.2 


175.8 


731.2 


158.7 




49.9 


61.4 


7.6 


67.8 


87.9 


1951 


389.9 


190.9 


671.9 


145.0 


11.6 


68.6 


69.8 


9.8 


69.3 


92.3 


1950 






















4th qtr. 


437.7 


239.1 


699.0 


169.5 




25.7 


67.0 


8.2 


70 .8 


90.8 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


477.1 


195.2 


814.9 


169.9 


13.5 


87.2 


86.5 


10.4 


80.5 


97 .8 


2nd qtr. 


456.9 


133.7 


770.1 


148.8 


11.4 


89.4 


81.1 


12.5 


82 5 


96.2 


3rd qtr. 


320.6 


249.9 


528.6 


130.8 


9.4 


49.5 


53.2 


8 2 


67.3 


91 3 


4th qtr. 


304.9 


184.9 


574.1 


130 3 


11.9 


48.3 


58.3 


8.1 


46.8 


83.7 



36 Includes children's. Includes boys'. 

Source: Quarterly Production of Factory Clothing (Selected Garments), D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 
TABLE 32 



MANUFACTURING 



Wood and Paper Products 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



SAWN LUMBER 


Canada 








East of Rocky Mountains 




British 




Total 


Prince 
Edward 
Island 


Nova 
Scotia 


New 
Bruns- 
wick Quebec Ontario 


Mani- 
toba 


Columbia 

Saskat- 
chewan Alberta 













Million feet, 


board measure 










1939 
1951 


331.4 
544.6' 


141.7 
262.8' 


0.4 
1.0' 


12.7 
26.6' 


17.6 
25.0' 


54.7 
93.0' 


40.1 
78.3' 


5.1 

4.5' 


3.2 

6.6' 


8.0 
27.7' 


189.7 
281.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


461.3' 
509.8' 
538.9' 


180.5' 
242.6' 
271.7' 


0.3' 
0.2' 
0.9' 


19.1' 
32.0' 
31.2' 


12.3' 
29.4' 
49.6' 


41.6' 
64.2' 
65.1' 


20.7' 
17.7' 
30.7' 


2.1' 
2.6' 
2.9' 


15.2' 
12.9' 
20.6' 


69.1' 
83.5' 
70.7' 


280.8 
267.2 
267.2 


A 
M 
J 


419.8' 

636.9' 
813.3 


148.5' 
323.7' 
480.8 


2.0 

1.2' 

1.9 


21.1' 
43.9' 
47.3 


27.1' 
29.8' 
42.9 


54.9' 
126.1' 
197.9 


28.8' 
108.3' 
166.9 


3.2' 

4.0 

12.0 


6.4' 
6.3' 
1.9 


5.0' 
3.9' 
9.9 


271.3 
313.3 
332.5 


J 

A 

S 


747.3 
696.3 
554.3 


454.7 
404.6 
295.0 


1.1 
0.9 
1.5 


42.3 
26.6 
21.8 


34.7 
24.3 
21.0 


190.1 
161.8 
102.4 


164.3 
169.4 
133.6 


7.4 

10.5 

5.9 


3.8 
2.0 
1.3 


10.9 
9.0 
7.7 


292.6 
291.6 
259.3 


O 
N 
D 


479.3 
360.4 
317.7 


176.7 

72.3 

103.2 


1.2 
0.5 
0.8 


15.4 
11.6 

7.4 


18.2 
4.5 
6.1 


66.4 
22.8 
22.2 


66.6 
15.3 
17.6 


2.6 
0.5 
0.5 


0.7 
3.1 
5.0 


5.6 
13.9 
43.6 


302.6 
288.1 
214.6 


1952 J 


418.8 


176.3 


0.3 


14.8 


15.8 


37.5 


26.1 


2.0 


15.7 


64.0 


242.5 





WOOD PULP' 1 ' 








NEWSPRINT 








Production 


Exports 


Produc- 
tion 




Shipments 




Stocks 
End of 
Period 


Total 


Mechanical Chemical 


Total 


Domestic 


Export 



Thousand tons 



1939 
1951 


347.2 
760.1 


228.2 
427.0 


111.9 
322.0 


58.8 
186.9 


243.9 
459.7 


238.4 
458.6 


15.8 
29.9 


222.6 
428.6 


169.5 
101.9 


1951 J 
F 
M 


738.2 

697.0' 

773.0 


422.7 
394.6 
438.3 


304.9 

292.4' 

323.4 


175.6 
149.6 
185.4 


453.0 
425.1 
473.0 


423.3 
400.8 
473.5 


28.4 
28.1 
32.0 


394.9 
372.7 
441.5 


118.8 
143.1 
142.5 


A 
M 
J 


740.4 
805.1 
773.3 


412.9 
455.7 
436.5 


316.1 
337.4 
325.3 


176.1 
188.6 
191.2 


447.6 

485.7 
464.3 


443.3 
486.3 
475.0 


27.7 
32.4 
29.2 


415.6 
453.9 
445.8 


146.8 
146.2 
135.5 


J 

A 

S 


746.6 
803.1 
716.4 


424.0 
449.3 
401.3 


311.1 
341.9 
304.5 


201.6 
211.0 
186.1 


452.5 
484.6 
431.1 


443.0 
480.6 
427.7 


29.1 
29.9 
28.5 


413.9 
450.7 
399.3 


145.0 
149.0 
152.3 


o 

N 
D 


809.4 
779.5 
719.4 


452.8 
435.9 
400.2 


344.7 
333.0 
309.7 


202.6 
187.6 
187.8 


492.5 
471.7 
435.3 


497.4 
491.0 
461.5 


33.0 
30.6 
30.9 


464.4 
460.4 
430.5 


147.4 
128.1 
101.9 


1952 J 
F 


770.4' 
744.3 


431.9' 
410.1 


328.5 
324.4 


196.3 
162.0 


470.5 

457.8 


445.2 
441.3 


28.8 
28.8 


416.4 
412.5 


127.2 
143.6 



Note: Newfoundland is included as of April, 1949, in data for wood pulp and newsprint. 

(1) Total pulp production covers "screenings" which are already included in exports. "Screenings" are excluded 
throughout from mechanical and chemical pulp. 

Source: Production, Shipments and Stocks on Hand of Sawmills, D.B.S. 

Bulletins of Canadian Pulp and Paper Association and Newsprint Association of Canada. 



37 



MANUFACTURING APRIL, 1952 

Shipments of Primary Iron and Steel Shapes to Consuming Industries 

(Carbon and Alloy) 
TABLE 33 Monthly averages or calendar months 



Agricultural 

Implements 
Automotive and Other Building 
Industries Farm Construction Containers 



Machinery Merchant Mining 

and Trade and National 

Tools Products Lumbering Defence 



Thousand tons 



Public Railway Whole- 
Works Cars and salers and 

and Railway Loco- Ship- Ware- 
Utilities Operating motives building houses 



Net Total Producers' Export 
Miscel- Domestic Inter- Ship- 

laneous Shipments change ments 



Pressing, 
Forming 

and 
Stamping 



1949 
1951 


12 5 
20 8 


10.1 
12.3 


30.2 
32.1 


17.1 
25.1 


9.7 
13.9 


29.3 
34.4 


7.5 
11.0 


0.2 
4.4 


12.2 
14 9 


1950 D 


19.6 


12.9 


30.8 


20 .2 


10.2 


30.9 


11.8 


0.3 


13.0 


1951 J 
F 
M 


18.5 
21.0 
21 6 


12.2 
12.5 
13 9 


35.8 
30.1 
34.8 


26 6 
24.1 
23 6 


13.3 
11.4 
12.8 


38.5 
28.1 
35.7 


13 5 
9.0 

10.6 


0.9 
0.8 
2.0 


13.7 
15.0 
17.1 


A 
M 

J 


24.9 
29.2 
21.4 


11 .9 
10.6 
13.4 


28.5 
36.4 
34.4 


24 8 
28.3 
26 .2 


16.0 
14.1 
12.1 


35.1 
35.3 
34.0 


9.0 
10.8 
11.1 


4.0 
4.4 
4.4 


15.6 
16 8 
16.1 


J 

A 

S 


23.6 
16 1 
17.5 


12.5 
9 5 
9.2 


32.0 
27.1 
28.8 


25.3 
26.7 
24.2 


13.7 
13.4 

13.0 


30.5 
34.9 

33.0 


10 9 
14.4 
10.7 


3.6 
5.0 
6.3 


15.2 
14.3 
11.6 


O 
N 
D 


20.4 
20.1 

15.7 


14.1 

15.6 
12.4 


36 6 
31.6 
28.7 


24.3 

21 7 
25 9 


14.2 
17.3 
15.1 


38.1 
34.9 

34.2 


11 9 

12.1 

8.4 


6.7 
6 8 
8.4 


14 8 
16.9 
11.7 


1952 J 


15 5 


11.6 


34.9 


21.7 


17 


38.0 


11.2 


6.2 


14.9 



Total 













Thousai 


id tons 










1949 
1951 


1.6 
2.3 


31.5 
34 9 


13.0 
15.9 


1.7 
3.4 


29.6 
27.2 


1.2 

1.6 


207.4 
254.2 


79.5 
140.1 


18.3 
5 9 


305.2 
400.2 


1950 D 


1.1 


28.3 


12.1 


1.4 


28.0 


1.2 


221.8 


107.2 


28 5 


357.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


0.7 
0.8 
1.2 


37.5 
37.4 
38.5 


18.0 

16 .1 
17.3 


1.2 
4.3 

3.6 


29.3 
28.4 
30 1 


1.4 
2.1 
3.5 


261.1 
241.1 
266.1 


143.4 
122.1 
150 1 


6.6 
4.2 

2.0 


411.2 

367.4 
418.2 


A 
M 

J 


1.9 

5.2 
4.5 


41.2 
39.9 
35.1 


15 9 
15.7 
14.8 


4.0 
3.5 
2.6 


30.1 
30.6 
28.4 


1.7 
1.5 
19 


264.7 
282.2 
260.4 


145.5 
161.6 
135.5 


2.1 
3.1 
3 4 


412.3 
446.9 
399.3 


J 

A 

S 


2.2 
1.6 

3 2 


31.9 

28 3 
28.1 


12.7 
13 6 
13 6 


2.6 

4.2 
3.8 


21.7 
24.5 
21.4 


1.5 

1.2 
1.0 


239.8 
234 . 9 
225.5 


131 7 
146.2 
138.2 


2.8 
10 5 
10.4 


374.3 
391.6 
374.2 


O 
N 
D 


2 7 
17 
2.1 


29.3 

36 1 
34.9 


15.5 

20 1 

17 4 


3.5 
4.3 
2.7 


26.8 
32 2 
22.8 


1.7 
1.5 
10 


260.5 
272.7 
241.5 


136.2 
132.6 
137.7 


9.0 

10.2 

6.1 


405.8 
415.5 
385.2 


1952 J 


1.2 


37.9 


16.6 


3 


23 7 


1.2 


254.4 


158 7 


12 


425.1 



38 



Source: Monthly Report on Primary Iron and Steel, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 33 - concluded 



MANUFACTURING 



Primary Iron and Steel 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Pig' 1 ' 
Iron 



PRODUCTION 



Steel 



PRIMARY IRON AND STEEL SHAPES 
Shipments 



Ferro- 
Alloys 



Total 



Ingots 



Castings Total < 



Export (3> Domestic Imports' 











Thousand net tons 








1939 
1951 


70.5 
212.7 


7.1 
20.9 


129.3 
297.3 


124.2 
287.2 


5.1 
10.1 


260 . 1 


21.4 
5.9 


254.2 


39.9 
139.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


201.1 
193.2 
220.6 


19.1 
14.9 
19.5 


309.7 
281.4 
314.8 


299.4 
271.2 
304.3 


10.2 
10.2 
10.5 


267.7 
245.3 
268.1 


6.6 
4.2 
2.0 


261.1 
241.1 
266.1 


108.4 

85.1 

117.6 


A 
M 
J 


211.1 
219.0 
213.2 


19.6 
23.5 
19.8 


312.0 
313.3 
293.5 


301.8 
302.9 
283.7 


10.2 

10.4 

9.9 


266.8 
285.3 
263.8 


2.1 
3.1 
3.4 


264.7 
282.2 
260.4 


147.7 
153.8 
143.1 


J 

A 

S 


210.3 
203.2 
212.5 


17.6 
25.3 
23.0 


274.6 

286.8 
268.2 


266.6 
277.9 
257.9 


8.0 

8.9 

10.4 


242.6 
245.4 
236.0 


2.8 
10.5 
10.4 


239.8 
234.9 
225.5 


145.7 
154.2 
150.8 


O 
N 
D 


224.5 
223.5 
220.5 


25.8 
22.3 
20.7 


309.4 
307.1 
296.5 


298.2 
295.5 
286.8 


11.3 

11.6 

9.8 


269.5 
282.9 
247.6 


9.0 

10.2 

6.1 


260.5 
272.7 
241.5 


180.1 
166.5 
121.5 


1952 J 
F 


209.2 
199.2 


21.5 


317. r 
305.9 


305.7 
294.3 


11. 3 r 
11.5 


266.4 
261.8 


12.0 
3.6 


254.4 
258.2 


179.0 
154.5 



(1) As of January, 1950 includes some silvery pig iron formerly included with ferro-alloys. '"Excluding producers' 
interchange. (3) Prior to 1946, exports include pigs, ingots, blooms, billets and rolling mill products. "'Prior to 
1946, imports include castings and forgings and rolling mill products. Since 1946, they include, in addition to all other 
shapes, wire and wire rope. 

Source: Primary Iron and Steel, D.B.S. 



TABLE 34 



Motor Vehicles: Production and Sales 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



Total Commercial 



PASSENGER CARS 



Motor 
Vehicles 



Including 
Military 



Production (1) 



Production' 1 ' 



Imports 
less Total 

Re-exports Supply 



Sales' 2 ' 



Total Export 



Domestic 

Sales 

Domestic Financed 











Thousands 










Number 


1939 
1951 


12.95 

34.48 


3.92 
11.04 


9.03 
23.44 


1.37 
3.31 


10.40 
26.75 


10.72 
26.01 


3.21 
3.10 


7.50 
22.91 


6,799 


1951 J 
F 
M 


39.20 
40.59 

47.78 


11.00 
11.35 
12.90 


28.21 
29.24 
34.88 


4.45 
4.46 
5.40 


32.65 
33.70 
40.28 


26.61 

34.32 r 
40.32 


0.52 
0.63 
2.44 


26.09 

33.69 r 

37.89 


6,205 

6,570 r 

9,811 


A 
M 
J 


41.06 
42.91 
36.23 


12.38 
12.62 
10.38 


28.68 
30.30 
25.85 


8.45 
8.26 
5.88 


37.13 
38 55 
31.72 


39.11 

28.50 
24.74 


4.18 
2.66 
1.72 


34.93 
25.84 
23.03 


8,451 
6,890 
7,216 


J 

A 

S 


30.29 
21.83 
29.86 


9.27 

7.99 

10.67 


21.02 
13.84 
19.19 


3.11 
1.00 
0.49 


24.13 
14.84 
19.68 


24.40 

17.28 
23.03 


3.71 
2.82 
4.42 


20.69 
14.46 
18.61 


7,526 
7,044 
5,681 


O 

N 
D 


32.46 
29.46 
22.09 


11.99 
10.80 
11.17 


20.47 
18.66 
10.92 


-0.15 
-0.87 
-0.70 


20.32 
17.79 
10.22 


18.93 
19.23 
16.17 


5.39 
5.46 
3.23 


13.54 
13.77 
12.93 


5,763 
5,775 
4,763 


1952 J 
F 


34.23 
32.45 


14.87 
14.72 


19.37 
17.73 


0.16 
0.70 


19.52 
18.43 


22.60 
22.74 


8.85 
4.78 


13.75 
17.96 


5,141 
6,406 



D.B.S. 



"'Monthly data are shipments subsequent to 1946. <2 'As of April, 1949, Newfoundland is included. 

Source: Motor Vehicle Shipments, Sales of New Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Financing, and Trade of Canada, 



39 



MANUFACTURING 



TABLE 35 



Refrigerators and Washing Machines 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



APRIL, 1952 



ELECTRIC REFRIGERATORS > 



Domestic Types 



All Types 



Factory 
Production Shipments stocks 1 -'' Imports Exports 



DOMESTIC WASHING MACHINES'*' 



Produc- Ship- Factory 

Uon : ments stocks - Imports Exports 



Thousands 



1939 
1951 


4 29 
23.05 


19 53 r 


45.20 r 


111 

9.14 


0.78 
0.27 


8.66 
20.01 


18.39 


29.93 


1.71 
0.36 


1.68 
1.65 


1951 J 
F 
M 


34.69 
31.45 
35.40 


33.36 r 

31.25 

33.60 


4.35 
4.54 
6.34 


8.82 

9.06 

10.02 


0.17 
0.08 
0.18 


30.71 
27.02 
29.90 


29.75 
25.56 
29.53 


11.36 
12.82 
13.20 


0.68 
0.45 
0.60 


0.50 
1.17 
1.12 


A 
M 

J 


34.22 
32.95 
26.93 


33.68 
30.13 
19.58 


6.88 

9.70 

17.04 


16.65 
18.60 
15.06 


0.13 
0.68 
0.61 


29.94 
27.24 
19.22 


28.30 
22.01 
14.52 


14.84 
20.07 
24.77 


0.23 
0.49 
37 


1.93 

1.74 
2 67 


J 

A 

S 


16.55 
17.32 
14.26 


10.74 
9.93 
8.61 


22.85 
30.25 
35.89 


11.43 
9.27 
3.61 


0.43 

0.37 
0.22 


13.32 
13.31 
12.25 


11.86 

9.86 

10.59 


26.22 
29.67 
31.34 


0.23 
0.15 
0.27 


1.59 
2.38 
2.21 


O 
N 
D 


13.44 

12.82 
6.60 


7.46 
9.46 
6.62 


41.87 
45.22 
45.20 r 


4.11 
2.07 
0.92 


0.03 
0.05 
0.30 


13.12 
12.23 
11.91 


14.26 
12.86 
11 54 


30.19 
29.56 
29.93 


0.44 
18 
0.23 


1.08 
1.27 
2 16 


1952 J 
F 


8.34 


9.06 


46.05 


1.10 
4 37 


0.08 
0.11 


12.43 


12.07 


30.29 


0.33 
25 


22 
1.51 



Radio and Television Receiving Sets 1 

Monthly averages or calendar months 





Estimated 
Production 15 ' 


Domestic 
Shipments 


Factory Stocks 
End of Period 


Imports 

IG) 


Exports 


Va] 
Factory 

Radios 


ue of 
Shipments 

Television 
sets 


Average 
Price per 
Set 




Radios 


Tele- 
vision 
sets 


Radios 


Tele- 
vision 
sets 


Radios 


Tele- 
vision 
sets 




Total 


Table 














Thousands 








Thousand dollars 


Dollars 


1939 
1951 


29.0 
55.2 


4.3 


30 9 

47.9 


21.1 
27.9 


3.3 


60.9 
185.0 


14.7 


4.9 

4.7 


0.1 
3.0 


1,667 
4.288 


1,739 


32 

36 


1951 J 
F 
M 


64.9 
69.3 

48.9 


4.0 

4.3 
5.8 


50 7 
56.8 
66 


29.8 
33.0 
38.2 


3.8 
4.5 

5.4 


158.5 
168.5 
145.9 


2.9 
2.7 
3.1 


3.4 
2.0 

5.4 


2.4 
1.5 
2 8 


4,405 
4,853 
5.351 


1,956 
2,387 
3,251 


32 
35 
33 


A 
M 

J 


72 4 
68.1 

66.4 


5.0 

5.7 
3.5 


57.5 
38.8 
32.9 


31.6 
16.5 
11.1 


4.4 
1.1 
0.5 


158.6 
184.7 
217.3 


3.6 

8.2 

11.3 


4.4 
3.3 

3.8 


2 5 
1.4 
2.4 


4.843 
3.529 
2.829 


2.528 
542 

235 


37 
39 
36 


J 

A 

S 


36.2 
42.1 

51.4 


3.1 
2.3 
5.3 


28 8 
36.3 

42.4 


13.1 
17.5 
26.2 


0.3 
9 
3.1 


223.1 
222.3 
221.3 


14.1 

15.5 
17 7 


5.0 
8.4 
6.4 


16 
2.4 

8 8 


2.630 
3.663 
4,038 


159 

488 

1,591 


42 
38 
34 


O 

N 
D 


36.0 

76 8 r 
30. 3 r 


4 

5 5 r 
2 7 r 


45.5 
59 1 
59 3 


31 
43.3 
44.0 


4.9 
5.6 

4.6 


206.9 
218 2 r 
185.0 


16.8 
16. 6 r 
14.7 


5 7 
4.4 
3.7 


4.3 

3 9 

15 


4.498 
5,287 
5.526 


2,471 
2,876 
2,380 


37 
36 
36 


1952 J 
F 


33.3 


3.7 


29 7 


18.9 


4.6 


186.7 


13.8 


2.9 

2.2 


2 5 
15 


3.126 


2,356 


37 



40 ; As of May, 1949, Newfoundland is included. ' - End of period. Does not include apartment-type machines. 

' Electric and other. Factory shipments adjusted for change in stocks. ' Includes television sets. '"Manu- 

facturers' list prices of Table Model electric standard broadcast radios. 

Source: Monthly Reports, Domestic Type Electric Refrigerators, Domestic Washing Machines, Trade of Canada, 
and Radio Receiving Sets, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 36 



Value of Building Permits 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



CONSTRUCTION 



NOVA 
CANADA SCOTIA 



QUEBEC 



ONTARIO 



Montreal- 
58 Muni- Maison- Sher- Three Fort Port 

cipalities Halifax neuve Quebec brooke Rivers William Hamilton Kitchener London Ottawa Arthur 













Thousand dollars 












1939 
1951 


5,023 
35,876 


94 
453 


771 
6,130 


208 
554 


98 
401 


84 
242 


44 
210 


189 
2,078 


65 
413 


158 
595 


171 
2,537 


37 
145 


1951 J 
F 
M 


24,954 
29,957 
38,504 


372 
236 
260 


3,941 
4,826 
8,208 


183 
120 
420 


187 
331 
488 


34 

45 
80 


52 
49 
42 


641 
2,193 
1,467 


486 
232 
354 


196 
298 
506 


1,599 
1,564 
7,046 


22 

109 
16 


A 
M 
J 


46,825 
54,676 
36,588 


590 
663 
636 


7,846 
9,591 
6,355 


790 
724 
523 


397 
649 
630 


346 
816 
413 


132 
494 
192 


3,174 
2,848 
1,306 


934 
510 
458 


930 

1,160 

861 


2,436 
3,695 
1,258 


163 
520 
213 


J 
A 

S 


48,029 
33,439 
27,776 


710 
251 
438 


5,940 
5,306 
3,865 


920 
373 
436 


1,254 

{234} 


225 
246 
300 


84 

1,355 

64 


1,138 
1,351 
1,709 


571 
375 
230 


1,348 
456 
322 


3,300 
1,362 
3,505 


236 

144 

99 


O 
N 
D 


38,251 
24,731 

26,778 


852 
219 
211 


5,459 
5,945 
6,276 


918 
900 
341 


449 
125 
76 ' 


189 

127 

77 


50 
6 
3 


7,137 

1,150 

821 


299 
325 
183 


299 
582 
183 


3,450 
551 
680 


131 

85 

5 


1952 J 
F 


13,738 
20,373" 


66 
113 


1,885 
2,245 


147 
127 


64 
93 


24 

54 


4 
13 


548 
637 


134 
420 


273 
2,820 


337 
2,117 


1 
32 



ONTARIO 



MANI- 
TOBA SASKATCHEWAN 



ALBERTA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 



St. York and 

Catha- East York Winni- 

rines Toronto Windsor Townships peg 



Regina 



New 
Saska- Edmon- Leth- West- Van- 

toon Calgary ton bridge minster couver Victoria 















Thousand dollars 














1939 
1951 


50 
407 


859 
3,931 


77 
1,019 


170 
1,362 


215 
1,374 


50 

506 


21 
310 


89 
1,860 


139 
3,008 


39 

402 


98 
197 


524 
1,995 


67 

341 


1951 J 
F 
M 


198 

1,199 

300 


5,845 
2,496 
2,403 


341 

539 

1,351 


3,134 
1,168 
1,078 


411 
1,026 
2,071 


40 

72 

312 


19 

22 

109 


1,181 
1,873 
1,544 


1,516 
3,471 
1,513 


211 
764 
639 


210 
646 
216 


1,454 
1,943 
2,085 


481 
907 
161 


A 
M 
J 


296 

440 

1,189 


2,430 
3,098 
3,863 


1,071 

4,233 

659 


1,371 
1,894 
1,276 


1,902 
2,461 
1,591 


421 
940 
565 


523 
643 
522 


3,440 
2,448 
1,873 


6,244 
4,612 
3,777 


674 
288 
279 


198 
215 
193 


2,657 
2,836 
1,542 


231 
287 
229 


J 
A 

S 


386 
141 
231 


9,394 
3,456 
1,972 


382 
498 
233 


1,725 

1,734 

733 


1,780 

824 

1,620 


1,169 
599 
404 


396 
563 

455 


1,742 
2,353 
1,493 


3,967 
2,672 
2,649 


559 
236 
452 


142 

200 

91 


1,851 
2,087 
1,057 


213 

796 
188 


O 
N 
D 


288 

170 

46 


2,842 
2,472 
6,895 


480 
1,270 
1,171 


818 
695 
712 


1,716 
834 
249 


343 
982 
223 


265 

124 

77 


1,770 

1,936 

670 


3,425 
1,110 
1,144 


437 

219 

64 


83 

36 

133 


1,804 
1,032 
3,595 


292 
172 
129 


1952 J 
F 


41 
134 


3,401 
1,231 


1,372 
312 


283 
893 


. 165 
1 216 


65 
199 


51 
45 


469 
1,372 


419 
474 


36 
93 


50 
206 


836 
3,321 


212 
267 



Generally, the twenty-four municipalities for which data are shown were selected as being leaders in the amount 
of permits issued during the period 1926-1946. Annual statistics for 58 municipalities are available historically in 
the Canada Year Book. Monthly reports on the subject were discontinued in December, 1946. 



41 



CONSTRUCTION 



TABLE 36 - concluded 



APRIL, 1952 



Value of Building Permits 

By Provinces ' 
Monthly averages or calendar months 





( anada 


New- 
found- 
land 


Prince 
Edward 
Liland 


Nova 
Scotia 


New 
Brunswick 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Manitoba 


Saskat- 
chewan 


Alberta 


British 
Columbia 












Thousand dollars 










1949 
1950 


(.2,102 
79,833 


461 


60 
83 


1,102 
2,288 


716 
1,228 


14,141 
19,695 


27,831 
36,148 


2,679 
3,140 


1,568 
1,900 


6,291 
7,222 


7,715 
7,667 


1951 J 
F 
M 


42,269 

53, 

74,215 


206 

77 

166 


20 


697 

475 

2,715 


184 

363 

1,370 


7,002 

8,182 

13,329 


25,328 
26,693 
41,563 


578 
1,402 
3,530 


171 
183 
681 


3,123 
6,361 
3,953 


4,981 
9.738 
6,908 


A 
M 

J 


93,214 

109,979 

81,125 


470 

1.364 

471 


136 

195 

31 


1.562 
1,258 
1,773 


808 
1,609 
1.305 


19,503 
22,879 
15,647 


44,464 
55,047 
40.532 


3,756 
5,306 
2,936 


1,455 
3,838 
2,154 


11,497 
8.850 
7,856 


9,563 
9,632 
8,421 


J 
A 

S 


88,324 
69,136 
65,691 


359 
370 
314 


19 
33 
70 


1,235 

715 

3.399 


869 
852 
676 


18,150 
14,509 
12,773 


44,194 
34,040 
31,376 


6,186 
2,555 
2,921 


2,230 
2.005 
1,417 


7,382 
6,344 
5,493 


7,699 
7.714 
7,253 


o 

N 
D 


73,765 

54,647 r 

53,568' 


486 

396 

95 


38' 
111 
201 


1.146 
830 
420 


863 

1,202 

88 


15,632 

13,187' 

9,535' 


39,166 
27,824 
33,901 


2.523 

1,783 

903 


1,056 

1.434 

693 


6,974 

3.604' 

2,316 


5.882 
4.275 
5,416 


1952 J 

F 


28,031' 
41,113 


101 

183 


10 


102 
239 


109' 
294 


4.656' 
6,079 


17,989' 
24,151 


313 
400 


196' 
389 


1.284 
2,217 


3,271' 
7,162 



By Types (1) 
Monthly averages or calendar months 









RESIDENTIAL 








INDUS- 
- TRIAL 


COM- INSTITU- 
MERCIAL TIONAL 


OTHER 








New 






Repair 






Total 1 


Atlantic 
'rovinces" 


1 Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie British 
Provinces Columbia 
















Thousand dollars 










1949 
1950 


34,328 
40,649 


657 
1,179 


7.923 
10,637 


15,928 
18,593 


5,980 
6,331 


3,841 
3,909 


2,780 
3,615 


3,355 
5,305 


12,486 
20,044 


8,599 
9,194 


552 
1,027 


1950 D 


17,280 


695 


5.372 


8,622 


908 


1,684 


1,240 


6,361 


17.827 


12,174 


276 


1951 J 
F 
M 


17,177 
22.738 
37.479 


464 
375 
593 


3,668 
4,719 
6,461 


9,557 
12,397 
22,414 


1,359 
1,411 
4,508 


2,130 
3.837 
3,502 


1,542 
1.773 
2,391 


8,301 
6,590 
7,275 


11.536 
13,007 
16,448 


3.312 

9.138 

10,239 


400 
248 
383 


A 
M 

J 


55,967 
58.523 
45,974 


1.415 
1,445 
1.702 


12,463 

12,211 

9,395 


27,253 
30.237 
22,470 


9,950 
9,775 
7,988 


4.887 
4,853 
4.419 


4,615 
5,708 
4.851 


9.744 

13,476 

6,203 


11,222 
16.077 
11,545 


11,057 
15,779 
12,128 


608 
416 
424 


J 

A 

S 


38,307 
34,530 
26,888 


938 
943 
830 


8.078 
7,341 
6,104 


19,801 
17,546 
12,184 


6.299 
5.279 
4,895 


3,192 

3,420 
2,875 


4.815 
4.424 
4,144 


6,507 
8.556 
8,619 


18,431 
11,203 
13,513 


19.928 

9,906 

12,018 


335 
518 
510 


O 
N 
D 


29.170 

22,205 r 

13,383' 


562 
329 
295 


7.036 

5.978' 

2.392' 


15.086 

10.938 

7,064 


4.413 
2,851 
1,472 


2,073 
2,109 
2,161 


3 993 
2,601 
1.454' 


17.433 

8.823 

12,624 


11,118 11,145 
9.046 r 11, 646 
5.088 20.828 


904 
325 
191 


1952 J 
F 


10.972' 
20,275 


137' 

175 


1.752' 
4,026 


6.926' 
9,696 


642 
1,558 


1,516' 
4,820 


1,338' 
1,920 


6,294' 

4,080 


5,063' 
8.717 


3,667' 
5.733 


696' 
387 



42 ! The coverage was extended to 507 municipalities in 1948, and as of February, 1952, stands at 818, minor revision 

still being required in the table, due to the non-receipt of returns from a few small places. No account is taken of the 
building activity outside of registration areas. Actual operations normally follow the granting of permits but a number of 
projects are not undertaken or abandoned. The amount depends upon the statement of the applicant and considerable 
change may develop before the completion of the operation. 
(2l As of January, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 37 



CONSTRUCTION 



Building Materials 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



PRODUCTION 



CEMENT PRODUCTS (i) 



Cement 
Concrete Concrete Pipe and 
Brick Blocks 12 ' Tile 



CLAY PRODUCTS 



ASPHALT PRODUCTS 



Thousands 



Thousand 
tons 



Building Brick«> 

Producers' 
Production (3) stocks 



Millions 



Vitrified 
Sewer 
Pipe 

Thousand 
feet 



Smooth- Mineral 
Asphalt surfaced surfaced and 
Shingles Rolls Rolls Sheathings 



RIGID 
INSU- 
LATING 
Felts BOARD 



Thousand squares 



Thousand 
tons 



Million 
sq. ft. 



1939 
1951 


3,466 


5,513 


19.35 


13.75 
31.21 


40.81 


329 


43 
182 


82 
101 


30 
104 


2.61 
5.39 


8.17 
24.37 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3,706 
3,320 
3,423 


4,803 
4,149 
5,166 


10.94 

9.45 

16.47 


29.43 
23.42 
27.85 


23.58 
23.59 
23.49 


316 
434 
340 


141 
181 
188 


79 

82 

125 


66 
74 
86 


5.60 
5.54 
6.89 


23.79 
22.65 
26.03 


A 
M 
J 


4,506 
5,159 
5,243 


5,638 
6,625 
7,845 


20.63 
23.39 
25.34 


28.71 
35.91 
35.67 


25.06 
25.09 
25.37 


299 
304 
325 


197 
253 
231 


116 
92 
85 


99 
113 
123 


6.76 
6.36 
5.47 


24.53 
25.99 
22.87 


J 
A 

S 


3,546 
2,877 
3,265 


6,450 
6,466 
5,428 


20.79 
27.35 
22.85 


36.54 
34.30 
32.78 


27.00 
26.92 
29.06 


366 
323 
316 


216 
237 
187 


118 
121 
126 


147 
149 
157 


4.70 
5.51 
4.72 


24.51 
27.03 
24.34 


o 

N 
D 


3,029 
2,166 
1,352 


5,719 
4,778 
3,091 


24.98 
19.11 
13.31 


35.03 
28.57 
26.26 r 


29.30 
30.99 
40.81 r 


324 
302 
294 


191 

106 

57 


129 

106 

33 


137 
65 
30 


4.97 
4.90 
3.29 


27.38 
24.72 
18.56 


1952 J 
F 


1,259 
2,188 


2,755 
3,349 


14.44 
16.21 


22.28 


42.88 


289 
376 


110 
109 


86 
101 


30 
83 


3.08 
3.97 


21.30 
21.08 



PRODUCERS' SALES 



PRODUC- 
TION EXPORTS 6 



IMPORTS 



PRODUCTION 



FACTORY 
SALES 



Cement Building Structural Drain 
Brick' 4 ' Tile' 4 " 5 ' Tile< 4 ' 



Sawn Lumber 



Window Cast Iron Steel 
Glass Soil Pipe Pipes 
and Tubes and 
Fittings Fittings 



Wire Paints, 
Nails Varnishes, 
Lacquers 

(7) 



Thousand 
barrels 



Millions 



Thousand 

tons Thousands 



Million board feet 



Thousand 
square feet 



Thousand tons 



Thousand 
dollars 



1939 
1951 


478 
1,405 


13.8 
29.7 


7.2 
16.0 


1,197 
1,599 


331.4 
544. 6 r 


176.1 
286.3 


4,067 
5,788 


1.4 

4.4 


8.4 
20.6 


5.5 
7.5 


2,155 
8,083 


1951 J 
F 
M 


887 

908 

1,380 


28.3 
23.4 
27.9 


13.8 
11.4 
16.1 


856 
836 
868 


461. 3 r 
509. 8 r 
538. 9 r 


264.1 
241.2 
296.9 


3,524 
3,790 
3,886 


5.1 

4.7 
5.5 


21.6 
22.0 
20.1 


7.8 
6.6 
7.6 


8,345 
7,618 
8,172 


A 
M 
J 


1,533 
1,880 
1,681 


27.2 
35.9 
35.4 


13.7 
17.3 
19.9 


1,371 
1,796 
2,168 


419. 8 r 
636.9' 
813.3 


303.7 
286.1 
265.7 


7,922 
6,355 
6,814 


5.5 
5.8 
5.6 


22.9 
22.9 
19.2 


7.1 
8.2 
7.9 


9,749 
10,515 
10,101 


J 
A 

S 


1,589 
1,754 
1,542 


34.9 
34.4 
30.6 


19.1 
17.9 
16.0 


1,996 
2,051 
2,172 


747.3 
696.3 
554.3 


318.6 
315.2 
281.8 


7,465 
7,501 
6,778 


3.1 
4.6 
4.1 


15.2 
23.4 
19.7 


6.5 
6.9 

7.1 


8,696 
8,031 
6,874 


o 

N 
D 


1,649 
1,277 
783 r 


34 8 
26.9 
16.4 


18.8 
15.2 
13.0 


2,439 

1,730 

901 


479.3 
360.4 
317.7 


318.1 
285.3 
258.8 


5,787 
5,948 
3,685 


3.8 
3.5 
2.2 


22.1 
22.3 
15.3 


8.6 
8.5 
7.4 


7,213 
6,426 
5,258 


1952 J 
F 


851 
1,175 


20.2 


13.9 


2,032 


418.8 


223.9 
250.6 


3,563 
3,088 


2.2 

2.4 


15.4 
23.6 


8.0 
8.1 


6,743 
7,483 



("Figures cover the production of firms which normally account for 85 per cent of the total for Canada. 

<2, Since January, 1949, includes concrete chimney blocks. (3) Prior to 1947 data on producers' sales were used 
to indicate production. Data for 1951 and 1952 are obtained by adjusting producers' sales for changes in inventories. 
(4) Includes Newfoundland as of May, 1949. (5) Hollow blocks including fireproofing and load-bearing tile. (6, Planks and 
boards and flooring. (7) Prior to 1946 figures represent gross value of production. Figures from 1946 to the present 
are factory sales of firms which normally account for 96% of total Canadian production. 

Source: Monthly Reports; Concrete Building Blocks' and Cement Pipe; Products made from Canadian clays; 
Asphalt Roofing; Rigid Insulating Board; Iron Castings and Cast Iron Pipes and Fittings; Steel Wire and Specified Wire 
Products; Sales of Paints, Varnishes and Lacquers and Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



43 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 



TABLE 39 



APRIL 1952 



Farm Cash Income ' 

Quarterly averages or quarters 



GRAINS, SEEDS AND HAY 



VEGETABLES AND OTHER FIELD CROPS"' 



LIVE 
STOCK 



Total 

Cash 

Income 



Total 



Wheat 


Oats 


Other 


Including 


Including 


Grains, 


Participa- 


Participa- 


Seeds 


tion 


tion 


and 


Payments 


Payments 


Hay - 



Total 



Potatoes 



Vege- 
tables 



Tobacco Total 



Million dollars 



1939 


17<>.25 


62.90 


54.48 


2 98 


5.44 


15.98 


4 95 


4 75 


4.86 


50.57 


1951 


706.38 


229.06 


173.86 


17.98 


37.22 


40.80 


9.60 


12.84 


14.30 


257 34 


1950 






















3rd qtr. 


603.31 


181.42 


141.69 


10 71 


29.02 


38.01 


12.60 


24 67 


— 


223 34 


4th qtr. 


729.75 


254.18 


143.95 


37.28 


72.95 


44.59 


11.59 


10.45 


12 70 


269 37 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


494.38 


72.94 


35.45 


13.99 


23.50 


56.69 


8 33 


3 87 


40.81 


240.64 


2nd qtr. 


757.53 


288.11 


251.68 


16.87 


19.55 


11.11 


4.58 


4 62 


— 


260.60 


3rd qtr. 


624.71 


148.65 


105.34 


13.20 


30.10 


41.24 


9 00 


31.02 


— 


238 98 


4th qtr. 


948.90 


406 53 


302.96 


27.84 


75.73 


54.17 


16.49 


11.84 


16.40 


289.15 



LIVE STOCK 



OTHER FARM PRODUCTS 



Cattle 

and 
Calves 



Hogs 



Sheep 
and 

Lambs 



Poultry 



Dairy 
Products 



Fruits 



Eggs 



Other 
Products ' 



Forest 
Products 



Fur 
Farming 













Million dollars 










1939 


23.60 


19.09 


1.68 


6.20 


28 45 


4.32 


6.86 


4 94 


3 78 


1.45 


1951 


124.40 


97.70 


4.43 


30.82 


93.40 


10.67 


34.26 


17.33 


21.34 


2.18 


1950 






















3rd qtr. 


130.02 


69.99 


5.22 


18.10 


102.18 


18.60 


21.08 


14.12 


4 01 


57 


4th qtr. 


138.17 


92.06 


8.36 


30.79 


71.94 


12.94 


25.70 


15.38 


33.11 


2.54 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


120.08 


92.64 


1.95 


25.98 


62.83 


2 90 


26.39 


10.04 


17.54 


4.40 


2nd qtr. 


141.04 


98.99 


1 04 


19.53 


107.72 


5.40 


33.33 


23.44 


26.46 


1 36 


3rd qtr. 


111.31 


88.92 


5.49 


33.26 


120.32 


20.46 


34.02 


15 97 


4.48 


0.59 


4th qtr. 


125.17 


110.24 


9.23 


44.51 


82.74 


13.93 


43.28 


19.86 


36.86 


2 38 



Prince 
Edward 
Island 



Nova 
Scotia 



New 
Bruns- 
wick 



Quebec 



Ontario Manitoba 



Saskat- 
chewan 



Alberta 



British 
Columbia 











Million 


dollars 










1939 


1.75 


3.57 


3 40 


24.90 


52.34 


16.20 


39.57 


30 01 


7.51 


1951 


6.71 


11.31 


12.35 


108.34 


198.43 


65.16 


156 66 


117.59 


29.83 


1950 




















3rd qtr. 


4 19 


8.82 


9.74 


93.85 


175.14 


50.51 


132.17 


101 30 


27.60 


4th qtr. 


5.81 


12.47 


15.93 


102.92 


171.14 


92.08 


163.19 


130.54 


35.68 


1951 




















1st qtr. 


5 67 


10.27 


10 11 


81.88 


198.92 


39.28 


53 26 


72.78 


22.22 


2nd qtr. 


6 58 


10.62 


11 .61 


115.36 


194.31 


68 66 


196.64 


132.53 


21.23 


3rd qtr. 


5 54 


9 37 


9 97 


110.08 


202 47 


51.08 


114.27 


87.49 


34.44 


4th qtr. 


9 04 


15 00 


17.72 


126.04 


198.03 


101.64 


262.46 


177.57 


41 41 



44 Note: Revised figures. 

1 Does not include Supplementary Government Payments made under Prairie Farm Assistance Act, Prairie Farm 
Income Act and Wheat Acreage Reduction Act. Includes barley and barley participation payments, rye, flax, 

flax adjustment payments, corn, clover and grass seed, hay and clover. Includes in addition sugar beets and 

fibre flax. includes wool, honey, maple products and miscellaneous farm products. 

Source: Farm Cash Income, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Inspected Slaughterings of Live Stock and Cold Storage Holdings of Meat 

and Poultry 

TABLE 41 Monthly averages or calendar months 



INSPECTED SLAUGHTERINGS 



Sheep and 
Cattle Calves Lambs Hogs 



COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS AS OF END 


OF PERIOD 




Veal 


Mutton 
and Lamb 




Pork 






Beef 


Total 


Cured or 
in cure 


Poultry 







Thousands 








Million pounds 






1939 

1951 


73 
96 


57 
49 


65 
36 


302 
374 


29.6 
19.4 


4.2 
4.1 


6.3 

4.1 


44.0 
38.9 


23.3 
13.1 


15.4 
34.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


104 
78 
78 


29 
26 
45 


27 
16 
17 


402 
340 
364 


22.4 
20. 8 r 
17. 9 r 


2.3 

1.8 r 

1.8 r 


3.0 r 
2.1 r 
2.1 


34. 8 r 
41. r 
44. l r 


13.2 
16. 5 r 
14. r 


18. 2 r 
14. 7 r 
11.8 


A 
M 
J 


94 
109 
109 


82 
94 
67 


14 
8 
9 


362 
407 
323 


17. 8 r 
17. 7 r 
15. 4 r 


2.7 
4.0 

4.5 r 


1.4 
0.9 
0.9 


46. 8 r 
49. 2 r 

43. 5 r 


13. 8 r 
15. 6 r 
15. 3 r 


10.2 
8.2 
8.0 r 


J 
A 

S 


97 

100 

95 


53 
48 
40 


18 
46 
73 


285 
300 
281 


15. 8 r 
14. 2 r 
16. 4 r 


4.4 r 

4.3 

4.6 r 


0.7 r 

0.8 

1.1 


35. r 
25. 5 r 
19. 9 r 


14. 4 r 
12. 7 r 
11. -2' 


8.1 r 
11. 9 r 
16.1 


o 

N 
D 


116 

107 

63 


45 
35 
20 


102 
83 
25 


460 
529 
436 


19. r 

23.6 

19.4 


5.2 

5.2 
4.1 


2.1 

3.6 
4.1 


27. l r 
38. r 
38.9 


13. 8 r 
18. 3 r 
13.1 


22.2 
31.3 
34.6 


1952 J 
F 


92 
72 


23 
23 


25 
21 


506 
500 


22.5 
18.8 


3.2 
2.2 


3.9 
2.8 


48.8 
60.9 


14.0 
15.2 


34.1 
31.6 



Prices and Price Ratios: Live Stock and Live-Stock Feeds 



Price index 
numbers of 

commo- 
dities and 
services 
used by 
farmers 



PRICES 



Index of 

live-stock 

feed 

prices 



Index of 
animal 

product 
prices 



193539 = 100 







Ratio of 


Hog- 
barley 
ratio 


Ratio of 

price of 

beef cattle 


price of 

beef 
cattle to 


Winnipeg 


to price 
of hogs (2) 


price of 
lambs 



Cattle, 






steers Hogs 






good up Bl 


Barley 


Oats 


to 1050 lbs dressed 


No. 1 


No. 2 


Toronto Toronto (3) 


feed' 4 ' 


C.W. 



Dollars per hundred 
pounds 



Dollars per bushel 



1939 
1951 


99 
217 


4 

4 r 


85.4 
240.0 


101.5 
336.9 


27.0 
19.4 


73.4 
131.1 


71.4 
91.5 


6.91 

32.86 


8.83 
33.08 


0.384 
1.340 


0.308 
0.965 


1951 J 
F 
M 


204 


6 r 


250.0 
258.9 
260.4 


310.9 
329.6 
347.2 


17.0 
17.2 
17.4 


122.0 
118.7 
122.1 


85.7 
84.6 
79.4 


29.25 
31.09 
32.06 


31.32 
34.26 
34.33 


1.439 
1.531 
1.518 


1.051 
1.101 
1.063 


A 

M 
J 


219 


l r 


256.4 
242.6 
228.1 


331.6 
336.1 
353.1 


16.4 
20.2 
24.3 


136.9 
125.0 
118.2 


80.9 
82.4 
82.6 


32.94 
32.73 
33.69 


31.42 
34.24 
37.35 


1.454 
1.244 
1.171 


1.048 
0.939 
0.839 


J 
A 

S 


228 


5 r 


216.7 
219.1 
224.9 


358.9 
348.3 
339.2 


26.1 
25.1 
21.2 


114.4 
123.5 
136.1 


91.9 

95.7 

102.2 


33.91 
33.48 
33.61 


38.86 
35.48 
32.25 


1.159 
1.170 
1.236 


0.805 
0.831 
0.869 


o 

N 
D 






235.6 
246.7 
240.8 


330.3 
328.5 
329.1 


17.0 
15.2 
15.8 


149.4 
152.5 
154.0 


102.6 
103.8 
105.7 


33.77 
33.62 
34.12 


29.48 
29.14 
28.88 


1.358 
1.432 
1.364 


0.951 
1.085 
0.999 


1952 J 
F 


228 


3 


234.5 
232.3 


318.2 
297.3 


14.6 

14.7 


154.1 
143.8 


98.3 
91.4 


32.86 
28.56 


27.79 
25.83 


1.410 
1.341 


0.960 
0.932 



'"Includes advance equalization payment on barley until March, 1947, and subsidy on hogs from 1944 to date. 
(2) Based on price for hogs including Dominion premium. A rise in ratio favours production of beef. ^'Prior to 1941, 
prices were quoted on a live weight basis. l4, Prior to August, 1939, Barley No. 1 feed was designated as Barley No. 3 
C.W. 

Source: Live-Stock Market Review, Dept. of Agriculture, Canadian Coarse Grains, Quarterly Review, and Cold 
Storage Holdings, D.B.S. 



45 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Exports of Grains and Live-Stock Products 

TABLE 41 - concluded Monthly averages or calendar months 



APRIL, 1952 







EXPORTS OF GRAINS 






EXPORTS OF LIVE STOCK PRODU 


3TS 






Wheat"' 


Flour 

in Terms 

of 

Wheat'" 


Oats" 


Barley*" Rye 1 " 


Beef and 

Veal, Fresh 

Chilled and 

Froxen 


Bacon, 
Hams and 
Shoulders 


Concentrated 
Canned Milk 
Meats Cheese Products Poultry 


Eggs 

in the 
Shell 






Million bushels 








Million 


pounds 






Million doxan 


1939 
1951 


10 76 
19.57 


2 00 
4 50 


0.59 (3) 1.19' : 
4.41 3.79 


07 (3) 
0.73 


0.32 

7.79 


15.65 
0.51 


39 
0.81 


7.58 
2.55 


2.87 
3.66 


0.23 
08 


0.11 

55 


1951 J 
F 
M 


11 83 
10.19 
11.07 


5 70 
4.73 
5 22 


2.29 
111 
1.81 


2.05 

0.66 
0.69 


0.42 
0.64 
0.31 


4.33 

2 65 
2 65 


2 37 
48 
0.38 


1 24 
0.84 

0.59 


0.45 
0.69 
0.29 


1.04 

1.25 
1 42 


0.01 
0.01 
0.02 


2 50 
80 
0.30 


A 
M 
J 


12 71 
17.70 
25.50 


5 81 

6 68 
4.81 


2.03 

7.82 
4.71 


1.25 
3.86 
4.08 


0.25 
1.03 
2 07 


6.08 
15.12 
17.73 


0.60 

45 
30 


0.36 
0.82 

0.79 


0.18 
0.11 
1.33 


1 92 
3.91 
3.93 


0.01 
0.09 


0.13 

0.10 
0.10 


J 

A 

S 


27.72 
19.16 
19.10 


4.16 

2 58 
3.15 


7 94 
9 10 
4.31 


2.05 
3.29 
3.80 


1.98 
0.46 
0.45 


15.43 
7.78 
7.13 


24 
0.16 
0.11 


0.63 

0.70 
0.92 


2.64 
4.63 
6.21 


4.96 
6.54 
4.00 


0.06 
0.06 
0.23 


0.12 
0.08 
0.14 


O 
N 
D 


27.59 
35.52 
16.78 


3 85 
4.03 

3.25 


5 26 
3.75 
2 85 


12.77 
7.66 
3.32 


0.24 
0.87 


8 95 
4.43 

1.15 


20 
34 
0.51 


78 
1.06 
1.01 


8.10 
5.09 
0.94 


3.38 
5.40 
6.22 


0.21 
0.16 
0.10 


19 
0.48 

1.63 


1952 J 
F 


16.00 
18.58 


4.04 
3 10 


2 67 
2.36 


2.55 
2.39 


0.08 
0.23 


0.67 
1.33 


0.50 
0.36 


1.48 
1.20 


.17 
0.10 


1 43 
3.24 


0.32 
0.34 


1.01 
0.22 



'"Overseas clearances plus U.S. imports for domestic use compiled from returns of Canadian elevator licensees and advice 
from American grain correspondents. '''Customs exports are adjusted to reflect actual physical movement of wheat flour 
from Canada. Data shown for the last three months are not so adjusted. '"Monthly averages of crop year. 

Source: Coarse Grains Quarterly, Wheat Review and Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



TABLE 42 



Milk and Milk Products: Production, Stocks and Sales 
Monthly averages or calendar months 





PRODUCTION 


FLUID 
SALES 


PRODUCTION OF DAIRY FACTORIES 


COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS'" 




Total 
Milk<» 


Milk and 
Cream 


Creamery 
Butter 


Cheddar 
Cheese 


Concentrated 

Milk 
Products 


Ice 
Cream 


Creamery 
Butter 13 ' 


Factory 
Cheese' 31 


Concentrated 

Milk 

Products 








Million pounds 






Thousand 
gals. 




Million pounds 




1939 
1951 


1,315 
1,366 


251 
352 


22.30 
21.47 


10.46 
7.11 


13.97 
36.21 


754 
2.122 


41.00 
44.82 


25 73 
31.88 


18.08 
64.02 


1951 F 
M 


815 
1,038 


329 
372 


7.07 
10.14 


1.25 
1.75 


15.31 

22.96 


1,115 
1,496 


17.34* 
9.82' 


24.38' 
20.03' 


16.67' 
12.65' 


A 
M 

J 


1.292 
1,706 
1.975 


347 
362 
356 


16.86 

28.77 
39.18 


3.92 

9.00 

14.29 


34.96 
53.96 

66.25 


1,866 
2,957 
3.279 


10.15* 
16.36* 

32 . 56' 


18.11' 
21.24* 

27.44' 


17.94' 
31 46' 
62.61' 


J 
A 

S 


1.862 
1,768 
1,552 


347 
347 
343 


36 34 
34.53 

29 01 


13.55 
13.38 
11.50 


56 97 
50.11 

41.54 


3,939 
3.456 
2,170 


45.94' 
55 70' 
62.61 


37.33' 
41.29' 
45.01* 


84.11' 
92 58' 
95 08' 


O 
N 
D 


1,398 

1,066 

958 


361 
353 
356 


23 58 
13 80 
10.18 


8.93 
3 74 
1 96 


34 .91 
22 04 
18.39 


1,628 
1.225 
1.201 


66.11* 

56 58' 
44.82 


42.03* 

36.96' 
31.88 


88 57' 
75.17' 
64.02 


1952 J 
F 
M 


903 


358 


8 83 
7 57' 
10 74 


1 13 
1 04 
1 71 


17 71 
16 92 
26.34 


1,129 
1,330 
1.511 


36.05 

25 58' 
17.40 


31 25 

27.03' 

26.93 


50.47 
38.59 



46 : A3 at end of period. Last month is preliminary. ■ Milk equivalents of cottage cheese and factory cheese other than 

cheddar, though not included in the monthly figures, are included in the monthly averages. I3, Includes butter and cheese 

imported and "In Transit". 

Source: Monthly Reports, Dairy Production, Milk Production and Utilixation; Cold Storage Holdings of Dairy Products, D.B.S 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 43 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 
Fish: Landings, Exports and Stocks 
Monthly averages or calendar months 



LANDINGS 



EXPORTS OF FISH PRODUCTS 



SeaHsh 



By Countries (2> 



Total 
value (1) 



MaritLmes 
Total and British United 

quantity* 1 * Quebec' 1 ) Columbia' 1 ) Total States 



Other 



STOCKS 



Selected Types 

Storage 

Holdings 
End of 
Salmon Lobster Period (3) 





Thousand 
dollars 








Million pounds 










1939 
1951 


1,436 
6,055 


81.2 
107.6 


46.4 
58.0 


34.8 
49.6 


27.5 
45.0 


14.5 
27.6 


13.0 
17.3 


6.2 
5.2 


1.2 
2.1 


31.5 
44.5 


1951 J 
F 
M 


3,252 

l,602 r 

1,614 


129.3 
50. 7 r 
30.1 


19.7 
17.1 
20.9 


109.7 
33. 6 r 
9.2 


55.3 
38.7 
37.3 


30.1 
21.3 
18.6 


25.2 
17.4 
18.7 


5.3 
4.1 
3.8 


2.3 
1.6 
1.3 


39.1 
31. 6 r 
25.3 


A 

M 
J 


2,288 
8,526 
7,337 


62.4 
142.5 
116.5 


56.8 
121.5 
101.5 


5.5 
21.0 
15.0 


34.8 
33.5 
36.8 


18.4 
24.3 
24.0 


16.5 

9.2 

12.8 


2.2 
2.4 
2.3 


2.3 

4.6 
4.2 


25.2 
35.7 
38.0 


J 
A 

S 


10,978 

14,067 

8,629 


122.7 
170.4 
114.0 


83.7 
86.3 
67.7 


39.1 
84.1 
46.2 


41.2 
41.8 
43.9 


27.8 
32.2 
29.8 


13.4 

9.5 

14.1 


2.7 

3.4 
6.8 


3.4 
1.4 
1.3 


43.2 
49.3 
51.0 


o 

N 
D 


5,007 
3,730 
5,374 


80.0 
106.7 
170.5 


53.1 
38.6 
29.1 


26.9 

68.1 

141.4 


65.2 

55.5 
55.3 


44.1 
36.7 
24.0 


21.1 
18.9 
31.3 


12.5 

12.0 

4.8 


0.5 
0.4 
2.4 


57.8 
50.6 
44.5 


1952 J 
F 


3,176 
3,022 


116.8 
100.6 


23.5 
21.2 


93.4 
79.4 


39.3 
33.9 


23.6 
17.6 


15.8 
16.3 


3.0 
3.0 


3.0 
0.9 


35. 5 r 
33.1 



'"Monthly totals of 1950 are not equivalent to annual data due to receipt of additional statistics which cannot be 
allocated by months. ' 2) Does not include bait, offal, meal, livers, tongues or roe. (3) As of April, 1949, Newfound- 
land is included. 

Source: Monthly Review of Canadian Fishery Statistics, D.B.S. 



Manufactured Food 



TABLE 44 


Monthly averages or 


calendar months; 


quarterly averages or quarters 










Wheat Flour 




Margarine 


Oatmeal Cereals Yeast, 
and Rolled Ready to Macaroni, Baking Fresh an< 
Oats Serve etc. Dry Powder Dried 

Production 






Production 


Exports (1) 


Stocks 
End of 
Period 


i Dried 




P.C. of 

capacity 


Million 
barrels 


Million 
barrels 


Produc- 
tion* 


Eggs <3) 










Million pounds 








1939 
1951 


63.2 
77.2 


1.40 
1.92 


0.45 


8.76 


3.35 


14.82 
8.68 


17.14 
18.35 


12.19 

17.44 


2.64 
2.37 


3.69 
6.13 


0.05 
0.11 


1951 J 
F 
M 


78.6 
85.8 
87.1 


2.00 r 
2.00 r 
2.19 


1.27 
1.05 
1.16 


9.79 

9.60 

10.84 


2.01 

2.81 r 

3.00 


9.08] 

7.06 

6.52J 


16.60 


19.04 


2.02 


5.71 




A 
M 
J 


86.4 
83.7 
81.4 


2.10 
2.11 
2.10 


1.29 
1.48 
1.07 


9.54 
7.73 
7.38 


3.85 
3.85 
3.32 


3.551 

6.42 

7.25J 


21.96 


17.64 


2.26 


6.12 


0.25 


J 

A 

S 


57.4 
64.4 
76.1 


1.41 
1.70 
1.80 


0.93 
0.57 
0.70 


6.27 
7.80 
8.33 


2.45 
1.88 
2.37 


6.17) 
11.54 
13.12J 


19.97 


15.38 


2.49 r 


6.26 


0.17 


O 

N 
D 


75.9 
77.1 
72.0 


1.93 
1.94 
1.76 


0.86 
0.90 
0.72 


10.15 
9.32 
8.41 


2.80 
2.58 
3.35 


12.89) 
11.23 
9.37J 


14.88 


17.68 


2.70 


6.42 




1952 J 
F 


73.5 
74.1 


1.84 
1.81 


0.90 
0.69 


9.40 
9.39 


2.95 r 
2.91 


8.31 
6.94 













'"Beginning August, 1945, customs exports are adjusted to reflect actual physical movement of wheat flour from 
Canada. Data shown for the last three months are not so adjusted. '"Includes Newfoundland. < 3 >Eggs, dried and 
powdered. 

Source: Canadian Milling Statistics, Margarine Report and Quarterly Report on Processed Foods, D.B.S. 



47 



FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 

Manufactured Food: Production 
TABLE 44 concluded Quarterly averages or quarters 



APRIL, 1952 



Biscuits 

Biscuits Plain Chewing 

Soda and Fancy Gum 



Million pounds 



Million 
boxes 



Cocoa 
Powder 
(for sale) 

Million 
pounds 



Chocolate 
Bars 

Million 
dozen 



Chocolate 
Confection- 
ery" 



Sugar 
Confection- 
ery 



lams 

and 

Jellies 



Marma- 
lades 



Soups 
Canned 



Million pounds 



1939 


7.03 


20.86 


1.71 


1 55 


5.06 


9.54 


11.61 


10.87 


2.98 


24.16 


1951 


10.97 


42.67 


3.02 


2.47 


9.68 


8 32 


17.44 


17.22 


4.52 


46.63 


1950 






















4th qtr. 


10.17 


37.37 


2 82 


2 84 


8.85 


13.27 


26.60 


17 31 


4.48 


45.84 


1951 






















1st qtr. 


13.16 


38.56 


3.11 


3.04 


9.58 


6.92 


14 15 


14.26 


5.60 


31.04 


2nd qtr. 


10.11 


43.95 


3.42 


2.51 


8 .12 


4.85 


14.32 


20.76 


4.42 


30.06 


3rd qtr. 


10.20 


47.58 


2.83 


1.98 


9.79 


6.47 


16.76 


19.56 


3.96 


70.55 


4th qtr. 


10.39 


40.58 


2.71 


2.35 


11.23 


15.03 


24.53 


14.30 


4.11 


54 86 



Infants' 

Foods Baked 
Prepared Beans 



Million pounds 



Pickles, 

Relishes 

and Sauces 

Thousand 
gallons 



Spiced Pork Beef Tea, 

Peanuts, and Spiced Stews and Blended, 

Process Peanut Salted and Ham, Boiled Packed, 

Cheese Butter Roasted Canned Dinners etc. 



Carbo- 
Coffee nated 
Roasted Beverages 



Million pounds 



Million 
gallons 



1939 


90 


19.63 


0.46 


4.58 


3.10 


1.97 






8.94 


9.58 


10.66 


1951 


8.97 


20.76 


1.17 


9.80 


5.91 


4.22 


4.25 


3.15 


10.72 


17.36 


22.92 


1950 
























4th qtr. 


11.10 


27.08 


1.58 


10.10 


5.82 


5.30 


5.64 


4.10 


10.06 


15.90 


20.05 


1951 
























1st qtr. 


7.06 


26.64 


1.14 


10.34 


6.21 


4.11 


4.74 


3.76 


11.78 


18.10 


17.40 


2nd qtr. 


6.52 


21.21 


1.05 


9.31 


5.88 


4.32 


4.70 


2.74 


11.10 


16.54 


25.89 


3rd qtr. 


9.42 


12.60 


1.14 


8.87 


5.69 


3.69 


2 92 


2.55 


9.19 


16.05 


28.48 


4th qtr. 


12.89 


22.61 


1.35 


10.67 


5.84 


4.76 


4.62 


3.54 


10.81 


18.78 


19.92 



SUGAR: PRODUCTION, SALES AND STOCKS 

Monthly averages or calendar months 





RAW CANE SUGAR 






REFINED SUGAR 










Receipts 


Stocks end 
of period 




Production 




Domestic Sales 




Stocks 




Granulated 


Yellow and 
brown 


Total 


Beet 


Cane 


Total 


End of 
period 










Million pounds 










1939 
1951 


82.1 
89.0 


74.5 
140.7 


83.6 
98 3 


10.2 
10.5 


93.8 
108.8 


24.3 


86.9 


94.5 
111.2 


248.5 
316 


1951 J 
F 
M 


28.7 
35.6 
49.0 


131.8 
93.4 
68.5 


55 8 
60.0 

66.9 


6.8 

9.0 
12.1 


62.6 
69.0 
78.9 


27.4 
25.7 
23 8 


72.5 
65.6 
73.4 


100.0 
91.3 
97.2 


309.2 
286.2 
267.7 


A 
M 

J 


73.3 
162 4 
137 .3 


69 8 
114.2 
132 .9 


59 6 

99 8 

104 4 


7.4 
12.7 
11.9 


67.0 
112.4 
116.3 


22.8 
33.7 
31.6 


72.8 

94.4 

113.2 


95.6 
128.1 
144 8 


238 8 
222 3 
193.7 


J 

A 

S 


108 9 
145.2 
128 8 


138 3 
168.5 
198.8 


89.4 

104.5 

89.7 


9.1 

98 
8 6 


98.4 

114.3 

98.4 


23.7 
17.1 
16.0 


93.7 
102.0 
109.4 


117.5 
119.1 
125.4 


174.6 
169.0 
142.0 


O 
N 
D 


89 4 
55 
53.9 


180 .9 
139 8 
140.7 


173 4 
175.8 
100.5 


12.7 

16 5 

9.7 


186.1 
192.3 
110.1 


24.1 
27.3 
18.1 


96.4 
86 2 
62.7 


120.5 

113.5 

80.8 


208.2 
287 1 
316.0 


1952 J 
F 


25 9 
25.4 


103 4 

74 7 


55.6 
45 .1 


9.8 
7 2 


65.4 

52.3 


20.9 
21.9 


67.2 
67.6 


88.1 
89.5 


290.9 
250.3 



48 : Bulk and packages. 

Source: Quarterly Report on Processed Foods, and The Sugar Situation in Canada, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 45 



DOMESTIC TRADE 



Value of Retail Trade 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 



















Lumber 


















and 




Grocery 










Garages 




Building 


Total 


and Com- 




Country 


Depart- 


Motor 


and 




Materials 


All 


bination 


Meat 


General 


ment 


Variety Vehicle 


Filling Clothing 


Shoe 


and 


Stores"' 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores 


Stores Dealers 


Stations Stores 2 


Stores 


Hardware 













Million dollars 












1941 
1951 


286.4 
870.4 


47.3 
139.4 


6.7 
17.0 


17.8 
44.6 


31.5 
75. l r 


7.1 
15.8 


30.0 
151.0 


17.1 
45.6 


18.7 
44.3 


3.7 
8.3 


12.7 
47.2 


1951 J 
F 
M 


703.8 
694. 2 r 
851. 6 r 


119.1 
118.1 
141.1 


15.1 
14.5 
17.1 


32.2 
32. 4 r 
38.5 


58.3 
58. 3 r 
72.6 


9.6 

9.6 

14.4 


127.2 
145.2 
178.3 


37.3 
33.5 
39.0 


32.2 
27.7 
42.3 


5.5 
4.5 
7.3 


36.0 
31.8 
36.1 


A 
M 

J 


859.2 
931.1 
940.2 


128.0 
139.2 
151.2 


16.0 
17.2 
18.0 


39.5 
49. 2 r 
48.9 


75.2 
76.6 
69.5 


13.1 

15.7 
16.5 


186.9 
183.1 
172.9 


42.7 
49.7 
51.5 


43.0 
46.5 
48.3 


8.1 r 
9.2 
10.4 


45.8 
57.5 
58.0 


J 

A 

S 


865.8 
897.4 
891.2 


139.7 
144.4 
144.5 


15.4 
17.5 
17.6 


48.4 
49.3 
47.9 


54. 4 r 

61.5 

72.4 


14.9 
14.4 
15.1 


158.1 
148.5 
145.3 


53.8 
51.3 
49.0 


38.0 
36.9 
44.1 


7.7 

7.4 r 

9.1 


53.0 
54.5 
51.4 


O 

N 
D 


898. 6 r 
906.1 
1005.7 


140.8 
145.9 
161. l r 


18.0 
17.3 
20.5 


49.3 
46.9 
52.6 


81. 2 r 
101.9 
119.8 


16.0 
17.4 
33.4 


139.9 

130.3 

96.2 


50.9 
44.3 
44. 5 r 


47.1 
51.0 
74.1 


8.1 

9.9 
12.6 


53.5 
46.6 
42.3 


1952 J 
F 


722.6 
735.1 


139.4 
137.4 


16.0 
15.6 


36.0 
37.4 


55.2 
60.2 


10.1 
11.4 


110.7 
126.2 


40.0 
37.3 


35.5 
30,6 


5.8 
5.0 


33.9 
31.2 



BY KINDS OF BUSINESS 



BY ECONOMIC AREAS 



Furniture 
Stores 



Radio and 
Appliance Restau- 
Dealers rants 



Coal and 

Wood 

Dealers 



Drug 
Stores 



Jewellery 
Stores 



Mari- 
times 



British 
Quebec Ontario Prairies Columbia 













Million dollars 












1941 
1951 


5.3 
13.1 


3.8 
11.3 


10.6 
30.0 


8.2 
16.5 


8.4 
19.0 


3.2 

6.5 r 


23.6 
58.5 


68.2 
204.8 


117.3 
336.1 


51.7 
176.2 


25.8 
94.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


11.2 
11.2 
13.3 


12.6 

11.7 
12.6 


25.4 
22.5 
26.8 


21.1 
20.0 
16.6 


17.4 
18.2 
19.1 


4.5 
4.2 
5.3 


48.6 
45.6 
59.1 


158.5 
154.9 
204.8 


286.4 
282.2 
343.9 


130.5 
129.4 
146.8 


79.9 
82.2 
97.0 


A 
M 

J 


14.4 
13.3 
13.8 


15.3 
10.7 
10.3 


27. r 

30.9 

30.9 


10.7 
10.6 
11.9 


17.1 
18.2 
18.6 


5.2 
5.3 
6.1 


57.5 
60.9 
63.3 


210.9 
223.6 
222.5 


325.6 
353.5 
362.3 


170.9 
195.9 
192.3 


94.2 
97.2 
99.9 


J 

A 

S 


12.0 
12.5 
13.2 


9.6 
9.4 
9.6 


35.0 
35.9 
33.4 


11.8 
14.1 
16.7 


17. 3 r 

18.6 

18.7 


5.2 
6.1 
5.9 


58.2 
59.3 
57.9 


200.9 
209.1 
211.2 


329.2 
335.6 
337.8 


183.1 
196.1 
188.9 


94.5 
97.3 
95.6 


O 
N 
D 


12.5 
13.8 
15.9 


10.6 
10.7 
12.5 


33.3 
29.6 
29.0 


20.9 
22.0 
21.6 


19.6 
18.6 
26.0 


6.0 

6.7 

16.8 


58.4 
59.6 
73.8 


212.6 
220.8 
227.7 


341.7 
341.5 
393.6 


192.3 
188.1 
200.3 


93.7 

96.2 

110.4 


1952 J 
F 


10.7 
11.4 


10.8 
10.3 


26.5 
26.6 


24.3 
20.5 


19.0 
19.0 


4.4 
4.9 


50.3 
46.9 


167.0 
169.5 


285.9 
291.2 


141.9 
139.5 


77.7 
88.1 



(I) Tctal value of sales by retail outlets, including "Tobacco" and "All Other Trades". 
"Family Clothing" and "Women's Clothing". 
Source: Monthly Report on Retail Trade. 



'Includes "Men's Clothing", 49 



DOMESTIC 


TRADE 
















APRIL, 


1952 










Retail Sales and Stocks 










TABLE 46 






Monthly averages or calendar months '' 






















DEPARTMENT STORES 












Tot;»l 

Ml 

Departments 

Sales Stocks 


Ladies' Apparel 

and 

Accessories 


Men's and Boys' 

Clothing, 

Furnishings 

and Shoes 


Food and 
Kindred 
Products 


Piece Goods, 

Linens 

and 

Domestics 


Home Furnishings, 
Furniture, Radio 
and Appliances 




Sales 


Stocks 


Sales 


Stocks 


Sales 


Stocks 


Sales 


Stocks 


Sales 


Stocks 














Million dollars 












1950 


72.7 


177.4 


20 9 




9 3 




5 




4 7 




13.0 




1951 


75.2 


182.6 


21 8 


42.3 


9.7 


24.8 


5.3 


4.2 


4.7 


15 4 


12 5 


43.2 


1950 D 


118.9 


177.4 


32 1 




18.2 




7.4 




5.4 




14.9 




1951 J 


58.3 


187.1 


14.0 


47.7 


6.0 


24.2 


4.7 


5.1 


5.9 


15.5 


12.5 


42.9 


F 


58.3' 


213.7 


14.3 


57.9 


6.0 


29.2 


5.1 


5.8 


4.9 


18.2 


12.7 


45.5 


M 


72.6 


240.4 


22.5 


64.7 


8.7 


32.3 


6.0 


5.4 


4.5 


19.4 


13.2 


55.4 


A 


75.2 


239.0 


22.9 


63 9 


9.0 


32.3 


4.7 


5.1 


4.3 


19.6 


14 8 


53.4 


M 


76.6 


235.2 


23.7 


58.6 


9.2 


33.1 


4.9 


5.0 


4.3 


19.5 


13.7 


54.4 


J 


69.5 


221.5 


19.8 


52.4 


8.9 


30.7 


4.7 


4.5 


4.2 


18.2 


11.8 


52.9 


J 


54. 4 r 


221.6 


13.6 


54.7 


6.0 


30.7 


4.5 


4.5 


3.7 


17.7 


10.2 


51.6 


A 


61.5 


232.9 


17.0 


62.5 


6.6 


34.5 


4.8 


4.7 


4.3 


18.4 


11.4 


49.9 


S 


72.4 


234.9 


23.4 


62.6 


9.2 


36.9 


4.7 


4.4 


4.7 


17.7 


11 8 


48.2 


o 


81. 2 r 


241.5 


27.0 


62.4 


12.1 


37.6 


5.3 


4.9 


5.1 


17.6 


11.9 


48.2 


N 


101.9 


225.6 


30.6 


56.4 


15.8 


34.0 


6.6 


5.0 


5.5 


16.5 


13.5 


44.6 


D 


119.8 


182.6 


33.0 


42.3 


18.7 


24.8 


7.9 


4.2 


5.2 


15.4 


12 6 


43.2 


1952 J 


55.2 


173.0 


14.0 


41.5 


6.2 


22.8 


4.9 


4.5 


6.2 


13.5 


9.7 


39.8 


F 


60.2 




15.9 




6.0 




5.3 




5.0 




12.1 














CHAIN STORES— SIX TRADES 












Food 
Stores 


Women's 
Clothing 


Shoe 


Hardware 


Drug 


Variety 




Sales 


Stocks 


Sales 


Stocks 


Sales 


Stocks 


Sales 


Stocks 


Sales 


Stocks 


Sales 


Stocks 














Million 


dollars 












1949 


37. 9 r 


32.4 


3.1' 


6.2 


2.7 


15.0 


0.7 r 


3.3 


2.3 


7.4 


11 8 


29.7 


1951 


52.4 


44.1 


3.4 


7.3 


3.1 


16 7 


1.1 


4.2 


2.5 


8.4 


13 7 


35.1 


1950 D 


52.3 


38.8 


5 7 


5.9 


4.8 


15.3 


1.4 


3.8 


3.5 


8.3 


27.5 


32.9 


1951 J 


44.0 


38. 8 r 


2.5 r 


6.8' 


18 


14. 6 r 


1.0 


3.7 r 


2.4 


8.4 r 


8.3 


33.4' 


F 


44 8 r 


39.7 


2.2 


8.0 


1.7' 


15.2 


0.8 r 


5.3 


2.4 


8.0 


8.3 r 


38.2 


M 


55.7 


41.0 


3.0 


8.5 


2.7 


16.4 


0.8 


4.9 


2.5 


8.0 


12.6 


42.5 


A 


48.7 


40.5 


3.0 


8.9 


2.6 


17.0 


1.0 


4 8 


2.2 


8.2 


11.4 


46.6 


M 


53 5 


41.0 


3.6 


8.9 


3.4 


18.5 


1.2 


5.1 


2.3 


8.1 


13.7 


47.5 


J 


55.8 


40 7 


3 8 


8.3 


3.7 


17 9 


1.2 


4.1 


2 4 


8.3 


14.3 


46.3 


J 


49.1 


42.9 


3.4 


6.9 


2 9 


16.7 


11 


4.4 


2.3 


8.2 


12 8 


45.0 


A 


52.7 


42.1 


3.0 


8.6 


2 8 


18.2 


1.0 


4.1 


2.3 


8.2 


12 5 


46.3 


S 


53 3 


43.0 


3.1 


8.4 


3.3 


18 3 


1.2 


4.2 


2.4 


8.5 


13 


47.9 


O 


53.4 


47 7 


3.3 


9 9 


2 9 


19.2 


14 


4.2 


2.6 


8.9 


13.9 


51.3 


N 


57.2 


47.0 


3.6 


10 2 


4.0 


19 4 


1.2 


4.6 


2.4 


9 5 


14 9 


53.9 


D 


60 8 


44.1 


6.5 


7 3 


5 4 


16 7 


1.4 


4.2 


3.6 


8 4 


28 9 


35.1 


1952 J 


55 


42.7 


2 7 


7 


19 


16 


0.9 


4.5 


2.4 


8.5 


8 8 


33.9 


F 


54 2 




2 6 




1.8 




8 




2 5 




9 8 





50 ' Stocks at end of period at selling value. 

Source: Department Store Sales and Stocks, and Chain Store Sales and Stocks, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 

TABLE 47 



DOMESTIC TRADE 



Retail Consumer Credit 

Quarterly averages or quarters (1) 



COMBINED TRADES 



Sales and Percentage Composition 



Accounts Receivable' 1 ) 



Cash 



Credit 



Total 



Instalment 



Total 
Sales 



Charge 



Sales Percent Sales Percent Sales Percent Sales Percent Total 



Instal- 
ment 



Charge 



Million dollars or percentages 



1949 
1951 

1950 4th qtr. 

1951 1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 



2,107.0 1, 

2.611.3 1, 

2,638.6 1, 

2,249.6 1, 
2,730.6 1, 

2.654.4 1, 
2,810.4 2, 



548. 
883 



927.4 

589.0 
989.8 
920.5 
033.1 



73.5 
72.4 

73.1 

70.6 
72.9 
72.4 
72.3 



558.9 
728.2 

711.2 

660.6 

740.8 
733.9 

777.3 



26.5 
28.0 

26.9 

29.4 
27.1 
27.6 

27.7 



128.7 
194.4 

203.4 

183.8 
200.8 
197.4 
195.4 



6.1 
7.5 



430.2 
533.8 

507.8 

476.8 
540.0 
536.5 
581.9 



20.4 
20.5 



467.5 
507.4 



19.2 546.6 



21.2 
19.8 
20.2 
20.7 



491.9 

478.3 
456.7 
507.4 



139.8 
105.7 

169.5 

143.2 

121.8 

99.8 

105.7 



327 
401 



377.1 

348.7 
356.5 
356.9 
401.7 



SELECTED TRADES 



Department Stores 



Clothing Stores 



Furniture, Radio and Appli- 
ance Stores 



Motor Vehicle Dealers 



Total 
Sales 



Credit Accounts Total 
Sales receivable' 11 Sales 



Credit Accounts 
Sales receivable' 1 



Total Credit Accounts Total Credit Accounts 
Sales Sales receivable' Sales Sales receivable' 













Million dollars 












1949 
1951 


213.9 
225.4 


63.3 
65.7 


83.7 
75.7 


127.5 
132. 8 r 


22.6 
25. 2 r 


27.3 
31.0 


69.9 
73. 2 r 


40.3 
40.8 


56.3 
52.4 


257.6 117.0 
453.0 215. r 


55.8 
70.3 


1950 4th qtr. 


300.8 


91.8 


93.6 


160.1 


31.4 


30.1 


85.9 


49.6 


76.4 


380.5 167.0 


72.4 


1951 1st qtr. 
2nd qtr. 
3rd qtr. 
4th qtr. 


189.1 
221.3 
188.4 
302.9 


57.2 
62.6 
53.5 
89.4 


74.7 
66.3 
58.7 
75.7 


102. 3 r 
137.8' 
118. 9 r 
172. 2 r 


22.1 
25. 9 r 
21.2 
31.6 


26.4 
25.9 
24.9 
31.0 


72.5 
77.9 
66. 3 r 
76.0 


42.6 
43.6 
37.1 
39.9 


65.3 
60.2 
51.9 
52.4 


450.8 207.9 
543.0 232. 6 r 
451.8 223.6 
366.3 195.7 


76.5 
79.7 
71.1 
70.3 



Note: Series adjusted to agree with revisions in the value of retail trade in 1950 and 1951. 
'"Accounts receivable as at end of period. 
Source: Retail Consumer Credit, D.B.S. 



TABLE 48 



Indexes of Wholesale Sales 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



General 
Index 



Auto Parts 

and 
Equipment 



Drugs Clothing Footwear 



Dry 
Goods 



Groceries 



Fruits and 
Vegetables 



Hardware 



Tobacco 
and Con- 
fectionery 











1935-39 = 


LOO 










1939 
1951 


109.1 
347.1 


112.8 
510.3 


111.0 
347.3 


106.1 

252.6 


111.5 
328.5 


105.8 
249.4 


108.6 
304.1 


107.7 
288.0 


110.6 

455.7 


113.4 
409.4 


1951 J 
F 
M 


317.6 
307.9 
338.9 


506.7 
465.2 
441.9 


342.9 
337.3 
334.3 


238.3 
258.5 
321.8 


235.0 
312.0 
416.6 


238.4 
285.1 
316.0 


280.6 
269.6 
281.2 


209.3 
237.3 
271.2 


429.9 
398.7 
473.2 


373.9 
316.2 
381.6 


A 
M 

J 


352.4 
372.6 
357.3 


559.1 
520.0 
504.2 


334.9 
362.6 
312.8 


249.7 
229.4 
203.3 


324.8 
317.4 
236.5 


272.5 
250.6 
195.8 


278.5 
319.5 
321.2 


296.7 
354.5 
339.9 


504.7 
525.2 
481.7 


435.8 
416.0 
432.6 


J 

A 

S 


338.7 
367.7 
357.0 


482.1 
526.7 
574.0 


328.1 
364.4 
338.1 


159.3 
262.9 
296.7 


203.9 

434.9 
432.1 


157.7 
263.0 
299.2 


321.5 
332.6 
317.4 


308.3 
303.3 
269.4 


418.3 
439.1 
458.1 


428.7 
453.8 
374.0 


O 
N 
D 


383.7 
364.4 
307.2 


580.1 
523.4 
440.2 


404.5 
387.9 
320.2 


300.6 
309.8 
200.9 


414.9 
382.6 
231.1 


289.0 
280.8 
145.1 


346.0 
321.6 
259.1 


262.3 
288.6 
315.0 


489.3 
470.6 
379.4 


454.7 
413.5 
431.5 


1952 J 
F 


308. 7 r 
313.2 


450. 2 r 
502.6 


372 . 5 r 
347.1 


210. 7 r 
228.5 


166. 9 r 
296.7 


166. l r 
225.6 


289. 7 r 
281.6 


249 . 5 r 
272.7 


365. 9 r 
354.9 


389. 7 r 
365.0 



Note: Series revised to reflect adjustment in weights. 
Source: Monthly Report on Wholesale Sales, D.B.S. 



51 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



TABLE 49 



APRIL, 1952 



Merchandise Exports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 





Index 

of 
Declared 

\ alius 


Index 

of 

Prices 


Index 

of 

Physical 

\ illume 


Total 
Domestic 

Kxports 


Fruits 

and 

Vegetables 


Wheat 


Wheat 
Flour 


Other 

Grain 

Products 


Cattle 


Beei and 
Veal, Fresh 


Other 
Meats 






1948=100 








Million dollars 








1939 
1951 


30.1 
127.3 


45.1 
122.5 


66.7 
103.9 


77.1 
326.2 


1.7 
2.0 


9.1 
36.8 


1.4 
9.5 


2.5 
12.9 


1.3 

5.3 


4.2 


2.9 

1.8 


1951 J 
F 
M 


111.3 

91.3 

113.2 


115.9 
117.8 
119.3 


96.0 

77.5 
94.9 


285.1 
233.9 
290.2 


2.2 
1.9 
1.6 


19.2 
18.1 
23.0 


11 8 

8 7 

10.6 


6.5 
5.0 
4.9 


5.5 
5.5 
7.6 


2.1 
1.3 
1.4 


2.4 
1.2 
1.0 


A 
M 
J 


115.2 
126.2 
121.9 


121.2 
121.9 
123.0 


95.0 

103.5 

99.1 


295.2 
323.4 
312.5 


1.3 
2.2 
1.6 


20.6 
27.1 
40.6 


12.1 

14.2 

9.4 


4.9 
14 2 
17.2 


6.9 
7.0 
4.9 


3.4 

8.4 
10.2 


12 
1.7 
18 


J 

A 

S 


146.1 
136.5 
124.9 


123.8 
125.5 
125.0 


118.0 

108.8 

99.9 


374.5 
349.8 
320.1 


14 
2.2 
2.3 


51.7 

44.4 
36.6 


11.7 
6.9 

4.8 


18.7 
12.8 
13.6 


3.0 
4.4 
5.7 


8.6 
4.1 

3.8 


13 
2 

2.0 


O 

N 
D 


144.8 
148.1 
148.0 


125.5 
126.0 
125.8 


115.4 
117.5 
117.6 


371.0 

379.5 
379.3 


2.5 

2.7 
2.0 


37.9 
58.8 
63.0 


8.3 
8.6 
6.9 


16.9 

20.2 
20.6 


5.5 
4.8 
2.2 


4.8 
2.3 

0.6 


2.7 
2.3 
2.0 


1952 J 
F 


126.3 
120.8 


125.0 r 

124.5" 


101. r 
97.0" 


323.7 
309.7 


2.1 

1.6 


28.1 
31.3 


8.2 
6.5 


8.8 

7.3 


1.3 
2.5 


0.4 
0.6 


2 3 
1 7 




Fish and 
Products 


Dairy 
Products 


Alcoholic 
Beverages 


Rubber 
Products 


Furs 

and 

Products 


Hides, 

Skins 

and 

Leather 


Other 

Animal 

and 

Vegetable 


Fibres 

and 
Textiles 


Planks 

and 
Boards 


Shingles 


Pulpwood 












Million dollars 










1939 
1951 


2.4 

9.8 


1.5 
1.8 


0.7 
4.7 


1.3 

2.4 


1.2 
2.5 


1.0 
1.9 


2.3 
-7.9 


1.2 
3.1 


4.0 
26.0 


0.7 
2.3 


10 
5.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


10.6 
8.8 

8.8 


0.5 
0.6 

0.6 


4.2 
3.4 

5.3 


1.6 
1.8 
2.1 


6.5 
4.4 
2.6 


2.9 
2.2 
1.8 


14.4 
9.4 
8.8 


2.7 
2.4 

2.7 


24.0 
21.3 
26.5 


2.4 
2.6 

3.2 


3 8 

3.9 

4 7 


A 
M 

J 


7 5 

8.6 
8.9 


0.6 
1.3 

1.7 


4.4 
4.3 

3.2 


2.1 
2.3 
2.1 


2.3 
1.9 
1.9 


1.7 
1.8 
2.0 


9 1 
4.8 
4.7 


2.7 

4.0 
3.1 


27.5 
26.6 
24.7 


3.5 
2.7 
1.6 


3.5 
2.7 
5.8 


J 

A 

S 


10.0 

9.1 
10.1 


2 1 
2.9 

2 8 


4.0 

4.7 

5.6 


3.0 
2.6 
3.1 


1.7 
1.1 
2.0 


2.4 
1.4 
1.8 


5 5 
5.7 

4.0 


3.4 
3.5 
2.3 


28.7 
28.9 
25 4 


1.8 
1.9 
2.2 


7 7 

8 
7.1 


O 
N 
D 


12.8 
10 9 
11.4 


3.7 
3.2 

1.6 


6.0 

5.8 
5.5 


2.6 
2.2 

3.5 


0.6 

0.6 
4.2 


2.2 
1.6 

1.1 


7.2 

8.7 

12.8 


3.4 
3.0 

3.7 


29 1 
25.9 
23.6 


2.4 
1.8 
1.2 


8.7 
6 6 
5 4 


1952 I 
F 


9 9 
8.3 


5 
1.0 


3.9 

4.0 


2.7 

2.6 


3.6 

2.0 


1.3 

9 


10 7 

9.5 


3.2 
2.7 


20.2 
22 2 


1.2 

1.6 


5 8 
5 8 



52 Note: Commencing with April, 1949, the Trade of Canada includes that of Newfoundland. 

Does not include re-exports. 
Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



APRIL 


, 1952 
















EXTERNAL 


TRADE 








Merchandise Exports by Commodities (1) 








TABLE 49 - concluded 




Monthly 


averages 


or calendar months 
















Other 












Auto- 










News- 


Wood 






Primary 






mobiles 


Other 


Aluminum 




Wood- 


print 


and 


Iron 


Ferro- 


Iron and 


Farm 


Other 


and 


Iron and 


and 




pulp 


Paper 


Paper 


Ore 


Alloys 


Steel"' 


Machinery Machinery 


Parts 


Steel 


Products 










Million dollars 










1939 


2.6 


9.6 


2.3 




0.2 


0.6 


0.6 


0.9 


2.1 


0.8 


2.2 


1951 


30.4 


44.7 


7.5 


1.5 


2.6 


2.7 


8.9 


3.4 


6.6 


2.8 


10.4 


1951 J 


24.0 


40.7 


6.4 





2.2 


2.6 


8.5 


2.7 


1.7 


2.0 


10.3 


F 


21.6 


35.8 


5.9 


— 


2.0 


1.0 


5.8 


2.8 


1.9 


1.9 


7.4 


M 


27.2 


43.3 


7.1 


— 


2.3 


1.4 


13.7 


2.8 


4.0 


2.3 


10.8 


A 


26.6 


42.3 


6.6 


0.6 


2.4 


3.1 


10.8 


3.4 


6.4 


2.6 


12.7 


M 


31.5 


47.2 


6.7 


1.0 


2.3 


1.8 


10.7 


3.8 


4.2 


2.6 


12.1 


J 


32.4 


39.2 


7.3 


2.4 


2.4 


2.3 


10.4 


2.7 


3.5 


2.5 


3.5 


J 


34.3 


51.3 


7.6 


2.2 


2.9 


2.6 


9.2 


2.5 


5.6 


2.5 


14.5 


A 


35.7 


51.5 


7.9 


3.2 


3.5 


2.7 


7.6 


2.3 


5.9 


2.4 


16.1 


S 


31.4 


44.0 


7.1 


2.4 


2.4 


2.9 


6.2 


3.5 


9.2 


2.3 


9.8 


O 


34.6 


50.1 


8.1 


3.5 


3.5 


4.0 


8.3 


4.3 


12.3 


4.2 


11.2 


N 


32.5 


49.6 


8.3 


1.9 


3.2 


3.8 


7.5 


4.0 


12.7 


4.3 


9.5 


D 


33.2 


41.4 


10.8 


1.3 


2.3 


4.4 


7.7 


5.5 


11.9 


4.3 


7.0 


1952 J 


33.5 


47.2 


7.1 


0.2 


3.2 


5.1 


13.1 


3.5 


18.2 


4.1 


7.1 


F 


27.4 


44.4 


8.0 


0.2 


2.4 


3.0 


10.7 


3.9 


18.3 


4.2 


8.9 










Precious 




Other 




Other 






Miscel- 




Copper 


Lead 




Metals 


Zinc 


Non- 


Asbestos 


Non- 




Other 


laneous 




and 


and 




(except 


and 


Ferrous 


and 


Metallic 




Chemical 


Commo- 




Products 


Products 


Nickel 


gold) 


Products 


Products 


Products 


Products 


Fertilizers 


Products 


dities 










Million dollars 










1939 


4.4 


0.8 


4.8 


1.4 


0.8 


0.8 


1.3 


1.1 


0.8 


1.3 


1.4 


1951 


7.3 


3 8 


11.4 


4.0 


7.0 


3.6 


6.8 


4.1 


3.0 


8.0 


5.1 


1951 J 


6.6 


3.9 


11.8 


4.9 


7.4 


2.7 


6.3 


3.5 


3.2 


6.2 


4.4 


F 


5.4 


2.4 


7.7 


5.4 


2.6 


2.2 


4.3 


2.9 


3.1 


6.0 


3.5 


M 


5.5 


3.9 


10.7 


3.3 


5.4 


4.3 


8.5 


3.5 


2.1 


6.5 


4.2 


A 


9.3 


3.2 


11.2 


2.8 


5.0 


3.3 


7.8 


3.8 


2.7 


7.8 


5.5 


M 


5.6 


5.2 


9.0 


4.1 


6.2 


2.7 


7.2 


4.2 


4.1 


7.7 


7.8 


J 


6.6 


2.2 


9.1 


4.2 


7.6 


3.1 


6.7 


3.7 


3.7 


7.3 


4.3 


J 


7.7 


3.4 


12.7 


5.6 


9.6 


4.5 


6.9 


4.6 


2.5 


9.1 


5.9 


A 


5.6 


3.1 


13.3 


4.2 


6.8 


2.6 


7.4 


4.1 


3.0 


9.7 


4.6 


S 


7.4 


3.9 


11.4 


3.1 


7.5 


3.2 


6.7 


4.8 


2.9 


8.3 


4.7 


O 


7.0 


3.4 


13.7 


3.0 


8.8 


4.5 


7.2 


5.0 


2.4 


8.9 


5.9 


N 


7.9 


5.1 


12.8 


2.8 


9.8 


4.6 


5.5 


5.2 


3.1 


10.3 


4.8 


D 


12.6 


5.8 


13.4 


5.0 


7.7 


5.2 


7.5 


4.5 


3.0 


8.1 


5.3 


1952 J 


8.7 


4.2 


10.8 


4.3 


7.6 


4.4 


5.8 


4.3 


3.2 


7.6 


6.3 


F 


5.2 


3.9 


13.6 


2.5 


10.3 


4.8 


5.7 


4.3 


3.5 


7.2 


5.4 


"'Does 

■ — 


not include 


re-exports. 


< 2 > Includes pigs, 


ingots, blooms and billets, castings and forgings and rolling mill products. 53 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



TABLE 50 



APRIL, 1952 



Merchandise Imports by Commodities 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Index 

of Index 

Declared of 

\ nines Prices 



Index 

of 
Physical 

Volume 



Fruits, Grains 

Total Nuts and and 

Imports Vegetables Products 



Tea, 

Sugar Coffee, Rubber Furs 

and Vegetable Cocoa and and and 

Products Oils Chocolate Products Products 







1948=100 










Million dollars 








1939 
1951 


28.4 
154.8 


47.2 
126.0 


60.2 
122.9 


62.59 
340.40 


2 89 
12.41 


0.74 
3.84 


1 95 
7.16 


78 
3 25 


1.42 
6.86 


1.34 
7.04 


0.59 
1.80 


1950 D 


121.3 


116.7 


103.9 


266.29 


10.66 


5.99 


6.55 


2 74 


5.76 


7.24 


1 36 


1951 J 
F 
M 


149.0 
124.9 
156.0 


119.9 
122.3 
124.6 


124.3 
102.1 
125.2 


327.19 
274.17 
342.50 


11.80 
10.09 
12.86 


2 31 
1.91 
2.86 


3 83 
1.86 
3 16 


4.15 
3.04 
4.47 


7 66 
6.90 
8.44 


11.85 
7.30 
9.92 


4 66 
3 07 
2 57 


A 
M 
J 


179.0 
184.2 
163.8 


128.1 
129.5 
129.9 


139.7 
142.2 
126.1 


393.04 
405.07 
360.42 


13.48 
14.90 
14.96 


5.28 
6.15 
3.47 


5 88 

10.40 

9.21 


7.43 
6.42 
3.85 


7 91 
6.80 
6.43 


7.65 
9 37 
7.95 


2 37 
1.61 
1.29 


J 

A 

S 


168.7 
162.1 
141.5 


129.6 
127.2 
126.2 


130.2 
127.4 
112.1 


370.64 
357.47 
311.50 


13.69 

11.90 

9.26 


2 31 
2.11 
2.10 


8.43 

14.16 

9.86 


2.67 
1.36 
1.32 


7.89 
5.25 
4.68 


6.60 
7.12 
3.98 


1.38 
71 
92 


O 
N 
D 


156.1 
147.9 
123.9 


124.2 
121.5 
121.6 


125.7 
121.7 
101.9 


344.15 
325.70 
273.01 


11.33 
12.64 
11.99 


4.01 
5.60 
7.98 


9.58 
5.77 
3.72 


1 58 
1 15 
1.53 


6.49 
8 00 
5.91 


4.71 
3.73 
4.34 


1.03 
0.76 
1 22 


1952 J 


139.6 


119.8 


116.5 


307.08 


11.37 


1.70 


2 90 


2.05 


8.84 


5.78 


2.58 



Other Cotton Wool 

Vegetable Flax, 

Hides and Raw and Hemp, Raw and 

and Animal unmanu- Manu- Jute and Unmanu 

Leather Products factured factured Products factured factured 



Synthetic 

Fibres 
Manu- and 

Products 



Books and Paper 
Other Printed and 

Textiles Matter Product! 















Million dollars 












1939 
1951 


1.01 
2 60 


2.65 
10.72 


1 40 
8 .01 


1.65 
7.25 


0.77 
2.59 


0.88 
7.90 


1.30 
5.64 


0.45 
2.95 


1.94 
5.94 


1.26 
4.24 


0.72 
2.90 


1950 D 


2.79 


10.11 


11.99 


5.51 


1.74 


6.04 


3.88 


2.04 


4.30 


3.36 


2.22 


1951 I 
F 
M 


3.68 

3.08 
3 50 


10.58 

9.17 

12 13 


10.69 

7.15 

12.42 


9.82 
8.58 
9.56 


2.46 
1.32 
2.24 


6.63 

7.41 
8.55 


6.22 
5.88 
5.77 


3.09 
2.54 
3.49 


6.43 
5.49 
7.24 


4 23 
3.36 

4 10 


2 84 
2.65 
3.08 


A 
M 
J 


3.62 
2 81 
3.07 


9 95 
9 92 
8.52 


11.41 

12.54 

7.07 


11.96 
8.18 

6 21 


2.80 
2.59 

4 04 


13.19 
9 71 
9.87 


8.95 

6 63 
5.50 


4.94 
4 02 
3.24 


7.31 
7.43 
5 41 


4.70 
4 21 
3.80 


3 02 
2 85 
2.61 


J 

A 

S 


2.61 
2 21 
1.93 


9.99 
10.47 
10.91 


3 23 
3 65 
4.33 


6.59 
6 27 
4 64 


4.84 
2 83 
2 16 


14.80 

11 60 

6 58 


6.56 
6.54 
4.98 


3 14 
2.78 
2.18 


5.50 
5.49 
5 62 


4.07 
4.44 
4.53 


2 71 
2.83 

2.64 


o 

N 

D 


1.97 
1 61 
1.16 


14 53 
12 42 

10 10 


5 31 
10 54 

7.79 


5 36 
5 42 
4 40 


1 68 
2.98 
1.15 


2 39 
2 03 
2.05 


4.39 
3.54 
2.76 


2.38 
2 01 
1.64 


5 13 
4.92 
5.33 


5.03 
4.48 
3.95 


3 54 
3.38 
2.70 


1952 J 


1.25 


10.22 


10.24 


5 82 


1.83 


2 08 


4.04 


2.27 


6 .10 


5.04 


2 72 


54 


Note: As of April, 1949, The Trade of Canada 
Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 


includes 


that of Newfoi. 


ndland. 











PRIL 


, 1952 
















EXTERNAL 


TRADE 








Merchandise Imports by Commodities 








ABLE 50 - concluded 




Monthly 


averages 


or calendar months 










Wood, 
























Unmanu- 
























factured 






Pipes, 














Pracious 




and 




Primary 


Tubes and 


Engines 






Automobiles 


Other 


Aluminum 


Metals 




Manu- 


Iron 


Iron and 


and 


and 


Farm 


Other 


and 


Iron and 


and 


(except 




factured 


Ore 


Steel<» 


Fittings 


Boilers 


Machinery Machinery Parts 


Steel 


Products 


gold) 










Million dollars 










939 


0.82 


0.35 


4.00 


0.20 


0.63 


1.74 


3.57 


3.42 


1.36 


0.50 


0.29 


m 


4.28 


1.89 


16.88 


3.60 


7.37 


16.26 


27.40 


22.15 


15.49 


2.34 


2.52 


350 D 


2.74 


0.54 


9.71 


2.04 


4.22 


8.61 


18.96 


18.89 


11.61 


1.85 


2.92 


}51 J 


3.76 


0.01 


12.73 


3.10 


6.32 


12.15 


25.67 


25.43 


14.97 


1.90 


3.04 


F 


3.88 


0.01 


10.66 


2.14 


5.56 


13.46 


20.77 


23.61 


12.08 


1.27 


2.04 


M 


4.98 


0.03 


14.67 


3.07 


7.10 


16.51 


25.96 


27.95 


15.91 


2.04 


2.92 


A 


5.01 


0.38 


17.46 


3.64 


8.37 


21.23 


29.89 


33.42 


19.62 


1.89 


2.69 


M 


4.96 


1.32 


17.47 


4.93 


7.58 


21.48 


31.77 


29.92 


18.69 


2.70 


3.58 


J 


5.30 


3.17 


16.91 


3.98 


6. 02 


17.98 


29.42 


25.98 


15.92 


2.70 


3.31 


J 


4.93 


3.70 


18.60 


4.02 


6.94 


18.76 


30.99 


22.71 


15.38 


2.61 


2.75 


A 


4.30 


4.13 


18.16 


4.12 


5.67 


19.63 


27.74 


14.69 


15.65 


2.84 


2.43 


S 


3.53 


3.35 


18.48 


2.98 


7.80 


14.19 


26.01 


16.04 


14.06 


3.14 


1.57 





3.98 


3.99 


21.55 


4.72 


8.62 


15.57 


28.04 


16.82 


15.78 


3.41 


2.02 


N 


3.68 


1.73 


19.59 


3.63 


8.87 


12.10 


28.21 


15.63 


15.29 


2.49 


2.52 


D 


2.98 


0.85 


16.22 


2.84 


9.00 


12.01 


24.28 


13.61 


12.49 


1.09 


1.35 


)52J 


3.79 


0.21 


20.13 


2.91 


11.20 


13.37 


27.42 


17.49 


15.08 


1.05 


2.25 
























Other 






Other 










Other 




Refrige- 




Miscella- 






Non- 


Clay 


Coal 




Petroleum 


Non- 


Chemicals 


rators 




neous 




Electrical 


Ferrous 


and 


and 


Glass and 


and 


Metallic 


and Allied 


and 


Tourists' 


Com- 




Apparatus 


Products 


Products 


Products 


Glassware 


Products 


Products 


Products 


Parts 


Purchases 


modities 










Million dollars 










89 


1.15 


1.57 


0.66 


3.82 


0.66 


4.66 


1.27 


3.64 


0.10 


0.79 


3.62 


951 


10.01 


9.37 


3.62 


15.86 


2.65 


29.49 


5.43 


15.98 


2.55 


3.92 


18.25 


950 D 


7.21 


7.27 


2.83 


13.19 


2.33 


27.47 


3.43 


11.95 


1.51 


2.48 


10.25 


951 J 


9.46 


8.13 


3.59 


14.02 


2.79 


27.20 


3.62 


17.60 


3.15 


1.98 


13.65 


F 


7.81 


8.13 


2.65 


13.12 


2.21 


20.11 


3.46 


13.99 


2.68 


1.35 


12.39 


M 


10.38 


12.20 


3.35 


10.51 


2.82 


23.75 


3.86 


17.36 


3.44 


2.37 


14.93 


A 


11.44 


9.76 


4.34 


12.73 


3.41 


25.16 


5.46 


18.83 


4.72 


3.97 


17.75 


M 


11.02 


10.94 


4.03 


16.76 


3.08 


34.26 


6.23 


18.48 


4.70 


2.92 


21.73 


I 


10.27 


8.71 


3.87 


17.81 


2.74 


30.21 


6.60 


15.47 


3.87 


3.58 


19.47 


J 


9.90 


8.82 


4.16 


17.00 


2.90 


38.61 


6.74 


16.89 


2.60 


4.17 


20.46 


A 


11.20 


10.74 


4.11 


18.64 


2.57 


34.54 


6.79 


15.30 


2.05 


6.77 


23.70 


S 


9.72 


6.55 


3.20 


16.76 


2.37 


33.56 


6.53 


14.11 


1.13 


5.83 


17.96 


O 


10.91 


10.01 


3.75 


21.19 


2.59 


31.92 


5.47 


15.97 


1.01 


6.14 


20.23 


N 


9.59 


10.80 


3.52 


18.84 


2.48 


28.58 


5.74 


15.78 


0.80 


4.13 


20.73 


D 


8.41 


7.64 


2.83 


12.98 


1.81 


25.99 


4.60 


12.03 


0.47 


3.85 


15.97 


952 J 


10.66 


7.57 


3.12 


13.77 


2.01 


25.90 


3.27 


14.81 


0.54 


2.21 


21.52 


u)I 


deludes pigs 


ingots, blooms and billets, castings and forgings, ferro-alloys and rolling mill products. 




55 



EXTERNAL TRADE 

Merchandise Exports and Imports by Areas 

TABLE 51 Monthly averages or calendar months 



APRIL, 1952 



ALL COUNTRII -s 




COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES 






Total 


United Kingdom Australia 


India") 


Exports Imports 


Exports Imports 


Exports Imports Exports Imports 


Exports Imports 













Million dollars 










1939 
1951 


77.08 
326.21 


62.59 
340.40 


35.90 
72.70 


15.74 
60.59 


'27 . 34 
52.62 


9.50 
35.08 


2.67 
4.09 


0.94 
3.85 


0.43 
2.98 


0.82 
3.35 


1951 J 
F 
M 


285.13 
233.91 
290.16 


327.19 
274.17 
342.50 


56.05 
47.67 
60.00 


55.93 
42.62 
55.44 


40.05 
33.59 
39.65 


33.92 
27.81 
30.41 


2.46 
1.39 
4.60 


1 44 
0.78 
1.85 


4.99 
4.89 
6.29 


4.29 
1.67 
4.16 


A 
M 

J 


295.18 
323.36 
312.50 


393.04 
405.07 
360.42 


61.32 
67.63 
66.12 


71.15 
75.65 
70.62 


41.72 
47.24 
51.27 


48.94 
43.60 
39.93 


4 27 
5.27 
1.43 


2 71 
6.19 
5.62 


3.65 
0.96 
1.48 


3 53 
3.53 
6.55 


J 

A 

S 


374.47 
349.76 
320.09 


370.64 
357.47 
311.50 


100.65 
86.10 
68.55 


82.01 
79.96 
55.57 


73.93 
66.40 
52.51 


43.30 
39.05 
28.56 


5.42 
4.74 
2.38 


7.52 
7.39 
6.57 


1.94 
1.50 
0.57 


5.31 
2.29 
1.97 


O 
N 
D 


371.03 
379.54 
379.33 


344.15 
325.70 
273.01 


90.99 
81.93 
85.40 


53.98 
51.28 
32.89 


63.96 
57.99 
63.14 


32.73 
33.33 
19.42 


6.15 
5.40 
5.57 


3.21 
2.18 
0.78 


3.70 
2.80 
2.96 


1.92 
3.67 
1.32 


1952 J 
F 


323.70 
309.69 


307.08 


65.26 
68.75 


38.70 


43 27 
43.61 


24 34 


5 78 
3.53 


63 


4.05 
6.02 


2 13 



COMMONWEALTH 
COUNTRIES 

Union of (,) 
South Africa 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES 



Total 



United States 



Latin America 



Europe 



Exports 



Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 













Million dollars 










1939 
1951 


1.50 
4.39 


0.33 
0.45 


41.18 
253.50 


46.85 
279.81 


31.70 
191.47 


41.41 
234.41 


1.68 
18.17 


1.33 
22.81 


4.49 
30.57 


3.08 
14.82 


1951 J 
F 
M 


2 72 

2.54 
3.67 


0.22 
0.41 
0.52 


229.08 
186.24 
230.17 


271.26 
231.55 
287.06 


186.95 
152.43 
190.21 


233.31 
199.03 
245.71 


14.04 
10.67 
11.99 


22 03 
17.03 
22.45 


16.43 
13.49 
17.14 


9.49 

9 61 

11.13 


A 
M 
J 


4.31 

5 60 
4 34 


0.53 
0.81 
0.57 


233.86 
255.73 
246.38 


321.89 
329.42 
289.80 


183.18 
208.68 

188.40 


278.41 
273.17 
241.47 


14.32 
17.53 
11.21 


22.17 
27.12 
23.02 


19.54 
15.81 
32.20 


14.69 
18.64 
16.14 


J 

A 

S 


8.16 
4.10 
4. OS 


0.55 
0.45 
0.29 


273.81 
263.66 
251.54 


288 63 
277.51 
255.93 


201.93 
192.84 
186.73 


234.74 
229.46 
211.60 


16.35 
17.69 
18.21 


23.52 
23.63 
21.48 


41.42 
41.93 
36.88 


18.48 
17.05 
15.07 


O 
N 
D 


5.47 
4.01 
3 75 


0.41 
37 
0.25 


280.04 
297.61 
293.93 


290.16 
274.42 
240.12 


207.13 
209 . 26 
189.94 


238.27 
224.68 
203.06 


21.01 
26.63 
28.38 


26.50 
24.08 
20 68 


38.55 
39.49 
54 04 


18.99 
18.26 
10.34 


1952 J 
F 


4.33 

4.15 


0.25 


258.44 
240 94 


268.39 


187.87 
168.73 


228.71 


28.76 
27.26 


22.22 


27.30 
28 81 


11.40 



56 Note: Prior to January, 1950, Ireland is included with Commonwealth countries but has since been shown with 

European and Foreign countries. 

(1) Does not include re-exports. (,) Includes Pakistan prior to 1948. '"Prior to 1947 includes "other British 
South Africa" and Northern Rhodesia. 
Source: Trade of Canada, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 52 



EXTERNAL TRADE 



Factors in the Balance of Payments 

Monthly averages or calendar months 10 



Balance of Merchandise Trade- 21 * 









Net 
Exports 








of Non- 


All 


United 


United 


Monetary 


countries 


Kingdom 


States 


Gold 





Returning 


Foreign 


Canadian 


Tourist 


Tourist 


Auto 


Automo- 


Entries' 3 ' 


biles 



Security Sales Between Canada 
and Other Countries* 



Official 

Holdings 

of Gold 

and 

U.S. 

Net sales(-f-) Net purchases( — ) Dollars* 1 ' 



All 
countries 



United 
Kingdom 



United 

States 







Million dollars 




Thousand cars 


] 


Million dollars 


Million 
U.S. dollars 


1939 
1951 


16.1 
-12.8 


18.8 
18.3 


-10.7 
-43.5 


15.3 
12.5 


105.8 
185.0 


44.9 


6.0 
1.5 


-0.5 
-0.6 


4.8 
-0.5 


404.2 
1,778.6 


1951 J 
F 
M 


-38.4 
-37.3 
-48.5 


6.2 
5.9 
9.3 


-43.0 
-44.1 
-52.4 


17.3 

11.7 

8.4 


40.9 
38.9 
62.7 


12.6 
11.5 
28.4 


18.2 

23.0 

8.9 


-1.8 
-1.6 
-0.6 


16.0 

20.2 

6.7 


1,743.3' 
1,741.7' 
1,653.4 


A 
M 
J 


-92.9 
-78.1 
-44.6 


-7.1 

3.8 

11.5 


-92.3 
-61.7 
-50.6 


16.2 
13.0 
13.8 


86.3 
148.3 
290.5 


28.5 
34.5 
43.9 


6.2 

-1.9 

2.7 


-0.5 
-1.6 
-1.3 


1.9 

-2.2 

1.4 


1,664.3 
1,681.6 
1,683.0 


J 

A 

S 


7.9 

-3.9 

12.0 


30.8 
27.6 
24.2 


-29.8 
-33.7 
-22.1 


13.4 
11.0 
10.8 


489.1 
504.1 
281.2 


97.8 

103.7 

70.5 


1.1 

2.8 

-3.0 


-0.2 

0.6 

-1.0 


0.2 

0.4 

-5.0 


1,668-7 
1,561.8 
1,610.1 


O 

N 
D 


31.5 

58.8 

112.0 


31.5 
25.7 
45.3 


-27.4 

-11.9 

-9.9 


8.2 

7.7 

18.3 


147.6 
76.0 
54.1 


54.2 
30.1 
23.1 


-30.2 

-22.2 

12.2 


0.6' 


-31.4 

-24.7 

10.7 


1,678.1 
1,748.9 
1,778.6 


1952 J 
F 


21.0 


19.3 


-37.6 


13.3 


38.1' 
52.4 


14.0 


6.5 


-0.3 


4.0 


1,783.5 
1,787.0 



"'Official holdings of Gold and U.S. dollars are given as of end of year and month in Statistical Summary of the 
Bank of Canada and Annual Report of Foreign Exchange Control Board. l2) Annual results are from the Canadian 



Balance of International Payments and monthly totals as given in Trade of Canada, 
foundland is included. 

*For explanatory notes see April 1951 issue, pages 96 and 97. 



'As of January, 1950, New- 



TRANSPORTATION 



TABLE 53 



Shipping and Aviation 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



MERCHANT SHIPPING AT SIX MAJOR PORTS' 1 ' 



CANALS CIVIL AVIATION' 3 ' 



Freight 
Loaded 



Freight 
Unloaded 



Net Registered Tonnage of Vessels Cleared <*' 



Foreign 



Total Foreign Coasting 



Quebec, 
Montreal, 
Toronto (2) 



Vancouver, 

Saint John, 

Halifax 



Total' 2 ' Revenue Revenue 
Cargo Passenger Ton 
Traffic Miles Miles 



Thousand short tons 



Thousand tons 



Millions Thousands 



1939 
1950 


671 
643 


690 
1,193 


2,852 
3,173 


1,445 
1,590 


1,407 
1,582 


1,845 
1,770 


1,469 
1,845 


2,599 
3,049 


1.8 
39.5 


535 


1950 N 
D 


899 
538 


1,817 
729 


3,605 
2,259 


2,002 
1,272 


1,603 
987 


1,902 
360 


1,703 
1,898 


3,280 
814 


36.7 
38.2 


504 
597 


1951 J 
F 
M 


636 
585 
614 


473 
420 
494 


2,057 
1,841 
2,182 


1,137 
1,000 
1,203 


919 
840 
979 


17 


2,057 
1,841 
2,165 


— 


36.9 
33.3 
42.0 


542 
524 
634 


A 
M 
J 


641 

881 

1,144 


1,008 
1,434 
1,457 


2,685 
3,645 
3,995 


1,438 
2,000 
2,053 


1,247 
1,646 
1,942 


765 
1,727 
2,092 


1,920 
1,918 
1,903 


1,981 
3,698 
3,822 


42.6 
49.6 
58.7 


633 
690 
680 


J 

A 

S 


1,192 
887 
735 


1,677 
1,347 
1,437 


4,747 
4,463 
3,874 


2,239 
2,036 
1,863 


2,508 
2,427 
2,011 


2,468 
2,329 
1,987 


2,279 
2,134 
1,887 


3,842 
3,946 
3,842 


58.0 
60.1 
61.2 


703 
812 
708 


O 
N 
D 


1,194 

1,310 

705 


1,193 
1,313 

586 


3,824 
3,879 
2,444 


2,068 
2,239 
1,356 


1,756 
1,640 
1,088 


1,911 

1,913 

365 


1,913 
1,966 
2,079 


3,981 

3,345 

642 


54.6 
45.4 


815 
756 



"'Prior to 1941 
"'Excludes Canada- 



statistics are for 
United Kingdom 



shipping 
Route. 



year ended March 31. 
'* 'Annual data include 



"'Annual data are averages of nine months. 57 
tugs. 



TRANSPORTATION 



APRIL, 1952 



Carloadings of Revenue Freight on Canadian Railways 



TABLE 54 


Monthly averages or calendar months 






TOTAL 


FARM PRODUCTS AND FOODS 




FOREST PRODUCTS 




METALS 


. aue 

( .lis 

i o ided 


Fresh Live Stock, 
Fruits Meats and 
Grain and and Packing- 
Grain Vege- house All 
Products tables Products Other 


Pulpwood 


Woodpulp Lumber, 

and Lath and 

Paper Shingles 


All 
Other 


Ores, Con- 
centrates 
and 

Refined 













Thousand 


cars 










1949 
1951 


325.5 
348.6 


42.6 
49.4 


5.1 

4.5 


10 2 
8.0 


6.9 

6.6 


14 5 
23.1 


17.0 
20.7 


14.9 
18 3 


6.6 
6.8 


15.8 
17.6 


1951 F 
M 


294 . 3 
336.2 


29.1 
32.6 


4.5 
4.4 


6.5 
7.1 


5.6 

6.1 


24.8 
29.4 


21.1 
24.2 


15.8 
19.2 


5.0 
6.3 


10.8 
12.6 


A 
M 
J 


337.1 
180.4 

370.0 


45.9 
58.2 
52.3 


4.9 
3.6 
2.5 


7.7 
8.1 
7.7 


5.0 
5.3 

5.2 


15.4 
24.3 
30.2 


21.0 
21.0 
19.7 


17.4 
19.7 
22.1 


6.3 

7.6 
7 6 


15 .3 
20.1 
21.8 


J 

A 

S 


350.2 
363.0 

349.6 


51.1 
54.5 
49.0 


1.8 
2 8 
5.2 


69 
7.8 
8.6 


5.5 

5.1 
6.4 


28.7 
26.0 
20.5 


18.5 
19.9 
18.7 


20.9 
19 .5 
18.6 


6.3 
6.0 

6.2 


21.7 
24.4 
21.0 


O 
N 
D 


389.8 
366.9 
314.6 


63.8 
64.1 
52.3 


7.5 
6.7 
4.2 


11.2 

10.0 

6.5 


11.4 

10 3 

6.2 


17.6 
14.5 
18.7 


20.7 
20.4 
21.1 


19.2 
17.4 
13.3 


7 3 
9.6 
7.2 


21.0 

16.8 
12.4 


1952 J 
F 
M 


332.7 
316.3 
331.1 


47.0 
42.3 
52.1 


4.3 
3.3 
3.9 


6.6 
5.9 
5.2 


5.2 
5.0 
4.2 


33.3 

32.4 
28.7 


22 1 
22.3 
22.2 


12.0 
13.7 
16.4 


5.7 
7.5 
8.7 


11.9 
12.2 
12 4 



NON-METALLIC MINERALS 



Coal and 
Coke 



Petroleum 

and 
Gasoline 



Building 
Materials 



All 
Other 



IRON AND STEEL 



OTHER 



Autos, 
Machinery, 
Primary Implements 
Products and Parts Fertilizers 



Other 
Manufac- 
turing and Merchan- 

Miscel- dise 

laneous L.C.L. 



Cars 
Received 

from 
Connec- 
tions 













Thousand 


cars 










1949 
1951 


28.6 

28.4 


21.4 
21.6 


18.0 
19.7 


6.2 
7.7 


7.3 
9.0 


7.8 
9.2 


3.0 
3.1 


22.6 
25.1 


77.0 
70.1 


132.9 
149.1 


1951 F 
M 


27.4 
25.2 


19.7 
19.7 


11.7 
15 5 


6.3 
7.8 


8.2 
10.4 


8.7 
11.8 


3.2 
3.5 


21.6 

25 9 


64.3 
74.5 


144.5 
171.7 


A 

M 

J 


23.3 
24.6 
26.2 


17.1 
23.0 

22.5 


19 .2 
24.1 
23.7 


7.5 
8.6 
9.2 


9.3 

9.6 
9.5 


12 2 

11.2 

9.9 


4.8 
5.3 
2.1 


27.1 
28.0 
27.5 


77.6 
77.9 
70.3 


150.1 
157.4 
145.6 


J 

A 

S 


23.5 

25.3 
30 3 


23.2 
25.3 

21 5 


23.6 

25 8 
24.0 


7.5 
7.8 

8.1 


8.3 

8.1 
8.7 


9.0 
7 5 
8.1 


1.7 
2.4 

2.3 


25.4 
25.3 
25.1 


66.7 
69.5 
67.3 


138.1 
148.0 
138.7 


O 
N 
D 


35.2 
35.7 
31 7 


22 3 
21.2 
21.3 


24.4 
19.0 
13.2 


8.9 
7.7 
6.0 


9.3 
9.0 

8 1 


7.9 
7.8 

6.6 


2.5 
2.8 
3.5 


26 3 
24.1 
21 4 


73.4 
69 7 
60.9 


154.5 
144.9 
140.3 


1952 I 
F 
M 


34.5 
26.4 

21 5 


25 1 
22 
21.2 


11 .5 
12 
14.4 


6.0 
5.9 

6.1 


9.5 
9.4 
9.6 


9.3 

9.8 

12.1 


3.5 

3.2 

4.2 


22.0 

20.9 
21.2 


63 3 
62.3 
67 1 


154.2 
160.7 
159.5 



58 Note: Based on weekly carloadings reported by major lines only. 

Source: Weekly Report, Carloadings, D.B.S. 



APRIL, 1952 



TABLE 55 



TRANSPORTATION 
Operating Statistics of Canadian Railways 

Monthly averages or calendar months 



Operating Revenues 



Total 



Freight Passenger 



Operating Operating 
Expenses Income <2) 



Revenue 



Tons 
carried 



Tons 

carried 

one mile 



Pasr-'-gers Passengers 
Carried Carried 

One Mile 









Million dollars 








Millions 




1939 
1951 


30.6 
89.9 


23.8 
72.3 


3.0 
7.4 


25.4 
80.7 


4.0 
5.1 


7.9 
14.7 


2,622 
5,339 


1.7 
2.4 


146 
257 


1950 N 
D 


89.9 
84.3 


72.2 
64.8 


5.7 
7.5 


72.6 
72.8 


13.5 

7.7 


15.0 
13.6 


5,222 
5,191 


2.1 

2.6 


202 
261 


1951 J 
F 
M 


81.6 

76.5 
88.1 


67.3 
63.7 
72.3 


6.0 
5.4 
6.8 


73.3 
72.1 
79.0 


3.3 
0.3 
6.4 


14.0 
12.8 
14.0 


4,968 
4,582 
5,122 


2.4 
2.2 
2.8 


209 
187 
239 


A 
M 
J 


88.1 
92.4 
91.6 


73.1 
75.4 
72.5 


5.8 
6.7 
8.4 


80.0 
83.5 
81.8 


4.0 
5.1 
5.9 


14.2 
15.1 
15.5 


5,190 
5,629 
5,456 


2.3 
2.1 
2.3 


200 
231 
298 


J 

A 

S 


91.8 
93.8 
91.4 


71.3 
73.2 
72.2 


9.6 
9.5 
7.8 


82.3 
86.1 
80.2 


4.7 
4.0 
5.4 


15.0 
15.4 
14.4 


5,337 
5,405 
5,320 


2.6 
2.6 
2.2 


340 
335 
268 


o 

N 
D 


99.0 
94.7 
89.9 


81.1 
76.8 
68.8 


7.0 
6.7 
8.8 


84.2 
83.5 
83.4 


11.2 

7.3 
3.9 


16.6 
15.9 
13.8 


5,744 
5,828 
5,490 


2.2 
2.4 
2.9 


244 
233 
303 



CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 



CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY 
CANADIAN LINES 



Operating Revenues 



Total 



Freight Passenger 



Operating Operating (2) 
Expenses Income 



Operating Revenues 



Total 



Freight Passenger 



Operating Operating (2) 
Expenses Income 













Million 


dollars 










1939 
1951 


12.7 
35.7 


9.9 
29.3 


1.3 
3.2 


9.9 
31.8 


2.4 
2.2 


14.4 
45.6 


11.1 
35.9 


1.4 

3.7 


13.1 
43.1 


0.9 
1.8 


1950 N 
D 


35.1 
33.8 


29.0 
26.9 


2.5 
3.2 


28.0 
27.4 


6.0 
4.9 


46.0 
43.5 


36.1 
32.1 


2.7 • 
3.8 


38.8 
39.8 


6.1 

2.7 


1951 J 
F 
M 


32.7 
31.0 
34.5 


27.7 
26.1 
28.3 


2.6 
2.4 
3.0 


28.9 
27.4 
31.2 


1.4 
1.7 
2.9 


40.4 
37.6 
45.0 


32.8 
30.5 
36.4 


2.9 
2.5 
3.4 


38.9 
39.3 
42.0 


0.7 

Dr2.5 

2.2 


A 
M 
J 


34.9 
37.4 
36.4 


29.5 
31.2 
29.2 


2.5 
2.9 
3.7 


30.8 
34.9 
33.2 


2.6 
1.0 
1.9 


44.2 
46.2 
46.5 


35.8 
36.8 
36.0 


2.9 
3.4 
4.2 


43.0 
42.3 
42.4 


0.3 
3.0 
2.9 


J 

A 

S 


35.8 
36.3 
36.0 


28.2 
28.7 
28.8 


4.0 
4.0 
3.3 


32.5 
34.7 
30.3 


1.1 
0.3 
1.9 


47.5 
48.8 
46.7 


36.2 
37.5 
36.3 


4.9 
4.8 
3.9 


43.8 
45.2 
43.8 


2.6 
2.6 
2.2 


O 

N 
D 


40.4 
37.9 
35.6 


33.9 
31.4 
28.2 


3.0 
2.8 
3.7 


33.1 
32.0 
32.3 


4.6 
4.1 
3.1 


49.7 
48.1 
46.7 


39.9 
38.2 
34.5 


3.4 
3.3 
4.6 


44.9 
45.4 
45.6 


5.4 
2.0 
0.4 



Beginning with April, 1950, Newfoundland is included. 

(1) In the upper section of this table, the annual statistics prior to 1951 embrace all steam railways, while monthly 
averages for 1951 and monthly data refer to railways with annual operating revenues of $500,000 or over. (2) Operating 
income equals operating revenues less operating expenses adjusted for tax accruals and rent of equipment and joint 
facilities. 

Source: Operating Revenues, Expenses and Statistics, Railways in Canada, D.B.S. 



59 



FINANCE 



TABLE 56 



APRIL, 1952 



Bank of Canada 

As of end of period 



LIABILITIES 



Chartered Bank Cash 



Notes in 
tills 



Deposits 

at Bank of 

Canada 



Total 



Govern- 




Foreign ' 


Notes in 




Total 


ment 


Other 


Currency 


Hands of 


All Other 


Liabilities 


Deposits 


Deposits 


Liabilities 


Public 


Accounts 


or Assets 



Million dollars 



1939 
1951 


70.6 
273.1 


217.0 
619.0 


287.6 
892.1 


46.3 
94.9 


17.9 
66.1 


155.6 


162 
1,191 


13.3 
44 4 


527 
2,444 


1951 F 
M 


202.8 
185.1 


550.5 
552.9 


753.3 
738.1 


69.5 

70.5 


204.6 
206.7 


128.9 
88.5 


1.093 
1.134 


39.8 
28.7 


2,289 
2,267 


A 
M 

J 


203.1 
214.8 
177.1 


556.1 
530.1 
590.7 


759.2 
744.9 
767.8 


56.9 
76.2 

75.3 


215.1 
221.5 
220.1 


137.7 
129.9 
132.8 


1,120 
1,123 
1,174 


58.9 
38.8 
32.2 


2,348 
2,334 
2,402 


J 

A 

S 


226 .0 
189.7 
195.2 


558.2 
580.4 
579.4 


784.2 
770.1 
774.6 


91.1